Service sentence examples

service
  • The service was a most pleasant experience.

  • Your service is eternally appreciated.

  • I just had dinner and the service was a little slow.

  • You're saying it's sinful if you go to a whore house, but take-out service is acceptable?

  • Mayer was something else—have a service, bury the guy in absentia and get him the hell off the books.

  • A number of those in attendance asked if the service was still on for seven o'clock.

  • No one answered until Dean finally said, "The bus service stinks."

  • Mrs. Lincoln attempted to attend the service but was chased away.

  • I know the service, and it is my habit orders strictly to obey.

  • During his service, chiefly as an adjutant, Prince Andrew had seen the anterooms of many important men, and the different types of such rooms were well known to him.

  • I can't imagine them missing her Aunt Rose Abbott's service or at least calling in with their status.

  • I ought to get a public service medal.

  • She dressed in a comfortable uniform marking her as a civilian member of the government service before hesitating to choose what uniforms to bring: the summer- or winter-weight uniforms.

  • Her service as a teacher of English is not to be measured by her own skill in composition.

  • A few weeks later Dean was discharged from the service and he gravitated back to Parkside and, temporarily he thought, to Collingswood Avenue.

  • "Are these the troops?" a blond woman asked, dressed in tactical clothing and sporting advanced weaponry that reminded Brady just how elite the positions in the special protective service were considered.

  • The description of that vehicle is plastered at every toll booth, state police barracks and wire service from here to California and back.

  • "I'm sorry Martha missed her aunt's service but flying on short notice is iffy," I added.

  • He suspected Death always thought him weaker despite service that had been, until now, flawless.

  • To such the State renders comparatively small service, and a slight tax is wont to appear exorbitant, particularly if they are obliged to earn it by special labor with their hands.

  • The Service before everything.

  • She was free of service to Tim, of the fourteen-hour days and political games.

  • Speranski went on to say that honor, l'honneur, cannot be upheld by privileges harmful to the service; that honor, l'honneur, is either a negative concept of not doing what is blameworthy or it is a source of emulation in pursuit of commendation and rewards, which recognize it.

  • I got him his appointment in the service, said the prince disdainfully.

  • All were silently crossing themselves, and the reading of the church service, the subdued chanting of deep bass voices, and in the intervals sighs and the shuffling of feet were the only sounds that could be heard.

  • He reported his visit to the post-memorial service gathering at the Byrne's home as uneventful, adding Cynthia's mother was "a real charmer."

  • We are grateful for your service, you may go.

  • "How can I be of service?" he asked.

  • The service ended in 40 minutes with the priest extending an invitation for friends to return to Mrs. Byrne's home.

  • That was a nice touch sending old Arthur to the memorial service to repre­sent the firm.

  • By the time we'd finished our meal, with a piece of cake, there wasn't much time before the service was to begin and the pastor excused himself to prepare.

  • We're...going to have a service next week.

  • He'd be at the service next week and not to see if a missing man would turn up in veiled drag, but simply because Cynthia Byrne told him she'd be pleased with his presence.

  • His blue mood following the memorial service dissipated with the passing days and he remained in fair spirits.

  • Thanks to Anna Mikhaylovna's efforts, his own tastes, and the peculiarities of his reserved nature, Boris had managed during his service to place himself very advantageously.

  • After the service, Alex was unusually silent.

  • After the service and obligatory greetings, hand shakings and pats-on-the-back, Willard and I returned to his office.

  • "Memorial service," Dean corrected him.

  • The latter are dug up with the tusks; the left one being generally employed in this service, and thus becoming much more worn than its fellow.

  • When it was time for the church service to begin, she was in such a state of excitement that I thought it best to take her away; but Captain Keller said, "No, she will be all right."

  • In the midst of the service the voices of the priests suddenly ceased, they whispered to one another, and the old servant who was holding the count's hand got up and said something to the ladies.

  • The death-dealer before him was newer, with less than a few decades in the service of Death.

  • I knew about Princes because I took Ed to her for stud service back in January.

  • People at the memorial service had contradictory stories and when Howie pressed them, no one seemed to have any real facts.

  • They're holding a memorial service for Jeffrey Byrne next week.

  • He knew the old man wouldn't miss the service and spotted him in the far right corner.

  • The service on Christmas Eve day was, of course, about Jesus.

  • The service lasted just under an hour and consisted mostly of Reverend Humphries preaching against giving in to the devil's temptation for wicked bodily desires.

  • The exhausted couple stopped at a service station to fill the tires to their proper level.

  • Two more black-clad protective service members with weapons drawn stood nearby, one a safe distance behind the lunatic and the other near the cliff.

  • "If I don't see you next week at the service, it won't be because I didn't try to get there," he added.

  • If you must know, Ethel couldn't make it to the service and thought the firm should be represented.

  • His attempts to avoid his predestined path are unsuccessful: he is not received into the Russian service, and the appointment he seeks in Turkey comes to nothing.

  • The tipster is doing a wonderful service for the country.

  • A comely, fresh-looking old man was conducting the service with that mild solemnity which has so elevating and soothing an effect on the souls of the worshipers.

  • We'll do some service tomorrow, said he, sniffing its nostrils and kissing it.

  • This aunt I never met... or maybe I did but don't know it... she thinks I'm like practically a priest and she wants me to do all this stuff at the memorial service, for our side of the family!

  • It means I can trade you a good or service for an intermediate store of value known as money, and then trade that money to the person who actually has the goods I want.

  • When the communion service began, she smelt the wine, and sniffed so loud that every one in the church could hear.

  • It's in the Emperor's service... it can't be helped... one is sometimes a bit hasty on parade...

  • At the descent of the high steep hill, down which a winding road led out of the town past the cathedral on the right, where a service was being held and the bells were ringing, Pierre got out of his vehicle and proceeded on foot.

  • Denisov, dissatisfied with the government on account of his own disappointments in the service, heard with pleasure of the things done in Petersburg which seemed to him stupid, and made forcible and sharp comments on what Pierre told them.

  • I considered telling her the tipster was ill and out of service for a few days but common sense dictated that doing so might encourage someone to commit a crime in the tipster's absence.

  • Cynthia's mother was due on Sunday and would stay through the memorial service on Tuesday.

  • The chanting of the service ceased, and the voice of the priest was heard respectfully congratulating the dying man on having received the sacrament.

  • From habit she scrutinized the ladies' dresses, condemned the bearing of a lady standing close by who was not crossing herself properly but in a cramped manner, and again she thought with vexation that she was herself being judged and was judging others, and suddenly, at the sound of the service, she felt horrified at her own vileness, horrified that the former purity of her soul was again lost to her.

  • Dean sensed his wife looked forward to the service and it helped her to come to terms with her son's sudden marriage.

  • While Pumpkin Green was not at this week's mass, or probably any other service within miles of Ouray, Billy Langstrom's partner in love Melissa attended.

  • Looks like he ate his service revolver, but the jury's still out.

  • Dean arrived just as the service was beginning, having been at his desk since 7 a.m. stewing over the recent turn of events.

  • What's more, the Internet can be a fact checker, post office, Rolodex, Yellow Pages, White Pages, game board, garage sale, university, movie theater, jukebox, matchmaking service, travel agent, photo album, bank, support group ...

  • It will verify the credentials of any service people who come by.

  • While military service was less important to securing work in commerce, that was not a particularly noteworthy occupation.

  • A thanksgiving service was arranged, Kutuzov was awarded the Grand Cross of Maria Theresa, and the whole army received rewards.

  • Rostov was particularly in need of money now that the troops, after their active service, were stationed near Olmutz and the camp swarmed with well-provisioned sutlers and Austrian Jews offering all sorts of tempting wares.

  • And the two friends told each other of their doings, the one of his hussar revels and life in the fighting line, the other of the pleasures and advantages of service under members of the Imperial family.

  • Because when once a man starts on military service, he should try to make as successful a career of it as possible.

  • "What year did you enter the service?" he asked with that affectation of military bluntness and geniality with which he always addressed the soldiers.

  • When the service was over the governor's wife beckoned him to her.

  • After explaining the situation and giving her address, she turned down the road toward the nearest public area – a service station 2 miles away.

  • She'd been trying for years to have his voluntary service revoked.

  • After the Austerlitz campaign Prince Andrew had firmly resolved not to continue his military service, and when the war recommenced and everybody had to serve, he took a post under his father in the recruitment so as to avoid active service.

  • My father is chief in command of the Third District, and my only way of avoiding active service is to serve under him.

  • Ryland worked for the National Forest Service and regaled Donnie with tales of the outdoor splendors of the Colorado mountains.

  • "The number six and nine lifts service most of the double black diamond runs," Dean said to Fred with a smile as the old man glided to a wide stop.

  • If an incident occurred, why was no one else in the government service housing community awake?

