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sheep

sheep

sheep Sentence Examples

  • Alex knew the sheep liked this area.

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  • Still, goats and sheep had been in North America for hundreds of years.

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  • In 1892 the number of live sheep shipped for foreign ports was 40,000; in 1898 the export reached a total of 577,813, which in 1901 fell off to 25,746.

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  • In 1892 the number of live sheep shipped for foreign ports was 40,000; in 1898 the export reached a total of 577,813, which in 1901 fell off to 25,746.

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  • Pigs, sheep and goats are also kept in considerable numbers.

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  • The majority of the species of Acacia are edible and serve as reserve fodder for sheep and cattle.

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  • It was the picture of a sheep, and it was drawn so well that the stranger was filled with astonishment.

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  • During the same period, owing to the efforts of pastoralists to improve their flocks, there was a gradual increase in the weight of wool produced per sheep from 341b to an average of over 71b.

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  • The failure of the crops was almost universal and large numbers of sheep and cattle perished for want of food.

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  • The failure of the crops was almost universal and large numbers of sheep and cattle perished for want of food.

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  • The raising of cattle, pigs and sheep is a fairly important branch of industry throughout the duchy; horses are bred in Kamburg.

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  • Julie's sort of a black sheep in her family.

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  • 1902 a nd the number of sheep and cattle in Australia had of P greatly diminished, but the year 1902 was one of veritable drought.

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  • 1902 a nd the number of sheep and cattle in Australia had of P greatly diminished, but the year 1902 was one of veritable drought.

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  • I'm a lost sheep, Sofia said.

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  • For birds it is chiefly used of geese; and for other animals most generally of sheep and goats.

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  • One day a traveler was walking through a part of Italy where a great many sheep were pasturing.

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  • Cattle and sheep are produced in large numbers in some of the provinces, while in others mining forms the chief industry.

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  • Oxen and cows are of secondary importance and the climate is unsuitable for sheep; horses of a small breed are used to some extent.

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  • Oxen and cows are of secondary importance and the climate is unsuitable for sheep; horses of a small breed are used to some extent.

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  • "At first, I think it was knowing he was a black sheep like me.  My sister always treated me like I was a blight on the family name.  She tried to help me in her own way, I guess, which was better than what Rhyn's brothers did to him.  I wanted to believe he could make it in the Immortal world, because if he could, I could, too," she started.

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  • In ancient sculptures and coins he is represented as a young man, habited like a shepherd, and sometimes carrying a sheep on his shoulders.

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  • And whose sheep are these?

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  • I'm the poop the black sheep left behind in the pen.

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  • It was his business to take care of the sheep which belonged to a rich landholder by the Ettrick Water.

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  • For twenty-two years I have lived amongst these pollarded trees, these rutty roads, beside these tangled thickets and streams along whose banks only children and sheep can pass.

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  • It is from the particular application of the word to sheep that "flock" is used of the Christian Church in its relation to the "Good Shepherd," and also of a congregation of worshippers in its relation to its spiritual head.

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  • Its greatest defect is the cold southerly and westerly storms, which cause great losses in cattle and sheep. The Patagonian coast-line and mountainous region are also healthy, having a dry and bracing climate.

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  • Under the system of grazing practised throughout Australia it is customary to allow sheep, cattle and horses to run at large all the year round within enormous enclosures and to depend entirely upon the natural growth of grass for their subsistence.

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  • able trade of rearing fine wool sheep, first commenced by Captain John McArthur in 1803.

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  • The inhabitants of these islands support themselves by seafaring, pilotage, grazing of cattle and sheep, fishing and a little agriculture, chiefly potato-growing.

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  • Attempts to breed these sheep in other countries have always resulted in a deterioration in the quality of the skins owing to some peculiarity of climate.

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  • I would teach you how to draw pictures of sheep and horses, and even of men, said the stranger.

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  • Sheep and goats form almost.

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  • It has been asserted (by Sir Thomas Urquhart) that the piece of artillery was actually tried upon a plain in Scotland with complete success, a number of sheep and cattle being destroyed.

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  • "I can say in the presence of God, in comparison of whom we are but like poor creeping ants upon the earth, I would have lived under my woodside to have kept a flock of sheep rather than undertook such a government as this."

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  • Two dogs that size didn't present much of a threat to an Elk, or the wild sheep, for that matter.

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  • Two dogs that size didn't present much of a threat to an Elk, or the wild sheep, for that matter.

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  • Thus, 1 - x would represent the operation of selecting all things in the world except horned things, that is, all not horned things, and (1 - x) (1 - y) would give us all things neither horned nor sheep. By the use of such symbols propositions could be reduced to the form of equations, and the syllogistic conclusion from two premises was obtained by eliminating the middle term according to ordinary algebraic rules.

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  • You know, like buffalo, pronghorn, and Doll sheep - wildlife native to the United States.

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  • In 1878, 65,000,000 sheep yielded 230,000,000 lb weight of wool, or an average per sheep of about 32 lb.

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  • The town is an important agricultural centre, its fairs for sheep and ponies in particular being well attended.

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  • (a) Normandy, Perche, Cotentin and maritime Flanders, where horses are bred in great numbers; (b) the strip of coast between the Gironde and the mouth of the Loire; (c) the Morvan including the Nivernais and the Charolais, from which the famous Charolais breed of oxen takes its name; (d) the central region of the central plateau including the districts of Cantal and Aubrac, the home of the famous beef-breeds of Salers and Aubrac.1 The famous pre-sal sheep are also reared in the Vende and Cotentin.

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  • Enormous flocks of these sheep are kept in the deserts around Bukhara.

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  • Near the top of a hill he saw a little shepherd boy who was lying on the ground while a flock of sheep and lambs were grazing around him.

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  • All along the sides of the road fallen horses were to be seen, some flayed, some not, and broken-down carts beside which solitary soldiers sat waiting for something, and again soldiers straggling from their companies, crowds of whom set off to the neighboring villages, or returned from them dragging sheep, fowls, hay, and bulging sacks.

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  • When that door was opened and the prisoners, crowding against one another like a flock of sheep, squeezed into the exit, Pierre pushed his way forward and approached that very captain who as the corporal had assured him was ready to do anything for him.

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  • A stone cottage up the road was the only sign of inhabitation, and a herd of sheep raised their heads as he neared.

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  • Numerically the flocks of Australia represent one-sixth of the world's sheep, and in just over half a century (1851-1905) the exports of Australian wool alone reached the value of £650,000,000.

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  • Thus, if x= horned and y = sheep, then the successive acts of election represented by x and y, if performed on unity, give the whole of the class horned sheep. Boole showed that elective symbols of this kind obey the same primary laws of combination as algebraical symbols, whence it followed that they could be added, subtracted, multiplied and even divided, almost exactly in the same manner as numbers.

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  • The industries include cotton-spinning, weaving, nail-making and oilworks, and there are frequent markets for cattle and sheep. Lanark is a place of considerable antiquity.

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  • In 1878 the number of cattle was 12,000,000; of sheep, 65,000,000; and of horses, 4,000,000; in 1899 the numbers were - cattle, 25,000,000; sheep, 89,000,000; and horses, about 4,500,000.

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  • In it were many great cities; and from one end of it to the other there were broad fields of grain and fine pastures for sheep and cattle.

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  • The woodman sang of the wild forest; the plowman sang of the fields; the shepherd sang of his sheep; and those who listened forgot about the storm and the cold weather.

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  • Large markets and fairs are held for corn, hops, cattle and sheep; and the town contains some highly reputed ale breweries, besides paper mills and iron foundries.

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  • In the season of 1899-1900 the wool exports weighed 420,000,000 lb, and averaged more than 5 lb per sheep. The extra weight of fleece was owing to the large importation of better breeds.

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  • The export, moreover, of live sheep and of frozen mutton to Europe has become an important factor in the trade of Argentina.

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  • North of the Temple enclosure there was a gate, known as the Sheep Gate, which must have opened into the third valley mentioned above, and stood somewhere near what is now the north side of the Haram enclosure, but considerably south of the present north wall of the latter.

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  • To the west of the Sheep Gate there were two important towers in the wall, called respectively Meah and Hananeel.

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  • In 1910 there were 495,000 neat cattle (285,000 milch cows), 94,000 horses (average value, $106), 229,000 sheep and 95,000 swine.

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  • To the west of the Sheep Gate there were two important towers in the wall, called respectively Meah and Hananeel.

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  • Sheep and Lambs Pigs.

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  • Are you going to insist that Howie admit to her what we're doing at Econ Scrutiny all day; not just counting sheep births and soy bean crops?

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  • Sitting beside her in the car, I describe what I see from the window--hills and valleys and the rivers; cotton-fields and gardens in which strawberries, peaches, pears, melons, and vegetables are growing; herds of cows and horses feeding in broad meadows, and flocks of sheep on the hillside; the cities with their churches and schools, hotels and warehouses, and the occupations of the busy people.

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  • The air is filled with the bleating of calves and sheep, and the hustling of oxen, as if a pastoral valley were going by.

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  • Practically the whole of the territory between the 145° meridian and the Great Dividing Range, as well as extensive tracts in the south and west, are a natural sheep pasture with climatic conditions and indigenous vegetation pre - eminently adapted for the growth of wool of the highest quality.

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  • He was often called the Ettrick Shepherd, because he was the keeper of sheep near the Ettrick Water.

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  • He led her back the way she'd come and to a small house with a couple dozen fluffy sheep in a pen in back.

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  • The only brother not to declare outright war on him, Kiki was a distant second to Andre in his tepid support of their black sheep of a young brother.

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  • He gave these to a shepherd and ordered him to bring them up among his sheep, far from the homes of men.

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  • Sheep production, mining volumes, births, crop production, weather patterns... it's all public information reports and numbers.

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  • Another wild adventure by the black sheep of a sister that was dear Hannah's.

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  • Children and adults alike can enjoy seeing chickens, sheep, horses and farm animals in their natural environment.

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  • Such a charge as prelude to the advance of a great infantry bayonet attack must have swept the exhausted Prussians down the hill like sheep, but the opportunity passed, and the gunners finding their position untenable, limbered up, not without severe losses, and retired to a second position in rear.

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  • The walls are covered with mounted stuffed raccoon, skunk, sheep and elk and the decor is full of rustic charm.

