How to use Seq in a sentence

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  • George Sand, who was a firm believer in the doctrine of heredity, devotes a whole volume of her autobiography (Histoire de ma vie, 1857 seq.) to the elaboration of this strange pedigree.

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  • Radermacher assigns the Asinaria to a date as early as 212 B.C. Of the extant plays the Cistellaria and the Stichus must be associated with the Miles as comparatively early works; for the former was clearly produced before (though not long before) the conclusion of the Second Punic War, see 1.201 seq.; and the Stichus is proved by its didascalia to have been produced in 200 B.C. The Pseudolus and the Truculentus fall within the last seven years of his life.

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  • Chassin, La Vendee et la Chouannerie (Paris, 1892 seq.); "L'Etat des services de Santerre dresse par lui-meme," in the third volume of Souvenirs et memoires (1899), published by Paul Bonnefon.

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  • The only Latin countries in which conflict has not arisen appear to be the principality of Andorra and the republic of San Marino (Giron y Areas, SituaciOn juridica de la Iglesia Catolica, Madrid, 1905, p. 173 et seq.).

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  • For further information the reader should consult the Parentalia, published by Wren's grandson in 1750, an account of the Wren family and especially of Sir Christopher and his works; also the two biographies of Wren by Elmes and Miss Phillimore; Milman, Annals of St Paul's (1868); and Longman, Three Cathedrals dedicated to St Paul in London (1873), pp. 77 seq.

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  • Io seq.) bears the same name as the one who advised Rehoboam to acquiesce in the disruption (1 Kings xii.

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  • They treat with almost unique fullness a few years in the middle of the 9th century B.C., but ignore Assyria; yet only the Assyrian inscriptions explain the political situation (§ 10 seq.), and were it not for them the true significance of the 8th-7th centuries could scarcely be realized (§ 15 seq.).

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  • It is instructive to observe in Egypt the form which old traditions have taken in Manetho (Maspero, Rec. de travaux, xxvii., 1905, 1.22 seq.); cf.

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  • But though this defensive zeal led to active persecution, still in theory Judaism was a tolerated religion wherever the Church had sway, and many papal bulls of a friendly character were issued throughout the middle ages (Scherer, p. 32 seq.).

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  • The history of Mississippi may be divided into the period of exploration (154 1699), the period of French rule (1699-1763), the period of English rule (1763-1781), the period of Spanish rule (1781-1798), the territorial period (1798-1817), and the period of statehood (1817 seq.).

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  • The seats of government have been Natchez (1798-1802), Washington (1802-1817), Natchez (1817-1821), Columbia (1821-1822), Jackson (1822 seq.).

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  • Most of Riley's work is in the Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society (Oxford, 1898 seq.), which he edited; see his Spanish Policy in Mississippi-after the Treaty of San Lorenzo, i.

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  • His first works were Elementa Metaphysicae (1743 et seq.) and Logica (1745).

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  • While we have elsewhere no connected account of this, Justin's Apology contains a few paragraphs (61 seq.), which give a vivid description of the public worship of the Church and its method of celebrating the sacraments (Baptism and the Eucharist).

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  • Wilson, Ohio (New York, 1902), and a great mass of material on this subject is contained in the publications of the Geological Survey of Ohio (1837 et seq.).

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  • How anxious the Pergamene kings, with their ardent Hellenism, were to avoid offence is shown by the elaborate forms by which, in their own capital, they sought to give their real control the appearance of popular freedom (Cardinali, Regno di Pergamo, p. 281 seq.).

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  • Briggs, The Messiah of the Apostles, p. 284 seq.; Sabatier, Les Origines litteraires et la composition de l'Apocalypse de St Jean (1887); Spitta, Die Offenbarung des Johannes untersucht (1889).

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  • Hantzsch (Ann., 1896, 2 9 2, pp. 34 0 et seq.) hyponitrous acid and nitramide are to be regarded as stereoisomers, being the anti-and synforms of the same compound.

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  • See Romische Mitteilungen, 1898, 305 seq.; Notizie degli scavi, 1902, 219.

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  • He was an accomplished writer and scholar, contributed largely to William Hutchinson's History of the County of Cumberland (2 vols., 1794 seq.), and published A View of the Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution (1797), dedicated to George Washington, and consisting of thirteen discourses delivered in America between 1763 and 1775.