  • They were given reasonable service and whispered offers to, "Stay three nights, the next one's free, and we'll give you a receipt for four."

  • "Chief Inspector Hercule O'Connor, at your service," he answered, with a bow.

  • Her mother was to arrive the next day and stay through the memorial service on the following Wednesday.

  • Things are a little hectic around here planning for the memorial service next week.

  • "I guess we'll be having the Memorial Service on Tuesday after all," she said.

  • This makes business a meritocracy and encourages business owners to focus on quality, service, and reputation since these are so easy for customers to check.

  • I have come, and am at your service to help you nurse my uncle.

  • The sick man was given something to drink, there was a stir around him, then the people resumed their places and the service continued.

  • On leaving the bed both Prince Vasili and the princess passed out by a back door, but returned to their places one after the other before the service was concluded.

  • "As far as the service goes he is quite punctilious, your excellency; but his character..." said Timokhin.

  • From early in the morning, wearing a dressing jacket, she attended to her household affairs, and then she drove out: on holy days to church and after the service to jails and prisons on affairs of which she never spoke to anyone.

  • In their service he risked his skin and his life twenty times a year, and in their service had lost more horses than the money he had from them would buy.

  • But while Nicholas was considering these questions and still could reach no clear solution of what puzzled him so, the wheel of fortune in the service, as often happens, turned in his favor.

  • When the service was over, Kutuzov stepped up to the icon, sank heavily to his knees, bowed to the ground, and for a long time tried vainly to rise, but could not do so on account of his weakness and weight.

  • But if I were right, I should be rendering a service to my Fatherland for which I am ready to die.

  • Though Petya would remain in the service, this transfer would give the countess the consolation of seeing at least one of her sons under her wing, and she hoped to arrange matters for her Petya so as not to let him go again, but always get him appointed to places where he could not possibly take part in a battle.

  • The church bells everywhere were ringing for service, just as usual on Sundays.

  • Who would have said that I should be a soldier and a captain of dragoons in the service of Bonaparte, as we used to call him?

  • There were the same receptions and balls, the same French theater, the same court interests and service interests and intrigues as usual.

  • Several churches of different denominations are open, and divine service is performed in them unhindered.

  • Enjoy a full service bar with bottled and draft beer or wine.

  • Reservations are a must at this hip locale where you'll encounter world-class service and a tantalizing menu filled with unique recipes.

  • Service is top priority at this restaurant, with the staff having three tables each.

  • Hotel amenities include complimentary shuttle service, fitness center, spa, swimming pool, on-site parking, express check-in and complimentary breakfast.

  • Shared guest amenities include business services, such as copying and faxing, evening turn-down service, a concierge desk and local restaurant delivery.

  • The amazing, super-fast service is made even better by a bilingual wait staff and inexpensive pricing.

  • The hotel offers patio dining, catering service, carry out and a private party room.

  • The classic, white-linen dining room is elegant, service is impeccable, and the steaks--hand-selected, aged and grilled to perfection--are the best you'll ever sink your teeth into.

  • Have you chosen a post in which you might be of service to your neighbor?

  • More like paying for a service – you know, like babysitting.

  • They're going to hold a memorial service for Byrne at the Catholic Church.

  • Passenger steamship service was transferred to a new 5 ac. pier on the lake front, built at a cost of $500,000.

  • Domestic service - - - 223,861 791,176 1,015,037

  • Public service.

  • At the evening service a litany is rarely used.

  • Although the restaurant is under new management, this hasn't done a thing to diminish the quality of the food and service.

  • It also offers a delivery service and off-site catering services.

  • Dinner service is upscale, in ambiance, menu prices and dress--business casual.

  • Not only is their beer and wine selection extensive, but they also provide take out service and a children's menu.

  • The restaurant has full service bar and variety of food to meet all tastes.

  • There is nightly entertainment at the hotel and a full service bar for customers to enjoy.

  • There is a ferry service available if you want to take your car over to the island.

  • The restaurant has a full service bar with great selection of wine, beer and spirits.

  • Whether you choose to dine in or have your food delivered, you will be impressed with the speed of the service.

  • Indian restaurants are not plentiful in this city--there is only one--but it makes up for its monopoly with delicious food and friendly service.

  • Featuring a full bar and take-out service, this casual establishment brings some south of the border flavor to the top of the mountain.

  • While the pub will make reservations for those seeking special accommodations, a standard dinner service is strictly on a first come, first served basis.

  • Diners can eat-in, take-out or order delivery service for both lunch and dinner.

  • After a day of hiking and exercise, the city offers many options for entertainment and experience with the local culture through its varied clubs, bars, exercise groups and service organizations.

  • The restaurant's atmosphere is casual to the point that you can order to-go; the food and service are impeccable.

  • Seasonal options, as well as a full beverage service may be added.

  • Almost two hundred years old, this tavern establishment provides friendly service and proximity to a number of fantastic wineries.

  • After the service he asked Mr. Warren, the organist to play for me.

  • To be in Anna Pavlovna's drawing room he considered an important step up in the service, and he at once understood his role, letting his hostess make use of whatever interest he had to offer.

  • I began the service from the lower grade.

  • Moro's is very small and does not accept reservations, but once you sit down, the service is extremely attentive.

  • Nightly turn-down service adds a touch of pampering, while in-room massage and aromatherapy treatments rejuvenate the mind and body.

  • The work of blockade, and of harassing the Confederates on the coast and the rivers of the Atlantic seaboard, called for much service in boats, and entailed a great deal of exposure.

  • Howie was the only other person in attendance for the service.

  • When is the service?

  • She asked if I thought Martha would fly out for the funeral or memorial service.

  • I told her Julie was sleeping after a distressing funeral service.

  • He just calls room service.

  • He grumbled something about getting one of those "take a number" dispensers the big city post offices had, right below their self-serving signs applauding their high level of service.

  • I was off in the service.

  • She snapped the markers indicating her rank—Special Assistant to the Undersecretary of the Domestic Security Service.

  • He sponsored my entrance into government service.

  • I told Tim I was done with government service.

  • According to the National Weather Service, this is a doozy of a storm.

  • So why was he at the Byrne memorial service?

  • She was buried on Friday and Dean attended yet another burial service.

  • She called Alex again, before she left the barn, but it went to his answering service.

  • It seemed that recently all his father talked about was his days in the service.

  • In a variety of ways it does a great deal of social service similar to that of gilds of help. Its administration has always been in the hands of laymen, and it works through local "conferences" or branches, the general council having been suspended because it declined to accept a cardinal as its official head.

  • In a personal interview Metternich offered to take him into the government service.

  • About 1583 Antonio took this son to France, where he became a page in the service of Catherine de' Medici, wife of King Henry II.

  • In due time he entered the military service, and fought through the civil wars until the peace in 1598.

  • he led a studious life until, when war broke out, he entered the service of the republic of Venice and served with distinction in the field.

  • His long term of service in the House, his leadership of his party on its floor, his candidacy for the speakership, and his recent election to the United States Senate, marked him out as the available man.

  • He was brought up in the merchant service, and entered the United States navy as a lieutenant in 1798.

  • By the end of the month he was ready for service with a squadron of eight ships and brigs, and some small craft.

  • He was appointed inspector-general of higher education in 1876, and after his election as life senator in 1881 he continued to take an active interest in educational questions, especially as affected by compulsory military service.

  • Santarosa entered the service of Napoleon during the annexation of Piedmont to France, and was sub-prefect of Spezia from 1812 to 1814.

  • He remained, however, loyal in sentiment to the house of Savoy, and, after the restoration of the king of Sardinia in 1814, he continued in the public service.

  • Passing into the service of Uruguay, he was sent to Corrientes with a small flotilla to oppose Rosas's forces, but was overtaken by Admiral Brown, against whose fleet he fought for three days.

  • This system is of much service in following out mathematical, physical and chemical problems in which it is necessary to represent four variables.

  • He had behaved like a cowardly recruit who mutilates himself to escape military service.

  • Paupers, insane, and those convicted of treason, felony or bribery in an election are barred, " while the disability continues," and no person in the military, naval or marine service of the United States is deemed.

  • William Westbury, who left New College, "transferring himself to the king's service," in May 1442, and appears in the first extant Eton Audit Roll1444-1445as headmaster, was probably such from May 1442.

  • In China at the present day many Taoist gods are (or are given out as) men deified for service to the state.

  • He hoped to see further service, but the queen was opposed to this, and he was removed from the navy, and given the honorary post of colonel-general of hussars.

  • There is also a weekly French service between Porto Torres and Ajaccio in Corsica.

  • ' The discharge certificates of sailors from the Classis Misenas and Classis Ravennatis belonged to Sardinians who had returned home after service in those fleets.

  • After studying law at the universities of Leipzig and Göttingen, he entered the service of the prince of Nassau-Weilburg, whom in 1791 he represented at the imperial diet.