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  • He stocked the farm with sheep and cattle brought from the mainland.

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  • She followed him like a lost sheep.

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  • Oberhasli, Pygmy, Nigerian Dwarf, Angora... that's the one everybody confuses with a sheep...

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  • It wasn't necessary to count sheep.

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  • Alex had written the Game and Fish Commissions in several western states, hoping for a chance at a mountain goat or sheep.

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  • Sheep's milk cheese (pecorino) is largely made, but sold as the Roman product.

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  • We find in the Babylonian-Assyrian omen-texts special designations for the three main lobes of the sheep's liver - the lobus dexter, the lobus sinister and the lobus caudatus; the first-named being called "the right wing of the liver," the second "the left wing of the liver," and the third "the middle of the liver."

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  • In the interior cattle and sheep are plentiful, on the plateau horses and donkeys.

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  • "He led them forth like sheep," in Israel in Egypt, and the music of the Witch of Endor, and the appearance of Samuel's spirit in Saul) are as modern as Gluck's.

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  • In the desert tracts fine breeds of camels, cattle, horses and sheep are to be found wherever there is pasturage.

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  • He was responsible for all care, must restore ox for ox, sheep for sheep, must breed them satisfactorily.

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  • Sheep have likewise been raised in Piauhy, but there is no market for mutton and their wool is not utilized.

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  • The Bergamo sheep is the largest breed in the country; that of Cadore and Belluno approaches it in size.

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  • Merino sheep have been acclimatized in the Abruzzi, Capitanata and Basilicata.

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  • The number of sheep, however, is on the decrease.

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  • In 1905 Italy exported 32,786 and imported 17,766 head of cattle; exported 33,574 and imported 6551 sheep; exported 95,995 and imported 1604 swine.

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  • Of imported animals, cattle, goats, asses and dogs thrive well, ponies and horses indifferently, and sheep badly, though some success has been achieved in breeding them.

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  • Rhayader has for some centuries been an important centre for Welsh mutton and wool, and its sheep fairs are largely attended by drovers and buyers from all parts.

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  • On the representations of Orpheus in heathen and Christian art (in which he is finally transformed into the Good Shepherd with his sheep), see A.

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  • The town is a trading centre of some importance, and in the surrounding district are large sheep and ostrich farms. The neighbourhood is noted for its abundance of everlasting flowers.

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  • East of the Ain, forests of fir and oak abound on the mountains, the lower slopes of which give excellent pasture for sheep and cattle, and much cheese is produced.

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  • Live-stock breeding is very extensively carried on by the Kirghiz, namely, horses, cattle, sheep, camels, goats and pigs.

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  • The business of shipping live sheep and frozen mutton has not been attempted on a large scale, owing principally to the lack of facilities for loading at the port of Montevideo or elsewhere.

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  • The chief domestic animals are the camel, horse, ass, ox, buffalo (used both as a beast of burden and for riding), sheep with a short silky fleece, the goat and the pig, which last here reaches its southernmost limit.

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  • The prairies are superseded by wheat-fields, and flocks of sheep destroy the true steppe-grass (Stipa pennata).

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  • But the breeding of horses and sheep is of equal importance with agriculture.

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  • Live-stock are diminishing in numbers all round: in the case of horses, from 21 per 100 inhabitants in 1882 to II per loo inhabitants in 1904; of cattle, from 31 in 1851 to 23 in 1882 and 27 in 1904; sheep, from 56 to 46 and 41 in the years named respectively; and pigs, from 13 to 9 and 10 respectively.

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  • Of the 55 million sheep kept in Russia only about 15 millions belong to the fine merino breed, and these are pastured chiefly on the Black Sea steppes.

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  • The principal types to be found in the United Kingdom and on the continent of Europe are open wagons (the lading often protected from the weather by tarpaulin sheets), mineral wagons, covered or box wagons for cotton, grain, &c., sheep and cattle trucks, &c. The principal types of American freight cars are box cars, gondola cars, coal cars, stock cars, tank cars and refrigerator cars, with, as in other countries, various special cars for special purposes.

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  • All these have greatly declined in numbers, being profitably replaced by sheep. Land-birds are few in kind, and are mostly strays from South America.

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  • Its auction marts for sheep and cattle sales are the largest in the south-west of Scotland; at an autumn sale as many as 15,000 sheep and 1400 cattle are disposed of in one day.

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  • Sheep, rams, bullocks, fowls are given sacrificial salt to lick, and then sacrificed by the priest and deacon, who has the levitical portions of the victim as his perquisite.

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  • Its habits are similar everywhere and it is still, and has been from time immemorial, especially known to man in all the countries it inhabits as the devastator of sheep flocks.

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  • Its original shape seems to have been an irregular oblong bar, which was stamped with the figure of a sheep, ox or sow.

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  • Oxen, sheep, dogs, monkeys, bats, and probably horses also suffer from similar parasitic diseases.

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  • Honiton (Honetona, Huneton) is situated on the British Icknield Street, and was probably the site of an early settlement, but it does not appear in history before the Domesday Survey, when it was a considerable manor, held by Drew (Drogo) under the count of Mortain, who had succeeded Elmer the Saxon, with a subject population of 33, a flock of 80 sheep, a mill and 2 salt-workers.

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  • The number of horses was 192,000 in 1910; of dairy cows, 297,000; of hogs, 1,356,000; and of sheep, 215,000.

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  • His men became panic-stricken at the first rush and allowed themselves to be slaughtered like sheep. Baker himself with a few of his officers succeeded by hard fighting in cutting a way out, but his force was annihilated.

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  • Mos, people), the great body of " faithful people" which, in nearly every various conception of the Christian Church, stands in relation to the clergy as a flock of sheep to its pastor.

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  • The only industry of importance is grazing, cattle being raised for export to Chile, and a few sheep for their wool.

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  • In Mongolia the population is essentially nomadic, its wealth consisting in herds of horned cattle, sheep, horses and camels.

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  • The great order of Ungulata is represented by various forms of sheep, as many as ten or twelve wild species of Ovis being met with in the mountain chains of Asia; and more sparingly by several peculiar forms of antelope, such as the saiga (Saiga tatarica), and the Gazella gutturosa, or yellow sheep. Coming to the deer, we also meet with characteristic forms in northern Asia, especially those belonging to the typical genus Cervus.

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  • Sheep abound in the more temperate regions, and goats are universally met with; both of these animals are used as beasts of burden in the mountains of Tibet.

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  • Large flocks of sheep are kept, both for their flesh and their wool, and there are in the province large numbers of horned cattle and of pigs, Geese and goose feathers form lucrative articles of export.

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  • sodium carbonates), and with herds of cattle and sheep, receiving in return cotton and hardware and kolas; (4) the Hausa merchants.

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  • Many millions of sheep and oxen all over the world have thus been treated, and the rate of mortality reduced from io to less than %.

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  • Dumfries markets for cattle and sheep, held weekly, and for horses, held five times annually, have always ranked with the best, and there is also a weekly market for pork during the five months beginning with November.

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  • The slopes of the Armenian highlands are clothed with fine forests, and the vine is grown at their base, while on the wide-stretching steppes the Turko-Tatars pasture cattle, horses and sheep. The lower part of the Kura valley assumes the character of a dry steppe, the rainfall not reaching 54 in.

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  • Of interest for sportsmen, as well as serving as prey for the carnivores, are red deer, goats (Capra pallasit and C. aegagrus), chamois, roebuck, moufflon (Ovis musimon), argali or Asiatic wild sheep (0.

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  • Ammon), another species of sheep in O.

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  • In such districts sheep farming is chiefly practised, and there is a considerable area of heath pasture.

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  • Dandolo published in Italian several treatises on agriculture, vine-cultivation, and the rearing of cattle and sheep; a work on silk-worms, which was translated into French by Fontanelle; a work on the discoveries in chemistry which were made in the last quarter of the 18th century (published 1796); and translations of several of the best French works on chemistry.

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  • Next came the sowing, the seed being pressed into the soil by the feet of sheep which were driven over the fields.

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  • Vast flocks of sheep and of goat constituted their wealth, although they also possessed oxen.

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  • During the middle ages cattle and sheep were the chief farm animals, but the intermixture of stock consequent on the common-field system was a barrier to improvement in the breed and conduced to the propagation of disease.

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  • Sheep were small and their fleeces light, nevertheless, owing to the meagreness of the yields of cereals' and the demand for wool for export, sheep-farming was looked to, as early as the 12th century, as the chief source of profit.

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  • " Some have 24,000 sheep, some 20,000 sheep, some io,000, some 6000, some 4000, and some more and some less "; and yet it is alleged the price of wool had nearly doubled, " sheep being come to a few persons' hands."

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  • A penalty was therefore imposed on all who kept above 2000 sheep; and no person was to take in farm more than two tenements of husbandry.

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  • In John Houghton's Collections on Husbandry and Trade, a periodical work begun in 1681, there is one of the earliest notices of turnips being eaten by sheep:" Some in Essex have their fallow after turnips, which feed their sheep in winter, by which means the turnips are scooped, and so made capable to hold dews and rain water, which, by corrupting,; _ mbibes the nitre of the air, and when the shell breaks it runs about and fertilizes.

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  • By feeding the sheep, the land is dunged as if it had been folded; and those turnips, though few or none be carried off for human use, are a very excellent improvement, nay, some reckon it so, though they only plough the turnips in without feeding."

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  • Ten years before, John Worlidge, one of his correspondents, and the author of the Systema Agriculturae (1669), observes, " Sheep fatten very well on turnips, which prove an excellent nourishment for them in hard winters when fodder is scarce; for they will not only eat the greens, but feed on the roots in the ground, and scoop them hollow even to the very skin.

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  • Ten acres (he adds) sown with clover, turnips, &c., will feed as many sheep as one hundred acres thereof would before have done."

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  • Turnips were hand-hoed and extensively employed in feeding sheep and cattle.

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  • It was during this period that the genius of Robert Bakewell produced an extraordinary change in the character of our more important breeds of live stock, more especially by the perfecting of a new race of sheep - the well-known Leicesters.

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  • In the same year Merino sheep were introduced by George III., who was a zealous farmer.

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  • Much of the grain was never harvested, whilst owing mainly to the excessive floods there commenced an outbreak of liver-rot in sheep, due to the ravages of the fluke parasite.

