This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

shiraz

shiraz

shiraz Sentence Examples

  • of Shiraz, not far from where the small river Pulwar flows into the Kur (Kyrus).

    0
    0
  • In 1821 Rich went to Basora, whence he made an excursion to Shiraz, visiting the ruins of Persepolis and the other remains in the neighbourhood.

    0
    0
  • At Shiraz he died of cholera on the 5th of October 1821.

    0
    0
  • Some rivers, notably the Kur (Kyros, Araxes) which flows into the Bakhtegan lake east of Shiraz, drain into inland depressions or lakes.

    0
    0
  • The capital of the province is Shiraz, and the subdivision in districts, the chief places of the districts and their estimated population, and the number of inhabited villages in each as they appear in lists dated 1884 and 1905 are shown on the following page.

    0
    0
  • from Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • In Persia Jews are often the victims of popular outbursts as well as of official extortion, but there are fairly prosperous communities at Bushire, Isfahan, Teheran and Kashan (in Shiraz they are in low estate).

    0
    0
  • from Shiraz, and has a population of about 9000.

    0
    0
  • Fuzuli showed far more originality than any of his predecessors; for, although his work is naturally Persian in form and in general character, it is far from being a mere echo from Shiraz or Isfahan.

    0
    0
  • From Sultanieh he proceeded by Kashan and Yazd, and turning thence followed a somewhat devious route by Persepolis and the Shiraz and Bagdad regions, to the Persian Gulf.

    0
    0
  • persica, Persian tobacco, the source of the famous Shiraz tobacco, is regarded as only a variety of N.

    0
    0
  • The town is situated on the high road from Isfahan to Shiraz, 52 m.

    0
    0
  • Shiraz >>

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz and S.W.

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz, is surrounded by a mud-wall 3 m.

    0
    0
  • Lambs.-The sorts that primarily interest the fur trade in Europe and America are those from south Russia, Persia and Afghanistan, which are included under the following wholesale or retail commercial terms: Persian lamb, broadtail, astrachan, Shiraz, Bokharan and caracul lamb.

    0
    0
  • Astrachan, Shiraz and Bokharan lambs, size 22 by 9 in., are of a coarser, looser curl, and chiefly used for coat linings, while the Persians are used for outside of garments, collars, cuffs, stoles, muffs, hats and trimmings and gloves.

    0
    0
  • Blanford, lions are still numerous in the reedy swamps, bordering the Tigris and Euphrates, and also occur on the west flanks of the Zagros mountains and the oak-clad ranges near Shiraz, to which they are attracted by the herds of swine which feed on the acorns.

    0
    0
  • part of the Gulf, the port for the Shiraz district of southern Persia, and Bandar `Abbas, at the entrance of the Gulf, being the chief centres of population.

    0
    0
  • He did his best to remedy the misery caused by the intestine wars, repaired the ruined mosques and other public edifices, founded hospitals and libraries - his library in Shiraz was one of the wonders of the world - and improved irrigation.

    0
    0
  • He then made the pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina, and visited the shrine of Ali at Mashhad-Ali, travelling thence to Basra, and across the mountains of Khuzistan to Isfahan, thence to Shiraz and back to Kufa and Bagdad.

    0
    0
  • In Persia, also, wines are made, especially in the Shiraz district.

    0
    0
  • Khorasan to the Perso-Afghan border, its western limit being indicated by a long line to the northwest from near Shiraz, taking in the whole upper country to the Russian frontier and the Elburz; (2) the provinces south and south-west of the Caspian; (3) a narrow strip of wooded country south-west of the Zagros range, from the Diyala River in Turkey in Asia to Shiraz; (4) the Persian side of the Shatt-el-Arab, and Aralictan, east of the Tigris; and (5) the shores of the Persian Gulf and Baluchistan.

    0
    0
  • Including the oak-forests of Shiraz with the wooded slopes of the Zagros, he found in his third division that, however little known was the tract, it appeared to contain, like the second, a Palaearctic fauna with a few peculiar species.

    0
    0
  • Priests, merchants, villagers, especially about Shiraz, townsmen, shopkeepers, doctors and lawyers wear it very long, often nearly to the heels.

    0
    0
  • At Shiraz it is often of fine cotton, and elaborately ornamented with black embroidery.

    0
    0
  • Isfahan (100,000); Meshed (8o,ooo); Kerman, Resht, Shiraz (6o,ooo); Barfurush, Kazvin, Yezd (5o,ooo); Hamadan, Kermnshah (40,000); Kashan, Khoi, Urmia (35,000); Birjend, Burujird, Bushire, Dizful, Kum, Senendij (Sinna), Zenjan (25,00o to 30,000); Amol, Ardebil, Ardistan, Astarabad, Abekuh, Barn, Bander, Abbasi, Bander Lingah, Damghan, Dilman, Istahbanat, Jahnim, Khunsar, Kumishah, Kuchan, Marand, Maragha, Nishapur, Sari, Sabzevar, Samnan, Shahrud, Shushter (1o,ooo to 20,000).

