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sherman

sherman

sherman Sentence Examples

  • Hayes, the new president, having chosen John Sherman to be his secretary of the treasury, an effort was made to send Garfield to the United States Senate in Sherman's place.

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  • Blaine, of Maine, and the other John Sherman, of Ohio.

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  • Between the casting of the first and the thirty-third ballot, Garfield, who was the leader of Sherman's adherents in the convention, had sometimes received one or two votes and at other times none.

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  • Sherman, Philip H.

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  • Sherman.

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  • Being ordered to co-operate with Sherman in North Carolina, Schofield moved his corps by rail and sea to Fort Fisher, North Carolina, in seventeen days, occupied Wilmington on the 22nd of February 1865, fought the action at Kinston on the 8 - 10th of March, and on the 23rd joined Sherman at Goldsboro.

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  • Sherman's march on Atlanta in 1864 and in the Nashville campaign of the same year; and was transferred early in 1865 to Sherman's army in its march through the Carolinas.

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  • Among the measures and events distinguishing his term as president were the following: The meeting of the Pan-American Congress at Washington; the passage of the McKinley Tariff Bill and of the Sherman Silver Bill of 1890; the suppressing of the Louisiana Lottery; the enlargement of the navy; further advance in civil service reform; the convocation by the United States of an international monetary conference; the establishment of commercial reciprocity with many countries of America and Europe; the peaceful settlement of a controversy with Chile; the negotiation of a Hawaiian Annexation Treaty, which, however, before its ratification, his successor withdrew from the Senate; the settlement of difficulties with Germany concerning the Samoan Islands, and the adjustment by arbitration with Great Britain of the Bering Sea fur-seal question.

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  • His work in connexion with the drafting of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act and with the Bering Sea controversy attracted attention.

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  • Sherman of New York was nominated for Vice-President.

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  • At the ensuing election in November, Taft and Sherman received 321 electoral votes against 162 cast for William Jennings Bryan and John W.

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  • Wilmington was captured by the Federals in February 1865; General Sherman's army crossed the southern boundary in March; a battle was fought at Bentonville, March 19-21; Raleigh was entered on April 13; and the Confederates under General Joseph E.

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  • On the 8th of June he was appointed on a committee with Jefferson, Franklin, Livingston and Sherman to draft a Declaration of Independence; and although that document was by the request of the committee written by Thomas Jefferson, it was John Adams who occupied the foremost place in the debate on its adoption.

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  • In the Atlanta campaign under Sherman he gained considerable distinction, rising successively to the rank of brigadier-general in 1864 and major-general in 1865.

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  • After the battles around Marietta, and the crossing of the Chattahoochee river on the 8th and 9th of July, Sherman continued his advance against Atlanta.

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  • The three Union armies under Sherman's command, outnumbering the Confederates about 3 to 2, began their movement on the 16th of July; the Army of the Cumberland (Gen.

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  • Sherman's confidence in Thomas and his troops was, however, justified.

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  • Sherman quickly realized this, and the Army of the Tennessee, now commanded by Gen.

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  • Sherman's cavalry had hitherto failed to do serious damage to the railway, and the Federal general now proceeded to manoeuvre with his main body so as to cut off Hood from his Southern railway lines (August).

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  • Another cavalry raid effected but slight damage to the line, and Sherman now decided to take his whole force to the south side.

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  • This apparently dangerous movement (August 25) is a remarkable illustration of Sherman's genius for war, and in fact succeeded completely.

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  • All citizens were now ordered to leave, the place was turned into a military camp, and when Sherman started on his "March to the Sea," on the 15th of November, a large part of the city was burned.

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  • Sherman and his army took possession of the town, destroyed the arsenal, and did considerable damage to property.

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  • Two of his speeches in particular attracted attention, one against the policy of protection (16th of March 1892), and the other against the repeal of the silver purchase clause of the Sherman Act (16th of August 1893).

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  • The Democratic party was even more radically divided on the question of monetary policy than the Republican; and President Cleveland, by securing the repeal of the silver purchase clause in the Sherman Act by Republican votes, had alienated a great majority of his party.

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  • Sherman, the Federal commander, made Marietta his next intermediate point in his Atlanta campaign, and the Confederate commander, General Joseph E.

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  • After several preliminary engagements Sherman on the 26th and 27th of June made repeated unsuccessful attempts to drive the Confederates from their defences at Kenesaw Mountain; he then resorted to a flanking movement which forced the Confederate general to retire (July 2) toward Atlanta.

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  • At Millen better arrangements prevailed, and when, after Sherman began his march to the sea, the prisoners were returned to Andersonville, the conditions there were somewhat improved.

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  • JOHN SHERMAN (1823-1900), American financier and statesman, a younger brother of General W.

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  • Sherman, was born at Lancaster, Ohio, on the 10th of May 1823.

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  • During this period he was largely concerned in the enactment of the Anti-Trust Law of 1890, and of the so-called Sherman Act of the same year, providing for the purchase of silver and the issuing of Treasury notes based upon it.

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  • A selection from the correspondence of John Sherman and his brother Gen.

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  • Sherman was published as The Sherman Letters in 1894.

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  • Sherman published Recollections of Forty Years in the House, Senate and Cabinet: an Autobiography (Chicago and New York, 1895).

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  • Roger Sherman >>

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  • In 1787, with Roger Sherman and William Samuel Johnson (1727-1819), he was one of Connecticut's delegates to the constitutional convention at Philadelphia, in which his services were numerous and important.

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  • In particular, when disagreement seemed inevitable on the question of representation, he, with Roger Sherman, proposed what is known as the "Connecticut Compromise," by which the Federal legislature was made to consist of two houses, the upper having equal representation from each state, the lower being chosen on the basis of population.

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  • At a critical moment he actually left the Virginian armies to their own commanders, and started to take personal command in a threatened quarter, and throughout he was in close touch with Sherman and Thomas,.

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  • Later in 1863, when the battle of Chattanooga brought the Federals to the borders of Georgia, Johnston was assigned to command the Army of Tennessee at Dalton, and in the early days of May 1864 the combined armies of the North under Sherman advanced against his lines.

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  • For the main outlines of the famous campaign between Sherman and Johnston see American Civil War (§ 29).

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  • With a handful of men he opposed Sherman's march through the Carolinas, and at Bentonville, N.C., fought and almost won a most gallant and skilful battle against heavy odds.

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  • But the Union troops steadily advanced, growing in strength as they went, and a few days after Lee's surrender at Appomattox Johnston advised President Davis that it was in his opinion wrong and useless to continue the conflict, and he was authorized to make terms with Sherman.

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  • The duel of Sherman and Johnston is almost as personal a contest between two great captains as were the campaigns of Turenne and Montecucculi.

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  • From 1891 until 1897 he was a member of the United States Senate, in which, during President Cleveland's second term, he was recognized as the chief defender of the Administration, and he was especially active in securing the repeal of the silverpurchase clause of the Sherman Act.

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  • WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN (1820-1891), American general, was born on the 8th of February 1820, at Lancaster, Ohio.

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  • He was descended from Edmond Sherman, who emigrated from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634.

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  • Sherman, a judge of the Supreme Court of Ohio, died suddenly in 1829, leaving his widow with a family of young children.

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  • The usual changes of station and detached duty made him acquainted with the geography of all the Southern states, and Sherman improved the opportunity by making topographical studies which proved of no small value to him later.

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  • In 1859, the state of Louisiana proposing to establish a military college, Sherman was appointed its superintendent.

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  • On the 1st of January 1860 the "State Seminary of Learning and Military Academy" was opened, and here Sherman remained until the spring of 1861, when it was evident that Louisiana would join the states seceding from the Union.