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  • Rye is perhaps more largely grown as a green crop to be fed off by sheep, or cut green for soiling, in the spring months.

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  • No very great reliance can be placed upon the figures relating to turnips (which include swedes), as these are mostly fed to sheep on the ground, so that the estimates as to yield are necessarily vague.

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  • The highest and lowest annual totals for the United Kingdom in the period 8751905 were the following: After 1892 cattle, which in that year numbered 11,519,417, and sheep declined continuously for three years to the totals of 1895, the diminution being mainly the result of the memorable drought of 1893.

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  • Sheep, which numbered 32,J71,018 in 1878, declined continuously to 27,448,220 in 1882-a loss of over five million head in five years.

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  • In Great Britain in 1905, for every head of cattle there were about four head of sheep, whereas in Ireland the cattle outnumbered the sheep. Again, whilst Great Britain possessed only half as many cattle more than Table XiiI.-Numbers of Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Pigs in the United Kingdom in 1905.

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  • Ireland, she possessed six times as many sheep. The cattle population of England alone slightly exceeded that of Ireland, but cattle are more at home on the broad plains of England than amongst the hills and mountains of Wales and Scotland, which are suitable for sheep. Hence, whilst in England sheep were not three times as numerous as cattle, in Wales they were nearly five times, and in Scotland nearly six times as many.

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  • [[Table Xiv]].-Numbers of Cattle, Sheep and Pigs imported into the United Kingdom, 1891-1905 The animals come mainly from the United States of America, Canada and Argentina, and the traffic in cattle is more uniform than that in sheep, whilst that in pigs seems practically to have reached extinction.

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  • An increase in live cattle accompanied a decrease in live sheep and pigs, but the imports of dead meat expanded fifteen-fold over the period.

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  • The home-grown is the estimated dead weight of sheep and lambs slaughtered, which is taken at 40% of the total number of sheep and lambs returned each year in the United Kingdom.

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  • imported column is given the weight of fresh (frozen) mutton and lamb imported, plus the estimated dead weight of the sheep imported on the hoof for slaughter.

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  • - Average Annual Imports of Cattle, Sheep and Figs, and of Dead Meat, into the United Kingdom over eight 5-yearly Periods.

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  • - Home Product and Imports of Sheep and Mutton into the United Kingdom - Thousands of Tons.

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  • Little use is made of the weighbridge in selling store-cattle, sheep or swine.

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  • The quantity of digestible nutritive matter in 1000 lb of ordinary feeding-stuffs when supplied to sheep or oxen is shown in Table XIX.

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  • If the sole purpose for which an animal is reared is to prepare it for the block - and this is the case with steers amongst cattle and with wethers amongst sheep - the sooner it is ready for slaughter the less should be the outlay involved.

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  • This body was instituted in 1798 as the Smithfield Cattle and Sheep Society, the title being [[Table Xix]].

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  • At the first show, held at Smithfield in 1799, two classes were provided for cattle and two for sheep, the prizes offered amounting to 52: ios.

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  • In 1839 the classes comprised seven for cattle, six for sheep, and one for pigs, with prizes to the amount of £300.

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  • By 1862 the classes had risen to 29 for cattle, 17 for sheep and 4 for pigs, and the prize money to 2072.

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  • At the centenary show in 1898 provision was made for 40 classes for cattle, 29 for sheep, 18 for pigs, and 7 for animals to be slaughtered, whilst to mark the importance of the occasion the prizes offered amounted to close upon 5000 in value.

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  • 1907 there were 38 classes for cattle, 29 for sheep, 20 for pigs, and 12 for carcase competitors, and the value of the prizes was £4113.

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  • Provision is made, however, for all the well-known breeds of sheep and swine.

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  • In the sheep section of the Smithfield show the classes for ewes were finally abolished in 1898, and the classes restricted to wethers and wether lambs, whose function is exclusively the production of meat.

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  • At the 1905 show, sheep of each breed, and also cross-breds, competed as (1) wether lambs under twelve months old, and (2) wether sheep above twelve and under twenty-four months old.

    0
    0
  • The only exception was in the case of the slowly-maturing Cheviot and mountain breeds, for which the second class was for wether sheep of any age above twelve months.

    0
    0
  • Of prize sheep at the centenary show the largest average daily gain was o.

    0
    0
  • In the case of wether sheep, twelve to twenty-four months old, the highest daily increase was o� 56 lb per head as yielded by Lincolns, aged twenty-one months.

    0
    0
  • The three-year-old wethers and older oxen that used to be common in the fat stock markets are now rarely seen, excepting perhaps in the case of mountain breeds of sheep and Highland cattle.

    0
    0
  • It was in 1875 that the Smithfield Club first provided the competitive classes for lambs, and in 1883 the champion plate offered for the best pen of sheep of any age in the show was for the first time won by lambs, a pen of Hampshire Downs.

    0
    0
  • The cattle and sheep entered for this competition are shown alive on the first day, at the close of which they are slaughtered and the carcases hung up for exhibition, with details of live and dead weights.

    0
    0
  • In the case of sheep the National Sheep Breeders' Association looks after the interests of flockmasters in general, whilst most of the pure breeds are represented also by separate organizations.

    0
    0
  • The Hampshire Down Sheep Breeders' Association may be taken as a type of the latter, its principal object being to encourage the breeding of Hampshire Down sheep at home and abroad, and to maintain the purity of the breed.

    0
    0
  • In this book are named the recognized and pure-bred sires which have been used, and ewes which have been bred from, whilst there are also registered the pedigrees of such sheep as are proved to be eligible for entry.

    0
    0
  • Prizes are offered by the society at various agricultural shows where Hampshire Down sheep are exhibited.

    0
    0
  • Other sheep societies include the Leicester Sheep Breeders' Association, the Cotswold Sheep Society, the Lincoln Longwool Sheep Breeders' Association, the Oxford.

    0
    0
  • Down Sheep Breeders' Association, the Shropshire Sheep Breeders' Association and Flock Book Society, the Southdown Sheep Society, the Suffolk Sheep Society, the Border Leicester Sheep Breeders' Society, the Wensleydale Longwool Sheep Breeders' Association and Flock Book Society, the Incorporated Wensleydale Blue-faced Sheep Breeders' Association and Flock Book Society, the Kent Sheep Breeders' Association, the Devon Longwool Sheep Breeders' Society, the Dorset Horn Sheep Breeders' Association, the Cheviot Sheep Society and the Roscommon Sheep Breeders' Association.

    0
    0
  • c. 15) it was provided that cattle, sheep and pigs imported into the United Kingdom should be slaughtered at the place of landing.

    0
    0
  • At Deptford, for example, large numbers of cattle and sheep which thus arrive - mainly from Argentina, Canada and the United States - are at once slaughtered, and so furnish a steady supply of fresh-killed beef and mutton.

    0
    0
  • In 1900 the discovery early in the year of the existence of foot-and-mouth disease amongst cattle and sheep shipped from Argentina to the United Kingdom led to the issue of an order by which all British ports were closed against live animals from the country named.

    0
    0
  • This order came into force on the 30th of April, and the result was a marked decline in the shipments of live cattle and sheep from the River Plate, but a decided increase in the quantity of frozen meat sent thence to the United Kingdom.

    0
    0
  • The largest number of sheep attacked was [[Table Xxi]].

    0
    0
  • It is compulsory on owners to notify the authorities as to the existence of scab amongst their sheep. By the Diseases of Animals Act (1903) powers to prescribe the dipping of sheep, irrespective of the presence or otherwise of sheep scab, were conferred upon the Board of Agriculture.

    0
    0
  • For its size and in relation to its sheep population Wales harbours the disease to a far greater extent than the other divisions of Great Britain.

    0
    0
  • shows the number of cattle, sheep and pigs shipped from Ireland into Great Britain in each of the fifteen years 1891-1905, the numbers of horses similarly shipped being also indicated.

    0
    0
  • The export trade in cattle, sheep and pigs is practically restricted to pedigree animals required for breeding purposes, and though its aggregate value [[Table Xxvi]].-Quantities and Value of Home-bred Live Stock exported from the United Kingdom, 1900-1905.

    0
    0
  • In 1887, at Newcastle-on-Tyne, a prize of 200 went to a compound portable agricultural engine, one of £loo to a simple portable agricultural engine, and lesser prizes to a weighing-machine for horses and cattle, a weighing-machine for sheep and pigs, potato-raisers and one-man-power cream separators.

    0
    0
  • The mountaineers breed some cattle and sheep, and cultivate small fields on the mountain-sides.

    0
    0
  • The number of sheep decreased slightly between 1870 and 1900, when there were 4,030,021; in 1910 there were 3,203,000 sheep in the state.

    0
    0
  • Large numbers of horses, cattle and' sheep are bred, the cattle being famous.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly a selection of particular plants to breed from, because they possess certain desirable characteristics, is as rational as the selection of particular animals for breeding purposes in order to maintain the character of a herd of cattle or of a flock of sheep.

    0
    0
  • From 1807 to 1816 Elkanah Watson (1758-1842), a prominent farmer and merchant, lived at what is now the Country Club, and while there introduced the merino sheep into Berkshire county and organized the Berkshire Agricultural Society; he is remembered for his advocacy of the building of a canal connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean, and as the author of Memoirs: Men and Times of the Revolution (18J5), edited by his son, W.

    0
    0
  • In summer the country appears as one waving field of wheat, millet and mealies; whilst on the mountain slopes and on their flat tops are large flocks of sheep, cattle and goats, and troops of ponies.

    0
    0
  • Ox and sheep tallow, with the addition of resin, are the primary materials for making the hard yellow or primrose soaps; these tallows are often adulterated.

    0
    0
  • If they fall on pasture land or fodder of any kind and are eaten by any herbivorous animal, such as a hare, rabbit, horse, sheep or ox, the active embryos or larvae are set free in the alimentary canal of the new host.

    0
    0
  • The adult stage, for example, has been found in the nasal passages of sheep, goats, horses and even of man, and the larval stage in the pleural and peritoneal cavities of dogs and cats.

    0
    0
  • Forestry is greatly developed; the breed of sheep in the Carpathians is of an improved quality, and the horses bred in the plain of the Hanna are highly esteemed.

    0
    0
  • The Attic plain, notwithstanding the lightness of the soil, furnished an adequate supply of cereals; olive and fig groves and vineyards were cultivated from the earliest times in the valley of the Cephisus, and pasturage for sheep and goats was abundant.