    0
    0
  • The tumbaku for export is chiefly produced in the central districts round about Isfahan and near Kashan, while the tumbaku of Shiraz, Fessa, and Darab in Fars, considered the best in Persia, is not much appreciated abroad.

    0
    0
  • The principal opium-producing districts are those of Shiraz, Isfahan, Yezd, Kerman, Khorasan, Burujird and Kermnshh.

    0
    0
  • About three-fifths of this number belong to the diocese of Azerbaijan, with a bishop at Tabriz, and reside in the cities of Tabriz, KhoI, Selmas, Urmia and Maragha, and in about thirty villages close to the north-western frontier; the other two-fifths, under the diocese of Isfahan, with a bishop in Julfa, reside in Teheran, Hamadan, Julfa, Shiraz, Bushire, Resht, Enzeli and other towns, and in some villages in the districts of Chahar Mahal, Feridan, Barbarud, Kamareh, Kazaz, Kharakan, &c. Many Persian Armenians are engaged in trade and commerce, and some of their merchants dispose of much capital, but the bulk live on the proceeds of agriculture and are poor.

    0
    0
  • In June 1908 it had 4 places of worship (Julfa, Yezd, Kerman, Shiraz), 5 schools (Julfa, Isfahan, Yezd, Kerman and Shiraz).

    0
    0
  • The Jews in Persia number about 36,000, and are found in nearly all cities of the country, but communities with synagogues and priests exist only in the larger cities like Teheran, Isfahan, Yezd, Shiraz, Hamadan, &c.

    0
    0
  • The Zoroastrians, commonly called gabrs, numbering about 9000, reside principally in the cities and villages of Yezd and Kerman, and only three or four hundred live in Teheran, Kashan, Isfahan and Shiraz, some engaged in trade and commerce, but most of them employed in agricultural work and gardening.

    0
    0
  • Various Armenian firms, one with branches at many places in Persia and Russia, also do banking business, while various European firms at Tabriz, Teheran, Isfahan, Shiraz and Bushire, facilitate remittances between Europe and Persia.

    0
    0
  • Uosain fought with the Mozaffarids of Shiraz and the Black Sheep Turkomans (Kara Kuyunli) of Armenia,with the latter of whom he ultimately entered into alliance.

    0
    0
  • His son Mobariz ud-din Mahommed, who followed him in 1313, became governor in Fars under Abu Said, in Kerman in 1340, and subsequently made himself independent at Fars and Shiraz (1353) and in Isfahan.

    0
    0
  • From Isfahan he passed on to Shiraz, and thence returned in triumph to his own capital of Samarkand.

    0
    0
  • Five years later he subdued Mazandaran, and later still he was again at Shiraz, having effected the subjugation of Luristan and other provinces in the west.

    0
    0
  • Kum and Tauris or Tabriz (then the capital) were also visited by the Italian envoys following in the royal suite; and the incidental notice of these cities, added to Contarinis formal statement that the extensive country of U~suncassan is bounded by the Ottoman Empire and by Caramania, and that Siras (Shiraz) is comprehended in it, proves that at least Azerbaijan, Irak, and the main part of the provinces to the south, inclusive of Fars, were within the dominions of the reigning monarch.

    0
    0
  • Another writer says that he marched against Murad Khan in Irak-iAjami and Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • This last account is extremely probable, and would show that the young Turkoman had wished to make one grand effort to save Isfahan and Shiraz (with Kazvin and the neighboring country), these being, after the capital Tabriz, the most important cities of Uzun ~iasans Persia.

    0
    0
  • His ifi-starred father, at no time more than a nominal ruler, was at Shiraz, apparently deserted by soldiers and people.

    0
    0
  • He was summoned to Shiraz to put down rebellion in Fars; and before he could drive out the Uzbegs, he had to secure himself against Turkish inroads threatening from the west.

    0
    0
  • Among many other sufferers Imam Kuli Khan, conqueror of Lar and Hormuz, the son of one of Abbass most famous generals, founder of a college at Shiraz, and otherwise a public benefactor, fell a victim tO his savage cruelty.

    0
    0
  • The Afghans fled through the town; and Ashraf, murdering the poor old shah Uosain on his way, hurried with the wreck of his army towards Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • Karim took refuge behind the walls of Shiraz, and all the efforts of the enemy to dislodge him were ineffectual.

    0
    0
  • He built the great bazaar of Shiraz, had a tomb constructed over the remains of Hafiz, and repaired the turbat at the grave of Sadi, outside the walls.

    0
    0
  • The seizure of the citadel at Shiraz by the adherents of the former, among whom were the more influential of the Zends, may have induced him to adopt this measure as one of prudent conciliation.