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  • Grignard (Comptes Rendus, 1900 et seq.) showed that aldehydes combine with magnesium alkyl iodides (in absolute ether solution) to form addition products, which are decomposed by water with the formation of secondary alcohols, thus from acetaldehyde and magnesium methyl iodide, isopropyl alcohol is obtained.

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  • For a more complete account of Migne's life, see the article in the Catholic Encyclopedia (New York, 1906 seq.).

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  • The other, John bar Aphtonya, was the founder of the famous monastery of Kenneshre, opposite ' See Feldmann, Syrische Wechsellieder von Narses (Leipzig, 1896); Mingana, Narsai, homiliae et carmina (2 vols., Mosul, 1905); and other editions of which a list is given by Duval, p. 344 seq.

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  • See Marquardt-Mau, Privatleben der Romer, pp. 550 seq.

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  • Knowling's Testimony of St Paul to Christ, pp. 111 seq.

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  • His most considerable work was The History of the Church and State of Scotland (London, 1655, seq.).

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  • Richard, L'Oceanographie (Paris, 1907); List of Oceanic Depths and Serial Temperature Observations, received at the Admiralty in the year 1888 (et seq.) from H.M.

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  • Makaroff, The Yermak in the Ice (in Russian) (St Petersburg, 1901); The Norwegian North Atlantic Expedition (on the " Voringen "), 1876-1878 (Christiania, 1880-1900); Expeditions scientifiques du " Travailleur " et du " Talisman," 1880-1883 (Paris, 1891 et seq.); Die Ergebnisse der Plankton-Expedition, 1889 (Kiel, 1892 et seq.); Resultats des campagnes scientifiques accomplies sur son yacht par Albert I e ' Prince Souverain de Monaco (Monaco, from 1889); The Danish " Ingolf " Expedition, 1806 (Copenhagen, 1900); Prof. Luksch, Expeditionen S.M.

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  • Reports of many minor expeditions and researches have appeared in the Reports of the Fishery Board for Scotland; the Marine Biological Association at Plymouth; the Kiel Commission for the Investigation of the Baltic; the Berlin Institut fur Meereskunde; the bluebooks of the Hydrographic Department; the various official reports to the British, German, Russian, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Belgian and Dutch governments on the respective work of these countries in connexion with the international cooperation in the North Sea; the Bulletin du musee oceanographique de Monaco (1903 seq.); the Scottish Geographical Magazine; the Geographical Journal; Petermanns Mitteilungen; Wagner's Geogi'aphisches Jahrbuch; the Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Societies of London and Edinburgh; the Annalen der Hydrographie; and the publications of the Swedish Academy of Sciences.

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  • I seq.

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  • Orients 2nd ed., p. 492 seq.

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  • In conjunction with other scholars Waitz took a leading part in the publication of the Forschungen zur deutschen Geschichte (Munich, 1862 seq.), and in the Nordalbingische Studien, published in the Proceedings of the Schleswig-Holstein Historical Society (Kiel, 1844-1851).

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  • Bethune-Baker, Nestorius and his Teaching, p. 16 seq.

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  • Charles (Assumption of Moses, pp. 105 seq.), and it appears that the incident was familiar to Clement of Alexandria, Origen and other early writers.

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  • There is much valuable material in the Register (Frankfort, 1903 seq.) of the Kentucky State Historical Society, and especially in the publications of the Filson Club of Louisville.

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  • Above all we can see from the original sources of the Mandaean religion, which also represents a branch of Gnosticism, how great a part the sacraments played in the Gnostic sects (Brandt, Mandciische Religion, p. 96 seq.).

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  • Similarly, the last book of the Pistis-Sophia contains the myth of the capture of the rebellious archontes, whose leaders here appear as five in number (Schmidt, Koptisch-gnostische Schriften, p. 234 seq.).

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  • In the Valentinian systems the pair of aeons, Anthropos and Ekklesia, occupy the third or fourth place within the Oydods, but incidentally we learn that with some representatives of this school the Anthropos took a still more prominent place (first or second; Hilgenfeld, Ketzergeschichte, p. 294 seq.).