    0
    0
  • truncatulus harbours the Cercaria of Fasciola hepatica, the liver-fluke, which causes rot in sheep. Ancylus, which occurs in rivers, has a minute limpet-like shell.

    0
    0
  • It has long been famous for its cattle and sheep sales, but more particularly for the great August lamb fair, the largest in Scotland, at which as many as 126,000 lambs have been sold.

    0
    0
  • Later, mention is made of large and ferocious dogs which were employed to guard sheep and cattle, or to watch at the door of the house, or even to act as a companion, and G.

    0
    0
  • Their services to their owners and to Arctic explorers are well known, but Eskimo dogs are so rapacious that it is impossible to train them to refrain from attacking sheep, goats or any small domesticated animals.

    0
    0
  • The bark is completely dog-like, and the primitive hunting instincts have been cultivated into a marvellous aptitude for herding sheep and cattle.

    0
    0
  • The extensive meadows supply pasturage for a large number of cattle and sheep, and the horses raised in the Perche have a wide reputation as draught animals.

    0
    0
  • There are four classes in Somaliland: (I) nomads who breed ponies, sheep, cattle and camels, live entirely on milk and meat, and follow the rains in search of grass; (2) settled Somali, comparatively few, living in or near the coasts; (3) outcast races, not organized in tribes but living scattered all over Somaliland; they are hunters, workers in iron and leather, and the chief collectors of gum and resin; (4) traders.

    0
    0
  • Women hold a degraded position among the Somali (wives being often looted with sheep), doing most of the hard work.

    0
    0
  • The Somali have also large herds of cattle - oxen, sheep and goats.

    0
    0
  • Wild sheep and goats live in the Rocky Mountains.

    0
    0
  • Cattle, horses and sheep are largely reared in the southern prairie region on ranches or smaller holdings.

    0
    0
  • Apparently the musk-ox (Ovibos moschatus) has little or no near relationship to either the oxen or the sheep; and it is not improbable that its affinities are with the Asiatic takin (Budorcas) and the extinct European Criotherium of the Pliocene of Samos.

    0
    0
  • The space between the nostrils and the upper lip is covered with short close hair, as in sheep and goats, without any trace of the bare muzzle of oxen.

    0
    0
  • In common with an allied ruminant from the same district, previously described as Euceratherium, it seems probable that Preptoceras is related on the one hand to the musk-ox, and on the other to the Asiatic takin, while it is also supposed to have affinities with the sheep. If these extinct forms really serve to connect the takin with the musk-ox, their systematic importance will be very great.

    0
    0
  • The native sheep possess many of the characteristics of goats.

    0
    0
  • The name is derived from the Norse faar, a sheep (a derivation better seen in the Faroe Isles).

    0
    0
  • Horses, asses, cows, deer, sheep, goats, swine, cats and dogs were introduced by the early Spaniards.

    0
    0
  • From the wool which their sheep yield they manufacture every article of native dress and good blankets.

    0
    0
  • Oxen, sheep, horses and other live-stock introduced from Europe thrive well, but little attention is paid to stock-rearing.

    0
    0
  • of live-stock, a stud-farm was opened near Serajevo, and foreign horses, cattle, sheep and poultry are imported.

    0
    0
  • The surrounding district is mainly agricultural and pastoral, producing oats, maize, cotton, olive oil, cattle, sheep, skins, hides and butter.

    0
    0
  • The " tax on sheep, camels, buffaloes and hogs " (aghnam, meaning literally " sheep," but for taxing purposes the other animals are included under the same name), formed originally part of the " tithe."

    0
    0
  • The estimated receipts are, from sheep £T1,790,720, from camels and buffaloes £T144,520, :and from hogs £T8890, or together £T1,814,152.

    0
    0
  • The bonds are secured on the surplus of the revenues assigned to the guarantee of the Anatolian railway collected by the Public Debt Administration, on the excess revenue, after certain deductions, accruing to the government under the " Annex-Decree to the Decree of Muharrem " above described, on the sheep tax of the vilayets of Koniah, Adana and Aleppo, and on the railway itself.

    0
    0
  • Then it was taken by Timur, from whom the sultan Ahmed Ben Avis fled, and, finding refuge with the Greek emperor, contrived later to repossess himself of the city, whence he was finally expelled by Kara Yusuf of the KaraKuyunli ("Black Sheep") Mongols in 1417.

    0
    0
  • About 1468 the descendants of the latter were driven out by Uzun Hasan or Cassim of the Ak-Kuyunli ("White Sheep") Mongols.

    0
    0
  • On the 10th day of the month every household shall take a firstling male without blemish, of sheep or goat, and should kill it on the 14th at even, and sprinkle the two sideposts and lintel with the blood, and eat the roasted flesh, not sodden, including head, legs and inwards; all remaining over until the morning to be burnt by fire.

    0
    0
  • We thus see that the American and the European-Asiatic elements of the flora are nearly equivalent; and if the flora of Arctic North America were better known, the number of plants common to America might be still more enlarged.5 In the south, a few goats, sheep, oxen and pigs have been introduced.

    0
    0
  • Wheat, oats, barley and other cereals are grown and exported, and owing to the abundance of pasture and forage, sheep and cattle-rearing are actively carried on.

    0
    0
  • They kept horses (though in small numbers), sheep and goats, but no traces of their rearing horned cattle have yet been found.

    0
    0
  • Water is plentiful in the Elburz, and situated in well-watered valleys and gorges are innumerable flourishing villages, embosomed in gardens and orchards, with extensive cultivated fields and meadows, and at higher altitudes small plateaus, under snow until March or April, afford cool camping grounds to the nomads of the plains, and luxuriant grazing to their sheep and cattle during the summer.

    0
    0
  • In the external trade the exports to Russia consist chiefly of grain, cattle, sheep, butter and other animal products, furs, game, feathers and down.

    0
    0
  • The Turkomans possess a famous breed of horses and keep camels, sheep, cattle, asses and mules.

    0
    0
  • They also make felts and a rough cloth of sheep's wool.

    0
    0
  • The business of the town is chiefly connected with the interests of the sheep and cattle farmers of the Riverina district, a plain country, in the main pastoral, but suited in some parts for cultivation.

    0
    0
  • In 1920 there were 238,736 horses, 730,421 cattle, 934,084 sheep and 457,052 pigs, against 297,- 645 horses, 940,319 cattle, 1,100,481 sheep and 538,920 pigs in 1913.

    0
    0
  • Nearly all the land is in the hands of peasant proprietors, who cultivate sweet potatoes, peas, beans, corn, &c., and rear sheep and goats.

    0
    0
  • In Rio Grande do Sul, where it has attained its greatest development, about 400,000 beeves are slaughtered annually for the manufacture of jerked beef (xarque), beef extract, &c. Little attention has been given to sheep in Brazil except in the southern states, and even there the flocks are small.

    0
    0
  • The principal breed of sheep is the merino, which does well in the higher altitudes.

    0
    0
  • In 1908 Europeans were returned as owning 32,000 horses, 220,000 horned cattle, 765,000 sheep, 68,000 goats, 25,000 pigs, 960 ostriches and 384,000 poultry.

    0
    0
  • Large herds of cattle - over 500,000 in the aggregate - are owned by the natives, who also possess vast flocks of goats and sheep. The dairy industry is well established, and Natal butter commands a ready sale.

    0
    0
  • The principal occupation of the Mongols is cattle-breeding, and Russian writers estimate that on an average each yurta, or family, has about 50 sheep, 25 horses, 15 horned cattle and io camels.

    0
    0
  • The number of live stock in Hungary proper in two different years is shown in the following table: - In Croatia-Slavonia the live stock was numbered in 1895 at: horses, 309,098; cattle, 908,774; sheep, 595,898; pigs, 882,957.

    0
    0
  • Sheep are not stocked so extensively as cattle, and are tending rapidly to decrease, a result due to the spread of intensive cultivation and the rise in value of the soil.

    0
    0
  • There are also large flocks of sheep, cows, goats, ponies, fine dogs and Bactrian camels.

    0
    0
  • The more important wild animals are a large wild sheep (Ovis poli), foxes, wolves, jackals, bears, boars, deer and leopards; amongst birds, there are partridges, pheasants, ravens, jays, sparrows, larks, a famous breed of hawks, &c.

    0
    0
  • Schweinfurt carries on an active trade in the grain, fruit and wine produced in its neighbourhood, and it is the seat of an important sheep and cattle market.

    0
    0
  • The banken veld is also unsuited in summer for horses and sheep, though cattle thrive.

    0
    0
  • Among the high veld farmers the breeding of merino sheep is very popular.

    0
    0
  • He said not to him once and stopped, but three times, Feed my sheep."

    0
    0
  • 6° C i Capital of Federal District Capitals of States and Territories 0 Railways of Venezuela - the horse, ass, ox, sheep, goat, hog, dog, cat, &c. - are not indigenous.

    0
    0
  • Their main wealth consists in their herds of cattle and flocks of sheep. They raise, however, crops of maize, millet, sweet potatoes and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • These were "lost sheep of the house of Israel"; but Christ's freedom from Jewish exclusiveness is also brought out (I) as regards Samaritans, by the rebuke administered to the disciples at ix.52 sqq., the parable in x.

    0
    0
  • Its habits much resemble those of the rest of the group to which it belongs; and, like the leopard, when it happens to come within reach of an abundant and easy prey, as the sheep or calves of an outlying farming station, it kills far more than it can eat, either for the sake of the blood only or to gratify its propensity for destruction.

    0
    0
  • 17) states that it was cut twice, and afterwards was good keep for sheep, and Berossus remarked that wheat, sesame, barley, ochrys, palms, apples and many kinds of shelled fruit grew wild, as wheat still does in the neighbourhood of Anah.

    0
    0
  • By the first of these (1290) the town was granted a fair on St Margaret's Day (July 20) and as the abbey had extensive sheep walks the trade in wool was considerable.

    0
    0
  • In Teneriffe and Grand Canary the corpse was simply wrapped up in goat and sheep skins, while in other islands a resinous substance was used to preserve the body, which was then placed in a cave difficult of access, or buried under a tumulus.

    0
    0
  • Sheep skins and sail-cloth are articles of trade.