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  • Though his brother John Sherman was a leader in the party which had elected Lincoln, William Sherman was very conservative on the slavery question, and his distress at what he thought an unnecessary rupture between the states was extreme.

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  • Promoted, brigadier-general of volunteers, Sherman was in August sent to Kentucky to serve under General Robert Anderson.

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  • He was relieved of his post soon afterwards in consequence, but the event justified Sherman's view.

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  • At the battle of Shiloh Sherman's gallant conduct gained him promotion to majorgeneral.

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  • In Grant's final Vicksburg campaign Sherman commanded the XV.

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  • When, after Rosecrans's defeat at Chickamauga, Grant was placed in supreme command in the west, Sherman succeeded to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, with which he took part in the great battle of Chattanooga.

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  • Sherman thereupon, leaving behind Thomas and Schofield to deal with Hood, made the celebrated "March to the Sea" from Atlanta to Savannah with 60,000 picked men.

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  • In January 1865 Sherman marched northwards again, once more abandoning his base, towards Petersburg, where Grant and Lee were waging a war of giants.

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  • Sherman defeated him and reached Raleigh, the capital of North Carolina, on the r3th of April, having marched nearly 500 m.

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  • by land and sea) rejoined Sherman in North Carolina.

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  • With 90,000 men Sherman drove Johnston before him, and when Lee surrendered to Grant Johnston also gave up the struggle.

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  • There was much friction between Sherman and the war secretary, Stanton, before the terms were ratified, but with their signature the Civil War came to an end.

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  • Sherman had the good fortune to learn the art of command by degrees.

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  • When Grant became full general in 1866 Sherman was promoted lieutenant-general, and in 1869, when Grant became president, hesucceeded to the full rank.

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  • General Sherman retired, after being commanding general of the army for fifteen years, in 1884.

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  • Sherman's Memoirs were published in 1875 (New York).

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  • See also Rachel Sherman Thorndike, The Sherman Letters (New York, 1894) Home Letters of Gen.

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  • Sherman (1909), edited by M.

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  • Irwin, Sherman and his Campaigns: a Military Biography (New York, 1865); W.

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  • Fletcher Johnson, Life of William Tecumseh Sherman (Philadelphia, 1891); Manning F.

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  • Force, General Sherman (Great Commanders series) (New York,1899).

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  • Sherman >>

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  • He commanded a division in the Vicksburg campaign and in the fighting about Chattanooga, and was one of Sherman's corps commanders in the final campaigns in Georgia and the Carolinas.

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  • On the 14th of May 1863 Johnston who then held the city, was attacked on both sides by Sherman and McPherson with two corps of Grant's army, which, after a sharp engagement, drove the Confederates from the town.

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  • On the 9th of July Sherman began an investment of the place, and during the succeeding week a sharp bombardment was carried on.

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  • Sherman's army entered on the 17th and remained five days, burning a considerable part of the city and ravaging the surrounding country.

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  • The principal cities are San Antonio, Houston, Dallas, Galveston, Fort Worth, Austin, the capital, Waco, El Paso, Laredo, Denison and Sherman.

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  • At the same time expenditures were largely increased by liberal pension legislation, and the government's purchase of silver bullion almost doubled by the provisions of the new Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890.

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  • "JAMES SCHOOLCRAFT SHERMAN (18J5-1912), American politician, was born near Utica, N.Y., Oct.

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  • Other parks are Lake Park, also on the lake shore, at North Point, where stands the waterworks pumping station with its tall tower; Riverside and Kilbourn Parks, east and west respectively of the upper Milwaukee river, in the northern part of the city, Washington Park on the west side, containing a menagerie and a herd of deer; Sherman Park on the west side, and Kosciusko, Humboldt and Mitchell Parks on the south side.

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  • Sherman (November 7, 1861).

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  • Had Halleck reinforced Mitchel, that officer might perhaps have forestalled the later victories of Grant and Sherman.

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  • Sherman from Memphis, and a force from Helena on the Arkansas side, failed, owing to Pemberton's prompt retirement to Oxford, Mississippi, and complications brought about by the intrigues of an able but intractable subordinate, McClernand, induced Grant to make a complete change of plan.

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  • Sherman was to proceed down the great river, and join the ships from the Gulf before Vicksburg, while Grant himself drove Pemberton southwards along the Mississippi Central railway.

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  • Charleston was attacked without success in 1862, but from June to August 1863 it was besieged by General Gillmore and Admiral Dahlgren, and under great difficulties the Federals secured a lodgment, though it was not until Sherman appeared on the land side early in 1865 that the Confederate defence collapsed, Fort Fisher near Wilmington also underwent a memorable siege by land and sea.

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  • Grant, with the other three under Sherman, McClernand and McPherson, moved by water to the neighbourhood of the fortress.

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  • As Sherman in 1862, so now Grant was unable to obtain any foothold on the high ground, and no effective attack was possible until this had been gained.

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  • Grant was now given supreme command in the west, and the Army of the Tennessee (now under Sherman) and two corps from Virginia under Hooker were hurried by rail to Tennessee.

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  • On the left Sherman made little progress; on the right, however, Hooker and the men from the Potomac army fought and won the extraordinary "Battle above the Clouds" on Lookout Mountain, and on the 25th the Confederate centre on Missionary Ridge was brilliantly stormed by Thomas and the Army of the Cumberland.

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  • Sherman was to command in the west, Grant's headquarters accompanied Meade and the Army of the Potomac. The general plan was simple and comprehensive.

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  • Meade was to "hammer" Lee, and Sherman, at the head of the armies which had been engaged at Chattanooga and Knoxville, was to deal with the other great field army of Confederates under Johnston, and as far as possible gain ground for the Union in the south-east.

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  • Sherman's own plans went farther still, and included an eventual invasion of Virginia itself from the south, but this was not contemplated as part of the immediate programme.

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  • Meanwhile Sherman had fought his Atlanta campaign.

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  • Whilst Grant, with his avowed object of crushing Lee's army, lost no opportunity of fighting a battle coute que coute, Sherman, intent rather on the conquest of territory, acted on different lines.

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  • Sherman was far too wary to be drawn into an action under unfavourable conditions.

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  • Johnston's inferiority in numbers was now becoming lessened as Sherman had to detach more and more troops to his ever-lengthening communications with Chattanooga.

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  • Hitherto neither leader had offered a weak spot to his opponent, though the constant skirmishing had caused a loss of 9000 men to Sherman and about two-thirds of that number to the Confederates.

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  • At this moment Sherman suddenly changed his policy and sent his troops straight against the hostile entrenchments.

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  • Sherman acted thus in order to teach his own men and the enemy that he was not "afraid," and the lesson was not valueless.

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  • His campaign had not been unsuccessful, for Sherman had never succeeded in taking him at a disadvantage, but the whole of the South, including President Davis and his chief of staff General Bragg, clamoured for a more "energetic" policy, and General J.

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  • An attack on the Army of the Ohio near Jonesboro concluded the Atlanta campaign, which left Sherman in control of Atlanta, but hampered by the necessity of preserving his communications with Chattanooga and weakened by a total loss of 30,000 men.

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  • - Although General Canby, with a Federal force in the south, had been ordered to capture Mobile early in the year - after which he was to operate towards Atlanta - Mobile still flew the Confederate flag, and Hood, about to resume the offensive, was thus able to base himself on Montgomery in order to attack Sherman in flank and rear.

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  • A heavy attack on the post of Allatoona (to the garrison of which Sherman sent the famous message, "Hold the fort, for I am coming") was repulsed (October 5).

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  • Sherman had now resolved to execute his plan of a march through Georgia to the sea and thence through the Carolinas towards Virginia, destroying everything of military value en route.