    0
    0
  • Aga Mahommed, son of Mahommed Ilasan, the Kajar chief of Astarabad, a prisoner at large in Shiraz, was in the environs of that city awaiting intelligence of the old kings decease, and, hearing it, instantly escaped to Mazandaran, there to gather his tribesmen together and compete for the crown of Persia.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, Sadik, brother to Zaki, who had won considerable and deserved repute by the capture of Basra from the Turkish governor, abandoned his hold of the conquered town on hearing of the death of Karim, and appeared with his army before Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • Zaki, enraged at his nephews desertion, marched out of Shiraz towards Isfahan.

    0
    0
  • When intelligence of these events reached Kerm~n, Sadik Khan hastened to Shiraz, proclaimed himself king in place of Abu l-Fatb Khan, whom he declared incompe- ~ M d tent, to reign, and put out the eyes of the young prince.

    0
    0
  • The campaign ended in the capture of Shiraz and assumption of sovereignty by Ali Murad, who caused Sadik Khan to be put to death.

    0
    0
  • ~He died, on his way from the former place to Isfahan, and was succeeded by Jiafir, son of Sadik,i who reigned at Shiraz, assisted in the government by an able but unprincipled kalantar, or head magistrate, named Hajji Ibrahim.

    0
    0
  • He had hastened to Shiraz on hearing of his fathers death and received a warm welcome from the ~

    0
    0
  • Lutf All Khan bad not been many months on the throne when Aga Mahommed advanced to attack him, and invested the city of Shiraz, but retreated soon afterwards to Teheran, which he had made the capital of his dominions.

    0
    0
  • Lutf Ali Khan was suddenly deserted by the whole of his army, except seventy faithful followers; and when he retreated to Shiraz he found the gates closed against him by Hajji Ibrahim, who held the city for the Kajar chief, Thence falling back upon Bushire, he found that the sheikh of that town had also betrayed him.

    0
    0
  • Surrounded by treason on every side, he boldly attacked and routed the chief of Bushire and blockaded Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • He encamped with an army of 30,000 menon the plain of Mardasht, near Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • The successful Kajar then entered Shiraz, and promoted the traitor Hajji Ibrahini to be his vizier.

    0
    0
  • In 1783, when the strength of the Persian monarchy was concentrated upon Isfahan and Shiraz, the Georgian tsar Heraclius entered into an agreement with the empress Catherine by which all connection with the shah was disavowed, and a quasi-vassalage to Russia substitutedthe said empire extending her aegis of protection over her new ally.

    0
    0
  • The second closed the gates of Teheran to all corners until Fath Ali Shah came himself from Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • His accession was ~Rka~ommed not publicly notified for some months after his grandfathers death, for it was necessary to clear the way of all competitors, and there were two on this occasionone ~Ali Mirza, governor of Teheran, who actually assumed a royal title, and one Hasan Ali Mirza, governor of Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • An engagement which took place near Kumishah, on the road between Isfahan and Shiraz, having been successful, the English commander pushed on to the latter town, where the two rebel princes were seized and imprisoned.

    0
    0
  • At Isafahan, Shiraz and Kerman serious riots took place, which weie with difficulty suppressed.

    0
    0
  • In the article on BABYIsM, the facts as to the life of the l3ab, Mirza Ali Mahommed of Shiraz, and the progress of the Babiist movement, are separately noticed.

    0
    0
  • Serious rioting arose only in Shiraz and Fars, where some persons lost their lives and a number of caravans were looted.

    0
    0
  • I67o), and Shaukat, the governor of ShIraz under Fath All Shah.

    0
    0
  • This favorite story was treated again by FasihI JurjanI (5th century of the Hegira), and by many modern poets as Damiri, who died under the ~afawI shah Mahommed (1577 1586; 985994 A.H.), Nmi, the historiographer of the Zand dynasty, and Uosain of Shiraz under Fatl~ All Shah, the last two flourishing towards the beginning of the present century.

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz, and has a population of about io,000.

    0
    0
  • The Taj alone is well worth the journey."' The Taj was designed by Ustad Isa, variously described as a Byzantine Turk and a native of Shiraz in Persia.

    0
    0
  • It is most largely produced in the districts of Ispahan, Shiraz, Yezd and Khonsar, and to a less extent in those of Khorasan, Kermanshah and Fars.

    0
    0
  • About Shiraz, Behbehan and Kermanshah it now occupies much of the land, and has consequently affected the price and growth of cereals.

    0
    0
  • At Ispahan, Shiraz and Yezd the drug, after being dried in the sun, is mixed with oil in the proportion of 6 or 7 Ib to 141 lb of opium, with the object, it is said, of suiting the taste of the Chinese - that intended for the London market being now always free from oil.

    0
    0
  • in a fertile plain on the high road between Isfahan and Shiraz, 140 miles (230km).

    0
    0
  • from Shiraz, and has a population of about 5000.

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • From Bombay he set out for Bushire, bearing letters from Sir John Malcolm to men of position there, as also at Shiraz and Isfahan.