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  • Reitzenstein has shown (p. 81 seq.) that very probably the system of the Naasseni described by Hippolytus was originally derived from purely pagan circles, which are probably connected in some way with the mysteries of the Attis cult.

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  • Krabe of Prummern near Aachen, the most scientific and practical of German cultivators, the results of whose experiments have been published in his admirable Lehrbuch der rationellen Weidenkultur (Aix-la-Chapelle, 1886, et seq.) went so far as to assert that willows prefer a dry to a wet soil.

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  • It need mean no more (Lightfoot, Essays on Supernatural Religion, 172 seq.) than narratives of (or concerning) the Lord; on the other hand, the phrase is capable of a much more definite meaning, and there are many scholars who hold that it refers to a document which contained a collection of the sayings of Jesus.

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  • Comprehensive researches (1905, seq.) have made it evident that Trypanosomes have a much more varied and complex development and life-history than was previously supposed.

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  • The places of the objects were at the same time determined with the Dorpat meridian circle (Stellarum fixarum imprimis duplicium et multiplicium positiones mediae, St Petersburg, 1852 seq.).

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  • Among the more important periodicals are the Bulletin of the Geological Society of America (Rochester, N.Y., 1889 seq.); the American Journal of Science (New Haven, Conn., 1818 seq.); the American Geologist (Minneapolis, i888 seq.); Journal of Geology (Chicago, 1893 seq.); Economic Geology (Lancaster, Pa., 1905 seq.).

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  • The Eudemus, on the soul (Fragmenta, 37 seq.), must have been in style and thought the most Platonic of all the Aristotelian writings.

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  • In France there are the works of Cousin (1835), Felix Ravaisson, who wrote on the Metaphysics (1837-1846), and Barthelemy St Hilaire, who translated the Organon and other works (1844 seq.).

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  • The church of St John is mainly Perpendicular, 'What the Fihrist (p. 13 seq.) has about various forms of Persian writing certainly refers in part at least to the species of Pahlavi.

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  • Grignard (Comptes rendus, 1900 et seq.) observed that magnesium and alkyl or aryl halides combined together in presence of anhydrous ether at ordinary R temperatures (with the appearance of brisk boiling) to form compounds of the type RMgX(R = an alkyl or aryl group and X = halogen).

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  • A Klages (Ber., 1902, 35, pp. 2633 et seq.) has shown that if one uses an excess of magnesium and of an alkyl halide with a ketone, an ethylene derivative is formed.

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  • That the "district" of the author is the north-east of Scotland cannot be doubted in the face of a passage such as this, in the fortieth legend (St Ninian), 1, 1359 et seq.

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  • Orients, p. 302 seq.; Records of the Past, ii.

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  • The Godhead was really one; it was the soul of the eternal world, displaying its beneficence on the earth, as well as in the sun and stars (ii.12 seq., 154 seq.).

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  • Meyer (Ber., 18 94, 2 7, p. 510 et seq.) showed that in benzenoid compounds ortho-substituents exert a great hindering effect on the esterification of alcohols by acids in the presence of hydrochloric acid, this hindering being particularly marked when two substituents are present in the ortho positions to the carboxyl group. In such a case the ester is best prepared by the action of an alkyl halide on the silver salt of the acid, and when once prepared, can only be hydrolysed with great difficulty.

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  • Facing the Plaza de Cespedes (once Plaza de la Reina and then Plaza de Armas) are hotels and clubs, the large municipal building - formerly the governor's palace (1855 seq.) - and the cathedral.

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  • Muirhead, Private Law of Rome, p. 73 et seq.

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  • See for geology Carl von Zittel, Beitrage zur Geologie and Palaontologie der libyschen Whste (Cassel, 1883); Reports of the Geological Survey of Egypt (Cairo, 1900, at seq.).

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  • See JEWS (HISTORY), § 17 seq.

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  • See George Ticknor Curtis, The Life of James Buchanan (2 vols., New York, 1883), the standard biography; Curtis, however, was a close personal and political friend, and his work is too eulogistic. More trustworthy, but at times unduly severe, is the account given by James Ford Rhodes in the first two volumes of his History of the United States since the Compromise of 1850 (New York, new edition, 1902 et seq.).

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  • John Bassett Moore has edited The Works of James Buchanan, comprising his Speeches, State Papers, and Private Correspondence (Philadelphia, 1908 et seq.).