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  • With the provisos that if Lee turned upon Sherman, Grant must follow him up sharply,'and that Thomas could be left to deal with Hood (both of which could be, and were, done), the scheme might well be decisive of the war.

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  • Fifty thousand picked men were to march through Georgia with Sherman, and Thomas was to be reinforced by all other forces available.

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  • It was at this same time that Sherman broke up his railway communication, destroying Atlanta as a place of arms, and set out on his adventurous expedition.

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  • Hood, at a loss to divine Sherman's purpose, hastened on into Tennessee amidst weather which would have stopped most troops.

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  • From Savannah, Sherman started on his final march through the Carolinas.

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  • Sherman, like Sheridan, was much criticized for his methods of reducing opposition, but it does not seem that his "bummers" were guilty of wanton cruelty and destructiveness, at least in general, though the cavalry naturally gave more ground for the accusation than the main body of the army.

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  • Johnston surrendered to Sherman at Durham Station on the 26th, and soon afterwards all the remaining Confederate soldiers followed their example.

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  • But Lee, the Johnstons, McClellan, Grant and Sherman had all served in the old army.

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  • Long forward strides of the Napoleonic type were rarely attempted; "changes of base" were indeed made across country, and over considerable distances, as by Sherman in 1864, but ordinarily either the base and the objective were connected by rail or water, or else every forward step was, after the manner of Marlborough's time, organized as a separate campaign.

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  • Reinforcements arriving, the whole force then marched inland to meet Sherman.

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  • Dallas is served by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, the Houston & Texas Central, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the" St Louis South-western, the Texas & New Orleans, the Trinity & Brazos Valley, and the Texas & Pacific railways, and by interurban electric railways to Fort Worth and Sherman.

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  • As the result of communications during 1897 between Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Secretary Sherman, the governments of Great Britain and the United States agreed to the appointment of a joint high commission, with a view of settling all outstanding differences between the United States and Canada.

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  • Sherman; the resistance of General Joseph E.

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  • Then Sherman began his famous " march to the sea," from Atlanta to Savannah, which revealed the weakness of the Confederacy.

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  • ROGER SHERMAN (1721-1793), American political leader, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was born at Newton, Massachusetts, on the 19th of April 1721 (O.S.).

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  • Sherman was not a deep and original thinker like James Wilson, nor was he a brilliant leader like Alexander Hamilton; but owing to his conservative temperament, his sound judgment and his wide experience he was well qualified to lead the compromise cause in the convention of 1787.

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  • Two of Sherman's grandsons, William M.

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  • Boutell's Life of Roger Sherman (Chicago, 1896), based on material collected by Senator Hoar, is a careful and accurate work.

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  • William Tecumseh Sherman >>

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  • He was about to go on leave of absence in order to be married in Baltimore when he received his nomination to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, Grant's and Sherman's old army, which was to take part under Sherman's supreme command in the campaign against Atlanta (1864).

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  • This nomination was made by Sherman and entirely approved by Grant, who had the highest opinion of McPherson's military and personal qualities.

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  • Sherman organized an expedition against these fortifications, which were reduced by a naval bombardment and were evacuated by the Confederates under General Thomas F.

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  • In 1864 he commanded a division of the 17th Army Corps in Sherman's Atlanta campaign, and before Atlanta, on the 10th of July, he received a wound which forced him to retire from active service, and left him lame for life.

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  • A non-partisan commission, appointed by Secretary John Sherman, recommended sweeping changes.

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  • Among the prominent men who have lived in Fairfield are Roger Sherman, the first President Dwight of Yale (who described Fairfield in his Travels and in his poem Greenfield Hill), Chancellor James Kent, and Joseph Earle Sheffield.

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  • Sherman, commanding the bulk of the Union forces in the Mississippi Valley, swept in a victorious march through the heart of the Confederacy to Savannah on the coast, and thence northward to North Carolina.

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  • Sherman pushed Johnston to a surrender on the 26th of April.

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  • Sherman's army, on its march through the Carolinas, passed through the city on the 13th of April 1865.

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  • In 1891 he wrote anonymously two Irish stories, John Sherman and Dhoya, for Mr Fisher Unwin's "Pseudonym Library."

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  • when he was with Sherman's army in North Carolina.

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  • Sherman's campaign in the Carolinas; and in September 1865 received the brevet of major-general of volunteers.

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  • In his administration of the war office Stanton was vigorous, rigid, and often harsh, and his peremptory manner, in speech and correspondence, was the cause of considerable friction between the war department and the generals, one of the last and most conspicuous instances being his controversy with General Sherman over the terms of surrender granted to J.

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  • Soon after entering Congress he became the acknowledged leader of the protectionists, and at the request of John Sherman, then chairman of the ways and means committee, he prepared a new tariff bill, which was introduced in the house in March 1860.

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  • In early life he had little time for politics, but after 1880 he became prominent in the affairs of the Republican party in Cleveland, and in 1884 and 1888 was a delegate to the Republican National Convention, in the latter year being associated with William McKinley in the management of the John Sherman canvass.

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  • Bushnell (1834-1904) United States senator from Ohio, to succeed John Sherman.

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  • the platform committee) and was leader of the delegation from Ohio, which had been instructed for John Sherman; after James G.

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  • Blaine withdrew his name there was a movement, begun by Republican congressmen, to nominate McKinley, who received 16 votes on the seventh ballot, but passionately refused to be a candidate, considering that his acquiescence would be a breach of faith toward Sherman.

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  • The members of his cabinet were: secretary of state, John Sherman (whose appointment created a vacancy in the Senate to which Marcus A.

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  • It is served by the Missouri, Kansas & Texas and the Houston & Texas Central railways, and by the Dallas & Sherman inter-urban (electric) line, the central power plant of which is immediately north of the city.

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  • In February 1864 General William Tecumseh Sherman, with an army of about 20,000, made an expedition from Vicksburg to Meridian, then an important railway centre and depot for Confederate supplies, chiefly for the purpose of making inoperative the Mobile & Ohio and the Jackson & Selma railways; on the 14th of the month his army entered Meridian, and within a week destroyed nearly everything in the city except the private houses, and tore up over i io m.

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  • He was then placed in charge of the Department of the Missouri, which he commanded for sixteen years, and in 1869, on Grant's election to the presidency and Sherman's consequent promotion to the full rank of general, he was made lieutenant-general.

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  • In 1883 he succeeded Sherman in the chief command of the United States army, which he held until his death at Nonquitt, Mass., on the 5th of August 1888.

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  • Among the other prominent statues are: the equestrian statue (1908) of General Philip Sheridan in Sheridan Circle, by Gutzon Borglum; an equestrian statue of General Sherman near the Treasury Building, by Carl Rohl-Smith; a statue of Frederick the Great (by T.

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  • His books were A Memoir of James Sherman (1863); the Sermons of Thomas Binney, with a biographical and critical sketch (1869); The Vision of God and other sermons (1876); The Indwelling Christ (1892).

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  • Silver-mining ceased to be highly remunerative beginning with the closing of the India mints and repeal of the Sherman Law in 1893; since 1900 the yield has shown an extraordinary decrease - in 1905 it was $6,945,581, and in 1907 $7,411,652 - and it is said that as a result of the great fall in the market value of the metal the mines can now be operated only under the most favourable conditions and by exercise of extreme economy.

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  • Following the repeal of the Sherman Law and other acts and tendencies unfavourable to silver coinage in 1893 and thereafter, the silver question became the dominant issue in politics, resulting in the success of the Populist-Democratic fusion party in three successive elections, and permanently and greatly altering prior party organizations.

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  • He was the author of the so-called Edmunds Act (22nd of March 1882) for the suppression of polygamy in Utah, and of the anti-trust law of 1890, popularly known as the Sherman Act.