  • He entered the university of Göttingen, but soon left, and, taking service in the Austrian army, took part in the Russian campaign of 1812, and fought in the following year at Dresden, Kulm and Leipzig.

  • He then entered the Dutch service, took part in the campaigns of 1815, and, after studying another year at Heidelberg, was member for Luxemburg of the military commission of the German federal diet (1824, 1825).

  • Leaving the service after the war, he studied jurisprudence at Heidelberg, Göttingen and Jena, and in 1819 went for a while to Geneva to complete his studies.

  • Later on he attempted to influence the Prussian Northern Union in the direction of the national policy, and he took part in the sessions of the Erfurt parliament; but, soon realizing the hopelessness of any good results from the vacillating policy of Prussia, he retired from the contest, and, as a major in the service of the SchleswigHolstein government, took part in the Danish War of 1850.

  • Throughout the revolutionary years he supported his brother's policy, became a member of the Erfurt parliament, and, after the collapse of the national movement, returned to the service of the duchy of Nassau.

  • In 1855 he turned Roman Catholic and entered the Austrian service as court and ministerial councillor in the department of foreign affairs.

  • Ecclesiastical immunities, such as reservation of the criminal cases of the clergy, exemption from military service and other privileges, are expressly maintained in a certain number of pacts.

  • He appeared on the 6th of March before the standing committee of the two Houses to explain his conduct, when he stated that he had come over because he saw danger to the Protestant religion in the king's service, and expressed his willingness to take the Covenant.

  • In July 1644 he went to Dorsetshire on military service, and on the 3rd of August received a commission as field-marshal general.

  • His military service terminated at the time of the Self-denying Ordinance in 1645; he had associated himself with the Presbyterian faction, and naturally enough was not included in the New Model.

  • He pressed on the Exclusion Bill with all his power, and, when that and the inquiry into the payments for secret service and the trial of the five peers, for which too he had been eager, were brought to an end by a sudden prorogation, he is reported to have declared aloud that he would have the heads of those who were the king's advisers to this course.

  • But Samuel's fame rests on the service which he rendered in adapting the life of the Jews of the diaspora to the law of the land.

  • He was educated partly privately and partly at a board school, and in 1886 entered the Civil Service.

  • He sat on various royal commissions, including those on the Civil Service and Venereal Diseases, and from 1917 to 1919 was again chairman of the Independent Labour party.

  • He himself was a prebendary of St Paul's, and was also a clerk in the service of William II.

  • by bringing about the marriage of his pupil with Mademoiselle de Blois, a natural but legitimated daughter of the king; and for this service he was rewarded with the gift of the abbey of St Just in Picardy.

  • Accordingly, in May 1617, Descartes set out for the Netherlands and took service in the army of Prince Maurice of Orange.

  • On the death of this general Descartes quitted the imperial service, and in July 1621 began a peaceful tour through Moravia, the borders of Poland, Pomerania, Brandenburg, Holstein and Friesland, from which he reappeared in February 1622 in Belgium, and betook himself directly to his father's home at Rennes in Brittany.

  • Fortunately the Cartesian method had already done its service, even where the theories were rejected.

  • From this time onwards his life was one of incessant toil; he was continually engaged in the active service of his order, was frequently travelling upon long and tedious journeys, and was constantly consulted on affairs of state by the reigning pontiff.

  • Shortly afterwards he refused to swear allegiance to the new imperial government, and was dismissed the service.

  • His chief innovation was the introduction of payment from the public treasury for state service.

  • His chief enactments relate to the payment of citizens for State service.

  • In 1553 the commissioners of chantries sold the chapel to the inhabitants to be continued as a place of divine service.

  • Two lines of steamers, an English and a Turkish, furnish an inadequate service between Basra and Bagdad, but there is no steam navigation on the river above the latter city.

  • Only where the cities were held by garrisons in the Persian service, garrisons composed mainly of Greek mercenaries, was the liberator likely to meet with any resistance.

  • His rule was most energetic; but while he favoured the barbarians in the imperial service, and appointed them to high office, Valentinian, openly jealous of his minister, sought to surround himself with Romans.

  • service of the East India company and sailed for Fort St David; here he showed himself very industrious, made the acquaintance of Robert Clive and rose rapidly from one position to another.

  • Baumgarten did good service in severing aesthetics from the other philosophic disciplines, and in marking out a definite object for its researches.

  • Two important educational establishments are the Indian Institute for the education of civil service students for thecolonies, to which is attached an ethnographical museum; and the Royal Polytechnic school, which almost ranks as a university, and teaches, among other sciences, that of diking.

  • Avicenna's chief reward for this service was access to the royal library of the Samanids (q.v.), well-known patrons of scholarship and scholars.

  • At first he entered into the service of a high-born lady; but ere long the amir, hearing of his arrival, called him in as medical attendant, and sent him back with presents to his dwelling.

  • The remaining ten or twelve years of Avicenna's life were spent in the service of Abu Ya`far 'Ala Addaula, whom he accompanied as physician and general literary and scientific adviser, even in his numerous campaigns.

  • Many Anglican bishops (amongst them the archbishop of York and most of his suffragans) felt so doubtful as to the wisdom of such an assembly that they refused to attend it, and Dean Stanley declined to allow Westminster Abbey to be used for the closing service, giving as his reasons the partial character of the assembly, uncertainty as to the effect of its measures and "the presence of prelates not belonging to our Church."

  • On one occasion when Colonel Napier was called from home on foreign service, these papers, together with a portrait of John Napier and a Bible with his autograph, were deposited for safety in a room of the house at Milliken, in Renfrewshire.

  • Another educational reform, the opening of the Indian civil service to competition, took place at the same time, and Jowett was one of the commission.

  • They were unanimous in adopting the idea of a church in which all the members were priests under the Lord Jesus, the One High Priest and Ruler; the officers of which were not mediators between men and God, but preachers of One Mediator, Christ Jesus; not lords over God's heritage, but ensamples to the flock and ministers to render service.

  • They were unanimous in regarding ministerial service as mainly pastoral; preaching, administering the sacraments and visiting from house to house; and, further, in perceiving that Christian ministers must be also spiritual rulers, not in virtue of any magical influence transmitted from the Apostles, but in virtue of their election by the Church and of their appointment in the name of the Lord Jesus.

  • On the whole, the preponderating preference has always been in favour of so-called extemporaneous, or free prayer; and the Westminster Directory of Public Worship has to a large extent stereotyped the form and order of the service in most Presbyterian churches.

  • The heroic defence of Londonderry owed much to them, as they were a majority of the population, and some of their ministers rendered conspicuous service.

  • During the sedition of the "green" and "blue" parties of the circus (known as the Nika sedition, 532) he did Justinian good service, effectually crushing the rebels who had proclaimed Hypatius emperor.

  • Both of these men made important contributions to science, and rendered an inestimable service to the country, not only through their publications but also through the interest they aroused in scientific research.

  • A bureau of meteorology was afterwards created at Cordoba which has rendered valuable service.

  • The service is governed by the international telegraph regulations, but is subject to local inspection and interruption in times of political disorder.

  • Owing to the great distances which must be covered, and also to the defective means of communication in sparsely settled districts, the costs of the postal service in Argentina are unavoidably high in relation to the receipts.

  • Compulsory attendance of young men at national guard drills is enforced for at least two months of the year, under penalty of enforced service in the Line.

  • There are about 320 officers in active service, and the total personnel ranges from 5000 to 6000 men.

  • The service is not popular, and it is recruited by means of conscription from the national guard, the term of service being two years.

  • The revenue of the republic is derived mainly from customs and excise, and the largest item of expenditure is the service of the public debt.

  • 79,174,400 Total service on funded debt, 19 and $15,914,335 paper .

  • Four years later (1520) the Portuguese seaman, Ferdinand Magellan, entered the estuary in his celebrated voyage round the world, undertaken in the service of the king of Spain (Charles I., better known as the emperor Charles V.).

  • This great navigator had already won renown in the service of Henry VII.

  • object of training the able-bodied citizens of Buenos Aires in military exercises and creating a volunteer army, ready for service if called upon, to withstand by force the pretensions of their opponents.

  • service (agents).

  • See also BANKS AND BANKING; SAVINGS BANKS; POST AND POSTAL SERVICE.

  • The municipal police is divided into two principal branchesthe service in uniform of the agents de police and the service out of uniform of ins pecteurs de police.

  • The Customs(douane), at one time only a branch of the administration of the contributions indirectes, were organized in 1869 as a special service.

  • The service in the departments comprises brigades, which are actually engaged in guarding the frontiers, and a clerical staff (service de bureau) entrusted with the collection of the duties.

  • The collection of these excise duties as well as the sale of matches, tobacco and gunpowder to retailers, is assigned to a special service in each department subordinated to a central administration.