    0
    0
  • After an exhausting journey from the coast he reached Shiraz, and was soon plunged into discussion with the disputants of all classes, "Sufi, Mahommedan, Jew, and JewishMahommedan, even Armenian, all anxious to test their powers of argument with the first English priest who had visited them."

    0
    0
  • He himself became judge in Shiraz, and died in Tabriz about 1286.

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz and 3 m.

    0
    0
  • Also quite delicate, with cherry flavors and a slightly gamey background, is Oracle Shiraz 2001 (Oddbins ).

    0
    0
  • We shared a bottle of deep red, smooth and spicy Australian shiraz, good value at £ 12.95.

    0
    0
  • This shiraz has been described as " plum flavors of the shiraz grape, adding subtle vanilla overtones " .

    0
    0
  • Vintage: 2003 Price: £ 14.00 Shiraz (Australia) Salisbury Ripe, plummy fruit on the nose with cedary oak undertones.

    0
    0
  • Made by renowned Aussie winemaker Ben Riggs, this is a fruit-driven, quality Shiraz that goes a treat with barbecues and roasted meats.

    0
    0
  • According to Nigel Dolan, group red winemaker for Beringer Blass, " Shiraz is the standout red variety for the region this vintage.

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz, not far from where the small river Pulwar flows into the Kur (Kyrus).

    0
    0
  • At the time of the Arabian conquest Istakhr offered a desperate resistance, but the city was still a place of considerable importance in the 1st century of Islam (see Caeiphate), although its greatness was speedily eclipsed by the new metropolis Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • In 1821 Rich went to Basora, whence he made an excursion to Shiraz, visiting the ruins of Persepolis and the other remains in the neighbourhood.

    0
    0
  • At Shiraz he died of cholera on the 5th of October 1821.

    0
    0
  • Some rivers, notably the Kur (Kyros, Araxes) which flows into the Bakhtegan lake east of Shiraz, drain into inland depressions or lakes.

    0
    0
  • The capital of the province is Shiraz, and the subdivision in districts, the chief places of the districts and their estimated population, and the number of inhabited villages in each as they appear in lists dated 1884 and 1905 are shown on the following page.

    0
    0
  • from Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • In 1349 a great part of Maimand and of three little villages belonging to it became wakf (pious endowment) of the shrine at Shiraz of Mir Ahmed, surnamed Shah Chiragh, a son of Musa Kazim, the seventh imam of the Shiahs, and the remainder of the Maimand grounds was given to the shrine by Mir Habbib Ullah Sharifi and by Shah Ismail in 1504; the administration of the Maimand property as well as the guardianship of the shrine is still with the descendants of Mir Habbib Ullah.

    0
    0
  • In Persia Jews are often the victims of popular outbursts as well as of official extortion, but there are fairly prosperous communities at Bushire, Isfahan, Teheran and Kashan (in Shiraz they are in low estate).

    0
    0
  • from Shiraz, and has a population of about 9000.

    0
    0
  • An extraordinary love of precedent, the result apparently of conscious want of original power, was sufficient to keep their writers loyal to their early guide for centuries, till at length the allegiance, though not the fashion of it, has been changed in our own days, and Paris has replaced Shiraz as the shrine towards which the Ottoman scholar turns.

    0
    0
  • Fuzuli showed far more originality than any of his predecessors; for, although his work is naturally Persian in form and in general character, it is far from being a mere echo from Shiraz or Isfahan.

    0
    0
  • From Sultanieh he proceeded by Kashan and Yazd, and turning thence followed a somewhat devious route by Persepolis and the Shiraz and Bagdad regions, to the Persian Gulf.

    0
    0
  • persica, Persian tobacco, the source of the famous Shiraz tobacco, is regarded as only a variety of N.

    0
    0
  • The town is situated on the high road from Isfahan to Shiraz, 52 m.

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz and S.W.

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz, is surrounded by a mud-wall 3 m.

    0
    0
  • 1844-1845 by Mirth `Ali Muhammad of Shiraz, a young Sayyid who was at that time not twenty-five years of age.

    0
    0
  • The Bab himself was in captivity first at Shiraz, then at Maki", and lastly at Chihriq, during the greater part of the six years (May 1844 until July 1850) of his brief career, but an active propaganda was carried on by his disciples, which resulted in several serious revolts against the government, especially aster the death of Muhammad Shah in September 1848.

    0
    0
  • Lambs.-The sorts that primarily interest the fur trade in Europe and America are those from south Russia, Persia and Afghanistan, which are included under the following wholesale or retail commercial terms: Persian lamb, broadtail, astrachan, Shiraz, Bokharan and caracul lamb.

    0
    0
  • Astrachan, Shiraz and Bokharan lambs, size 22 by 9 in., are of a coarser, looser curl, and chiefly used for coat linings, while the Persians are used for outside of garments, collars, cuffs, stoles, muffs, hats and trimmings and gloves.