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  • In 1864 he took part in the Atlanta campaign under Sherman, as a divisional and subsequently corps-commander: at the battle of Franklin he commanded the 2 3 rd Corps, and he served at Nashville also.

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  • He led an expedition following Sherman into the Carolinas and fought two successful actions with Bragg at Kinston, N.C. He was governor of Ohio in 1866-1867, and as such advocated the colonization of the freedmen in a restricted area, and sympathized with President Johnson's programme of Reconstruction and worked for a compromise between Johnson and his opponents, although he finally deserted Johnson.

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  • Grant - John Sherman of Ohio also having a considerable following - struggled through thirty-six ballots, when the friends of Blaine, combining with those of Sherman, succeeded in nominating General James A.

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  • Sherman, on his march through the Carolinas, entered Columbia, and on the ensuing night a fire broke out which was not extinguished until most of the city was destroyed.

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  • The militia was called out and regular troops were hurried to Shoshone county from Fort Sherman, Idaho and Fort Missoula, Montana.

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  • He was a member of the committee on finance throughout his service in the Senate, and his first speech in that body was a defence of the free coinage of silver and a plea for the preservation of the full legal tender value of greenback currency, though in 1893 he voted to repeal the silver purchase clause of the Sherman Act.

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  • At Shiloh he commanded a division, hich was practically a reserve to Sherman's.

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  • In October 1861 Stanton, secretary of war, ordered him north to raise troops for the expedition against Vicksburg; and early in January 1864, at Milliken's Bend, McClernand, who had been placed in command of one of the four corps of Grant's army, superseded Sherman as the leader of the force that was to move down the Mississippi.

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  • On the 17th, Grant, after receiving the opinion of Admiral Foote and General Sherman that McClernand was unfit, united a part of his own troops with those of McClernand and assumed command in person, and three days later ordered McClernand back to Milliken's Bend.

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  • It was the home of John Sherman from 1840 until his death.

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  • Sherman on the 23rd of November 1864.

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  • When Sherman prepared to invade Georgia in the spring of 1864 the XI.

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  • Sherman, frequently equal to a brigade.

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  • In the same year appeared Unitarian books by John Sherman (1772-1828) and Hosea Ballou (1771-1852), and another in 1810 by Noah Worcester (1758-1837).

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  • In Grant's campaigns terminating in the capture of Vicksburg, which city Logan's division was the first to enter and of which he was military governor, he rose to the rank of major-general of volunteers; in November 1863 he succeeded Sherman in command of the XV.

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  • Sherman's march across the state (February - March, 1865) was accomplished by an enormous destruction of property by fire and pillage.

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  • Sherman, then conducting his Atlanta campaign.

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  • corps of the Army of the Tennessee, under Sherman, was on the march from the Mississippi.

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  • But Sherman was still far distant, and the Federal forces at Knoxville, against which a large detachment of Bragg's army under Longstreet was now sent, were in grave danger.

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  • Grant waited for Sherman's four divisions, but prepared everything for battle in the meantime.

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  • His plan was that Thomas in the Chattanooga lines should contain the Confederate centre on Missionary Ridge, while Hooker on the right at Wauhatchie was to attack Lookout Mountain, and Sherman farther up the river was to carry out the decisive attack against Bragg's extreme right wing at the end of Missionary Ridge.

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  • But Grant would not move forward without Sherman, and the battle of Chattanooga was fought more than two months after Chickamauga.

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  • Sherman's corps was graudally brought over the river near the mouth of Chickamauga Creek, and formed up on the east side.

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  • The heights attacked were in Sherman's hands, and fortified against counter-attack, before nightfall.

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  • But the maps deceived Grant and Sherman as they had previously deceived Rosecrans.

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  • Sherman had captured, not the north point of Missionary Ridge, but a detached hill, and a new and more serious action had to be fought for the possession of Tunnel Hill, where Bragg's right now lay strongly entrenched.

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  • The Confederates used every effort to hold the position and all Sherman's efforts were made in vain.

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  • Grant therefore directed Thomas to move forward on the centre to relieve the pressure on Sherman.

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  • 1 1919, a grade held previously by only four Americans - Washington, Grant, Sherman, and Sheridan.

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  • Sherman retired into Virginia.

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  • Hood moved into Tennessee, expecting Sherman to follow him.

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  • Sherman, however, sent reinforcements to Thomas and continued his march to the sea.

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  • Sherman concluded an armistice with General Joseph E. Johnston on 21st April.

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  • To the crowd's disgust, it was actually Chuck Sherman who made his way down the aisle, complete with purple feather boa.

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  • Sherman took Atlanta and forced the confederates to retreat north to Tennessee.

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  • The German tank scored a hit on the Sherman leaving a pall of smoke rising from its hatches.

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  • Now about a gun, rocket launcher, or Sherman Tank (which are a bugger to keep inconspicuous) I have a contact.

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  • interchange of passes allowed Rosie Sherman to shoot home.

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  • interweavend Anthony's new material was seamlessly interwoven with the original Sherman brothers ' songs.

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  • Sherman: I'm either at risk, or I get out, or I go legit.

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  • living organism: the immense " General Sherman " sequoia tree.

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  • The German tank scored a hit on the Sherman leaving a pall of smoke rising from its hatches.

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  • Sherman described a set of criteria for the diagnosis of pathological synovial plicae.

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  • IN SEARCH OF THE SONS OF BARNUM Thanks to Zach McNeir for sending me some information on a movie publicist called Sherman Calloway.

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  • Answer: the General Sherman, a giant sequoia growing in California.

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  • Pearl's father embodies the bitterness and disorientation that gripped southern slaveholders forced to come to grips with Sherman's powerful onslaught.

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  • Tilbury was well within the range of a Sherman: they knew about such things.

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  • The trunk of the General Sherman tree weighs almost 1400 tons.

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  • Diet guru Sherman will hijack a pastry truck and over-indulge after discovering his wife left him and cleaned him out.

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  • Hayes, the new president, having chosen John Sherman to be his secretary of the treasury, an effort was made to send Garfield to the United States Senate in Sherman's place.

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  • Blaine, of Maine, and the other John Sherman, of Ohio.

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  • Between the casting of the first and the thirty-third ballot, Garfield, who was the leader of Sherman's adherents in the convention, had sometimes received one or two votes and at other times none.

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  • On the thirty-fourth he received seventeen, on the next fifty, and on the next almost the entire vote hitherto cast for Blaine and Sherman, and was declared nominated.

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  • Sherman, Philip H.

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  • Being ordered to co-operate with Sherman in North Carolina, Schofield moved his corps by rail and sea to Fort Fisher, North Carolina, in seventeen days, occupied Wilmington on the 22nd of February 1865, fought the action at Kinston on the 8 - 10th of March, and on the 23rd joined Sherman at Goldsboro.

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  • Sherman's march on Atlanta in 1864 and in the Nashville campaign of the same year; and was transferred early in 1865 to Sherman's army in its march through the Carolinas.

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  • Among the measures and events distinguishing his term as president were the following: The meeting of the Pan-American Congress at Washington; the passage of the McKinley Tariff Bill and of the Sherman Silver Bill of 1890; the suppressing of the Louisiana Lottery; the enlargement of the navy; further advance in civil service reform; the convocation by the United States of an international monetary conference; the establishment of commercial reciprocity with many countries of America and Europe; the peaceful settlement of a controversy with Chile; the negotiation of a Hawaiian Annexation Treaty, which, however, before its ratification, his successor withdrew from the Senate; the settlement of difficulties with Germany concerning the Samoan Islands, and the adjustment by arbitration with Great Britain of the Bering Sea fur-seal question.

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  • His work in connexion with the drafting of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act and with the Bering Sea controversy attracted attention.