  • The chief item of expenditure (which totalled 148 million pounds in 1905) is the service of the public debt, which in 1905 cost 483/4 million pounds sterling.

  • The chief expenses of the departments are the care of pauper children and lunatics, the maintenance of high-roads and the service of the departmental debt.

  • Recruiting and Strength.EJniversal compulsory service was adopted after the disasters of 1870-1871, though in principle it had been established by Marshal Niels reforms a few years before that date.

  • Compulsory service with the colors is in Germany no longer universal, as there are twice as many able-bodied men presented by the recruiting commissions as the active army can absorb.

  • This law naturally made a deep impression on military Europe, not merely because the period of color service was reducedGermany had taken this step years beforebut because of the almost entire absence of the usual exemptions.

  • Even bread-winners are required to serve, the state pensioning their dependants (75 centimes per diem, up to 10% of the strength) during their period of service.

  • Dispensations, and also the one-year voluntariat, which had become a short cut for the so-called intellectual class to employment in the civil service rather than a means of training reserve officers, were abolished.

  • In 1904, under the old system of three-years service with numerous total and partial exemptions, 324,253 men became liable to incorporation, of whom 25,432 were rejected as unfit, 55,265 were admitted as one-year volunteers, 62,160 were put back, 27,825 had already enlisted with a view to making the army a career, 5257 were taken for the navy, and thus, with a few extra details and casualties, the contingent for full service dwindled to 147,549 recruits.

  • It is at the disposal of the minister of war, who can decree the recall of all men discharged to the reserve the previous year and all those whose time of service has for any reason been shortened.

  • The Territorial Army and its reserve (members of which undergo two short periods of training) are, however, allocated to local service.

  • The reserves of the active army and the Territorial Army and its reserve can only be recalled to active service in case of emergency and by decree of the head of the state.

  • The total service rendered by the individual soldier is thus twenty-five years.

  • The full number of persons liable to be called upon for military service and engaged in such service is calculated (1908) as 4,800,000, of whom 1,350,000 of the active army and the younger classes of army reserve would constitute the field armies set on foot at the outbreak of war.

  • But in 1908, owing to the prevailing want of trained soldiers in France, it was proposed to set free the white troops in Algeria by applying the principles of universal service to the natives, as in Tunis.

  • The non-commissioned officers are, as usual in universal service armies, drawn partly from men who voluntarily enlist at a relatively early age, and partly from men who at the end of their compulsory period of service are re-engaged.

  • Such re-engagements are for one to three years effective service but may be extended to fifteen.

  • They date from the time of the legal expiry of each mans cornptilsory active service.

  • Rengags receive a bounty, a ~iigher rate of pay and a pension at the conclusion of their service.

  • There are also directors of stores, of naval construction, of the medical service, and of the submarine defences (which are concerned with torpedoes, mines and torpedo-boats), as well as of naval ordnance and works, The prefect directs the operations of the arsenal, and is responsible for its efficiency and for that of the ships which are there in reserve.

  • The inscript usually begins his service at the age of twenty and passes through a period of obligatory service lasting seven years, and generally comprising five years of active service and two years furlough.

  • Other schools are the school of naval medicine at Bordeaux with annexes at Toulon, Brest and Rochefort; schools of torpedoes and mines and of gunnery at Toulon, &c., &c. The coles dhydro graphic established at various ports are for theoretical training for the higher grades of the merchant service.

  • In 1792 he entered the public service during the administration of General Dumouriez.

  • A steam railway ferry connects it with the island railway on Riigen, and so with Sassnitz, whence a regular steamboat mail service affords communication with Trelleborg in Sweden.

  • Matriculating at the university of Gottingen in 1811, he began by devoting himself to astronomy under Carl Friedrich Gauss; but he enlisted in the Hanseatic Legion for the campaign of 1813 - 14, and became lieutenant of artillery in the Prussian service in 1815.

  • One remarkable discovery, however, of general interest, was the outcome of a long series of delicate weighings and minute experimental care in the determination of the relative density of nitrogen gas - undertaken in order to determine the atomic weight of nitrogen - namely, the discovery of argon, the first of a series of new substances, chemically inert, which occur, some only in excessively minute quantities, as constituents of the 1 The barony was created at George IV.'s coronation in 1821 for the wife of Joseph Holden Strutt, M.P. for Maldon (1790-1826) and Okehampton (1826-1830), who had done great service during the French War as colonel of the Essex militia.

  • He entered the Austrian army as an infantry officer in 1801, and saw much service in the Napoleonic wars.

  • LEVITES, or sons of Levi (son of Jacob by Leah), a sacred caste in ancient Israel, the guardians of the temple service at Jerusalem.'

  • - Although the legal basis for the final stage is found in the legislation of the time of Moses (latter part of the second millennium B.C.), it is in reality scarcely earlier than the 5th century B.C., and the Jewish theory finds analogies when developments of the Levitical service are referred to David (I Chron.

  • However intelligible may be the notion of a tribe reserved for priestly service, the fact that it does not apply to early biblical history is apparent from the heterogeneous details of the Levitical divisions.

  • The date of the evidence, however, has not been fixed with unanimity, and this very The musical service of the temple has no place in the Pentateuch, but was considerably developed under the second temple and attracted the special attention of Greek observers (Theophrastus, apud Porphyry, de Abstin.

  • A more directly religious element, it is true, was introduced by the practice of attending the synagogue service; but it is to be The grammatical inflexions of the word "Sabbath" would show that it is a feminine form, properly shabbat-t for shabbat-t.

  • remembered that this service was primarily regarded not as an act of worship but as a meeting for instruction in the law.

  • The Rhodian navy, which had distinguished itself in most of these wars, did further good service on behalf of Pompey in his campaigns against the pirates and against Julius Caesar.

  • The Senate was to consist of the same number of members (not less than six) for each state, the term of service being six years, but subject to an arrangement that half the number would retire every three years.

  • Bills imposing taxation or appropriating revenue must not originate in the Senate, and neither taxation bills nor bills appropriating revenue for the annual service of the government may be amended in the Senate, but the Senate may return such bills to the House of Representatives with a request for their amendment.

  • Aloys Karolyi entered the Austrian diplomatic service, and was attached successively to embassies at various European capitals.

  • His father, Mathieu de Lesseps (1774-1832), was in the consular service; hi$ mother, Catherine de Grivegnee, was Spanish, and aunt of the countess of Montijo, mother of the empress Eugenie.

  • de Lesseps then retired from the diplomatic service, and never afterwards occupied any public office.

  • A first scheme, indicated by him, was immediately drawn out by two French engineers who were in the Egyptian service, MM.

  • The town became the headquarters of the Royal Artillery on the establishment of a separate branch of this service in the reign of George I.

  • A second great service was the publication in the British Association Reports for 1833 of his "Report on the Recent Progress and Present State of certain branches of Analysis."

  • had seen much service in the Roman armies, and was a man of statesmanlike ability.

  • After the outbreak of the civil war, he was recalled by Caesar in 49, and entered his service, but took no active part against his old patron Pompey.

  • Joining a Polish artillery regiment in the French service, he took part in the Russian campaign of 1812, and subsequently so brilliantly distinguished himself in the defence of Danzig (January - November 1813) that he won the cross of the Legion of Honour.

  • On returning to Poland he was for a time in the Russian service, but lost his post, and his liberty as well for some time, for his outspokenness.

  • The family of Thun-Hohenstein, one of the wealthiest of the Austrian nobility, which has for more than 200 years settled at Tetschen, in Bohemia, has given several distinguished members to the Austrian public service.

  • Of the three sons of Count Franz, the eldest, Friedrich (1810-1881), entered the diplomatic service; after holding other posts he was in 1850 appointed president of the restored German Diet at Frankfort, where he represented the anti-Prussian policy of Schwarzenberg, and often came into conflict with Bismarck, who was Prussian envoy.

  • After his retirement from the public service in 1863 he supported in the Bohemian Landtag and the Austrian Reichsrat the federal policy of his brother Leo.

  • Subsequently he was transferred, perhaps through Cromwell's influence, to the service of the king, and in January 15 3 2 he was sent to Rome to obstruct the judicial proceedings against Henry in the papal curia.

  • Algiers maintains communication with Marseilles by a quick service of steamers, which run the 497 miles across the Mediterranean in twenty-eight to thirty hours.

  • And this result he achieved with men of less than two years' service, men, too, more heavily equipped and worse mounted than the veterans of the Grande Armee.

  • Grown to manhood he took service under Tiridates, now king of Armenia, in order by his own fidelity to atone for his father's treachery.

  • His grandfather was a small farmer in county Kildare, and his mother was the daughter of a captain in the merchant service.