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  • The Indian theory of Karma has been worked out with many 1 Phaedo, 69 et seq.

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  • The studies fell in the 18th century into an " abject state," from which they were first raised by a statute passed in 1800 (Report of Oxford University Commission of 1850-1852, p. 60 et seq.), under which distinctions were first allotted to the ablest candidates for the bachelor's degree.

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  • Among the developments in Greek thought of this period, especially interesting for the Old Testament is the teaching associated with Phocylides of Miletus; see Lincke, Samaria, pp. 47 seq.

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  • Hist., p. 127 seq.

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  • Considerable interest is attached to the remarkable series of hydrocarbons obtained by Gomberg (Ber., 1900, 33, p. 3150, et seq.) by acting on triphenylmethane chloride (from triphenylmethane carbinol and phosphorus pentachloride, or from carbon tetrachloride and benzene in the presence of aluminium chloride) and its homologues with zinc, silver or mercury.

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  • With Friedrich August Ukert (1780-1851) he founded the famous historical collection, Geschichte der europoischen Staaten (Gotha, 1819 seq.), and contributed many papers to learned periodicals.

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  • We have seen how closely the serpent is associated with water generally (§ 5 seq.), and since we meet with the belief that sources will dry up when the serpent-occupant is killed (Bechuanas, Zulus), or that they will resent impurities thrown into their springs by causing storms (tribes of the Hindu-Kush), it is not surprising to find elaborate precautions for the propitiation of such powerful beings.

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  • In Travancore a serpent-god is the property of a family, the priests of a temple; the eldest female carries the image at the festal processions and must lead a celibate life (Oldham, 153 seq.).

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  • For other evidence for the prominence of females, see Fergusson, 82, 257 seq.

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  • The cult taken by slaves to America is the Vodu (Vaudoo or Vaudoux) worship of Haiti (Ellis, 29 seq.).

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  • Introduced into Athens about 421 B.C., Aesculapius inherited the older local cult of the serpent " protector " Amynos (Harrison, 346 seq.).

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  • France had its traditions of the destruction of serpents by the early missionaries (Deane, 283 seq.), and the memory possibly survived at Luchon in the Pyrenees, where the clergy and people celebrated the eve of St John by burning live serpents.

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  • Bourke, Snake-Dance of the Moquis (1884), p. 180 seq.; see Frazer, Totem.

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  • Drake, History of Middlesex County, 2, p. 53 et seq.

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  • Especially interesting are the Baraithas which are preserved in the Gemara in Hebrew; they are " external " decisions not included in the more authoritative 4 See Strack, p. 16 seq.

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  • Lit., London, 1906,1906, p. 147 seq.; see also Jew.

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  • Iljin (see papers in the Ber., 1908, et seq.).

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  • See Charles Hudson, History of the Town of Lexington (Boston, 1868), and the publications of the Lexington Historical Society, (1890 seq.).

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  • Wissowa, Religion and Kultus der Romer, p. 355 seq.; monograph by Wackermann (Hanau, 1888); C. Pascal, Studii di antichita e mitologia (1896).

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  • Special attention is given to the ecclesiastical "widows" (3 seq.) and to presbyters (17 seq.).

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  • The change in the use of particles and the comparative rarity of the definite article form, together with the startling divergence in vocabulary, the chief ground of our perplexity" (Church Quarterly Review, 1903, pp. 428 seq.).

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  • Ngeli (Der Wortschatz des Apostels Paulus, 1905, pp. 85 seq.), whose opinion is all the more significant on this point that he refuses to admit any linguistic features adverse to the Pauline authorship of the other epistles.

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  • See "Lettres de Catherine de' Medicis," edited by Hector de la Ferriere (1880 seq.) in the Collection de documents inidits sur l'histoire de France.

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  • From the satire in which this invitation is contained we are able to form an idea of the style in which he habitually lived, and to think of him as enjoying a hale and vigorous age (203), and also as a kindly master of a household (159 seq.).

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  • The third satire, imitated by Samuel Johnson in his London, presents such a picture as Rome may have offered to the satirist at any time in the 1st century of our era; but it was under the worst emperors, Nero and Domitian, that the arts of flatterers and foreign adventurers were most successful, and that such scenes of violence as that described at 2 77 seq.