    0
    0
  • II.-A, a Coenurus from the brain of the sheep; the numerous scolices arise by invaginations of the bladder.

    0
    0
  • I I) in the brain of sheep; allied forms occur mature in the dog and larval in the rabbit.

    0
    0
  • The Bovidae comprise a great number of genera and species, and include the oxen, sheep, goats, antelopes and certain other kinds which come under neither of these designations.

    0
    0
  • In stature they range from the size of a hare to that of a rhinoceros; and their horns vary in size and shape from the small and simple spikes of the oribi and duiker antlers to the enormous and variously shaped structures borne respectively by buffaloes, wild sheep and kudu and other large antelopes.

    0
    0
  • The second group, or Caprinae, includes the sheep and goats, which are smaller animals than most of the Bovidae, generally with horns in both sexes, but those of the females small.

    0
    0
  • The genera are Ovis (sheep), Capra (goats) and Hemitragus (tahr).

    0
    0
  • Sheep and goats are very nearly related, but the former never have a beard on the chin of the males, which are devoid of a strong odour; and their horns are typically of a different type.

    0
    0
  • Many horses, cattle and sheep have been imported, and the meat-preserving industry is prosecuted.

    0
    0
  • The clover-grass ley is then grazed for a year or two with sheep, after which wheat and potatoes are the chief crops grown on the land.

    0
    0
  • Cattle and swine are reared, and dairy produce is largely exported; but the sheep of the province are small and their wool indifferent.

    0
    0
  • Though almost waterless, it is in fact better wooded and richer in pasture than any part of the Hamad; the sand-hills are dotted with ghada, a species of tamarisk, and other bushes, and several grasses and succulent plants - among them the adar, on which sheep are said to feed for a month without requiring water - are found in abundance in good seasons.

    0
    0
  • The great wealth of the Arabs is in their flocks of sheep and goats; they are led out to pasture soon after sunrise, and in the hotter months drink every second day.

    0
    0
  • The shepherds (rulers) of the nation make their flock an article of trade and treat the sheep as sheep for the shambles.

    0
    0
  • 5 The same date may be assigned to (2), where the traffickers in the sheep may be regarded as the Seleucid rulers, and the shepherds as the Jewish high priests and ethnarchs; the prelude to the Maccabean revolt largely consisted of the rapid and violent changes here figured.

    0
    0
  • UDAD, Aoudad or Audad, the Moorish name of the Barbary sheep, or arui, Ovis (Ammotragus) lervia, the only wild sheep found in Africa, where it inhabits all the mountain ranges of the north, descending to the eastward far into the heart of the Sudan.

    0
    0
  • The "lion-coloured" coat approximates to the hue of the limestone rocks on which these sheep dwell.

    0
    0
  • The dorcas gazelle is still common in the south of Tunisia; but perhaps the most interesting ruminant is the magnificent udad, or Barbary sheep, which is found in the sterile mountainous regions of south Tunisia.

    0
    0
  • There are large herds of cattle and flocks of sheep and goats.

    0
    0
  • Ovid also mentions its sheep (Met.

    0
    0
  • In the loftiest regions the pasture chiefly consists of a coarse grass (Stipa ychu), of which the llamas eat the upper blades and the sheep browse on the tender shoots beneath.

    0
    0
  • Sheep are reared over a somewhat wider range, exclusively for their wool.

    0
    0
  • Sheep ranges under the care of Scottish shepherds have also been established in the department of Junin, the stock being imported from southern Patagonia, England and Australia.

    0
    0
  • m., and is used for sheep grazing; Muskeget Island, which has excellent hunting, and of which about one-half is a public park; and the Gravel Islands and other islets.

    0
    0
  • the common liverfluke (Distomum hepaticum) - mature equally well in the bile-ducts of a man as in those of a sheep or rabbit, others and in fact the majority are restricted apparently to one host.

    0
    0
  • The liver-fluke (Distomum hepaticum) unlike most Trematodes flourishes in a wide range of hosts and infects man, horse, deer, oxen, sheep, pig, rabbit and kangaroo.

    0
    0
  • Sheep, how ever, suffer most from this parasite and from the allied D.

    0
    0
  • Wet summers are followed by an acute outbreak of liver-rot amongst sheep and this, together with the effects of other diseases that accompany wet seasons, cause the death of vast numbers of sheep, the numbers from both sources being estimated in bad years at from 12 to 3 millions in England alone.

    0
    0
  • humilis in North America: and is eaten by sheep during its encysted stage attached to herbage.

    0
    0
  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.

    0
    0
  • 461) in connexion with the treatment of the diseases of sheep. The fact that their eponymus is said to have been the son of Helios and Ge points to a very early settlement in the district.

    0
    0
  • Fruits and vegetables are plentiful, and there are large herds of buffaloes, goats and sheep. Silkworms are reared.

    0
    0
  • There is a considerable extent of pasture land, and the rearing of cattle, sheep, pigs and goats is largely practised.

    0
    0
  • Cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry show a general increase in numbers.

    0
    0
  • Another kind is the "schapsticker" (sheep stinger), S.

    0
    0
  • It is of smaller size than the preceding, and causes more injury to animals, such as sheep, dogs, &c. than to man.

    0
    0
  • Cattle and sheep are pastured in great numbers on its slopes.

    0
    0
  • Included in Kingsbridge is the little town of Dodbrooke, which at the time of the Domesday Survey had a population of 42, and a flock of 108 sheep and 27 goats; and in 1257 was granted a Wednesday market and a fair at the Feast of St Mary Magdalene.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports of local produce are potatoes, cumin seed, vegetables, oranges, goats and sheep, cotton goods and stone.

    0
    0
  • The priests were the Arval Brothers, who conducted the victims - ox, sheep and pig (suovetaurilia) - in procession with prayer to Ceres round the boundaries of the ager Romanus.

    0
    0
  • Cattle and sheep are also raised for the coast markets.

    0
    0
  • It imports general merchandise and manufactures, and exports phosphates, iron, zinc, barley, sheep, wool, cork, esparto, &c. There are manufactories of native garments, tapestry and leather.

    0
    0
  • He devoted himself to colonizing his extensive lands, and is said to have been the first to introduce sheep and blood horses into the province.

    0
    0
  • The destruction of its forests has led to the loss of all its alluvial soil, and now it is for the most part a brown and barren rock, covered at best with scanty aromatic scrub, pastured by sheep and goats.

    0
    0
  • In the Sheep and the Camel the long compound bone, supporting the two main (or only) toes is the cannon-bone.

    0
    0
  • The group at the present day is divided into Girafjidae (giraffe and okapi), Cervidae (deer), Antilocapridae (prongbuck), and Bovidae (oxen, sheep, goats, antelopes, &c.).

    0
    0
  • The department contains a comparatively large extent of pasturage, which has given rise to a considerable trade in horses, cattle, sheep and wool for the northern markets.

    0
    0
  • In the number of sheep the state rose from fourth rank in 1880 to first in 1890, but dropped to tenth rank in 1900, when there were 1,439,940 head; in 1910 1 Not including farms of less than three acres and of small productive capacity.

    0
    0
  • there were 1,909,000 sheep in the state.

    0
    0
  • On the plateaus large numbers of cattle, goats and sheep are reared.

    0
    0
  • and there are fine breeds of horses and large flocks of sheep. Productive fisheries are carried on at the mouth of the Don.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist chiefly of cereals, cattle, horses, sheep, wine, fish and hides.

    0
    0
  • The diet held at Frankfort in 1456 recalled the fact that the council of Constance had forbidden the pope to impose tenths without the consent of the clergy in the region affected, and that it was clear that he proposed to " pull the German sheep's fleece over its ears."

    0
    0
  • Parallel to this shrinkage was the decrease in ranging sheep (82.0% from 1850-1900; 34.2% from 1890-1900), and cattle, once numerous in the hill counties of the west, and in the Connecticut Valley; Boston, then ranking after London as the second wool market of the world, and being at one time the chief packing centre of the country.

    0
    0
  • In the same year, according to the same authority, there were in the state 196,000 milch cows, 92,000 other neat cattle, 45, 000 sheep and 70,000 swine.

    0
    0
  • Few oxen or sheep are reared in the colony, meat, as well as bread and most vegetables, being imported from America.

    0
    0
  • Some, for instance, may consider that the chamois and the so-called white goat of the Rocky Mountains are entitled to be included in the group; but this is not the view held by the authors of the Book of Antelopes referred to below; and, as a matter of fact, the term is only a vague designation for a number of more or less distinct groups of hollow-horned ruminants which do not come under the designation of cattle, sheep or goats; and in reality there ought to be a distinct English groupname for each subfamily into which "antelopes" are subdivided.

    0
    0
  • The subfamily is characterized by the narrow crowns of the molars, which are similar to those of sheep, and' the hairy muzzle.

    0
    0
  • They breed horses, cattle and sheep, but suffer heavy losses from murrain.

    0
    0
  • There were less than one-third as many sheep in 1910 (1,177,000) as in 1850; but in the same period the number of dairy cows (1,771,000 in 1910) steadily increased.

    0
    0
  • In most rotations barley is grown after turnips, or some other " cleaning " crop, with or without the interposition of a wheat crop. The roots are fed off by sheep during autumn and early winter, after which the ground is ploughed to a depth of 3 or 4 in.

    0
    0
  • only in order not to put the layer of soil fertilized by the sheep beyond reach of the plant.

    0
    0
  • 1 Barley is occasionally sown in autumn to provide keep for sheep in the following spring.

    0
    0
  • Outside the forest country the weka, an almost wingless bird, is numerous, and in the Alps a hawk-like green parrot, the kea, has learned to kill sheep and holds its ground.

    0
    0
  • Moreover the export of sheep skins and pelts was valued at £680,000 in the lastmentioned year.

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    0
  • The number of sheep has increased from 56,564,000 in 1886 to 22,000,000 in 5908, though the increase has been almost all in North Island.

    0
    0
  • The smaller size of the flocks and the breeding of sheep for meat rather than for wool, the cultivation of English grasses and of extensive crops of turnips and other roots on which to fatten sheep and lambs, all tend to change sheep-farming from the mere grazing of huge mobs on wide, unimproved runs held by pastoral licences.

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    0
  • The result is seen in the price obtained for New Zealand sheep in Smithfield Market, which is from Id.