    0
    0
  • Blanford, lions are still numerous in the reedy swamps, bordering the Tigris and Euphrates, and also occur on the west flanks of the Zagros mountains and the oak-clad ranges near Shiraz, to which they are attracted by the herds of swine which feed on the acorns.

    0
    0
  • part of the Gulf, the port for the Shiraz district of southern Persia, and Bandar `Abbas, at the entrance of the Gulf, being the chief centres of population.

    0
    0
  • He did his best to remedy the misery caused by the intestine wars, repaired the ruined mosques and other public edifices, founded hospitals and libraries - his library in Shiraz was one of the wonders of the world - and improved irrigation.

    0
    0
  • He then made the pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina, and visited the shrine of Ali at Mashhad-Ali, travelling thence to Basra, and across the mountains of Khuzistan to Isfahan, thence to Shiraz and back to Kufa and Bagdad.

    0
    0
  • In Persia, also, wines are made, especially in the Shiraz district.

    0
    0
  • Khorasan to the Perso-Afghan border, its western limit being indicated by a long line to the northwest from near Shiraz, taking in the whole upper country to the Russian frontier and the Elburz; (2) the provinces south and south-west of the Caspian; (3) a narrow strip of wooded country south-west of the Zagros range, from the Diyala River in Turkey in Asia to Shiraz; (4) the Persian side of the Shatt-el-Arab, and Aralictan, east of the Tigris; and (5) the shores of the Persian Gulf and Baluchistan.

    0
    0
  • Including the oak-forests of Shiraz with the wooded slopes of the Zagros, he found in his third division that, however little known was the tract, it appeared to contain, like the second, a Palaearctic fauna with a few peculiar species.

    0
    0
  • Priests, merchants, villagers, especially about Shiraz, townsmen, shopkeepers, doctors and lawyers wear it very long, often nearly to the heels.

    0
    0
  • At Shiraz it is often of fine cotton, and elaborately ornamented with black embroidery.

    0
    0
  • Isfahan (100,000); Meshed (8o,ooo); Kerman, Resht, Shiraz (6o,ooo); Barfurush, Kazvin, Yezd (5o,ooo); Hamadan, Kermnshah (40,000); Kashan, Khoi, Urmia (35,000); Birjend, Burujird, Bushire, Dizful, Kum, Senendij (Sinna), Zenjan (25,00o to 30,000); Amol, Ardebil, Ardistan, Astarabad, Abekuh, Barn, Bander, Abbasi, Bander Lingah, Damghan, Dilman, Istahbanat, Jahnim, Khunsar, Kumishah, Kuchan, Marand, Maragha, Nishapur, Sari, Sabzevar, Samnan, Shahrud, Shushter (1o,ooo to 20,000).

    0
    0
  • The tumbaku for export is chiefly produced in the central districts round about Isfahan and near Kashan, while the tumbaku of Shiraz, Fessa, and Darab in Fars, considered the best in Persia, is not much appreciated abroad.

    0
    0
  • The principal opium-producing districts are those of Shiraz, Isfahan, Yezd, Kerman, Khorasan, Burujird and Kermnshh.

    0
    0
  • About three-fifths of this number belong to the diocese of Azerbaijan, with a bishop at Tabriz, and reside in the cities of Tabriz, KhoI, Selmas, Urmia and Maragha, and in about thirty villages close to the north-western frontier; the other two-fifths, under the diocese of Isfahan, with a bishop in Julfa, reside in Teheran, Hamadan, Julfa, Shiraz, Bushire, Resht, Enzeli and other towns, and in some villages in the districts of Chahar Mahal, Feridan, Barbarud, Kamareh, Kazaz, Kharakan, &c. Many Persian Armenians are engaged in trade and commerce, and some of their merchants dispose of much capital, but the bulk live on the proceeds of agriculture and are poor.

    0
    0
  • In June 1908 it had 4 places of worship (Julfa, Yezd, Kerman, Shiraz), 5 schools (Julfa, Isfahan, Yezd, Kerman and Shiraz).

    0
    0
  • The Jews in Persia number about 36,000, and are found in nearly all cities of the country, but communities with synagogues and priests exist only in the larger cities like Teheran, Isfahan, Yezd, Shiraz, Hamadan, &c.

    0
    0
  • The Zoroastrians, commonly called gabrs, numbering about 9000, reside principally in the cities and villages of Yezd and Kerman, and only three or four hundred live in Teheran, Kashan, Isfahan and Shiraz, some engaged in trade and commerce, but most of them employed in agricultural work and gardening.

    0
    0
  • Various Armenian firms, one with branches at many places in Persia and Russia, also do banking business, while various European firms at Tabriz, Teheran, Isfahan, Shiraz and Bushire, facilitate remittances between Europe and Persia.