  • Toller) describes a thegn as "one engaged in a king's or a queen's service, whether in the household or in the country," and adds, "the word in this case seems gradually to acquire a technical meaning, and to become a term denoting a class, containing, however, several degrees."

  • i.), "the very name, like that of the gesith, has different senses in different ages and kingdoms, but the original idea of military service runs through all the meanings of thegn, as that of personal association is traceable in all the applications of gesith."

  • Shelburne expected great service from him as a pamphleteer, but Watson proved from the ministerial point of view a most impracticable prelate.

  • For many years the best workshop travellers were those driven by quick running ropes; these performed admirable service, but they have given place to the more modern electric traveller.

  • He had been an officer of the guard under Julian and Jovian, and had risen high in the imperial service.

  • The god and his viceregent, the king, had long ceased to disturb tenancy, and were content with fixed dues in naturalia, stock, money or service.

  • The service was usually discharged by slaves and serfs, but the amelu (and perhaps the muskinu) went to war.

  • They held an estate from the king consisting of house, garden, field, stock and a salary, on condition of personal service on the king's errand.

  • They could not delegate the service on pain of death.

  • The Code deals with a class of persons devoted to the service .of a god, as vestals or hierodules.

  • The death penalty was freely awarded for theft and other crimes regarded as coming under that head; for theft involving entrance of palace or temple treasury, for illegal purchase from minor or slave, for selling stolen goods or receiving the same, for common theft in the open (in default of multiple restoration) or receiving the same, for false claim to goods, for kidnapping, for assisting or harbouring fugitive slaves, for detaining or appropriating same, for brigandage, for fraudulent sale of drink, for disorderly conduct of tavern, for delegation of personal service, for misappropriating the levy, for oppression of feudal holders, for causing death of a householder by bad building.

  • Scudamore, second secretary to the Post Office, to inquire and report whether the electric telegraph service could be beneficially worked by the Post Office, and whether it would entail any very large expenditure on the.

  • In that year the Swiss government reduced the rate for inland telegrams by one-half, and the traffic immediately doubled, but the cost of carrying on the service increased in a larger ratio.

  • The reforms which it was to bring about were eagerly and impatiently demanded by the public. This great operation had to be effected without interrupting the public service, and the department had immediately to reduce and to simplify the charges for transmission throughout the kingdom.

  • Another reason assigned by the committee appointed by the Treasury in 1875 " to investigate the causes of the increased cost of the telegraphic service since the acquisition of the telegraphs by the state " is the loss on the business of transmitting Press messages, which has been estimated as at least £300,000 a year.

  • A further cause has been competition offered by the telephone service, but against this the Post Office has received royalties from telephone companies and revenue from trunk telephone lines.

  • The service which the government and the colonies desire is one which neither the Eastern Telegraph Company nor any other private enterprise is prepared to undertake on terms which can be considered in comparison with the terms upon which it can be provided by the associated governments."

  • International service regulations have been drawn up which possess equal authority with the convention and constitute what may be regarded as the law relating to international telegraphy.

  • Statistical Society (September 1872, March 1881); Report of a Committee appointed by the Treasury to investigate the causes of the increased cost of the Telegraphic Service, &c. (1875); Reports of the Postmaster-General for 1895, &c.; Journ.

  • his Life of his father (1898), his Address to London Chamber of Commerce on " Imperial Telegraphic Communication " (1902), Lecture to Royal United Service Institution on " Submarine Telegraphy " (1907), Lectures to Royal Naval War College (1910) and R.E.

  • Other experiments in inductive telegraphy were made by Preece, aided by the officials of the British Postal Telegraph Service, in Glamorganshire in 1887; at Loch Ness in Scotland in 1892; on Conway Sands in 1893; and at Frodsham, on the Dee, in 1894.

  • This station was intended for the Transatlantic service in correspondence with a similar station at Glace Bay in Nova Scotia.

  • The station was opened shortly afterwards for public service, the rates being greatly below that then current for the cable service.

  • The service was, however, interrupted in August 1909 by a fire, which destroyed part of the Glace Bay station, but was re-established in April 1910.

  • He entered the navy as midshipman (1799) with his father, Christopher Raymond Perry (1761-1818), a captain in the navy, and saw service against the Barbary pirates.

  • Doolittle was of the greatest importance in rendering the use of long lines practicable, and it is universally employed for such service.

  • The corporation of Glasgow having persisted in its efforts to obtain a licence, the Treasury appointed Sheriff Andrew Jameson (afterwards Lord Ardwall) a special commissioner to hold a local inquiry in Glasgow to report whether the telephone service in that city was adequate and efficient and whether it was expedient to grant the corporation a licence.

  • While considering that a really efficient Post Office service would afford the best means for securing such competition, it recommended that general, immediate and effective competition should at once be undertaken either by the Post Office or by local authorities.

  • Telephone business is characterized by two features: (I) that the capital account is never closed, and (2) that the costli - ness of the service increases with the size of the undertaking.

  • In a large city, where several inter - connected exchanges have to be built and thousands of subscribers are put into communication with each other, the service is at once more costly and more valuable than in a small town with a few hundred subscribers accommodated in one exchange.

  • In the provinces the unlimited service costs only £7, tos.

  • As the cost of the service varies in proportion to the amount of use, the toll rate is more scientific, and it has the further advantage of discouraging the unnecessary use of the instrument, which causes congestion of traffic at busy hours and also results in lines being " engaged " when serious business calls are made.

  • The tariff for unlimited use has to be made very high to cover the cost of the additional burdens thrown upon the service, and it only works economically to the individual subscriber who has an exceptionally large number of calls originating from his instrument.

  • The message-rate system equalizes the charges according to the service rendered.

  • Another method of charge, known as the " measured service rate," is de - signed to make the subscriber pay in proportion to the quality and quantity of the service he takes.

  • In London a two - line party service costs £3 per annum, the message fees being id.

  • The trunk line service is charged for on rates which vary from 3d.

  • The Anglo-French telephone service, which was opened between London and Paris in April 1891, was extended to the principal towns in England and France on the 11th of April 1904.

  • The service has since been extended to certain other English provincial towns; and the Anglo-Belgian telephone service has similarly been extended.

  • It was found possible to exchange speech when the conditions were exceptionally favourable; but in spite of the partial success of the experiment, a public service between the two capitals is not at present practicable.

  • Reports of Select Committee on Telephone and Telegraph Wires (1885), of Select Committee on Telegraph Bill (1892), of Joint Committee of the House of Lords and the House of Commons on Electric Powers (Protective Clauses) (1893), of Select Committee on Telephone Service (1895), of Select Committee on Telephones (1898), and of Select Committee on Post Office (Telephone) Agreement (1905); Treasury Minutes (1892 and 1899); Annual Reports of the Postmaster-General; Report to the Treasury by Sheriff Andrew Jameson on Glasgow Telephone Enquiry (1897); H.

  • He devoted himself to solitude, prayer and the service of the poor, and before long went on a pilgrimage to Rome.

  • From that day he gave himself up to the service of the lepers and the hospitals.

  • In Congress he was a consistent defender of sound money and civil service reform; in municipal politics he was in favour of business administrations and opposed to partisan nominations.

  • This is 490,251 higher than the actual population, 32,475,253, ascertained by the census of the 10th of February 1901; the difference is due to temporary absences from their residences of certain individuals on military service, &c., who probably were counted twice, and also to the fact that 469,020 individuals were returned as absent from Italy, while only 61,606 foreigners were in Italy at the date of the census.

  • Much, however, is effected towards unification, by compulsory military service, it being the principle that no man shall serve within the military district to which he belongs.

  • Domestic service, &c. - 574,855 171,875 402,980

  • The result was that for the first two years of state administration the service was distinctly bad, and the lack of goods trucks at the ports was especially felt.

  • Of the sum spent by the communes, about 1/2 goes for the sanitary service (doctors, midwives, vaccination), 3/4 for the maintenance of foundlings, i11 for the support of the sick in hospitals, and I~1 for sheltering the aged and needy.

  • The number of electors (2,541,327) at the general election in 1904 was 29% of the male population over twenty-one years of age, and 7~6% of the total population exclusive of those temporarily disfranchised on account of military service; and of these 627% voted.

  • Thus in Italy the universal service system, though probably the best organization both for the army and the nation, works with a maximum of friction.

  • The law of f875 therefore still regulates the principles of military service in Italy, though an important modification was made in 190719o8.

  • By this law, every man liable and accepted for service served for eight or nine years on the Active Army and its Reserve (of which three to five were spent with the colors), four or, five in the Mobile Militia, and the rest of the service period of nineteen years in the Territorial Militia.

  • But these figures do not represent the actual service of every able-bodied Italian.

  • Like almost all Universal Service countries, Italy only drafts a small proportion of the available recruits into the army.

  • Including officers on special service or in the reserve.