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  • Sherman of New York was nominated for Vice-President.

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  • At the ensuing election in November, Taft and Sherman received 321 electoral votes against 162 cast for William Jennings Bryan and John W.

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  • In his inaugural address (4th March 1909) President Taft announced himself as favouring the maintenance and enforcement of the reforms initiated by President Roosevelt (including a strict enforcement of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act, an effective measure for railway rate regulation, and the policy of conservation of natural resources); the revision of the tariff on the basis of affording protection to American manufactures equal to the difference between home and foreign cost of production; a graduated inheritance tax; a strong navy as the best guarantee of peace; postal savings banks; free trade with the Philippine Islands; and mail subsidies for American ships.

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  • Wilmington was captured by the Federals in February 1865; General Sherman's army crossed the southern boundary in March; a battle was fought at Bentonville, March 19-21; Raleigh was entered on April 13; and the Confederates under General Joseph E.

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  • On the 8th of June he was appointed on a committee with Jefferson, Franklin, Livingston and Sherman to draft a Declaration of Independence; and although that document was by the request of the committee written by Thomas Jefferson, it was John Adams who occupied the foremost place in the debate on its adoption.

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  • In the Atlanta campaign under Sherman he gained considerable distinction, rising successively to the rank of brigadier-general in 1864 and major-general in 1865.

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  • Sherman's invasion of Georgia (see American Civil War), which is therefore generally known as the "Atlanta campaign."

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  • After the battles around Marietta, and the crossing of the Chattahoochee river on the 8th and 9th of July, Sherman continued his advance against Atlanta.

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  • The three Union armies under Sherman's command, outnumbering the Confederates about 3 to 2, began their movement on the 16th of July; the Army of the Cumberland (Gen.

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  • Sherman's confidence in Thomas and his troops was, however, justified.

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  • Sherman quickly realized this, and the Army of the Tennessee, now commanded by Gen.

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  • Sherman's cavalry had hitherto failed to do serious damage to the railway, and the Federal general now proceeded to manoeuvre with his main body so as to cut off Hood from his Southern railway lines (August).

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  • Another cavalry raid effected but slight damage to the line, and Sherman now decided to take his whole force to the south side.

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  • This apparently dangerous movement (August 25) is a remarkable illustration of Sherman's genius for war, and in fact succeeded completely.

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  • All citizens were now ordered to leave, the place was turned into a military camp, and when Sherman started on his "March to the Sea," on the 15th of November, a large part of the city was burned.

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  • Sherman and his army took possession of the town, destroyed the arsenal, and did considerable damage to property.

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  • Two of his speeches in particular attracted attention, one against the policy of protection (16th of March 1892), and the other against the repeal of the silver purchase clause of the Sherman Act (16th of August 1893).

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  • The Democratic party was even more radically divided on the question of monetary policy than the Republican; and President Cleveland, by securing the repeal of the silver purchase clause in the Sherman Act by Republican votes, had alienated a great majority of his party.

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  • Sherman, the Federal commander, made Marietta his next intermediate point in his Atlanta campaign, and the Confederate commander, General Joseph E.

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  • After several preliminary engagements Sherman on the 26th and 27th of June made repeated unsuccessful attempts to drive the Confederates from their defences at Kenesaw Mountain; he then resorted to a flanking movement which forced the Confederate general to retire (July 2) toward Atlanta.

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  • At Millen better arrangements prevailed, and when, after Sherman began his march to the sea, the prisoners were returned to Andersonville, the conditions there were somewhat improved.

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  • JOHN SHERMAN (1823-1900), American financier and statesman, a younger brother of General W.

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  • Sherman, was born at Lancaster, Ohio, on the 10th of May 1823.

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  • During this period he was largely concerned in the enactment of the Anti-Trust Law of 1890, and of the so-called Sherman Act of the same year, providing for the purchase of silver and the issuing of Treasury notes based upon it.

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  • A selection from the correspondence of John Sherman and his brother Gen.

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  • Sherman was published as The Sherman Letters in 1894.

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  • Sherman published Recollections of Forty Years in the House, Senate and Cabinet: an Autobiography (Chicago and New York, 1895).

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  • Roger Sherman >>

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  • In 1787, with Roger Sherman and William Samuel Johnson (1727-1819), he was one of Connecticut's delegates to the constitutional convention at Philadelphia, in which his services were numerous and important.

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  • In particular, when disagreement seemed inevitable on the question of representation, he, with Roger Sherman, proposed what is known as the "Connecticut Compromise," by which the Federal legislature was made to consist of two houses, the upper having equal representation from each state, the lower being chosen on the basis of population.

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  • At a critical moment he actually left the Virginian armies to their own commanders, and started to take personal command in a threatened quarter, and throughout he was in close touch with Sherman and Thomas,.

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  • Later in 1863, when the battle of Chattanooga brought the Federals to the borders of Georgia, Johnston was assigned to command the Army of Tennessee at Dalton, and in the early days of May 1864 the combined armies of the North under Sherman advanced against his lines.

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  • For the main outlines of the famous campaign between Sherman and Johnston see American Civil War (§ 29).

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  • The great numerical superiority of the Federals enabled Sherman to press back the Confederates without a pitched battle, but the severity of the skirmishing may be judged from the casualties of the two armies (Sherman's about 26,000 men, Johnston's over io,000), and the obstinate steadiness of Johnston by the fact that his opponent hardly progressed more than one mile a day.

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  • With a handful of men he opposed Sherman's march through the Carolinas, and at Bentonville, N.C., fought and almost won a most gallant and skilful battle against heavy odds.

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  • But the Union troops steadily advanced, growing in strength as they went, and a few days after Lee's surrender at Appomattox Johnston advised President Davis that it was in his opinion wrong and useless to continue the conflict, and he was authorized to make terms with Sherman.

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  • The duel of Sherman and Johnston is almost as personal a contest between two great captains as were the campaigns of Turenne and Montecucculi.

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  • From 1891 until 1897 he was a member of the United States Senate, in which, during President Cleveland's second term, he was recognized as the chief defender of the Administration, and he was especially active in securing the repeal of the silverpurchase clause of the Sherman Act.

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  • WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN (1820-1891), American general, was born on the 8th of February 1820, at Lancaster, Ohio.

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  • He was descended from Edmond Sherman, who emigrated from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634.

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  • Sherman, a judge of the Supreme Court of Ohio, died suddenly in 1829, leaving his widow with a family of young children.

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  • The usual changes of station and detached duty made him acquainted with the geography of all the Southern states, and Sherman improved the opportunity by making topographical studies which proved of no small value to him later.

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  • In 1859, the state of Louisiana proposing to establish a military college, Sherman was appointed its superintendent.

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  • On the 1st of January 1860 the "State Seminary of Learning and Military Academy" was opened, and here Sherman remained until the spring of 1861, when it was evident that Louisiana would join the states seceding from the Union.

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  • Though his brother John Sherman was a leader in the party which had elected Lincoln, William Sherman was very conservative on the slavery question, and his distress at what he thought an unnecessary rupture between the states was extreme.

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  • Promoted, brigadier-general of volunteers, Sherman was in August sent to Kentucky to serve under General Robert Anderson.

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  • He was relieved of his post soon afterwards in consequence, but the event justified Sherman's view.

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  • At the battle of Shiloh Sherman's gallant conduct gained him promotion to majorgeneral.

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  • In Grant's final Vicksburg campaign Sherman commanded the XV.

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  • When, after Rosecrans's defeat at Chickamauga, Grant was placed in supreme command in the west, Sherman succeeded to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, with which he took part in the great battle of Chattanooga.

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  • After a brilliant and famous campaign of careful manoeuvre and heavy combats (see American Civil War), Sherman finally wrested Atlanta from the Confederates on the 1st of September.