    0
    0
  • At these places and in Sarwistan, near Shiraz and elsewhere, lie ruins of the Sassanid palaces, which in their design go back, to the Achaemenid architecture, blending with it, however, Graeco-Syrian elements and serving in their turn as models for the structures of the Caliphs (see ARcHITECTURE:

    0
    0
  • Uosain fought with the Mozaffarids of Shiraz and the Black Sheep Turkomans (Kara Kuyunli) of Armenia,with the latter of whom he ultimately entered into alliance.

    0
    0
  • His son Mobariz ud-din Mahommed, who followed him in 1313, became governor in Fars under Abu Said, in Kerman in 1340, and subsequently made himself independent at Fars and Shiraz (1353) and in Isfahan.

    0
    0
  • From Isfahan he passed on to Shiraz, and thence returned in triumph to his own capital of Samarkand.

    0
    0
  • Five years later he subdued Mazandaran, and later still he was again at Shiraz, having effected the subjugation of Luristan and other provinces in the west.

    0
    0
  • Kum and Tauris or Tabriz (then the capital) were also visited by the Italian envoys following in the royal suite; and the incidental notice of these cities, added to Contarinis formal statement that the extensive country of U~suncassan is bounded by the Ottoman Empire and by Caramania, and that Siras (Shiraz) is comprehended in it, proves that at least Azerbaijan, Irak, and the main part of the provinces to the south, inclusive of Fars, were within the dominions of the reigning monarch.

    0
    0
  • Another writer says that he marched against Murad Khan in Irak-iAjami and Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • This last account is extremely probable, and would show that the young Turkoman had wished to make one grand effort to save Isfahan and Shiraz (with Kazvin and the neighboring country), these being, after the capital Tabriz, the most important cities of Uzun ~iasans Persia.

    0
    0
  • His ifi-starred father, at no time more than a nominal ruler, was at Shiraz, apparently deserted by soldiers and people.

    0
    0
  • He was summoned to Shiraz to put down rebellion in Fars; and before he could drive out the Uzbegs, he had to secure himself against Turkish inroads threatening from the west.

    0
    0
  • Among many other sufferers Imam Kuli Khan, conqueror of Lar and Hormuz, the son of one of Abbass most famous generals, founder of a college at Shiraz, and otherwise a public benefactor, fell a victim tO his savage cruelty.

    0
    0
  • The Afghans fled through the town; and Ashraf, murdering the poor old shah Uosain on his way, hurried with the wreck of his army towards Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • Karim took refuge behind the walls of Shiraz, and all the efforts of the enemy to dislodge him were ineffectual.

    0
    0
  • He built the great bazaar of Shiraz, had a tomb constructed over the remains of Hafiz, and repaired the turbat at the grave of Sadi, outside the walls.

    0
    0
  • The seizure of the citadel at Shiraz by the adherents of the former, among whom were the more influential of the Zends, may have induced him to adopt this measure as one of prudent conciliation.

    0
    0
  • Aga Mahommed, son of Mahommed Ilasan, the Kajar chief of Astarabad, a prisoner at large in Shiraz, was in the environs of that city awaiting intelligence of the old kings decease, and, hearing it, instantly escaped to Mazandaran, there to gather his tribesmen together and compete for the crown of Persia.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, Sadik, brother to Zaki, who had won considerable and deserved repute by the capture of Basra from the Turkish governor, abandoned his hold of the conquered town on hearing of the death of Karim, and appeared with his army before Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • Zaki, enraged at his nephews desertion, marched out of Shiraz towards Isfahan.

    0
    0
  • When intelligence of these events reached Kerm~n, Sadik Khan hastened to Shiraz, proclaimed himself king in place of Abu l-Fatb Khan, whom he declared incompe- ~ M d tent, to reign, and put out the eyes of the young prince.

    0
    0
  • The campaign ended in the capture of Shiraz and assumption of sovereignty by Ali Murad, who caused Sadik Khan to be put to death.

    0
    0
  • ~He died, on his way from the former place to Isfahan, and was succeeded by Jiafir, son of Sadik,i who reigned at Shiraz, assisted in the government by an able but unprincipled kalantar, or head magistrate, named Hajji Ibrahim.

    0
    0
  • He had hastened to Shiraz on hearing of his fathers death and received a warm welcome from the ~

    0
    0
  • Lutf All Khan bad not been many months on the throne when Aga Mahommed advanced to attack him, and invested the city of Shiraz, but retreated soon afterwards to Teheran, which he had made the capital of his dominions.

    0
    0
  • Lutf Ali Khan was suddenly deserted by the whole of his army, except seventy faithful followers; and when he retreated to Shiraz he found the gates closed against him by Hajji Ibrahim, who held the city for the Kajar chief, Thence falling back upon Bushire, he found that the sheikh of that town had also betrayed him.