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    0
  • The valley and delta of the Vistula are very fertile, and produce good crops of wheat and pasturage for horses, cattle and sheep. Besides cereals, the chief crops are potatoes, hay, tobacco, garden produce, fruit and sugar-beet.

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    0
  • Cavalry horses (especially at the government stud farm of Marienwerder) and merino sheep are reared.

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    0
  • 44); " I am the door of the sheep, all they that came before Me are thieves and robbers," (x.

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    0
  • Here we find " ye cannot hear, cannot believe, because ye are not from God, not of My sheep " (viii.

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  • This universalism is not simply spiritual; the external element, presupposed in the Synoptists as that of the Jewish church within which Jesus' earthly life was spent, is here that of the now separate Christian community: He has other sheep not of this fold - them also He must bring, there will be one fold, one shepherd; and His seamless tunic, and Peter's net which, holding every kind of fish, is not rent, are symbols of this visible unity.

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  • And its greatness appears in its inexhaustibly deep teachings concerning Christ's sheep and fold; the Father's drawing of souls to Christ; the dependence of knowledge as to Christ's doctrine upon the doing of God's will; the fulfilling of the commandment of love, as the test of true discipleship; eternal life, begun even here and now; and God a Spirit, to be served in spirit and in truth.

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    0
  • The caribou, moose, antelope, mountain sheep, beaver, otter and mink are scarce.

    0
    0
  • The chief industry is agriculture, including sheep farming and stock raising.

    0
    0
  • The dry western plains are best adapted for sheep rearing, while the well-watered eastern regions are specially suitable for the growing of cereals and;also for horse breeding.

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    0
  • Sheep numbered over 5,000,000 in 1910, cattle over 600,000, horses over 100,000, goats (chiefly owned by natives) over 1,000,000.

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    0
  • Sheep are most abundant in the Rouxville, Wepener and Smithfield districts, goats in Philippolis.

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  • A government Department of Agriculture, created in 1904, affords help to the farmers in various ways, notably in combatting insect plagues, in experimental farms, and in improving the breed of horses, sheep and cattle.

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    0
  • Its chief exports are diamonds, live stock (cattle, horses and mules, sheep and goats), wool, mohair, coal, wheat and eggs.

    0
    0
  • The bison, which once ranged the plains in large herds, have been exterminated; the moose and the elk are found only occasionally in the wilder regions; mountain sheep, antelope, black and grizzly bears, wolves, coyotes and lynx (" wild cats ") are also becoming rare.

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  • In 1906 the farm area was almost equally divided between " dry " farming and farming under irrigation, three-fourths of the wheat produced was grown without irrigation, and the dry farming was very successful with the comparatively new and valuable crops of durum, or macaroni wheat, and Russian barley, which is used in straw for winter feed to sheep and neat cattle.

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  • The east is devoted chiefly to stock raising; for cattle, horses and sheep thrive well on the bunch grass except when it is covered with snow.

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    0
  • The principal sheep-raising counties are Custer, Yellowstone, whither many sheep are brought to be fattened, Rosebud, Beaverhead, Valley, and Meagher.

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  • In 1909 the number of sheep in Montana was 5,747,000, being exceeded only by the number in Wyoming; the number of cattle was 922,000, only 80,00o being milch cows, and the number of horses 319,000.

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    0
  • In 1765 the regent Prince Xaver imported 300 merino sheep from Spain, and so improved the native breed by this new strain that Saxon sheep were eagerly imported by foreign nations to improve their flocks, and " Saxon electoral wool " became one of the best brands in the market.

    0
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  • Sheep farming, however, has considerably declined within the last few decades.

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  • He visited all parts of the country himself, and personally encouraged agriculture; he introduced a more economical mode of mining and smelting silver; he favoured the importation of finer breeds of sheep and cattle; and he brought foreign weavers from abroad to teach the Saxons.

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  • The foundation of the famous school of mining at Freiberg, and the improvement of the Saxon breed of sheep by the importation of merino sheep from Spain, were due to his care.

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    0
  • They kept horses, cattle, sheep, goats and swine.

    0
    0
  • Both in literature and cult Hermes was constantly associated with the protection of cattle and sheep; at Tanagra and elsewhere his title was Kpcoc60pos, the ram-bearer.

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  • Sometimes he was represented in his pastoral character, as when he bears a sheep on his shoulders; at other times he appears as the messenger or herald of the gods with the KfpvKEiov, or herald's staff, which is his most frequent attribute.

    0
    0
  • The herds of bison, antelope and elk that once roamed the prairies have vanished, but a few mountain sheep still graze on the grass-covered mesas in inaccessible portions of the Bad Lands.

    0
    0
  • The gain was chiefly confined to cattle, but the number of horses, sheep and swine also showed substantial increases.

    0
    0
  • There is trade in the white wine of the neighbourhood, and in sheep, cattle and agricultural products.

    0
    0
  • For the rearing of sheep Kent is one of the chief counties in England.

    0
    0
  • The characteristic Chinese mode of dividing the "yellow road " of the sun was, however, by the twelve "cyclical animals " - Rat, Ox, Tiger, Hare, Dragon or Crocodile, Serpent, Horse, Sheep, Monkey, Hen, Dog, Pig.

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  • 310), he tried his hand at poetry in his early youth, while tending sheep at Smyrna.

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    0
  • On the third day, Cureotis (Koupe&Tls), children born since the last festival were presented by their fathers or guardians to the assembled phratores, and, after an oath had been taken as to their legitimacy and the sacrifice of a goat or a sheep, their names were inscribed in the register.

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    0
  • It feeds chiefly on fruit and roots, but kills sheep, goats, deer, ponies and cattle, and sometimes devours carrion.

    0
    0
  • Bears, wolves, foxes, goats (kokmet), wild sheep (arkharis), lizards, earth-rats, and a small rodent (teshikan), with ravens, eagles, wild ducks and wild geese are the other varieties principally encountered.

    0
    0
  • The numbers of cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry are generally increasing.

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    0
  • The dung of black cattle, horses, sheep, goats, &c., which contains sal ammoniac ready formed, is collected during the first four months of the year, when the animals feed on the spring grass, a kind of clover.

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  • 19 sqq., we read " that the masmasu (priest's magician) is to pass forth to the gateway, sacrifice a sheep in the palace portal, and to smear the threshold and posts of the palace gateway right 'and left with the blood of the lamb."

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  • The Livs and Letts were as much the prey of the Lithuanians "as sheep are the prey of wolves."

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    0
  • At one time London was able to supply many Continental gardens with giraffes, and Dublin and Antwerp have had great successes with lions, whilst antelopes, sheep and cattle, deer and equine animals are always to be found breeding in one collection or another.

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    0
  • ca`rdhas, which shows the pre-Teutonic form, means a troop), a number of animals of one kind driven or fed together, usually applied to cattle as "flock" is to sheep, but used also of whales, porpoises, &c., and of birds, as swans, cranes and curlews.

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  • A "herd-book" is a book containing the pedigree and other information of any breed of cattle or pigs, like the "flock-book" for sheep or "stud-book" for horses.

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    0
  • Formerly the word "herdwick" was applied to the pasture ground under the care of a shepherd, and it is now used of a special hardy breed of sheep in Cumberland and Westmorland.

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    0
  • 29-35), shows that the Nethinim were in charge of the rings and hooks connected with the temple service; they sheared the sheep offered for sacrifice in the temple and poured the libations.

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    0
  • Of the livestock, hogs were the most numerous in 1900, cattle next, sheep third, and horses fourth.

    0
    0
  • Garrett county in the extreme northwest, however, raises the largest number of sheep. Most of the tobacco is grown in the south counties of the West Shore.

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    0
  • Wheat, fruit, vines and cotton are largely grown, and cattle and sheep are bred.

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    0
  • It was built by Jehan Shah of the Kara Kuyunli, or Black Sheep dynasty (1437-1467).

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    0
  • Of domestic animals the camel and sheep are the most important.

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    0
  • The chief wealth of the Arab tribes of the plateaus consists in their immense flocks of sheep. The horses and mules of Algeria are noted; and the native cattle are an excellent stock on which to graft the better European varieties.

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    0
  • The chief exports are sheep and oxen, most of which are raised in Morocco and Tunisia, and horses; animal products, such as wool and skins; wine, cereals (rye, barley, oats), vegetables, fruits (chiefly figs and grapes for the table) and seeds, esparto grass, oils and vegetable extracts (chiefly olive oil), iron ore, zinc, natural phosphates, timber, cork, crin vegetal and tobacco.

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    0
  • According to Liebig, potassium is the essential alkali of the animal body; and it may be noted that sheep excrete most of the potassium which they take from the land as sweat, one-third of the weight of raw merino consisting of potassium compounds.

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    0
  • Stockfarming, a relatively undeveloped industry, tends to become more important, owing to the assistance which the state renders by the importation of horses, cattle, sheep and swine, from Europe and the United States, in order to improve the native breeds.

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    0
  • The numbers of horses, mules, cattle and sheep increased quite steadily from 1850 to 1900, but the number of swine in 1880 and in 1900 was nearly one-third less than in 1850.

    0
    0
  • Few cattle, but numbers of sheep, goats and swine are reared.

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    0
  • It preys upon almost any animal it can overcome, such as antelopes, deer, sheep, goats, monkeys, peafowl, and has a special liking for dogs.

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    0
  • For two years after that date a constant stream of squatters with their sheep flowed in from around Sydney and Tasmania to settle in the Port Phillip district, and by 1841 the population of the town had grown to 11,000.

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    0
  • Cattle and sheep are bred, and a trade is carried on in them with the whalers which visit these seas.

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    0
  • The Spaniards found no indigenous domestic animals in the country, and introduced their own horses, cattle, sheep and swine.

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    0
  • Next in importance is the breeding of sheep, which is largely confined to the cooler sierra districts.

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  • According to this report, which is not strictly trustworthy, there were in the republic 5,142,457 cattle, 859,217 horses, 334,435 mules, 287,991 asses, 3,424,430 sheep, 4,206,011 goats and 616,139 swine.

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  • Two years later home consumption returns noted the slaughter of 958,058 cattle (129,938 in the Federal District), 561,982 sheep, 992,263 goats and 887,130 hogs - the last item being larger than the census return of 1902.

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  • Merino sheep were introduced in 1541 and woollen manufactures date from that time.

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  • These prayers seem essentially genuine; indeed there was no European model from which they could have been imitated; but at the same time it must be remembered that they come down in Spanish writing, and not untouched by Spanish influence, as in one passage where there is a mention of sheep, an animal unknown to the Mexicans.

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  • There is a tradition that on one occasion the abbot of Beverley, anxious to investigate the case for himself, visited Mother Shipton's cottage disguised, and that no sooner had he knocked than the old woman called out "Come in, Mr Abbot, for you are not so much disguised but the fox may be seen through the sheep's skin."

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  • With the exception of dairy cows and horses there was likewise a corresponding decrease in the number of livestock during these years: the number of hogs decreased from 58,585 in 1890 to 56,970 in 1900 (51,000 in 1910); of sheep, from 211,825 in 1880 to 105,702 in 1900 (74,000 in 1910); and of neat cattle other than dairy cows, from 141,841 in 1880 to 116,835 in 1900 (93,000 in 1910); but the number of horses increased from 52,458 in 1890 to 77,233 in 1900 (59, 000 in 1910), and the number of dairy cows from 90,564 in 1890 to 115,036 in 1900 (122,000 in 1910).

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  • Potatoes, however, are grown in large quantities north and west of the White Mountains; and this district leads in the number of cattle and sheep, and in the production of all the cereals except Indian corn.

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  • ARGALI, the Tatar name of the great wild sheep, Ovis ammon, of the Altai and other parts of Siberia.

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  • Standing as high as a large donkey, the argali is the finest of all the wild sheep, the horns of the rams, although of inferior length, being more massive than those of Ovis poli of the Pamirs.

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  • (See SHEEP.)

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  • The wealth of the Bechuana consists principally in their cattle, which they tend with great care, showing a shrewd discrimination in the choice of pasture suited to oxen, sheep and goats.

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  • deep. The " sweet veld " is specially suitable to cattle, and the finer shorter grass which succeeds it affords pasturage for sheep.

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  • Trade is in wool, iron, grain, sheep, lithographic stone and leather.

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  • haedus, a kid), properly the name of the well-known domesticated European ruminant (Capra hircus), which has for all time been regarded as the emblem of everything that is evil, in contradistinction to the sheep, which is the symbol of excellence and purity.

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  • Although the more typical goats are markedly distinct from sheep, there is, both as regards wild and domesticated forms, an almost complete gradation from goats to sheep, so that it is exceedingly difficult to define either group. The position of the genus Capra (to all the members of which, as well as some allied species, the name "goat" in its wider sense is applicable) in the family Bovidae is indicated in the article Bovidae, and some of the distinctions between goats and sheep are mentioned in the article Sheep. Here then it will suffice to mention that goats are characterized by the strong and offensive odour of the males, which are furnished with a beard on the chin; while as a general rule glands are present between the middle toes of the fore feet only.

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  • In this ruminant, which is of a dark-brown colour, the relatively smooth black horns diverge outwards in a manner resembling those of the bharal among the sheep rather than in goat-fashion; and, in fact, this tur, which has only a very short beard, is so bharal-like that it is commonly called by sportsmen the Caucasian bharal.

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  • It is one of the species which render it so difficult to give a precise definition of either sheep or goats.

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  • Lydekker, Wild Oxen, Sheep, and Goats (London, 1898).

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  • to Lycaonia; these uplands are little cultivated and only afford extensive pasturage for large flocks of sheep and goats.

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  • The prophets who normally preside over the Suppers are called " your high-priests," and receive from the faithful the first-fruits of the winepress and threshingfloor, of oxen and sheep, and of each batch of new-made bread, and of oil.

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  • Cattle-farming is carried on in the high pasturelands and the plains of Peten; but the whole number of sheep (77, 000 in 1900) and pigs (30,000) in the republic is inferior to the number kept in many single English counties.

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  • The foliage may be eaten down by sheep early in autumn, without injuring it for the production of a crop of seed.

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  • Neither of these is much grown in Great Britain for the production of oil, but the "winter" variety is very extensively grown as green food for sheep. For this purpose it is generally sown at short intervals throughout the summer to provide a succession of fodder.

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  • Its highly nutritious leaves and stems are usually consumed by folding the sheep upon it where it grows, there is no green food upon which they fatten faster.

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  • The Hudsonian zone covers the upper slopes of the higher mountains of New England, New York and North Carolina and larger areas on the elevated slopes of the Rocky and Cascade Mountains; and on the western mountains it is the home of the mountain goat, mountain sheep, Alpine flying-squirrel, nutcracker, evening grosbeak and Townsends solitaire.

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  • Its chief value lies in its vast tracts of fertile soil, now rapidly filling up with settlers from all parts of the world, and the grassy uplands in the foot-hill region affording perennial pasturage for the cattle, horses and sheep of the rancher.

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  • In the mountains of British Columbia are the bighorn or Rocky Mountain sheep and the Rocky Mountain goat, while the saddleback and white mountain sheep have recently been discovered in the northern Cordillera.

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  • Cattle, sheep, swine and poultry are reared in abundance.

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  • All parts of the Dominion are well adapted for sheep; but various causes, amongst which must be reckoned the prosperity of other branches of agriculture, including wheat-growing and dairying, have in several of the provinces contributed to prevent that attention to this branch which its importance deserves, though there are large areas of rolling, rugged yet nutritious pastures well suited to sheep-farming.

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  • In the maritime provinces and in Prince Edward Island sheep and lambs are reared in large numbers.

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  • In Ontario sheep breeding has reached a high degree of perfection, and other parts of the American continent draw their supplies of pure bred stock largely from this province.

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  • The number of sheep and lambs in Canada was estimated for the year 1907 at 2,830,785, as compared with 2,465,565 in 1901.

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  • To this end experiments are conducted in the feeding of cattle, sheep and swine for flesh, the feeding of cows for the production of milk, and of poultry both for flesh and eggs.

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  • Shorthorns and polled Angus are the commonest breeds of cattle; the sheep are mostly Cheviots and a Cheviot-Leicester cross, but the native sheep are still reared in considerable numbers in Hoy and South Ronaldshay; pigs are also kept on several of the islands, and the horses - as a rule hardy, active and small, though larger than the famous Shetland ponies - are very numerous, but mainly employed in connexion with agricultural work.

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  • In the north-eastern portion the Budorus flows into the Aegean, being formed by two streams which unite their waters in a small plain, and were perhaps the Cereus and Neleus concerning which the story was told that sheep drinking the water of the one became white, of the other black.

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  • The mountains afford excellent pasturage for sheep and cattle, which were reared in great quantities in ancient times, and seem to have given the island its name; these pastures belonged to the state.

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  • In the township there are several villages, including Weymouth, North Weymouth, East Weymouth and South Weymouth, and the smaller villages of Weymouth Centre, Weymouth Heights, Lovell's Corner, Nash's Corner and Old Spain, and there are also four islands, Round, Grape, Slate and Sheep. The mainland itself is largely a peninsula lying between the Weymouth Fore river and the Weymouth Back river, to the west and east respectively.

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  • The mountains afford excellent pasture, and a considerable number of cattle, sheep and swine are reared.

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    0
  • Large numbers of cattle and sheep, the former similar to the small species at Aden, are reared as well as, in Great Comoro, the zebra.

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  • Their merchandise consists of sheep and goats, gum and resin, skins and ostrich feathers.

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  • Of these there were counted in 1900 1,115,022 head of horned cattle, 824,000 sheep, 1,556,000 pigs, and 230,000 goats.

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  • The Luneburger Heide yields an excellent breed of sheep, the Heidschnucken, which equal the Southdowns of England in delicacy of flavour.

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  • BHARAL, the Tatar name for the "blue sheep" Ovis (Pseudois) nahura, of Ladak and Tibet.

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  • In the absence of faceglands, as well as in certain other features, the bharal serves to connect more typical sheep with goats.

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  • Cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry are reared.

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  • of Aragon, who converted the pastures of the Apulian plain into a royal domain in 1445, and made Foggia the place at which the tax on the sheep was to be paid and the wool to be sold.

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  • During the 18th century a considerable trade in sheep, wool, wine and pelts developed, chiefly with Chihuahua and with the Indians of the plains.

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    0
  • Its mountains, which rise to a height of 1 72 ft., are rugged and nearly destitute of verdure, but the intervening valleys afford pasturage for sheep.

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  • side is a rolling table-land affording considerable pasturage for sheep, but over the whole N.W.

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  • The pili grass (Heteropogon contortus) is also noxious, for its awns get badly entangled in the wool of sheep. The native manienie (Stenotaphrum americanum) and kukai (Panicum pruriens), however, are relished by stock and are found on all the inhabited islands; the Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon), a June grass (Poa annua), and Guinea grass (Panicum jumentorum) have also been successfully introduced.

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  • The small islands of Lanai, Niihau and Kahoolawe are devoted chiefly to the raising of sheep and cattle - Niihau is one large privately owned sheep-ranch.

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  • It was estimated in 1908 that there were about 130,500 cattle and about 99,500 sheep on the islands.

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  • When Vancouver visited the islands in 1792, he left sheep and neat cattle, 3 protected by a ten years' taboo, and laid down the keel of a European ship for Kamehameha.

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  • According to Penn, "he took most delight in sheep," but he himself simply says: "A good deal went through my hands..

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    0
  • The list consists of oxen, sheep, geese, hens, honey, ale, loaves, cheese, butter, fodder, salmon and eels.

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  • One would scarcely be justified, however, in supposing that it was anything like universal; for the purchasing power of such a sum was at that time considerable, representing as it did about 16-20 oxen or 100-120 sheep. It would hardly be safe to credit men of the sixhynde class in general with more than a horse, spear and shield.

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  • Cattle and sheep were pastured on the common lands appertaining to the village, while pigs, which (especially in Kent) seem to have been very numerous, were kept in the woods.

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  • The sheep was valued at a shilling in both Wessex and Mercia, from early times till the i ith century.

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  • The price of a pig was twice, and that of an ox six times as great as that of a sheep. Regarding the prices of commodities other than live-stock we have little definite information, though an approximate estimate may be made of the value of arms. It is worth noticing that we often hear of payments in gold and silver vessels in place of money.

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  • When it was necessary to account for this position, theologians quoted the text of the Gospels, where St Peter is represented as the rock on which the Church is built, the pastor of the sheep and lambs of the Lord, the doorkeeper of the kingdom of heaven.

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  • Of this farm he " tilled as much as kept half a dozen men," retaining also grass for a hundred sheep and thirty cattle.

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  • animals in the steppe the first place belongs to the camel; next come goat and sheep (not the ordinary fat-tailed variety); the common buffalo is often kept by the Arabs and the Turkomans on the Euphrates and the Tigris; on the Euphrates is found the Indian zebu.

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  • Thus 1 Thermidor was consecrated to spelt, Io Thermidor to the watering-pot, 15 Thermidor to sheep, and 27 Thermidor to lentils.

    0
    0
  • The merino sheep was introduced by Frederick the Great, and since then the Silesian breed has been greatly improved.

    0
    0
  • In the mountainous region dairy-farming is carried on after the Alpine fashion and the breeding of sheep is improving.

    0
    0
  • The raising of sheep and swine was of considerably less relative importance in 1910 than in 1850, there being 1,882,357 sheep and 1,040,366 swine in 1850 and 1,112,000 sheep and 931,000 swine in 1910.

    0
    0
  • Cattle other than dairy cows as well as horses and sheep are most numerous in the western counties, in Bradford county on the north border, and in some of the counties of the south-east.

    0
    0
  • Among domesticated animals are to be found the horse, mule, donkey, cattle, sheep and goats, dogs, fowls and pigs, ducks and geese.

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  • Here are to be found yak, wild asses (kyang), several varieties of deer, musk deer and Tibetan antelope (Pantholops); also wild sheep (the bharal of the Himalaya), Ovis hodgsoni and possibly Ovis poli, together with wild goats, bears (in large numbers in the north-eastern districts), leopards, otter, wolves, wild cats, foxes, marmots, squirrels, monkeys and wild dogs.

    0
    0
  • The people pay a small poll-tax to China, and are exempted from any other impost; they also pay a small tax in kind, sheep, butter, &c., to their chiefs.

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    0
  • The taxes paid to the Lhasa government are mostly in kind, sheep, ponies, meal, butter, wool, native cloth, &c., and the coin paid is said to be about 130,000 ounces of silver a year.

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    0
  • From Mongolia come leather, saddlery, sheep and horses, with coral, amber and small diamonds from European sources; from Kham perfumes, fruits, furs and inlaid metal saddlery; from Sikkim and Bhutan rice, musk, sugar-balls and tobacco; from Nepal broadcloth, indigo, brasswork, coral, pearls, sugar, spices, drugs and Indian manufactures; from Ladak saffron, dried fruits and articles from India.

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    0
  • But vast tracts of land are useless except as pasture for sheep, and even the sheep are driven by the severe winters to migrate yearly into Estremadura (q.v.).

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    0
  • It is an important centre for trade in cereals and flour for export, and in sheep, cattle, wool, leather and timber.

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    0
  • The hill-sides afford pasture for 20,000 sheep. No forests exist on the island; all wood is brought from the coast of Rumelia or from Thasos.

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    0
  • Heusinger has shown that white sheep and pigs are injured by the ingestion (A) N b X N ?--,r N(A)+N of certain plants, while the pigmented individuals may eat them without harm.

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  • A few seconds after each of these headlong descents a mysterious sound strikes his ear - compared by some to drumming, and by others to the bleating of a sheep or goat,' which sound evidently comes from the bird as it shoots downwards, and then only.

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    0
  • Sometimes various lichens occur abnormally in such unexpected habitats as dried dung of sheep, bleached bones of reindeer and whales, old leather, iron and glass, in districts where the species are abundant.

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  • (Gentiana acaulis) and London pride (Saxifrage umbrosa),, Cerastium tomentosum, Stachys lavata and the beautiful evergreen Veronica rupestris with sheets of bright blue flowers, close to the ground, or by some of the finer grasses very carefully selected, such as the sheep's fescue (Festuca ovina) or its glaucous-leaved variety.

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  • Crested Dog's-tail Festuca duriuscula - Hard Fescue Festuca ovina - Sheep's Fescue .

    0
    0
  • Clover and lucerne are the other leading crops, and large flocks of sheep are kept in the region.

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  • The cattle and sheep fairs are important, and an agricultural show is held every May.

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  • Upon these clay-lands (kwelders) horses, cattle and sheep are at last able to pasture at low tide, and in course of time they are in turn endiked.

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  • Thyme and the small white dune-rose (Rosa pimpinellifolia) also grow in the dunes, and wall-pepper (Sedum acre), field fever-wort, reindeer moss, common asparagus, sheep's fescue grass, the pretty Solomon-seal (Polygonatum officinale), and the broadleaved or marsh orchis (Orchis latifolia).

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  • Sea-aster flourishes in the Wadden of Friesland and Groningen, the Dollart and the Zeeland estuaries, giving place nearer the shore to sandspurry (Spergularia), or sea-poa or floating meadow grass (Glyceria maritima), which grows up to the dikes, and affords pasture for cattle and sheep. Along the coast of Overysel and in the Biesbosch lake club-rush, or scirpus, is planted in considerable quantities for the hat-making industry, and common sea-wrack (Zostera marina) is found in large patches in the northern half of the Zuider Zee, where it is gathered for trade purposes during the months of June, July and August.

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  • They formerly served to support large flocks of sheep and some cattle, but are gradually transformed by the planting of woods, as well as by strenuous efforts at cultivation.

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  • A smaller, hardier kind of cattle and large numbers of sheep are kept upon the heath-lands in the eastern provinces, which also favour the rearing of pigs and bee-culture.

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  • In summer, indeed, the vast expanse is little better than an arid steppe; but in the winter it furnishes abundant pasture to flocks of sheep from the Apennines and herds of silver-grey oxen and shaggy black horses, and sheep passing in the summer to the mountain pastures.

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  • Broadtails, size IoX5 in., are the very young of the Persian sheep, and are killed before the wool has time to develop beyond the flat wavy state which can be best compared to a piece of moire silk.

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  • The so-called caracul lambs, size 12 X6 in., are the very young of the astrachan sheep, and the pick of them are almost as effective as broadtails, although less fine in the texture.

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  • Is a sheep found in Russia and Corsica and now very little in demand, and but few are imported into Great Britain.

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  • Many of the domestic kind in central and northern Europe and Canada are used for drivers' and peasants' coat linings, &c. In Great Britain many coats of the home-reared sheep, having wools two and a half to five inches long, are dyed various colours and used as floor rugs.

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  • The Hungarian peasants are very fond of their natural brown sheep coats, the leather side of which is not lined, but embellished by a very close fancy embroidery, worked upon the leather itself; these garments are reversible, the fur being worn inside when the weather is cold.

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  • Chinese sheep are largely used for cheap rugs.

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  • Value of English sheep from 3s.

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  • Vicuna is a species of long-necked sheep native to South America, bearing some resemblance to the guanaco, but the fur is shorter, closer and much finer.

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  • For straight seams the machines are excellent, making as neat a seam as is found in glove work, unless, of course, the pelts are especially heavy, such as bears and sheep rugs.

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  • From South Africa a quantity of jackal, hyena, fox, leopard and sheep karosses, i.e.

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  • They are limited in quantity and costly, and the trade depends upon various sorts of other sheep and goat wools for the bulk of its productions.

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  • Considerable herds of cattle are reared on the rich pastures of the lower Rhine, but the number of sheep in the province is comparatively small, and is, indeed, not greatly in excess of that of the goats.

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  • The breeding of livestock (cattle, sheep and horses), is an important source of income.

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  • There are large herds of camel, the camel-owning Arabs usually owning also large numbers of sheep and goats.

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  • The inhabitants, an industrious Gaelic-speaking community (110 in 1851 and 77 in 1901), cultivate about 40 acres of land (potatoes, oats, barley), keep about 1000 sheep and a few head of cattle.

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  • Coarse tweeds and blanketing are manufactured for home use from the sheep's wool which is plucked from the animal, not shorn.

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  • The extensive pastures support large herds of sheep and cattle, including a noteworthy breed of merino sheep. The horses of Mecklenburg are of a fine sturdy quality and highly esteemed.

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  • In cultivated districts cattle, sheep, and even human inhabitants are never safe from his nocturnal ravages.

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  • The kidney fat of all sheep and the skins of all goats slaughtered in the public yard are perquisites of government, the former being used for the manufacture of soap, which, with snuff, is a government monopoly.

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  • The exports are chiefly coal, sheep, tallow, wool, frozen meat and hides.

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  • Their country was rough and unfruitful as a whole (barley, however, was cultivated), being chiefly used for the pasture of sheep. Its inhabitants either led a nomadic life or occupied small villages; large towns were few.

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  • Away from the banks of the rivers, between the Euphrates and the Tigris and between the latter and the Persian mountains, are tribes of wandering Arabs, some of whom possess great herds of horses, sheep, goats, asses and camels, while in and by the marshes other tribes, in the transition stage from the nomadic to the settled life, own great herds of buffaloes.

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  • The aggregate number of sheep has shown a considerable falling off, and the rearing of them is mostly carried on only.

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  • Exempt from duty were now only refuse, raw products, scientific instruments, ships and literary and artistic objects; forty-four articles notably beer, vinegar, sugar, herrings, cocoa, salt, fish oils, ether, alum and sodawere unaffected by the change, while duties were henceforth levied upon a large number of articles which had previously been admitted dtity free, such as pig iron, machines and locomotives, grain, building timber, tallow; horses, cattle and sheep; and, again, the tariff law further increased the duties leviable upon numerous other articles.

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  • This he found at Phthiotis in Thessaly, where he surprised some wolves eating sheep; on his approach they fled, leaving him the bones.

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  • The number of horses and sheep is stationary or declining, but the raising of hogs, formerly abandoned in great part to the western states, is becoming an increasing industry.

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  • Sheep and goats, which subsist more easily on scanty pasturage, are relatively more numerous, the total number being calculated at 700,000.

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  • The Egyptian goose (chenalopex) is figured in the XVIIIth dynasty as sacred to Ammon; but his most frequent and celebrated incarnation was the woolly sheep with curved (" Ammon") horns (as opposed to the oldest native breed with long horizontal twisted horns and hairy coat, sacred to Khnum or Chnumis).

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  • Herds of cattle and flocks of sheep and goats are numerous throughout the country.

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