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  • Sherman thereupon, leaving behind Thomas and Schofield to deal with Hood, made the celebrated "March to the Sea" from Atlanta to Savannah with 60,000 picked men.

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  • In January 1865 Sherman marched northwards again, once more abandoning his base, towards Petersburg, where Grant and Lee were waging a war of giants.

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  • Sherman defeated him and reached Raleigh, the capital of North Carolina, on the r3th of April, having marched nearly 500 m.

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  • by land and sea) rejoined Sherman in North Carolina.

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  • With 90,000 men Sherman drove Johnston before him, and when Lee surrendered to Grant Johnston also gave up the struggle.

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  • There was much friction between Sherman and the war secretary, Stanton, before the terms were ratified, but with their signature the Civil War came to an end.

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  • Sherman had the good fortune to learn the art of command by degrees.

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  • When Grant became full general in 1866 Sherman was promoted lieutenant-general, and in 1869, when Grant became president, hesucceeded to the full rank.

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  • General Sherman retired, after being commanding general of the army for fifteen years, in 1884.

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  • Sherman's Memoirs were published in 1875 (New York).

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  • See also Rachel Sherman Thorndike, The Sherman Letters (New York, 1894) Home Letters of Gen.

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  • Sherman (1909), edited by M.

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  • Irwin, Sherman and his Campaigns: a Military Biography (New York, 1865); W.

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  • Fletcher Johnson, Life of William Tecumseh Sherman (Philadelphia, 1891); Manning F.

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  • Force, General Sherman (Great Commanders series) (New York,1899).

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  • He commanded a division in the Vicksburg campaign and in the fighting about Chattanooga, and was one of Sherman's corps commanders in the final campaigns in Georgia and the Carolinas.

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  • On the 14th of May 1863 Johnston who then held the city, was attacked on both sides by Sherman and McPherson with two corps of Grant's army, which, after a sharp engagement, drove the Confederates from the town.

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  • On the 9th of July Sherman began an investment of the place, and during the succeeding week a sharp bombardment was carried on.

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  • Sherman's army entered on the 17th and remained five days, burning a considerable part of the city and ravaging the surrounding country.

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  • The principal cities are San Antonio, Houston, Dallas, Galveston, Fort Worth, Austin, the capital, Waco, El Paso, Laredo, Denison and Sherman.

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  • At the same time expenditures were largely increased by liberal pension legislation, and the government's purchase of silver bullion almost doubled by the provisions of the new Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890.

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  • "JAMES SCHOOLCRAFT SHERMAN (18J5-1912), American politician, was born near Utica, N.Y., Oct.

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  • Schoolcraft (see 24.359) - and the Sherman Institute in California, an Indian school, bears his name.

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  • Other parks are Lake Park, also on the lake shore, at North Point, where stands the waterworks pumping station with its tall tower; Riverside and Kilbourn Parks, east and west respectively of the upper Milwaukee river, in the northern part of the city, Washington Park on the west side, containing a menagerie and a herd of deer; Sherman Park on the west side, and Kosciusko, Humboldt and Mitchell Parks on the south side.

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  • Sherman (November 7, 1861).

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  • Had Halleck reinforced Mitchel, that officer might perhaps have forestalled the later victories of Grant and Sherman.

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  • Sherman from Memphis, and a force from Helena on the Arkansas side, failed, owing to Pemberton's prompt retirement to Oxford, Mississippi, and complications brought about by the intrigues of an able but intractable subordinate, McClernand, induced Grant to make a complete change of plan.

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  • Sherman was to proceed down the great river, and join the ships from the Gulf before Vicksburg, while Grant himself drove Pemberton southwards along the Mississippi Central railway.

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  • Grant, as he pushed Pemberton before him to Granada, lengthened day by day his line of communication, and when Van Dorn, ever enterprising, raided the great Federal depot of Holly Springs the game was up. Grant retired hastily, for starvation was imminent, and Pemberton, thus freed, turned upon Sherman, and inflicted a severe defeat on that general at Chickasaw Bayou near Vicksburg (December 29).

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  • Charleston was attacked without success in 1862, but from June to August 1863 it was besieged by General Gillmore and Admiral Dahlgren, and under great difficulties the Federals secured a lodgment, though it was not until Sherman appeared on the land side early in 1865 that the Confederate defence collapsed, Fort Fisher near Wilmington also underwent a memorable siege by land and sea.

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  • Grant, with the other three under Sherman, McClernand and McPherson, moved by water to the neighbourhood of the fortress.

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  • As Sherman in 1862, so now Grant was unable to obtain any foothold on the high ground, and no effective attack was possible until this had been gained.

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  • Grant was now given supreme command in the west, and the Army of the Tennessee (now under Sherman) and two corps from Virginia under Hooker were hurried by rail to Tennessee.

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  • On the left Sherman made little progress; on the right, however, Hooker and the men from the Potomac army fought and won the extraordinary "Battle above the Clouds" on Lookout Mountain, and on the 25th the Confederate centre on Missionary Ridge was brilliantly stormed by Thomas and the Army of the Cumberland.

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  • Sherman was to command in the west, Grant's headquarters accompanied Meade and the Army of the Potomac. The general plan was simple and comprehensive.

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  • Meade was to "hammer" Lee, and Sherman, at the head of the armies which had been engaged at Chattanooga and Knoxville, was to deal with the other great field army of Confederates under Johnston, and as far as possible gain ground for the Union in the south-east.

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  • Sherman's own plans went farther still, and included an eventual invasion of Virginia itself from the south, but this was not contemplated as part of the immediate programme.

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  • Meanwhile Sherman had fought his Atlanta campaign.

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  • Whilst Grant, with his avowed object of crushing Lee's army, lost no opportunity of fighting a battle coute que coute, Sherman, intent rather on the conquest of territory, acted on different lines.

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  • Sherman was far too wary to be drawn into an action under unfavourable conditions.

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  • Johnston's inferiority in numbers was now becoming lessened as Sherman had to detach more and more troops to his ever-lengthening communications with Chattanooga.

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  • Hitherto neither leader had offered a weak spot to his opponent, though the constant skirmishing had caused a loss of 9000 men to Sherman and about two-thirds of that number to the Confederates.

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  • At this moment Sherman suddenly changed his policy and sent his troops straight against the hostile entrenchments.

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  • Sherman acted thus in order to teach his own men and the enemy that he was not "afraid," and the lesson was not valueless.

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  • His campaign had not been unsuccessful, for Sherman had never succeeded in taking him at a disadvantage, but the whole of the South, including President Davis and his chief of staff General Bragg, clamoured for a more "energetic" policy, and General J.

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  • An attack on the Army of the Ohio near Jonesboro concluded the Atlanta campaign, which left Sherman in control of Atlanta, but hampered by the necessity of preserving his communications with Chattanooga and weakened by a total loss of 30,000 men.

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  • - Although General Canby, with a Federal force in the south, had been ordered to capture Mobile early in the year - after which he was to operate towards Atlanta - Mobile still flew the Confederate flag, and Hood, about to resume the offensive, was thus able to base himself on Montgomery in order to attack Sherman in flank and rear.

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  • A heavy attack on the post of Allatoona (to the garrison of which Sherman sent the famous message, "Hold the fort, for I am coming") was repulsed (October 5).

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  • Sherman had now resolved to execute his plan of a march through Georgia to the sea and thence through the Carolinas towards Virginia, destroying everything of military value en route.

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  • With the provisos that if Lee turned upon Sherman, Grant must follow him up sharply,'and that Thomas could be left to deal with Hood (both of which could be, and were, done), the scheme might well be decisive of the war.