    0
    0
  • Surrounded by treason on every side, he boldly attacked and routed the chief of Bushire and blockaded Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • He encamped with an army of 30,000 menon the plain of Mardasht, near Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • The successful Kajar then entered Shiraz, and promoted the traitor Hajji Ibrahini to be his vizier.

    0
    0
  • In 1783, when the strength of the Persian monarchy was concentrated upon Isfahan and Shiraz, the Georgian tsar Heraclius entered into an agreement with the empress Catherine by which all connection with the shah was disavowed, and a quasi-vassalage to Russia substitutedthe said empire extending her aegis of protection over her new ally.

    0
    0
  • The second closed the gates of Teheran to all corners until Fath Ali Shah came himself from Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • His accession was ~Rka~ommed not publicly notified for some months after his grandfathers death, for it was necessary to clear the way of all competitors, and there were two on this occasionone ~Ali Mirza, governor of Teheran, who actually assumed a royal title, and one Hasan Ali Mirza, governor of Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • An engagement which took place near Kumishah, on the road between Isfahan and Shiraz, having been successful, the English commander pushed on to the latter town, where the two rebel princes were seized and imprisoned.

    0
    0
  • At Isafahan, Shiraz and Kerman serious riots took place, which weie with difficulty suppressed.

    0
    0
  • In the article on BABYIsM, the facts as to the life of the l3ab, Mirza Ali Mahommed of Shiraz, and the progress of the Babiist movement, are separately noticed.

    0
    0
  • Serious rioting arose only in Shiraz and Fars, where some persons lost their lives and a number of caravans were looted.

    0
    0
  • I67o), and Shaukat, the governor of ShIraz under Fath All Shah.

    0
    0
  • This favorite story was treated again by FasihI JurjanI (5th century of the Hegira), and by many modern poets as Damiri, who died under the ~afawI shah Mahommed (1577 1586; 985994 A.H.), Nmi, the historiographer of the Zand dynasty, and Uosain of Shiraz under Fatl~ All Shah, the last two flourishing towards the beginning of the present century.

    0
    0
  • 1512; 918 A.H.), who also wrote a romantic poem, Ba/tram u Bihiruz; Bba Fighani of ShIraz (d.

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz, and has a population of about io,000.

    0
    0
  • The Taj alone is well worth the journey."' The Taj was designed by Ustad Isa, variously described as a Byzantine Turk and a native of Shiraz in Persia.

    0
    0
  • It is most largely produced in the districts of Ispahan, Shiraz, Yezd and Khonsar, and to a less extent in those of Khorasan, Kermanshah and Fars.

    0
    0
  • About Shiraz, Behbehan and Kermanshah it now occupies much of the land, and has consequently affected the price and growth of cereals.

    0
    0
  • At Ispahan, Shiraz and Yezd the drug, after being dried in the sun, is mixed with oil in the proportion of 6 or 7 Ib to 141 lb of opium, with the object, it is said, of suiting the taste of the Chinese - that intended for the London market being now always free from oil.

    0
    0
  • in a fertile plain on the high road between Isfahan and Shiraz, 140 miles (230km).

    0
    0
  • from Shiraz, and has a population of about 5000.

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • From Bombay he set out for Bushire, bearing letters from Sir John Malcolm to men of position there, as also at Shiraz and Isfahan.

    0
    0
  • After an exhausting journey from the coast he reached Shiraz, and was soon plunged into discussion with the disputants of all classes, "Sufi, Mahommedan, Jew, and JewishMahommedan, even Armenian, all anxious to test their powers of argument with the first English priest who had visited them."

    0
    0
  • He himself became judge in Shiraz, and died in Tabriz about 1286.

    0
    0
  • of Shiraz and 3 m.

    0
    0
  • We shared a bottle of deep red, smooth and spicy Australian shiraz, good value at £ 12.95.

    0
    0
  • This Shiraz has been described as " plum flavors of the shiraz grape, adding subtle vanilla overtones ".

    0
    0
  • Vintage: 2003 Price: £ 14.00 Shiraz (Australia) Salisbury Ripe, plummy fruit on the nose with cedary oak undertones.

    0
    0
  • The area produces premium wines, including shiraz, from a growing viticulture industry.

    0
    0
  • Made by renowned Aussie winemaker Ben Riggs, this is a fruit-driven, quality Shiraz that goes a treat with barbecues and roasted meats.

    0
    0
  • According to Nigel Dolan, group red winemaker for Beringer Blass, Shiraz is the standout red variety for the region this vintage.

    0
    0
  • Stellar Organics Shiraz - This wine is said to be fruity and full bodied but not dry.

    0
    0
  • Shiraz:  Also used for Syrah, these glasses are smaller than other red wine glasses and tapered inward.

    0
    0
  • Spicy Shiraz from Australia offers a juicy, jammy red wine that pairs well with bold flavors.

    0
    0
  • Yellow Tail Shiraz is a highly drinkable and very reasonably priced Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • If you are looking for a solid red table wine with enough complexity to keep you from longing for its pricier cousins, give the Yellow Tail Shiraz a try.