  • The increase in the numbers rejected as unfit is accounted for by the fact that if only a small proportion of the contingent can be taken for service, the medical standard of acceptance is high.

  • The new terms of service for the other categories have been already stated.

  • The personnel on active service consisted of 1799 officers and 25,000 men, the former being doubled and the latter trebled since 1882.

  • As the companies grew in size and improved their discipline, it was seen by the Italian nobles that this kind of service offered a good career for men of spirit, who had learned the use of arms. To leave so powerful and profitable a calling in the hands of foreigners seemed both dangerous and uneconomical.

  • they had promised in their cities, by freeing the people from military service and disarming the aristocracy.

  • Immured in his castle at Pavia, accumulating wealth by systematic taxation and methodical economy, he organized the mercenary troops who eagerly took service under so good a paymaster; and, by directing their operations from his cabinet, he threatened the whole of Italy with conquest.

  • Son of Attendolo Sforza, this Francesco received the hand of Filippos natural daughter, Bianca, as a reward for past service and a pledge of future support.

  • But the princes of the house of Savoy were a race of warriors; and what Emmanuel Philibert lost as sovereign he regained as captain of adventure in the service of his cousin Philip II.

  • In Naples King Ferdinand retained some of the laws and institutions of Murats rgime, and many of the functionaries of the former government entered Naples his service; but he revived the Bourbon tradition, the odious police system and the censorship; and a degrading religious bigotry, to which the masses were all too much inclined, became the basis of government and social iife.

  • The French regular troops were withdrawn from Rome in December 1866; but the pontifical forces were largely recruited in France and commanded by officers of the imperial army, and service under the pope was considered by the French war office as equivalent to service in France.

  • The royal commissioner for finance, Giacomelli, had, as a precautionary measure, seized the pontifical treasury; but upon being informed by Cardinal Antonelli that among the funds deposited in the treasury were 1,000,000 crowns of Peters Pence offered by the faithful to the pope in person, the commissioner was authorized by the Italian council of state not only to restore this sum, but also to indemnify the Holy See for moneys expended for the service of the October coupon of the pontifical debt, that debt having been taken over by the Italian state.

  • Article 4 allotted the pontiff an annuity of 3,225,000 lire (~I29,ooo) for the maintenance of the Sacred College, the sacred palaces, the congregations, the Vatican chancery and the diplomatic service.

  • He therefore proposed to mak over the treasury service to the state banks, to increase th~ forced currency, to raise the stamp and registration duties and to impose a new tax on textile fabrics.

  • Fortunately for Italy, the marquis Visconti Venosta shortly afterwards consented to assume the portfolio of foreign affairs, which had been resigned by Duke Caetani di Sermoneta, and again to place, after an interval of twenty years, his unrivalled experience at the service of his country.

  • The government called out all the railwaymen who were army reservists, but continued to keep them at their railway work, exercising military discipline over them and thus ensuring the continuance of the service.

  • In October 1907 there was again a general strike at Milan, which was rendered more serious on account of the action of the railway servants, and extended to other cities; traffic was disorganized over a large part of northern Italy, until the government, being now owner of the railways, dismissed the ringleaders from the service.

  • The good man is the perfectly rational or perfect self-consistent man; and that is a full account of virtue, though Kant professes to re-interpret it still further in a much more positive sense as implying the service of humanity.

  • This portion of the ethical theory does curious service in Kant's doctrine of religion.

  • divine revelation and of a great institution like the Christian church suggested the possibility of enlisting scepticism in the service of dogmatic faith.

  • But before this event John had instituted a great inquiry, the inquest of service of June 1212, for the purpose of finding out how much he could exact from each of his vassals, a measure which naturally excited some alarm; and then, fearing a baronial rising, he had abandoned his proposed expedition into Wales, had taken hostages from the most prominent of his foes, and had sought safety in London.

  • declares that those who owe military service for their lands shall not be called upon to perform more than the due amount of such service.

  • says knights must not be compelled to give money instead of performing castle-guard, if they are willing to perform this service.

  • The constables of these castles had adopted the custom of compelling these landholders to give money and not service, mercenaries being then hired to perform this.

  • Ardently devoted to the service of humanity, he projected a scheme for a general concourse of all the savants in Europe, and started in London a paper, Journal du Lycee de Londres, which was to be the organ of their views.

  • There are four hospitals, each under a resident medical officer, under the general supervision of a senior officer of the Indian medical service, and medical aid is given free to the whole population.

  • Two able officers, Colebrooke of the Bengal Engineers, and Blair of the sea service, were sent to survey and report.

  • Educated at the universities of Bonn and Heidelberg, he obtained a position in Florence through the influence of an Englishman, William Craufurd, but soon he entered the Prussian diplomatic service and was employed in Florence, in Constantinople and in Rome.

  • In August he was sent to Spain, where he remained a prisoner for two years; in November i 506 he made his escape, and fled to the court of his brother-in-law, the king of Navarre, under whom he took service.

  • He was of good family, and after studying at the university of Naples he entered the public service, and was for many years employed in the office of the administration of finances.

  • c. 86) to the judge under the act in matters of the fabric, ornaments, furniture and decorations of churches, and the conduct of divine service, rites and ceremonies.

  • The works on religion and philosophy especially will be of as much service for the history of ideas in these later periods as the publication of the canonical books has already been for the earlier period to which they refer.

  • The other vigils are recognized in the calendar (including those of the saints) and the rubric directs that "the collect appointed for any Holy-day that hath a Vigil or Eve, shall be said at the Evening Service next before."

  • During his long service as a lieutenant he took part in the bombardment of Tripoli, and on a subsequent occasion showed great firmness in resisting the seizure of a seaman as an alleged deserter from the British navy, his ship at the time lying under the guns of Gibraltar.

  • during his struggles with the Saxons; he fought for Henry at Warnsta,dt and was killed in his service at Welfesholz.

  • He there entered the service of Henry IL, and had undertaken a campaign to regain his lands when he died at Pforzheim on the 8th of January 1557.

  • Ptolemy Euergetes (247-222 B.C.) rendered the greatest service to geography by the protection and encouragement of Eratosthenes, whose labours gave the first ap proximate knowledge of the true size of the spherical The .

  • After two successful voyages, Eudoxus, impressed with the idea that Africa was surrounded by ocean on the south, left the Egyptian service, and proceeded to Cadiz and other Mediterranean centres of trade seeking a patron who would finance an expedition for the purpose of African discovery; and we learn from Strabo that the veteran explorer made at least two voyages southward along the coast of Africa.

  • Marco remained for seventeen years in the service of the Great Khan, and was employed on many important missions.

  • The European country which had come the most completely under the influence of Arab culture now began to send forth explorers Spanish to distant lands, though the impulse came not from the Moors but from Italian merchant navigators in Spanish explora- service.

  • Sebastian afterwards made a voyage to Rio de la Plata in the service of Spain, but he returned to England in 1548 and received a pension from Edward VI.

  • Dampier's literary ability eventually secured for him a commission in the king's service; and he was sent on a voyage of discovery, during which he explored part of the coasts of Australia and New Guinea, and discovered the strait which bears his name between New Guinea and New Britain, returning in 1701.

  • After every deduction it remains true that no contemporary showed equal genius as a colonial statesman, or in this 'department rendered equal service to his country.

  • Sir John Howard, only son of the match between Howard and Mowbray, took service with his cousin the third duke of Norfolk, who had him returned as knight of the shire for Norfolk, where, according to the Paston Letters, this Howard of the Essex branch was regarded by the gentry as a strange man.

  • He did good service, however, in opposing the extension of slavery.

  • Prayer in the latter sense is a characteristic feature of the higher religions, and we might even say that Christianity or Mahommedanism, ritually viewed, is in its inmost essence a service of prayer.

  • (2) If, however, the worshipper place his god on a level with himself, so far at any rate as to make him to some extent dependent on the service man contracts to render him, then genuine prayer tends to be replaced by a mere bargaining, often conjoined with flattery and with insincere promises.

  • Anderledy, a Swiss, who had seen service in the United States.

  • The Marquis Lodovico Gonzaga of Mantua had for some time been pressing Mantegna to enter his service; and the following year, 1460, was perhaps the one in which he actually established himself at the Mantuan court, residing at first from time to time at Goito, but, from December 1466 onwards, with his family in Mantua itself.

  • 4, &c.) and the anonymous blessings commonly called Shemoneh 'Esreh (the Eighteen), together with certain Psalms. (Readings from the Law and the Prophets [Haphtarah] also formed part of the service.) To this framework were fitted, from time to time, various prayers, and, for festivals especially, numerous hymns.

  • The Ahoms retained the form of government in Assam peculiar to the Shan tribes, which may be briefly described as an organized system of personal service in lieu of taxation.

  • This afterwards declined, but it is now one of the principal points of communication between England and France, the railway company maintaining a daily service of fast steamers to Dieppe in connexion with the Chemin de fer de 1'Ouest.

  • From the age of 13 he belonged to the Canadian volunteer militia, with which he saw service in 1870 at the time of the Fenian raids.

  • He stayed there two years, and might have entered the service of the viceroy if he would have professed himself, as a few of his friends did, a Mahommedan.

  • It is administered by an elective municipal council with a civil service administrator as mayor.

  • The river was also canalized, a telephone service introduced, and extensive drainage works carried out.

  • Service is nominally voluntary, though it appears that a certain amount of compulsion is exercised.

  • In addition to this there is compulsory service in the National Guard (a) in the first class, consisting of men between seventeen and thirty years of age, liable for service with the standing army, and numbering some 15,000; (b) in the second class, for departmental service only, except in so far as it may be drawn upon to make up losses in the more active units in time of war, consisting of men from thirty to forty-five years of age, and (c) in the third class, for local garrison duty, consisting of men between forty-five and sixty years old.

  • In 1891 he was obliged to suspend the service of the public debt and make arrangements by which the bondholders accepted a reduced rate of interest.

  • In 1820 he suppressed an insurrection in the Caucasus, for which service he was raised to the rank of major-general.

  • In return for Russia's service in preventing the aid of Austria from being given to France, Gorchakov looked to Bismarck for diplomatic support in the Eastern Question, and he received an instalment of the expected support when he successfully denounced the Black Sea clauses of the treaty of Paris.

  • This was justly regarded by him as an important service to his country and one of the triumphs of his career, and he hoped to obtain further successes with the assistance of Germany, but the cordial relations between the cabinets of St Petersburg and Berlin did not subsist much longer.

  • In the modern states of western Europe the existing nobility seems to have for the most part had its origin in personal service to the prince.

  • And this nobility by personal service seems commonly to have supplanted an older nobility, in early the origirrof which was, in some cases at least, strictly immemorial.

  • The notion of holding land of the king became more prominent than the notion of personal service done to the king; but, as the land was held by the tenure of personal service, the actual relation hardly changed.

  • About 1836 he entered the civil service as an official of the foreign ministry.

  • Generally regarded as the partisan of a pro-English policy, he rendered most valuable service to his country by his able management of the foreign relations of Turkey, and not least by his efficacious settlement of affairs in Syria after the massacres of 1860.

  • The customs service includes British customs officers lent to the Liberian service.

  • A gunboat for preventive service purchased from the British government and commanded by an Englishman, with native petty officers and crew, is employed by the Liberian government.

  • At morning worship the service consists of a litany, scripture lessons, sermon, singing, extempore prayer.

  • A service of the British India Steam Navigation Company's steamers has been established between Negapatam and Colombo through Palk Strait and this narrow passage.

  • Other exceptions are the " Institutions of the Empress Marie," which absorb, inter alia, the duties on playing-cards and the taxes on places of public entertainment; the imperial civil list, so far as this does not exceed the sum fixed in 1906 (16,359,595 roubles!); the expenses of the two imperial chanceries, 10,000,000 roubles per annum, which constitute in effect a secret service fund.

  • In fact it was transformed into a separate department of the ministry of the interior, and, provided with an enormous secret service fund, soon dominated the whole ministry.

  • The system of obligatory military service for all, introduced in 1874, has been maintained, but the six years' term of service has Army.

  • Further, the age releasing from service was raised from 40 to 43 years and the militia (landsturm) was reorganized.

  • have been chiefly directed towards increasing the fighting capacity and readiness for immediate service of the troops in Asia, and towards the better reorganization of the local irregular militia forces.

  • The Bashkirs, Meshcheryaks and Teptyars rendered able service to the Russian government against the Khirgiz, and until 1863 they constituted a separate Cossack army.

  • Protected as they were by the right of self-government, exempted from military service, and endowed with considerable allotments of good land, these colonies are much wealthier than the neighbouring Russian peasants, from whom they have adopted the slowly modified village community.

  • Both the Molokani and the Dukhobortsi deny the authority of the civil government as such, and object on principle to military service.

  • The household servants or dependents attached to the personal service of their masters were merely set free; and they entirely went to reinforce the town proletariat.

  • had already been described in the Church service as " the ruler and autocrat of all Russia, the new Tsar Constantine in the new city of Constantine Moscow," but on no previous occasion had a grand-prince been crowned under that title.

  • Muromtsov, they drew up Vyborg and issued a manifesto calling on the Russian people mani- to refuse taxes and military service.

  • That in the work of restoring its military position the Russian government had the support of the Russian parliament was proved by a subsidy of Li 1,000,000 voted by the Duma, on the 30th of December 1909, for the special service of the reorganization and redistribution of the army.

  • A somewhat better theory of rate regulation was then framed, which divided railway expenditures into movement expense, connected with the line in general, and terminal expense, which connected itself with the stations and station service.

  • There has been also a further attempt in England to divide terminal charges into station and service terminals, according to the nature of the work for which compensation is sought.

  • This classification is based partly upon special conditions of service, which make some articles more economical to carry than others (with particular reference to the question whether the goods are offered to the companies in car-loads or in small parcels), but chiefly with regard to the commercial value of the article, and its consequent ability to bear a high charge or a low one.

  • Well trained as was the civil service of France, the effect of this supervision in deadening activity was sometimes more marked than in its effect in preventing abuse.

  • Such modifications of the hours of work have not only been beneficial to the men, but have improved the discipline of the staff and the punctuality and regularity of the train service, particularly in respect of the goods trains.

  • It was natural that this should be so, for the new transportation agency was so much more efficient than anything previously available that the people were eager to take advantage of its superior service.

  • The use of automatic couplers for freight cars throughout the United States, introduced in 1893-1900, greatly reduced the number of deaths and injuries in coupling, and the use of air brakes on freight cars, now universal, has reduced the risk to the men by making it less necessary for them to ride on the roofs of high box-cars, while at the same time it has made it possible to run long trains with fewer men; but except in these two features the freight service in America continues to be a dangerous occupation.

  • Its powers have been exercised with the greatest caution, yet with consistent firmness; and the publicity which has been given to the true and detailed causes of scores and scores of railway accidents by the admirable reports of the Board of Trade inspectors has been a powerful lever in improving the railway service.

  • In these statistics, the third item, " other persons," includes post office and customs officials and other persons connected with the railway service, as well as railway officers and servants off duty.

  • The American railways do not have to face this situation; but, after a long term of years, when they were allowed to do much as they pleased, they have now been brought sharply to book by almost every form of constituted authority to be found in the states, and they are suffering from increased taxation, from direct service requirements, and from a general tendency on the part of regulating authorities to reduce rates and to make it impossible to increase them.

  • Meantime, the purchasing power of the dollar which the railway company receives for a specified service is gradually growing smaller, owing to the general increases year by year in wages and in the cost of material.

  • But there is danger of their reaching the point where there is little or no margin between unit costs of service and unit receipts for the service.

  • This is in line with the provisions in the Constitution of the United States regarding the protection of property, but the difficulty in applying the principle to the railway situation lies in the fact that costs have to be met by averaging the returns on the total amount cf business done, and it is often impossible, in specific instances, to secure a rate which can be considered to yield a fair return on the specific service rendered.

  • Both in England and in America this process of consolidation has been obstructed by all known legislative devices, because of the widespread belief that competition in the field of transportation was necessary if fair prices were to be charged for the service.

  • For suburban traffic with a service at a few minutes' interval and short distances between the stations electric traction has proved itself to be superior in many respects to the steam locomotive, but for main line traffic and long distance runs it has not yet been demonstrated that it is commercially feasible, though it is known to be practically possible.

  • A few experimental results are set forth in Table XX., from which it will be seen that with a relatively low rate of combustion, a rate which denotes very light service, namely lb of coal per square foot of grate per hour, the efficiency of the boiler is %, which is as good a result as can be obtained with the best class of stationary boiler or marine boiler even when using economizers.

  • Coal-saving can be shown to the extent of about 1% in some cases, but the saving depends upon the kind of service on which the engine is employed.

  • Still used by several railways in Great Britain for express passenger service, but going out of favour; it is also found in France, and less often in Germany, Italy, and elsewhere in Europe.

  • It is adapted for light, high-speed service, and noted for its simplicity, excellent riding qualities, low cost of maintenance, and high mechanical efficiency; but having limited adhesive weight it is unsuitable for starting and accelerating heavy trains.

  • In America it is still the standard engine for passenger traffic, but for goods service it is now employed only on branch lines.

  • It has many advantages for heavy high-speed service, namely, large and well-proportioned boiler, practically unlimited grate area, fire-box of favourable proportions for firing, fairly low centre of gravity, short coupling-rods, and, finally, a combination of the safe and smooth riding qualities of the fourcoupled bogie type, with great steaming capacity and moderate axle loads.

  • A powerful engine for heavy passenger and fast goods service.

  • In addition to the foregoing list, various special locomotive types have been developed for suburban service, where high rates of acceleration and frequent stops are required.

  • - The demand of the present day is for engines of larger power both for passenger and goods service, and the problem is to design such engines within the limitations fixed by the 4 ft.

  • When the service is frequent enough to give a good power factor continuously, the steam locomotive cannot compete with the electric motor for the purpose of quick acceleration, because the motors applied to the axles of a train may for a short time absorb power from the central station to an extent far in excess of anything which a locomotive boiler can supply.

  • But isolated examples of high speeds do not give the traveller much information as to the train service at his disposal, for on the whole he is better off with a large number of trains all maintaining a good average of speed than with a service mostly consisting of poor trains, but leavened with one or two exceptionally fast ones.

  • Under the first set of conditions quickness and flexibility of service are relatively more important than under the second set.

  • One pair of tracks is used for a local service with stations about one-quarter of a mile apart, following the general plan of operation in vogue on all other intra-urban railways.

  • it is expressly mentioned by Isidore of Seville as the sixth element in the Eucharistic service, De offic. eccles.

  • The change is marked in the rituals by the duplication of the liturgical forms. The prayers of intercession and oblation, which in earlier times are found only in connexion with the former offering, are repeated in the course of the same service in connexion with the latter.

  • Allowing for this interval of military service, he applied himself exclusively for twenty-four years to his legal work.

  • Indian affairs, the committee on foreign relations and others, was prominent in the discussion of matters brought before the Senate from these committees, advocated the enlargement of the navy and the reform of the civil service, and opposed the pension veto messages of President Cleveland.

  • Among the measures and events distinguishing his term as president were the following: The meeting of the Pan-American Congress at Washington; the passage of the McKinley Tariff Bill and of the Sherman Silver Bill of 1890; the suppressing of the Louisiana Lottery; the enlargement of the navy; further advance in civil service reform; the convocation by the United States of an international monetary conference; the establishment of commercial reciprocity with many countries of America and Europe; the peaceful settlement of a controversy with Chile; the negotiation of a Hawaiian Annexation Treaty, which, however, before its ratification, his successor withdrew from the Senate; the settlement of difficulties with Germany concerning the Samoan Islands, and the adjustment by arbitration with Great Britain of the Bering Sea fur-seal question.

  • In 93 1 he entered the service of King Hugo of Italy as page; he afterwards rose to a high position at the court of Hugo's successor Berengar, having become chancellor, and having been sent (949) on an embassy to the Byzantine court.

  • In the old Egyptian church order, known as the Canons of Hippolytus, there are numerous directions for the service of the agape, held on Sundays, saints' days or at commemorations of the dead.

  • power and presence (numen) there, and the same festivals and sacrifices which had previously been devoted to the cult of the Canaanite Baal were now annexed to the service of Yahweh, the war-god of the conquering race.

  • Although during the composition of the Ferdinand and Isabella it had been of very intermittent service to him, it had so far improved that he could read with a certain amount of regularity during the writing of the Conquest of Mexico, and also, though in a less degree, during the years devoted to the Conquest of Peru.

  • But this difficulty was soon removed by the pupil's diligence; the very exigencies of his situation were of service to him in calling forth all his powers, and he studied the language with such success that at the close of his five years' exile he declares that he " spontaneously thought " in French rather than in English, and that it had become more familiar to " ear, tongue and pen."

  • He compressed into a single chapter the domestic history and policy of the emperors from the son of Heraclius to Isaac Angelus; and did no justice to the remarkable ability and the indefatigable industry shown in the service of the state by most of the sovereigns from Leo III.

  • The peculiar service which was rendered at this juncture by the ` Cambridge School' was that, instead of opposing a mere dogmatic opposition to the Tubingen critics, they met them frankly on their own ground; and instead of arguing that their conclusions ought not to be and could not be true, they simply proved that their facts and their premisses were wrong.

  • It is met at several points by lines which serve the rich mining districts to the south; at Cobre by the Nevada Northern from Ely in White Pine county in the Robinson copper mining district; at Palisade by the Eureka & Palisade, a narrow-gauge railway, connecting with the lead and silver mines of the Eureka District; at Battle Mountain by the Nevada Central, also of narrow gauge, from Austin; at Hazen by the Nevada & California (controlled by the Southern Pacific) which runs to the California line, connecting in that state with other parts of the Southern Pacific system, and at Mina, Nevada, with the Tonopah & Goldfield, which runs to Tonopah and thence to Goldfield, thus giving these mining regions access to the Southern Pacific's transcontinental service; and at Reno, close to the western boundary, by the Virginia & Truckee, connecting with Carson City, Minden, in the Carson Valley, and Virginia City, in the Comstock District, and by the Nevada-California-Oregon, projected to run through north-eastern California into Oregon, in 1910, in operation to Alturas, California.

  • An unusual: provision in the constitution, a result of its adoption in the midst of the Civil War, gives soldiers and sailors in the service of the United States the right to vote; their votes to be applied to the township and county in which they were bona fide residents at the time of enlistment.'

  • In 1863 the Territory raised six companies of infantry and six of cavalry (about 1000 men), which saw no actual service against the Confederates but were useful in subduing hostile Indians.

  • House, arguing that their service was optional and not a means of livelihood; it was public service and should not be made a job.

  • But his military appointment required obedience to the Committee of Public Safety, and this body, largely dominated by Edmund Pendleton, so restrained him from active service that he resigned on the 28th of February 1776.

  • The legions at once joined him; numbers of Franks enlisted in his service; an increased and well-equipped fleet secured him the command of the neighbouring seas.

  • SCHWENKFELD,' 'KASPAR (1490-1561), of Ossing, German theologian, was born in 1490, and after studying at Cologne and other universities served in various minor courts of Silesia, finally entering the service of the duke of Liegnitz, over whom he had great influence.

  • Bennigsen, having studied at the university of Gottingen, entered the Hanoverian civil service.

  • In 1855 he was elected a member of the second chamber; and as the government refused to allow him leave of absence from his official duties he resigned his post in the public service.

  • During the summer his fortunes ebbed, and he was soon superseded by his kinsman Owen Roe O'Neill, who returned from military service abroad at the end of July.

  • Boyne; and afterwards commanded an Irish regiment in the French service, and died in 1704.

  • Entering the diplomatic service at an early age, he was appointed successively to the legations of Madrid, Vienna, Berlin and Versailles, but in 1871 returned to Italy, to devote himself to political and social studies.

  • What does distinguish Hebrew prophecy from all others is that the genius of a few members of the profession wrested this vulgar but powerful instrument from baser uses, and by wielding it in the interest of a high morality rendered a service of incalculable value to humanity.

  • Although no evidence is at hand, it is probable that Ahaz of Judah rendered service to Assyria by keeping the allies in check; possible, also, that the former enemies of Jerusalem had now been induced to turn against Samaria.

  • To a certain extent it would seem that even as Chronicles (q.v.) has passed through the hands of one who was keenly interested in the Temple service, so the other historical books have been shaped not only by the late priestly writers (symbolized in literary criticism by P), but also by rather earlier writers, also of priestly sympathies, but of " southern " or half-Edomite affinity.

  • 458 B.C.) that Ezra returned with a small body of exiles to promulgate the new laws he had brought and to set the Temple service in order.

  • The sequel shows how a Jew might rise to power in the civil service of the Egyptian Empire and yet remain a hero to some of the Jews - provided that he did not intermarry with a Gentile.

  • Soon it came to his knowledge that Judas was in Samaria, whither he followed him on a sabbath with Jews pressed into his service.

  • Though they saw the enemy advancing upon them sword in hand they remained at worship untroubled and were slaughtered as they poured libation and burned incense, for they put their own safety second to the service of God.

  • The Jews of Spain attained to high places in the service of the state from the time of the Moorish conquest in 711.

  • While the Spanish period of Jewish history was thus brilliant from the point of view of public service, it was equally notable on the literary side.

  • The Italian Jews devoted themselves with ardour to the service of the state.

  • Soon after his accession he abolished the distinctive Jewish dress, abrogated the poll-tax, admitted the Jews to military service and their children to the public schools, and in general opened the era of emancipation by the Toleranzpatent of 1782.

  • They have attained to high rank in all branches of the public service, and have shown most splendid instances of far-sighted and generous philanthropy.

  • to Donaghadee), it was for more than 200 years a starting-point of the mail service between Great Britain and Ireland.

  • alight during each service till Whitsuntide.

  • There are separate schools for whites and blacks, and the equipment and service are approximately equal, although the whites pay about nine-tenths of the school taxes.

  • The pay for both senators and representatives is four dollars per day for a period not exceeding sixty days; should the session be prolonged the extra service is without compensation.

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