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  • Fifty thousand picked men were to march through Georgia with Sherman, and Thomas was to be reinforced by all other forces available.

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  • It was at this same time that Sherman broke up his railway communication, destroying Atlanta as a place of arms, and set out on his adventurous expedition.

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  • Hood, at a loss to divine Sherman's purpose, hastened on into Tennessee amidst weather which would have stopped most troops.

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  • From Savannah, Sherman started on his final march through the Carolinas.

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  • Sherman, like Sheridan, was much criticized for his methods of reducing opposition, but it does not seem that his "bummers" were guilty of wanton cruelty and destructiveness, at least in general, though the cavalry naturally gave more ground for the accusation than the main body of the army.

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  • Johnston surrendered to Sherman at Durham Station on the 26th, and soon afterwards all the remaining Confederate soldiers followed their example.

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  • But Lee, the Johnstons, McClellan, Grant and Sherman had all served in the old army.

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  • Long forward strides of the Napoleonic type were rarely attempted; "changes of base" were indeed made across country, and over considerable distances, as by Sherman in 1864, but ordinarily either the base and the objective were connected by rail or water, or else every forward step was, after the manner of Marlborough's time, organized as a separate campaign.

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  • Reinforcements arriving, the whole force then marched inland to meet Sherman.

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  • Dallas is served by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, the Houston & Texas Central, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the" St Louis South-western, the Texas & New Orleans, the Trinity & Brazos Valley, and the Texas & Pacific railways, and by interurban electric railways to Fort Worth and Sherman.

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  • As the result of communications during 1897 between Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Secretary Sherman, the governments of Great Britain and the United States agreed to the appointment of a joint high commission, with a view of settling all outstanding differences between the United States and Canada.

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  • Sherman; the resistance of General Joseph E.

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  • Then Sherman began his famous " march to the sea," from Atlanta to Savannah, which revealed the weakness of the Confederacy.

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  • ROGER SHERMAN (1721-1793), American political leader, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was born at Newton, Massachusetts, on the 19th of April 1721 (O.S.).

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  • Sherman was not a deep and original thinker like James Wilson, nor was he a brilliant leader like Alexander Hamilton; but owing to his conservative temperament, his sound judgment and his wide experience he was well qualified to lead the compromise cause in the convention of 1787.

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  • Two of Sherman's grandsons, William M.

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  • Boutell's Life of Roger Sherman (Chicago, 1896), based on material collected by Senator Hoar, is a careful and accurate work.

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  • William Tecumseh Sherman >>

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  • He was about to go on leave of absence in order to be married in Baltimore when he received his nomination to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, Grant's and Sherman's old army, which was to take part under Sherman's supreme command in the campaign against Atlanta (1864).

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  • This nomination was made by Sherman and entirely approved by Grant, who had the highest opinion of McPherson's military and personal qualities.

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  • Sherman organized an expedition against these fortifications, which were reduced by a naval bombardment and were evacuated by the Confederates under General Thomas F.

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  • In 1864 he commanded a division of the 17th Army Corps in Sherman's Atlanta campaign, and before Atlanta, on the 10th of July, he received a wound which forced him to retire from active service, and left him lame for life.

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  • A non-partisan commission, appointed by Secretary John Sherman, recommended sweeping changes.

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  • Among the prominent men who have lived in Fairfield are Roger Sherman, the first President Dwight of Yale (who described Fairfield in his Travels and in his poem Greenfield Hill), Chancellor James Kent, and Joseph Earle Sheffield.

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  • Sherman, commanding the bulk of the Union forces in the Mississippi Valley, swept in a victorious march through the heart of the Confederacy to Savannah on the coast, and thence northward to North Carolina.

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  • Sherman pushed Johnston to a surrender on the 26th of April.

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  • Sherman's army, on its march through the Carolinas, passed through the city on the 13th of April 1865.

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  • In 1891 he wrote anonymously two Irish stories, John Sherman and Dhoya, for Mr Fisher Unwin's "Pseudonym Library."

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  • when he was with Sherman's army in North Carolina.

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  • Sherman's campaign in the Carolinas; and in September 1865 received the brevet of major-general of volunteers.

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  • In his administration of the war office Stanton was vigorous, rigid, and often harsh, and his peremptory manner, in speech and correspondence, was the cause of considerable friction between the war department and the generals, one of the last and most conspicuous instances being his controversy with General Sherman over the terms of surrender granted to J.

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  • Soon after entering Congress he became the acknowledged leader of the protectionists, and at the request of John Sherman, then chairman of the ways and means committee, he prepared a new tariff bill, which was introduced in the house in March 1860.

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  • In early life he had little time for politics, but after 1880 he became prominent in the affairs of the Republican party in Cleveland, and in 1884 and 1888 was a delegate to the Republican National Convention, in the latter year being associated with William McKinley in the management of the John Sherman canvass.

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  • Bushnell (1834-1904) United States senator from Ohio, to succeed John Sherman.

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  • the platform committee) and was leader of the delegation from Ohio, which had been instructed for John Sherman; after James G.

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  • Blaine withdrew his name there was a movement, begun by Republican congressmen, to nominate McKinley, who received 16 votes on the seventh ballot, but passionately refused to be a candidate, considering that his acquiescence would be a breach of faith toward Sherman.

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  • The members of his cabinet were: secretary of state, John Sherman (whose appointment created a vacancy in the Senate to which Marcus A.

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  • It is served by the Missouri, Kansas & Texas and the Houston & Texas Central railways, and by the Dallas & Sherman inter-urban (electric) line, the central power plant of which is immediately north of the city.

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  • In February 1864 General William Tecumseh Sherman, with an army of about 20,000, made an expedition from Vicksburg to Meridian, then an important railway centre and depot for Confederate supplies, chiefly for the purpose of making inoperative the Mobile & Ohio and the Jackson & Selma railways; on the 14th of the month his army entered Meridian, and within a week destroyed nearly everything in the city except the private houses, and tore up over i io m.

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  • He was then placed in charge of the Department of the Missouri, which he commanded for sixteen years, and in 1869, on Grant's election to the presidency and Sherman's consequent promotion to the full rank of general, he was made lieutenant-general.

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  • In 1883 he succeeded Sherman in the chief command of the United States army, which he held until his death at Nonquitt, Mass., on the 5th of August 1888.

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  • Among the other prominent statues are: the equestrian statue (1908) of General Philip Sheridan in Sheridan Circle, by Gutzon Borglum; an equestrian statue of General Sherman near the Treasury Building, by Carl Rohl-Smith; a statue of Frederick the Great (by T.

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  • His books were A Memoir of James Sherman (1863); the Sermons of Thomas Binney, with a biographical and critical sketch (1869); The Vision of God and other sermons (1876); The Indwelling Christ (1892).

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  • Silver-mining ceased to be highly remunerative beginning with the closing of the India mints and repeal of the Sherman Law in 1893; since 1900 the yield has shown an extraordinary decrease - in 1905 it was $6,945,581, and in 1907 $7,411,652 - and it is said that as a result of the great fall in the market value of the metal the mines can now be operated only under the most favourable conditions and by exercise of extreme economy.

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  • Following the repeal of the Sherman Law and other acts and tendencies unfavourable to silver coinage in 1893 and thereafter, the silver question became the dominant issue in politics, resulting in the success of the Populist-Democratic fusion party in three successive elections, and permanently and greatly altering prior party organizations.

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  • He was the author of the so-called Edmunds Act (22nd of March 1882) for the suppression of polygamy in Utah, and of the anti-trust law of 1890, popularly known as the Sherman Act.

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  • In 1864 he took part in the Atlanta campaign under Sherman, as a divisional and subsequently corps-commander: at the battle of Franklin he commanded the 2 3 rd Corps, and he served at Nashville also.