    0
    0
  • Pair the Yellow Tail Shiraz with beef (it can hold its own with a rare steak, smothered in a brandy-cream sauce as well as perfectly complementing a char-grilled burger) or pasta.

    0
    0
  • The name Paringa derives from the single vineyard where this 2003 Shiraz came from.

    0
    0
  • David and Dena Hickinbotham at their ARH Wine Company have produced a well-crafted Shiraz from their vineyard in South Australia on the south bank of the River Murray in an area where approximately 50% of Australian wines are produced.

    0
    0
  • The Paringa Shiraz's nose pops with ripe cherries and plums coupled with spice and tarry smoked oak.

    0
    0
  • This 2003 Shiraz represents a good value and a delicious one to up the ante.

    0
    0
  • When people think of Australian Shiraz their first thought is generally Penfolds.

    0
    0
  • Premium Shiraz grapes are pulled in from McLaren Vale, Coonawarra, Barossa Valley, Padthaway, and the Robe-all the best spots in Australia.

    0
    0
  • Penfolds' 2003 Thomas Hyland Shiraz vintage has a medium-body and is soft and supple.

    0
    0
  • Nice complexity and an appealing Shiraz representative.

    0
    0
  • This is the junior bottle to the better and more expensive "Command" Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • Well, probably the best place to spot one is on a bottle of Marquis Philips Shiraz, or any Marquis Philips for that matter.

    0
    0
  • Australian Shiraz has a general reputation for being "fruit bombs" with intense fruit flavors and a high alcohol content.

    0
    0
  • This Marquis Philips Shiraz 2003 from Southeastern Australia may exhibit some of those characteristics but it's not over the top.

    0
    0
  • Fess Parker Winery Shiraz Frontier Red is the creation of the actor, Fess Parker, who began a winery in Santa Barbara County in 1989.

    0
    0
  • Fess Parker Winery Shiraz Frontier Red, Lot No. 61 is an affordable wine that will compliment casual summer barbecues and friendly chats by the pool.

    0
    0
  • California Shiraz and Syrah have decent aging potential ranging from five to 20 years depending on the vintage and the wine style.

    0
    0
  • Shiraz tends to be a lusher, jammier style than Syrah, lending itself well to early drinking.

    0
    0
  • Whether this Bonny Doon Shiraz has held up is anyone's guess, but at such an affordable price, if you come across a bottle it may be well worth a try.

    0
    0
  • Barossa's Shiraz is generally full-bodied to begin with so it's illogical to expect a lightweight red from them anyway.

    0
    0
  • Onyx in color, Peter Lehmann's Barossa Shiraz is opulent and concentrated, purveying juicy black cherries and plums in the bouquet.

    0
    0
  • Ideally, your closest friends appreciate wine as much as you, but don't hesitate to invite someone who doesn't care for wine; this may be a golden opportunity to bring the Margarita man over to the Shiraz side.

    0
    0
  • Put together a flight of Syrahs, a Hermitage from France's Northern Rhône Valley, a Syrah from California's Santa Ynez Valley, and then a big Shiraz from Australia's Barossa Valley.

    0
    0
  • Shiraz is by far the most popular Australian dry red wine, but it is not the only red wine this large continent has to offer.

    0
    0
  • Shiraz is by far the most popular red wine out of Australia and of course, deserves mentioning.

    0
    0
  • To make your exploration into Australian dry red wines, including Shiraz, below is a list of the finest dry reds Australia has to offer.

    0
    0
  • This increased interest is often attributed to the rise of Shiraz, Australia's take on Syrah (or Sirah, if you prefer).

    0
    0
  • Langhorne Creek - Known for producing award winning Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz, wines produced in this region are famous for their full, forward fruit flavors and soft tannic structure.

    0
    0
  • To me, a Côtes-du-Rhône, Syrah, Shiraz, Grenache/Garnacha wines are never a mistake as a country wine picnic wines.

    0
    0
  • Their selection includes: Pinot Grigio, Chardonnay, Riesling, Rose, Cabernet, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • If it's made anywhere else, it's Syrah; in Australia, it's Shiraz.

    0
    0
  • Australian wine making is so much more than Shiraz, just ask Australian wine expert James Gosper.

    0
    0
  • LTK: Which wine would you like to see garner the same attention and popularity as Australia's Shiraz?

    0
    0
  • This Australian Shiraz is spicy, bold and loaded with ripe fruit flavors that burst on the palate.

    0
    0
  • Start with an accessible, easy drinking red wine like a fruity Shiraz from Australia or a slightly sweet Muscat Canelli.

    0
    0
  • A favorite is D'Arenberg's Laughing Magpie wine, which is a Rhone-style blend of Shiraz and Viognier.

    0
    0
  • The Bin 128 Coonawara Shiraz is a fruity, early drinker that retails for around $20 per bottle.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →