Shakespeare sentence example

shakespeare
  • Shakespeare remains so popular because he wrote about timeless human experiences: love and fear and envy, anger and revenge and jealousy, ambition and regret and guilt.
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  • The principal modern monument to the poet's memory in Stratford is the Shakespeare Memorial, a semi-Gothic building of brick, stone and timber, erected in 1877 to contain a theatre, picture gallery and library.
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  • The only positive piece of evidence produced is the passage from Thomas Nash's "Epistle to the Gentlemen of the Two Universities," prefixed to Greene's Arcadia, 1859, in which he upbraids somebody (not known to be Shakespeare) with having left the "trade of Noverint" and busied himself with "whole Hamlets" and "handfuls of tragical speeches."
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  • Few English writers have known so adroitly as Tennyson how to bend the study of Shakespeare to the enrichment of their personal style.
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  • It occurs frequently in poetry, owing to the alteration for metrical reasons of the natural order of words; Jevons quotes as an example Shakespeare, Henry VI.: "The duke yet lives that Henry shall depose."
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  • He may conceivably have met Bacon, but it is quite incredible that he met Shakespeare in the printing shop of Thomas Vautrollier.
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  • Many of these were not pure Shakespeare; and he is credited with the addition of a dying speech to the text of Macbeth.
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  • Garrick practically ceased to act in 1766, but he continued the management of Drury Lane, and in 1769 organized the Shakespeare celebrations at Stratford-on-Avon, an undertaking which ended in dismal failure, though he composed an " Ode upon dedicating a building and erecting a Statue to Shakespeare " on the occasion.
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  • Like all the greatest writers except Shakespeare, Montaigne thoroughly and completely exhibits the intellectual and moral complexion of his own time.
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  • Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew has been influenced in several respects (including the names Tranio and Grumio) by the Mostellaria.
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  • The breaking of such a promissory oath was called " perjury " (as in classical Latin and in Shakespeare), contrary to modern usage which confines the word to false evidence before a court of justice.
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  • The plan of Shakespeare's Stratford at least is preserved, for the road crossing Clopton's bridge is an ancient highway, and forks in the midst of the town into three great branches, about which the village grew up. The high cross no longer stands at the marketplace where these roads converged.
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  • The word signifies horned cattle, and is found in Shakespeare's own writing, in the restored line "It is the pasture lards the rother's sides" (Timon of Athens), '' where "brother's" was originally the accredited reading.
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  • Shakespeare is buried in the chancel of Holy Trinity church, his wife lying next to him.
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  • At Snitterfield to the north, where the low wooded hills begin to rise from the valley, lived Shakespeare's grandfather and uncle.
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  • It is said that, after the invention of printing, amongst others Queen Elizabeth translated it, and that the work was well known to Shakespeare.
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  • A repeated perusal of this drama suggests the judgment that it is overpraised when ranked at no great distance from Shakespeare's national dramas.
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  • Its supposed ill-boding nature is alluded to in Shakespeare's VI., where Suffolk desires for his enemies "their sweetest shade, a grove of cypress trees."
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  • Its style is mainly Early English, and among those buried here are Gower, Fletcher and Massinger, the poets, and Edmund, brother of William Shakespeare.
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  • At Bankside were the Bear and the Paris Gardens, used for the popular sport of bear and bull baiting; and the Globe theatre, the scene of the production of many of Shakespeare's plays for fifteen years after its erection in 1599.
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  • Duncan is chiefly known through his connexion with Macbeth, which has been immortalized by Shakespeare.
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  • He had composed an opera called Die Feen adapted by himself from Gozzi's La Donna Serpente, and another, Das Liebesverbot, founded on Shakespeare's Measure for Measure, but only Das Liebesverbot obtained a single performance in 1836.
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  • But with Der Ring des Nibelungen Wagner devoted himself to a story which any ordinary dramatist would find as unwieldy as, for instance, most of Shakespeare's subjects; a story in which ordinary canons of taste and probability were violated as they are in real life and in great art.
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  • David Hume summed up his admiration for Douglas by saying that his friend possessed "the true theatric genius of Shakespeare and Otway, refined from the unhappy barbarism of the one and licentiousness of the other."
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  • Not without interest to Englishmen is the name of Gabriel Dobrentei (q.v.), the translator of Shakespeare's Macbeth, represented at Pozsony in 1825.
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  • Of the many later publications of the Kisfaludy society the most important as regards English literature is the Shakspere Minden Munkdi (Complete Works of Shakespeare), in 19 vols.
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  • He is the Magyarizer of Shakespeare's Anthony and Cleopatra, Othello, Macbeth, Henry VIII., Winter's Tale, Romeo and Juliet and Tempest, as also of some of the best pieces of Burns, Moore, Byron, Shelley, Milton, Beranger, Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Goethe and others.
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  • He himself wrote several plays, including adaptations of Shakespeare.
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  • We know but little of Isaiah's predecessors and models in the prophetic art (it were fanaticism to exclude the element of human preparation); but certainly even the acknowledged prophecies of Isaiah (and much more the disputed ones) could no more have come into existence suddenly and without warning than the masterpieces of Shakespeare.
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  • He made acquaintance with, and at least tried to appreciate, Shakespeare.
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  • He therefore set all his wonderful cleverness to the task, going so far as to adopt a little even of that Romantic disobedience to the strict classical theory which he condemned, and no doubt sincerely, in Shakespeare.
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  • Holinshed (who was followed by Shakespeare in 2 Henry VI., act 4 sc. 6) tells us that when Cade, in 1450, forced his way into London, he first 45 Y of all proceeded to London Stone, and having struck his sword upon it, said in reference to himself and in explanation of his own action, " Now is Mortimer lord of this city."
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  • At no other period were so many great men associated with its history; the latter years of Elizabeth's reign are specially interesting to us because it was then that Shakespeare lived in London, and introduced its streets and people into his plays.
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  • The early years of Stuart London may be said to be closely linked with the last years of Elizabethan London, for the greatest men, such as Raleigh, Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, lived on into James's reign.
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  • Shakespeare's own day, and the characters he introduces into his plays are really his own contemporaries.
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  • At the Mermaid Ben Jonson had such companions as Shakespeare, Raleigh, Beaumont, Fletcher, Carew, Donne, Cotton and Selden, but at the Devil in Fleet Street, where he started the Apollo Club, he was omnipotent.
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  • Among his principal works upon these subjects may be noted the four volumes of Letteratura della nuova Italia (1860-1910); his essays upon Goethe, Ariosto, Shakespeare, Corneille, and the Poetry of Dante; his two volumes Storia della storiografia italiana del secolo XIX.
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  • Holinshed's Chronicle was the chief source of Shakespeare's account of Hotspur in Henry IV.
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  • Gutenberg and Shakespeare were among the patrons of the thirteen months in this calendar.
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  • He retained his intellectual lucidity and an absolute command of his faculties to the last, reading Shakespeare with obvious appreciation until within a few hours of his death.
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  • For some time he had been greatly interested by the poetry of the north, more particularly Percy's Reliques, the poems of " Ossian" (in the genuineness of which he like many others believed) and the works of Shakespeare.
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  • This same idea of necessary relation to national character and circumstance is also applied to dramatic poetry, and more especially to Shakespeare.
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  • Lessing had done much to make Shakespeare known to Germany, but he had regarded him in contrast to the French dramatists with whom he also contrasted the Greek dramatic poets, and accordingly did not bring out his essentially modern and Teutonic character.
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  • Herder does this, and in doing so shows a far deeper understanding of Shakespeare's genius than his predecessor had shown.
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  • Even Shakespeare has been played by these amateurs, and the abundant wit of the Japanese is on the way to enrich the stage with modern farces of unquestionable merit.
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  • Great numbers of European and American authors were rendered into JapaneseCalderon, Lytton, Disraeli, Byron, Shakespeare, Milton, Turgueniev, Carlyle, Daudet, Emerson, Hugo, Heine, De Quincey, Dickens, Krner, Goethetheir name is legion and their influence upon Japanese literature is conspicuous.
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  • His vigorous and idiomatic version of Plutarch, Vies des hommes illustres, was translated into English by Sir Thomas North, and supplied Shakespeare with materials for his Roman plays.
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  • He seems to have been interested in the poetic diction of Milton and Thomson, and a few of his verses are remotely inspired by Shakespeare and Gray.
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  • The earliest English tragedy, Gorboduc (1565), the Mirror for Magistrates (1587), and Shakespeare's Lear, are instances in point.
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  • His principal published work was an edition of Shakespeare's Poems (1898); but he wrote also on North's Plutarch and Ronsard.
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  • Names like Shakespeare, Grotius, Bacon, Hobbes appear in half a dozen different places.
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  • As a manager, though he committed some grievous blunders, he did good service to the theatre and signally advanced the popularity of Shakespeare's plays, of which not less than twenty-four were produced at Drury Lane under his management.
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  • But not every generation has the same notions of the way in which Shakespeare is best honoured.
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  • The Iliad and the Odyssey are as familiar to him as Shakespeare to the educated Englishman.
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  • In his day, Shakespeare was low-brow entertainment for the common class.
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  • Under the terms of the definition I offered earlier, that makes Shakespeare the epitome of art—that is, something that continues to speak to future generations.
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  • It seems strange that my first reading of Shakespeare should have left me so many unpleasant memories.
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  • But, with all my love for Shakespeare, it is often weary work to read all the meanings into his lines which critics and commentators have given them.
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  • When she met Dr. Furness, the Shakespearean scholar, he warned her not to let the college professors tell her too many assumed facts about the life of Shakespeare; all we know, he said, is that Shakespeare was baptized, married, and died.
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  • In Captain Keller's library she found excellent books, Lamb's "Tales from Shakespeare," and better still Montaigne.
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  • The saying, "It's all Greek to me," came from a number of early writers such as Thomas Dekker and William Shakespeare.
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  • Shakespeare's humorous and poignant story is now a musical!
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  • This site features some of the greatest classic sad love poems by William Blake, Robert Browning, Emily Elizabeth Dickinson, John Keats, Edgar Allen Poe, William Shakespeare and so many more.
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  • Even if you aren't the next Shakespeare, your fiancé is sure to love the gesture.
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  • Shakespeare argued that a rose called by another name would still smell as sweet, but as one can see from Romeo and Juliet, names are made of powerful stuff indeed.
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  • In this way, it is reminiscent of the work of Shakespeare - written in poetic style and dealing with themes which are larger than the characters in the story.
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  • Can you imagine Disney being inspired by Shakespeare?
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  • He was buried in Westminster Abbey at the foot of Shakespeare's statue with imposing solemnities.
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  • After the cessation in 1882 of works in connexion with the Channel tunnel, to connect England and France, coal-boring was attempted in the disused shaft, west of the Shakespeare Cliff railway tunnel near Dover.
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  • Later in the century they were read in schools, and some of Shakespeare's lines are direct reminiscences of Erasmus.
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  • Sladek was, with his excellent translations, one of the first to make Czech readers acquainted with the riches of English literature (especially Shakespeare).
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  • He was a diligent student of Shakespeare, and his last literary work was On the Received Text of Shakespeare's Dramatic Writings and its Improvement (1862).
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  • Perrot or Pierrot, the diminutive of the proper name Pierre), the name given 1 "Parakeet" (in Shakespeare, i Hen.
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  • To the historian it furnishes what is evidently the testimony of an eye-witness on several matters of importance which are neglected by other narrators; and to the student of literature it has the exceptional interest of being one of the prime sources of Shakespeare's historical plays.
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  • At the grammar school of Stratford-on-Avon, about 1671-1677, Shakespeare presumably studied Terence, Horace, Ovid and the Bucolics of Baptista Mantuanus (1502).
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  • In 1797 appeared his Apology for the Believers in the Shakespeare Papers which were exhibited in Norfolk Street, followed by other tracts on the same subject.
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  • These contributions to the literature of Shakespeare are full of curious matter, but on the whole display a great waste of erudition, in seeking to show that papers which had been proved forgeries might nevertheless have been genuine.
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  • Among his avowed antagonists in literary warfare the most distinguished were Malone and Steevens, the Shakespeare editors; Mathias, the author of the Pursuits of Literature; Dr Jamieson, the Scottish lexicographer; Pinkerton, the historian; Dr Irving, the biographer of the Scottish poets; and Dr Currie of Liverpool.
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  • Coggeshall is our authority for the tale, which Shakespeare has immortalized, of Hubert's refusal to permit the mutilation of his prisoner; but Hubert's loyalty was not shaken by the crime to which Arthur subsequently fell a victim.
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  • The next few happy years were devoted to his profession and a good deal of miscellaneous reading, especially of Shakespeare (he learnt English in order to compare the original with his well-thumbed German version) and Homer.
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  • He also edited the principal publications of the society, including its notable translation of Shakespeare's Dramatic Works, to which he contributed the Midsummer Night's Dream (1864), Hamlet and King John (1867).
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  • It is uncertain whether the conventional fleur-de-lis was originally meant to represent the lily or white iris - the flower-de-luce of Shakespeare - or an arrow-head, a spear-head, an amulet fastened on date-palms to ward off the evil eye, &c. In Roman and early Gothic architecture the fleur-de-lis is a frequent sculptured ornament.
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  • The work contains a large amount of information, and shows that its compilers were men of great industry; but its chief interest lies in the fact that it was largely used by Shakespeare and other Elizabethan dramatists; Shakespeare, who probably used the edition of 1587, obtaining from the Chronicles material for most of his historical plays, and also for Macbeth, King Lear and part of Cymbeline.
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  • Dyce for the Shakespeare Society in 1844, and connected by some commentators with Shakespeare, was written about 1590, and therefore gives a nearly contemporary view of More.
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  • Shakespeare makes Hamlet and Horatio study at Wittenberg.
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  • One on the history of Oleg, the more or less legendary Varangian, who was guardian to the son of Rurik, was described by her as an "imitation of Shakespeare."
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  • He insisted especially on the necessity of truth to nature in the imaginative presentation of the facts of life, and in one letter he boldly proclaimed the superiority of Shakespeare to Corneille, Racine and Voltaire.
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  • By his original interpretation of Aristotle's theory of tragedy, he delivered German dramatists from the yoke of the classic tragedy of France, and directed them to the Greek dramatists and to Shakespeare.
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  • Though hampered by of William Shakespeare (1898), which reached its fifth edition lack of materials and by political necessities, his strategy was in 1905.
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  • Besides editions of English classics his works include a Life of Queen Victoria (1902),(1902), Great Englishmen of the Sixteenth Century (1904), based on his Lowell Institute lectures at Boston, Mass., in 1903, and Shakespeare and the Modern Stage (1906).
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  • He proposed to bring out an edition of Shakespeare by subscription, and many subscribers sent in their names and laid down their money; but he soon found the task so little to his taste that he turned to more attractive employments.
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  • Johnson has frequently blamed Shakespeare for neglecting the proprieties of time and place, and for ascribing to one age or nation the manners and opinions of another.
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  • Yet Shakespeare has not sinned in this way more grievously than Johnson.
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  • He had received large subscriptions for his promised edition of Shakespeare; he had lived on those subscriptions during some years; and he could not without disgrace omit to perform his part of the contract.
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  • This terrible word proved effectual, and in October 1765 appeared, after a delay of nine years, the new edition of Shakespeare.
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  • But, unfortunately, he had altogether neglected that very part of our literature with which it is especially desirable that an editor of Shakespeare should be conversant.
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  • Yet he ventured to publish an edition of Shakespeare, without having ever in his life, as far as can be discovered, read a single scene of Massinger, Ford, Dekker, Webster, Marlow, Beaumont or Fletcher.
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  • Macaulay, it must be noted, exaggerated persistently the poverty of Johnson's pedigree, the squalor of his early married life, the grotesqueness of his entourage in Fleet Street, the decline and fall from complete virtue of Mrs Thrale, the novelty and success of the Dictionary, the complete failure of the Shakespeare and the political tracts.
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  • He read and re-read in early boyhood the Bible, Aesop, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, Weems's Life of Washington and a history of the United States; and later read every book he could borrow from the neighbours, Burns and Shakespeare becoming favourites.
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  • Under the advice of the second Mrs Godwin, and with her active co-operation, he carried on business as a bookseller under the pseudonym of Edward Baldwin, publishing several useful school books and books for children, among them Charles and Mary Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare.
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  • A library edition of his collected works in prose and verse was issued by Mr Bullen from the Shakespeare Head Works, Stratford-on-Avon, in 8 vols., 1908.
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  • Edvard Lembcke (18r5-1897) made himself famous as the admirable translator of Shakespeare, but the incidents of 1864 produced from him some volumes of direct and manly patriotic verse.
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  • Mention must also be made of two dramatists, Peter Thun Feorsom (1777-1817), who produced an excellent translation of Shakespeare (1807-1816), and Thomas Overskou (1798-1873), author of a long series of successful comedies, and of a history of the Danish theatre (5 vols., Copenhagen, 18J4-1864).
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  • The stories on which Shakespeare based several of his plays were supplied by Bandello, probably through Belleforest or Paynter.
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  • The "black despair" which Shakespeare has cast round his dying hours appears to be without historical foundation.
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  • Though utterly baseless, the story gained currency in the Mirrour for Magistrates, and was adopted in Shakespeare's 2 Henry VI.
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  • It may be that to political enmity the tradition of Henry's riotous youth, immortalized by Shakespeare, is partly due.
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  • Shakespeare introduces Siward and his son, whom he calls young Siward, into the tragedy of Macbeth, and represents the old man as saying when he heard that his son's wounds were in front, "Had I as many sons as I have hairs, I would not wish them to a fairer death."
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  • The Malcolm genius of Shakespeare, in his Macbeth, based on Canmore.
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  • The hostile forces met at Shrewsbury, and Shakespeare has made the result immortal.
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  • Between this drama and its successor, Die Brazil von Messina, Schiller translated and adapted to his classic ideals Shakespeare's Macbeth (1801) and Gozzi's Turandot (1802).
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  • The earl of Northumberland took refuge in Wales, and the tripartite alliance of Owen with Percy and Mortimer (transferred by Shakespeare to an earlier occasion) threatened a renewal of danger.
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  • In Paris, in 1827, he saw Charles Kemble and an English company play Shakespeare.
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  • In this thinker, who was his senior by five years, Goethe found the master he sought; Herder taught him the significance of Gothic architecture, revealed to him the charm of nature's simplicity, and inspired him with enthusiasm for Shakespeare and the Volkslied.
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  • With Gotz von Berlichingen, Shakespeare's art first triumphed on the German stage, and the literary movement known as Sturm and Drang was inaugurated.
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  • They appear early in the year, or, as Shakespeare says, "come before the swallow dares, and take the winds of March with beauty."
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  • He was also, though he deplored the conduct of the militants, a decided supporter of woman suffrage; and he took an active interest in, and lent a helping hand to, many social movements, the Working Men's College, Toynbee Hall, the Hampstead Garden Suburb, Children's Country Holidays, the Shakespeare National Memorial, as well as to a number of miscellaneous church societies.
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  • Both his collegiate and editorial duties stimulated his critical powers, and the publication in the two magazines, followed by republication in book form, of a series of studies of great authors, gave him an important place as a critic. Shakespeare, Dryden, Lessing, Rousseau, Dante, Spenser, Wordsworth, Milton, Keats, Carlyle, Thoreau, Swinburne, Chaucer, Emerson, Pope, Gray - these are the principal subjects of his prose, and the range of topics indicates the catholicity of his taste.
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  • It expressed itself at last in the monumental work of Don Quixote, which places Cervantes beside Rabelais, Ariosto and Shakespeare as one of the four supreme exponents of the Renaissance.
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  • What Ariosto is for Italy, Cervantes for Spain, Erasmus for Holland, Luther for Germany, Shakespeare for England, that is Rabelais for France.
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  • Depicting feudalism in the vivid colours of an age at war with feudal institutions, breathing into antique histories the breath of actual life, embracing the romance of Italy and Spain, the mysteries of German legend, the fictions of poetic fancy and the facts of daily life, humours of the moment and abstractions of philosophical speculation, in one homogeneous amalgam instinct with intense vitality, this extraordinary birth of time, with Shakespeare for the master of all ages, left a monument of the Re- naissance unrivalled for pure creative power by any other product of that epoch.
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  • To complete the sketch, we must set Bacon, the expositor of modern scientific method, beside Spenser and Shakespeare, as the third representative of the Renaissance in England.
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  • 1846), who translated Shakespeare into Finnish, and Karl Bergbom (b.
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  • So also Mill is justified in preferring a scene of Shakespeare or an hour's conversation with a friend to a great mass of lower pleasure.
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  • For the relations between Bacon and Ben Jonson see The Tale of the Shakespeare Epitaphs by Francis Bacon (New York, 1888); for Bacon's poetical gifts see an article in the Fortnightly Review (March 1905).
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  • The version of Hamlet for Guizot's Shakespeare was his work.
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  • The gillyflower of Chaucer and Spenser and Shakespeare was, as in Italy, Dianthus Caryophyllus; that of later writers and of gardeners, Matthiola.
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  • He is also the author of translations from Shakespeare and Calderon, and of considerable historical works.
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  • In 1808 he lectured at the Royal Institution, but with little success, and two years later he gave his lectures on Shakespeare and other poets.
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  • Besides furnishing the early playwrights with material for miracle plays, it has supplied episodes and apologues to many a writer, including Boccaccio, John Gower and Shakespeare.
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  • There are possible allusions to him in Shakespeare, and the current clerical notion of him is very unjustly adopted by Marston in the words "wicked Rabelais"; but Bacon described him better as the great jester of France, and a Scot, Sir Thomas Urquhart, translated the earlier books in 1653.
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  • He had occupied the interval in various literary labours, the most important being the notes he contributed to Theobald's edition of Shakespeare, and an anonymous share in a pamphlet on the jurisdiction of the Court of Chancery, The Legal Judicature in Chancery stated (1727).
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  • In 1747 appeared his edition of Shakespeare, into which, as he expressed it, Pope's earlier edition was melted down.
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  • He had previously entrusted notes and emendations on Shakespeare to Sir Thomas Hanmer, whose unauthorized use of them led to a heated controversy.
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  • This, like the scandal concerning Margaret and Suffolk, is baseless; the tradition, however, continued and found expression in the Mirror for Magistrates and in Drayton's Heroical Epistles, as well as in Shakespeare's Henry VI.
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  • Dr Karl Schmidt's Margareta von Anjou, vor and bei Shakespeare (Palaestra, liv., Berlin, 1906) is a useful digest of authorities.
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  • The castle was the scene, according to the tradition which Shakespeare has perpetuated, of the murder of King Duncan by Macbeth, thane of Cawdor (or Calder), in 1040.
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  • We no longer condemn Shakespeare for having violated the ancient dramatic laws, nor Voltaire for having objected to the violations.
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  • His literary taste was conventional, including the standard British writers, with a preference for Shakespeare among the poets, Berkeley among the philosophers, and Montaigne (in Cotton's translation) among the essayists.
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  • His favourite reading was poetry and mystical philosophy: Shakespeare, Dante, George Herbert, Goethe, Berkeley, Coleridge, Swedenborg, Jakob Boehme, Plato, the new Platonists, and the religious books of the East (in translation).
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  • The life of Antony by Plutarch is our main authority; it is upon this that Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra is based.
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  • The word was also used generally for a very young and innocent child, thus Shakespeare, Henry V., ii.
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  • Thus an object of pity as well as awe, he is the most tragic figure in our literature - the only man of his age who could be conceived as affording a groundwork for one of the creations of Shakespeare.
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  • On the death of Mirabeau a few months later, Barnave paid a high tribute to his worth and public services, designating him the Shakespeare of oratory.
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  • Schiller was also translated, and a few plays of Shakespeare (Hamlet, &c.) from a French version.
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  • Terror and pity had never found on the stage word or expression which so exactly realized the ideal aim of tragic poetry among the countrymen of Aeschylus and Sophocles since the time or since the passing of Shakespeare, of Marlowe and of Webster.
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  • Two years afterwards the greatest man born since the death of Shakespeare paid homage to the greatest of his predecessors in a volume of magnificent and discursive eloquence which bore the title of William Shakespeare, and might, as its author admitted and suggested, more properly have been entitled A propos de Shakespeare.
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  • It was undertaken with the simple design of furnishing a preface to his younger son's translation of Shakespeare; a monument of perfect scholarship, of indefatigable devotion, and of literary genius, which eclipses even Urquhart's Rabelais - its only possible competitor; and to which the translator's father prefixed a brief and admirable note of introduction in the year after the publication of the volume which had grown under his hand into the bulk and the magnificence of an epic poem in prose.
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  • In English literature Milton seems to have been more familiar to him than Shakespeare, and Spenser was perhaps more of a favourite with him than either.
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  • He has translated Tegner's Frithiofs Saga, several plays of Shakespeare and some other foreign masterpieces.
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  • The poet Dr Laza Kostich made excellent translations from Shakespeare (King Lear, Romeo and Juliet, King Richard III.), and gave the Servian stage two of its best tragedies: Maxim Tsrnoyevich and Petar Segedinats; also the comedy Gordana.
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  • Sir John Talbot, immortalized by Shakespeare, was several times viceroy; he was almost uniformly successful in the field, but feeble in council.
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  • The Ulster annalists give a very different estimate of the great Talbot from that of Shakespeare: "A son of curses for his venom and a devil for his evils; and the learned say of him that there came not from the time of Herod, by whom Christ was crucified, any one so wicked in evil deeds " (O'Donovan's Four Masters).
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  • It would be hard to name other four men who, within the same period, used Shakespeare's language with equal grace and force.
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  • Thus the " lazy yawning drone," as Shakespeare puts it, has a short shrift when his usefulness to the community is ended.
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  • Chaucer wrote a treatise on the astrolabe; Milton constantly refers to planetary influences; in Shakespeare's King Lear, Gloucester and Edmund represent respectively the old and the new faith.
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  • This at least is the generally accepted theory, although Eclipse's dam is said to have been covered by Shakespeare as well as by Marske.
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  • It is celebrated as the Elsinore of Shakespeare's tragedy of Hamlet, and was the birthplace of Saxo Grammaticus, from whose history the story of Hamlet is derived.
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  • As with the Bible and Shakespeare, his phrases have passed into the common speech, and are used by every one (even in Urdu) without being conscious of their origin.
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  • He brought out an edition of Hegel's works, adapted several of Shakespeare's plays for the theatre, wrote a.
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  • The second is that Shakespeare captures entirely different moods from hilarious good humor to deep depression and remorse closely adjacent to one another.
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  • As one of Shakespeare's comedies, there is sure to be the sub-plots that include romantic intrigue and women in disguise.
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  • Jacobean plays, before Shakespeare, were particularly visceral, and I don't think Alex is going to ignore that!
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  • He was a frequent visitor to Peckham while attending rehearsals of his first major play afore Night Come at the Royal Shakespeare.
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  • Lancaster's involvement in the project is the linguistic annotation of Shakespeare texts.
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  • Determining whether Shakespeare uses archaisms consciously requires a close examination of his language word by word.
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  • A sub-plot, without parallel in Shakespeare, dealt with attempts to weed out racist bigotry from the Met.
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  • I have given the Norton two stars because it isn't completely horrible (it's hard to completely botch Shakespeare ).
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  • Shakespeare Bivvy - Double skin construction from 1000mm PU coated nylon taffeta offers total waterproof protection with the added benefit of minimal condensation.
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  • The Ninagawa Company returns to the Barbican in its 25th birthday year with a production of Shakespeare's tragedy Coriolanus.
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  • In Twelfth Night, also by Shakespeare, a trick is played on Malvolio, a steward to the rich countess Olivia.
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  • Hecat the Witch Queen battles with Love Goddess Venus in a Victorian courtroom to expose the Seven Deadly Sins in Shakespeare.
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  • A housewife has inherited a rare Shakespeare book from a long-lost cousin which could fetch millions at auction.
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  • At the time, it seemed very much like Shakespeare's sole method of creating comedy was to involve cross-dressing.
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  • Her current book-length project, entitled Shakespeare by Design, is on Shakespearean dramaturgy.
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  • Come and watch the eloquence of Shakespeare against the backdrop of Borde Hill.
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  • If BCP is false eloquence, so is Shakespeare.
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  • Enjoy the opportunity for optional excursions to the surrounding environs or plays by the Royal Shakespeare Company.
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  • Entertainment includes music and drama ranging from candlelit evensong in college chapels to Shakespeare in the park.
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  • It would by no means be the first time that the content of a Shakespeare play was dictated by political expediency.
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  • The cast are all first-rate, with special praise due Harry Dickman's sly Shakespeare.
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  • Now a town museum, it was once the home of Thomas Nash who married the girl next door, Shakespeare's granddaughter Elizabeth.
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  • The image is a leafy glade, a take on Shakespeare's Midsummer's Nights Dream.
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  • Dimensions 6'9 " x 8 " (206 x 22cm) £ 17.99 Shakespeare Rod holdall - A holdall for the specialist carp angler.
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  • Sonnet 116, William Shakespeare Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments.
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  • The New Penguin version bears the imprimatur of the Royal Shakespeare Company.
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  • Bill Clinton visited Shakespeare's county of Warwickshire on his final lap of honor.
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  • Al fresco Shakespeare has aways struck me as a peculiar form of British masochism.
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  • This beautiful cottage nestling in the hamlet of Armscote is ideal for touring either Shakespeare's Stratford or the Cotswolds.
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  • The beautiful Shakespeare Rose, which changes from pale pink to dark pink in color, is exclusive to the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.
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  • The 1932 Grade II* listed theater will be transformed to create the best modern playhouse for performing Shakespeare in the world.
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  • Ms Heywood said the finished product would be " the best modern playhouse for Shakespeare in the world " .
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  • Long sonnets by Shakespeare or romantic poems by Browning and Lord Byron are the norm for love poetry.
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  • An edition of Shakespeare edited by himself would be absolutely priceless.
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  • How does the signifier " Shakespeare " function within American popular culture?
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  • But Shakespeare's audience knows that it is a mortal sin to attempt marriage when you are already married.
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  • Hard lines for the poor adapter Shakespeare's sonnets are generally held to be the finest love poems in the English language.
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  • Below is the example of an English sonnet, written by Shakespeare.
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  • When Greenblatt discusses the sources of Shakespeare's inspiration, they are often stunningly banal and overly speculative.
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  • Copy out the four lines of Shakespeare's poem and continue it by adding a stanza or two of your own.
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  • Probably the most well known superstition involves William Shakespeare's Macbeth, which is often called " the Scottish play " by actors.
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  • In some exam syllabuses students may do spoken work for assessment in a GCSE Shakespeare study.
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  • Studying Shakespeare often seems very theoretical because students aren't usually going to put the play on themselves.
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  • Shakespeare, for example, often used a trochee at the start of his predominantly iambic lines.
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  • In 1927 and early 1928, she had walk-ons in the Old Vic's Shakespeare repertory.
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  • Shakespeare acquired a considerable property adjacent to it, retired here after his active life in London, and here died.
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  • The slab over the poet's grave bears the lines beginning "Good friend, for Jesus' sake forbeare To digg the dust enclosed heare"; while the effigy on the mural monument above may well be an authentic representation, though somewhat altered and damaged by time and restoration (see Shakespeare: Portraits).
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  • Apart from the interest attaching to the pleasant country town and its pastoral environment, through their influence traceable in Shakespeare's writings, there are further connexions with himself and his family to be found.
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  • The house adjacent to New Place known as Nash's house was that of Thomas Nash, who married Shakespeare's granddaughter Elizabeth Hall; it is used as a museum.
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  • This panegyric, which is accompanied by a series of epitaphs and is composed in a strain of fearless extravagance, was, as the author declares, written "unfee'd"; it shows that Ford sympathized, as Shakespeare himself is supposed to have done, with the "awkward fate" of the countess's brother, the earl of Essex.
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  • In Perkin Warbeck (printed 1634; probably acted a year later) he chose an historical subject of great dramatic promise and psychological interest, and sought to emulate the glory of the great series of Shakespeare's national histories.
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  • A wholly baseless anecdote, condensed into a stinging epigram by Endymion Porter, asserted that The Lover's Melancholy was stolen by Ford from Shakespeare's papers.
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  • Among lyricists were: Coloman Toth, who is also the author of several epic and dramatic pieces; John Vajda, whose Kisebb Koltemenyek (Minor Poems), published by the Kisfaludy society in 1872, are partly written in the mode of Heine, and are of a pleasing but melancholy character; Joseph Levay, known also as the translator of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus, Taming of the Shrew and Henry I V.; and Paul Gyulai, who, not only as a faultless lyric and epic poet, but as an impartial critical writer, is highly esteemed, and whose Romhdnyi is justly prized as one of the best Magyar poems that has appeared in modern times.
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  • 6 Besides the various translators from the English, as for instance William Gyori, Augustus Greguss, Ladislaus Arany, Sigismond Acs, Stephen Fejes and Eugene Rakosy, who, like those already incidentally mentioned, assisted in the Kisfaludy society's version of Shakespeare's complete works, metrical translations from foreign languages were successfully made by Emil Abranyi, Dr Ignatius Barna, Anthony Varady, Andrew Szabo, Charles Berczy, Julius Greguss, Lewis Doczi, Bela Eredi, Emeric Gaspar and many others.
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  • Meredith, the What is living and what is dead of the Philosophy of Hegel (Macmillan), and the Breviary of Aesthetic (Rice Institute, Texas), the volume Shakespeare, Ariosto and Corneille (Henry Holt & Co., New York), and the Poetry of Dante by Douglas Ainslie.
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  • It was long supposed that the autograph of Shakespeare in a copy of Florio 's translation showed his study of the Essays.
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  • His Declaration of Egregious Popish Impostures (1603) furnished Shakespeare with the names of the spirits mentioned by Edgar in King Lear.
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  • Of course he finds Shakespeare a very "incorrect" author, although he is willing to allow him considerable praise for his vigour.
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  • Georges Eekhoud, born at Antwerp on the 27th of May 1854, was in some ways the most passionately Flemish of the whole group. He described the life of the peasants of his native Flanders with a bold realism, making himself the apologist of the vagabond and the outcast in a series of tragic stories: - Kees Doorik (1883), Kermesses (1883), Nouvelles Kermesses (1887), Le Cycle patibulaire (1892), Mes Communions (1895), Escal Vigor (1899) and La Faneuse d'amour (1900), &c. Nouvelle Carthage (1888) deals with modern Antwerp. In 1892 he produced a striking book on English literature entitled Au siècle de Shakespeare, and has written French versions of Beaumont and Fletcher's Philaster (1895) and of Marlow's Edward II.
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  • When it was thought sufficient to say with Boileau that Corneille excited, not pity or terror, but admiration which was not a tragic passion; or that "D'un seul nom quelquefois le son dur ou bizarre Rend un poeme entier ou burlesque ou barbare;" when Voltaire could think it crushing to add to his exposure of the "infamies" of Theodore - " apres cela comment osons-nous condamner les pieces de Lope de Vega et de Shakespeare?"
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  • That he was the greatest tragic and dramatic poet born since the age of Shakespeare, the appearance of Hernani in 1830 made evident for ever to all but the meanest and most perverse of dunces and malignants.
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  • Shakespeare was the son of Hobgoblin by Aleppo, and consequently the male line of the Darley Arabian would come through these horses instead of through Bartlett's Childers, Squirt, and Marske; the Stud-Book, however, says that Marske was the sire of Eclipse.
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  • I think it is bigger by "twenty hundred thousand times" (my favorite number used by Shakespeare.)
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  • My answer to that begins in the past, in the time of William Shakespeare.
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  • Nearly four hundred years after his death, Shakespeare's works are read and studied around the globe.
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  • Colleges offer degree programs in Shakespeare.
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  • All these things are the same today as they were in Shakespeare's time, and because of that, his stories are still very relevant to us.
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  • I do not remember a time since I have been capable of loving books that I have not loved Shakespeare.
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  • I have since read Shakespeare's plays many times and know parts of them by heart, but I cannot tell which of them I like best.
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  • See Mahood for other examples of Shakespeare 's puns on unspoken words.
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  • Attribution to Shakespeare: Based on the 1600 quarto title page.
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  • Interest in Shakespeare 's alleged Catholicism has revived in recent years.
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  • Today 's editors of scholarly printed editions of Shakespeare co-exist with remarkable harmony.
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  • A plausible early tradition claims Shakespeare was a schoolmaster for some years.
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  • This plaque on the schoolroom wall states that Shakespeare studied in this room.
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  • But Shakespeare 's audience knows that it is a mortal sin to attempt marriage when you are already married.
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  • Hard lines for the poor adapter Shakespeare 's sonnets are generally held to be the finest love poems in the English language.
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  • When Greenblatt discusses the sources of Shakespeare 's inspiration, they are often stunningly banal and overly speculative.
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  • Copy out the four lines of Shakespeare 's poem and continue it by adding a stanza or two of your own.
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  • Probably the most well known superstition involves William Shakespeare 's Macbeth, which is often called " the Scottish play " by actors.
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  • Studying Shakespeare often seems very theoretical because students are n't usually going to put the play on themselves.
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  • Why no thoroughgoing attempt to apply Stoicism to Shakespeare has yet been undertaken is a mystery.
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  • Through the treachery of a surprising white devil, Shakespeare challenges his audiences to spot the true color of villainy.
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  • Many of the clichés and truisms that rival Shakespeare are creeping into our vocabulary.
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  • A prominent theme in the plays of William Shakespeare is that of the ambiguous or unjust accusation of infidelity.
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  • Having a bad disposition; surly: " as valiant as the lion, churlish as the bear " (Shakespeare).
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  • She was a versatile actress, equally at home with the works of Shakespeare or O'Neill.
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  • Iago, the villainous character in Shakespeare 's Othello, seems deep in thought with his eyes lowered.
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  • Jacobean plays, before Shakespeare, were particularly visceral, and I don't think Alex is going to ignore that !
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  • In 1927 and early 1928, she had walk-ons in the Old Vic 's Shakespeare repertory.
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  • Shakespeare is a historian by virtue of creating well-made plays.
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  • The biography gave a fresh, new insight into the life and times of William Shakespeare.
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  • "The world is your oyster" is a paraphrase of a metaphor first used by William Shakespeare.
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  • Baby Names has several offbeat baby name lists you can use for inspiration, ranging from names of Oscar winners to names inspired by Shakespeare.
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  • Andrea and I planned on getting married in Shakespeare Gardens in Central Park.
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  • We were having problems finding Shakespeare Gardens so I called our officiant Diane for help.
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  • This may be as famous as Romeo's pledge to Juliet in Shakespeare's epic.
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  • You'll find hundreds of shower curtains at any given time, printed with all kinds of unusual designs from William Shakespeare, designs to patchwork quilt styles.
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  • Back when Clive Owen was working in theatre doing Shakespeare's plays in 1988, he played Romeo opposite actor Sara-Jane Fenton's Juliet.
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  • The actor is well-known across generations for roles in The English Patient, Pride and Prejudice, Shakespeare in Love, Bridget Jones' Diary, Love Actually, Mamma Mia and What a Girl Wants.
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  • William Shakespeare Cuff bracelet has the following message engraved in the sterling silver: We are such stuff as dreams are made on.
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  • With so many of Shakespeare's heroines disguising themselves as boys, actors found themselves double cross-dressing - boys playing girls playing boys.
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  • There's a few twists and turns here and there that I won't spoil for those who've never seen the corresponding episodes, but Shakespeare this ain't.
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  • Memories are Forever has famous poets such as William Shakespeare and Henry Vaughan.
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  • For example, a beginning reader might study Dr. Seuss and his voice, while a teen might study Shakespeare, Hemingway and modern novelists.
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  • Many classic books are now in the public domain as are works by famous writers like Shakespeare.
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  • Shakespeare once said, " A rose is a rose, is a rose...", and that same philosophy can be applied to any bikini contest.
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  • She took the Oscar home this year for her portrayal of Viola in Shakespeare in Love.
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  • Shakespeare's women make for some fun choices.
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  • Shakespeare's women often disguised themselves as men, allowing for some costume creativity.
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  • Shakespeare's fairies, such as Ariel from The Tempest and all the Midsummer Night's Dream fairies are usually dressed in a simple, classic style, such as with ballet lyrical or woodland-themed costumes.
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  • To paraphrase Shakespeare, "The path to true love never did run straight".
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  • Shakespeare finds a highly eloquent way to express the idea that money can't buy love.
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  • Depending on your personal style and the message you would like to communicate, The Beatles can have just as much to say about love as Shakespeare.
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  • Shakespeare's done it, e.e. cummings has done it - perhaps it's now your turn.
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  • Sonnets grew to enormous popularity under the pen of William Shakespeare.
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  • Robert Browning, William Shakespeare, and even Edgar Allen Poe have all tried mightily to produce written texts that reflect the wonder and the mystery of love.
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  • These erstwhile suitors are the subject of comedies from Shakespeare to Friends, and yet the fact is that it is a reality.
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  • Your partner may eventually forgive the breakup, but that is considerably less likely should you be found to have plagiarized Shakespeare during the process.
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  • The 1996 version, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, used Shakespeare's original lines, but the film's setting was a modern one, with guns instead of swords and cars rather than carriages.
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  • I also performed in a lot of Shakespeare and classical plays in college, and was used to having to memorize a great deal of lines for each show."
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  • Shakespeare said it best when he ruminated on what's in a name, but the truth of the matter is that styles change with the fashion times, and pj's haven't escaped that inevitable evolution.
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  • The plot of West Side Story was inspired by Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, though the action was updated to reflect the current social climate in America.
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  • At some point the human-sized fairies turned into 'wee folk' - Shakespeare's fairies were the size of insects.
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  • Picard is created by Patrick Stewart, a veteran of the Royal Shakespeare Company.
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  • Just as Shakespeare stole from classic Greek and Roman stories, it's not that you have to tell a new story - it's that you have to tell it in a new way.
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  • In fact, Shakespeare is one such author because he named king and queen of the fairies in A Midsummer Night's Dream, Oberon and Titania.
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  • Towards the end of the 16th century, mentions of beautiful but small fairies are found in literature, including the works of Shakespeare.
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  • (probably William Warner), first printed in 1595, which Shakespeare may possibly have used (in MS.) for his Comedy of Errors.
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  • To no town has the memory of one famous son brought wider notoriety than that which the memory of William Shakespeare has brought to Stratford; yet this notoriety sprang into strong growth only towards the end of the 18th century.
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  • The task of preserving for modern eyes the buildings which Shakespeare himself saw was not entered upon until much of the visible connexion with his times had been destroyed.
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  • Shakespeare may have attended the grammar school attached to the old guildhall in Church Street.
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  • In 1757 Voltaire came to reside at Lausanne; and although he took but little notice of the young Englishman of twenty, who eagerly sought and easily obtained an introduction, the establishment of the theatre at Monrepos, where the brilliant versifier himself declaimed before select audiences his own productions on the stage, had no small influence in fortifying Gibbon's taste for the French theatre, and in at the same time abating that "idolatry for the gigantic genius of Shakespeare which is inculcated from our infancy as the first duty of an Englishman."
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  • The Upper Avon, also called the Warwickshire, and sometimes the "Shakespeare" Avon from its associations with the poet's town of Stratford on its banks, is an eastern tributary of the Severn.
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  • The familiar charge, repeated in Shakespeare, of having written Ego et meus rex, while true in fact, is false in intention, because no Latin scholar could put the words in any other order; but it reflects faithfully enough Wolsey's mental attitude.
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  • Siegfried's whole character and career is, indeed, annihilated in the clumsy progress towards this consummation; but Shakespeare might have condoned worse plots for the sake of so noble a result; and indeed Wagner's awkwardness arises mainly from fear of committing oversights.
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  • The oak and sycamore in front of Birnam House, the famed twin trees of Birnam, are believed to be more than 1000 years old, and to be the remnant of the wood of Birnam which Shakespeare immortalized in Macbeth.
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  • In 1763 the first North Bridge, connecting the Old Town with the sloping ground on which afterwards stood the Register House and the theatre in Shakespeare Square, was opened; a little later the Nor' Loch was partially drained, and the bridging of the Cowgate in 1785 encouraged expansion southwards.
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  • He accordingly returned in 1871 to England from Italy, where he was studying, and modelled the figures of Shakespeare, Fame and Clio, which were rendered in marble and in bronze.
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  • Lounsbury's Shakespeare and Voltaire (1902) may also be specified.
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  • With the splendour of the full moon falling upon him, his hand clasping his Shakespeare, and looking, as we are told, almost unearthly in the majestic beauty of his old age, Tennyson passed away at Aldworth on the night of the 6th of October 1892.
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  • Roubiliac's statue of Shakespeare, for which Garrick sat, and for which he paid the sculptor three hundred guineas, was originally placed in a small temple at Hampton, and is now in the entrance hall at the British Museum.
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  • Shakespeare was undoubtedly the greatest master the English language has ever known and, quite probably, will ever know.
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  • But first we must go further back, from Shakespeare at the end of the sixteenth century to Plato around 370 BC.
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  • I cannot tell exactly when I began Lamb's "Tales from Shakespeare"; but I know that I read them at first with a child's understanding and a child's wonder.
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  • After thinking a little while, she added, 'I think Shakespeare made it very terrible so that people would see how fearful it is to do wrong.'
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  • It also offers lists for the United States presidents, the plays of Shakespeare, and Constitutional Amendments.
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  • To paraphrase Shakespeare, there are more things in heaven and earth than man can possibly account for.
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  • Highlights: Shaw was a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, a playwright and novelist.
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  • He greatly increased his political information, and also acquired, from the study of the Bible and Shakespeare, a wonderful knowledge of English.
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  • Had Shakespeare treated it, he would hardly have contented himself with investing the hero with the nobility given by Ford to this personage of his play, - for it is hardly possible to speak of a personage as a character when the clue to his conduct is intentionally withheld.
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  • He brings back Shakespeare, the poet.
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  • As with Shakespeare and Beethoven, the day will never come when we can measure the influence of so vast a mind upon the history of art.
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  • As high a degree of originality may be shown in transformation as in invention, as Moliere and Shakespeare have proved in the region of dramatic art.
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