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  • He led an expedition following Sherman into the Carolinas and fought two successful actions with Bragg at Kinston, N.C. He was governor of Ohio in 1866-1867, and as such advocated the colonization of the freedmen in a restricted area, and sympathized with President Johnson's programme of Reconstruction and worked for a compromise between Johnson and his opponents, although he finally deserted Johnson.

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  • Grant - John Sherman of Ohio also having a considerable following - struggled through thirty-six ballots, when the friends of Blaine, combining with those of Sherman, succeeded in nominating General James A.

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  • Sherman, on his march through the Carolinas, entered Columbia, and on the ensuing night a fire broke out which was not extinguished until most of the city was destroyed.

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  • The militia was called out and regular troops were hurried to Shoshone county from Fort Sherman, Idaho and Fort Missoula, Montana.

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  • He was a member of the committee on finance throughout his service in the Senate, and his first speech in that body was a defence of the free coinage of silver and a plea for the preservation of the full legal tender value of greenback currency, though in 1893 he voted to repeal the silver purchase clause of the Sherman Act.

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  • At Shiloh he commanded a division, hich was practically a reserve to Sherman's.

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  • In October 1861 Stanton, secretary of war, ordered him north to raise troops for the expedition against Vicksburg; and early in January 1864, at Milliken's Bend, McClernand, who had been placed in command of one of the four corps of Grant's army, superseded Sherman as the leader of the force that was to move down the Mississippi.

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  • On the 17th, Grant, after receiving the opinion of Admiral Foote and General Sherman that McClernand was unfit, united a part of his own troops with those of McClernand and assumed command in person, and three days later ordered McClernand back to Milliken's Bend.

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  • It was the home of John Sherman from 1840 until his death.

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  • Sherman on the 23rd of November 1864.

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  • When Sherman prepared to invade Georgia in the spring of 1864 the XI.

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  • Sherman, frequently equal to a brigade.

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  • In the same year appeared Unitarian books by John Sherman (1772-1828) and Hosea Ballou (1771-1852), and another in 1810 by Noah Worcester (1758-1837).

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  • In Grant's campaigns terminating in the capture of Vicksburg, which city Logan's division was the first to enter and of which he was military governor, he rose to the rank of major-general of volunteers; in November 1863 he succeeded Sherman in command of the XV.

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  • Sherman's march across the state (February - March, 1865) was accomplished by an enormous destruction of property by fire and pillage.

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  • Sherman, then conducting his Atlanta campaign.

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  • corps of the Army of the Tennessee, under Sherman, was on the march from the Mississippi.

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  • But Sherman was still far distant, and the Federal forces at Knoxville, against which a large detachment of Bragg's army under Longstreet was now sent, were in grave danger.

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  • Grant waited for Sherman's four divisions, but prepared everything for battle in the meantime.

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  • His plan was that Thomas in the Chattanooga lines should contain the Confederate centre on Missionary Ridge, while Hooker on the right at Wauhatchie was to attack Lookout Mountain, and Sherman farther up the river was to carry out the decisive attack against Bragg's extreme right wing at the end of Missionary Ridge.

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  • But Grant would not move forward without Sherman, and the battle of Chattanooga was fought more than two months after Chickamauga.

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  • Sherman's corps was graudally brought over the river near the mouth of Chickamauga Creek, and formed up on the east side.

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  • The heights attacked were in Sherman's hands, and fortified against counter-attack, before nightfall.

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  • But the maps deceived Grant and Sherman as they had previously deceived Rosecrans.

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  • Sherman had captured, not the north point of Missionary Ridge, but a detached hill, and a new and more serious action had to be fought for the possession of Tunnel Hill, where Bragg's right now lay strongly entrenched.

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  • The Confederates used every effort to hold the position and all Sherman's efforts were made in vain.

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  • Grant therefore directed Thomas to move forward on the centre to relieve the pressure on Sherman.

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  • 1 1919, a grade held previously by only four Americans - Washington, Grant, Sherman, and Sheridan.

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  • Sherman retired into Virginia.

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  • Hood moved into Tennessee, expecting Sherman to follow him.

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  • Sherman, however, sent reinforcements to Thomas and continued his march to the sea.

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  • Answer: the General Sherman, a giant sequoia growing in California.

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  • Pearl 's father embodies the bitterness and disorientation that gripped Southern slaveholders forced to come to grips with Sherman 's powerful onslaught.

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  • Sherman received a telegraphic message from Secretary Stanton, containing the announcement of the assassination of President Lincoln.

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  • Tilbury was well within the range of a Sherman: they knew about such things.

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  • The trunk of the General Sherman tree weighs almost 1400 tons.

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  • Diet guru Sherman will hijack a pastry truck and over-indulge after discovering his wife left him and cleaned him out.

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  • She worked with Sherman Williams and then Lowe's to create paint colors and she lent her name to a series of suburban home designs by Kaufman Broad.

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  • This Gothic Revival mansion served as General Sherman's Civil War headquarters.

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  • Often, you can get ideas, tips and helpful tools for creating your own color palettes by visiting paint company websites, like Sherman Williams.

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  • One really helpful tool that you can find on Sherman Williams' website is their Colorsnap application for Blackberrys and iPhones.

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  • Another helpful tool you can use from Sherman Williams is their color visualizer.

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  • Once you have found the perfect paint colors for your kitchen, you can print the color information and a coupon to take to your local Sherman Williams paint store.

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  • The company's skincare line was developed by Trish McEvoy and her dermatologist husband Dr. Ronald Sherman.

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  • Mary-Kate and Ashley Fuller Olsen were born in Sherman Oaks, California to David Olsen and his wife Jarnette Fuller, who divorced in 1995.

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  • Katharine Hope McPhee was born March 25, 1984 in Sherman Oaks, California.

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  • In a public statement, a Sherman Oaks, California police captain said that the woman had "…an infatuation with Ms. Abdul."

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  • Los Angeles police found the 30-year old obsessed fan dead in a car in front of Paula Abdul's house in Sherman Oaks.

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  • Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen we born on June 13, 1986, in Sherman Oaks, California.

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  • Annie Sherman: This website has a range of vintage costume and estate jewelry including a Whiting and Davis mesh gold tone snake bracelet.

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  • If you are not yet familiar with Ben Sherman, taking a peek at his reading glasses collection is a good place to start!

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  • General Sherman's succinct declaration on the brute nature of war has become ensconced in our national lexicon as an offhand way of acknowledging the true horror of war without actually having to think on it.

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  • PO Box 5224, Sherman Oaks, CA 91413-5224.

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  • Aerobics and Fitness Association of America. 15250 Ventura Blvd, Suite 200, Sherman Oaks, CA 91403.

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  • Ben Sherman - This is a menswear designer that knows how swimwear should fit, which is evidenced by the cut and styles in his swimwear line.

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  • Other brands to consider as you hunt for your shoulder bag include Kenneth Cole Reaction, Timbuk2, Bellino and Ben Sherman.

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  • It was in 1961, however, when the Sherman brothers joined Disney's staff, and their name became synonymous with Disney's music.

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  • Richard and Robert Sherman wrote for such movies as The Parent Trap, Mary Poppins, Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree, The Jungle Book, The Happiest Millionaire, and The Aristocats.

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  • Sherman's Travel - Another meta-search engine for great airline deals is Sherman's Travel.

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  • Although owner Ken Sherman claims to have lost four inches off his waist, that old myth of abdominal training somehow burning off waist fat still doesn't hold water regardless of the product being hawked.

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  • Through the 1960s and 1970s, parodists such as Peter Schickele, Allan Sherman and Ray Stevens found success with humorous parodies.

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  • Don't forget to return here for your follow-up visit with Dr. Sherman.

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