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  • Winstedt published it in the Classical Review (1899), pp. 201 seq.

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  • Westlake, Revue de droit international, 1896, p. 268 seq.; International Law, pt.

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  • I seq.; Palazzi, Gesta Pontiff.

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  • Ladenburg that the pyridinium alkyl iodides rearrange themselves when strongly heated and yield a and -y alkyl pyridines (Ber., 1883, 16, p. 1410 seq.; Ann., 1888, 247, p. I).

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  • For complete bibliography of all works of Bellarmine, of translations and controversial writings against him, see C.Sommervogel, Bibliotheque de laCompagnie de Jesus (Brussels and Paris, 1890 et seq), vol.

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  • Xenocrates's theory of inorganic nature was substantially identical with the theory of the elements which is propounded in the Timaeus, 53 C seq.

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  • Here we need only mention the litaniae which are stated by Usener ("Alte Bittgange," in Zeller, Philosophische Aufsatze, p. 278 seq.) to have been first instituted by Pope Liberius (352-366).

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  • The Calendar of State Papers, Colonial Series (London, 1860 et seq.), contains much evidence for the history of the buccaneers in the West Indies.

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  • Articles on canon law in Wetzer and Welte's Kirchenlexicon (2nd ed., Freiburg, 1880 et seq.); Hauck, Realencyklopeidie fiir Prot.

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  • Canon 18 of the Code of 1870 recognizes the offices of catechist, reader and sub-deacon (Wirzmann, The English Church and People in South Africa, p. 223 et seq.).

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  • Senderens, Comptes rendus, 1901, 132, p. 210 seq.); and from hydrazines of the type CnH2,2_1 NH NH2 by oxidation with alkaline potassium ferricyanide (N.

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  • Their constitution was determined by C. Liebermann (Ber., 1888, 21, p. 2342; 1889, 22, p. 124 seq.).

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  • Stobbe, Ann., 1901, 314, p. III; 315, p. 219 seq.; 1903, 326, p. 347 Cyclo-hexane Group. Hydrocarbons.

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  • As a result of this report a further sum of £too,000 was voted for 1 Annual Register (1902), p. 280 seq.

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  • Experiments have been made unsuccessfully in sugar cane (1885) and silk culture (1885 seq.).

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  • On soil and agriculture, see Biennial Reports (Topeka, 1877 seq.) of the State Board of Agriculture; Experiment Station Bulletin of the Kansas Agricultural College (Manhattan); and statistics in the United States Statistical Abstract (annual, Washington), and Federal Census reports.

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  • On manufactures see Federal Census reports; Kansas Bureau of Labor and Industry, Annual Report (1885 seq.); Kansas Inspector of Coal Mines, Annual Report (1887 seq.).

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  • Old Testament (Canon and Criticism); Jews (history, § 21 seq.).

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  • Their characteristics are further considered in the History of Ethics, p. 186 seq.

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  • Plato's account of Zeno's teaching (Parmenides, 128 seq.) is, however, presumably as accurate as it is precise.

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  • Authorities.-As regards the scientific aspects of the country, almost everything of value in previous books and papers is included in the magnificent work (1882 et seq.), in 28 4to vols., by Alfred Grandidier, entitled Histoire naturelle, physique, et politique de Madagascar.

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  • It is worthy of note that the Roman Church finds support in this book for its teaching with 1 See especially Geiger, Urschrift and Uebersetzungen der Bibel, 206 seq.

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  • Taramelli (Notizie degli Scavi, 1905, 41 seq.) rightly points out that the nucleus of the Roman municipium is probably represented by the present quarter of the Marina, in which the streets intersect at right angles and Roman remains are frequently found in the subsoil.

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  • Gildemeister, De rebus indicis, p. 89 seq.

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  • The Collections (Hartford 1860 et seq.) of the Connecticut Historical Society contain valuable material, especially the papers of Governor Joseph Talcott; and the Papers (New Haven, 1865 et seq.) of the New Haven Colony Historical Society are extremely valuable for local history; but a vast number of documents relating to the colonial and state periods, now in the state library at Hartford, have never been published.

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  • In this crisis Nicholas showed high personal ' See Stockmar, Denkwurdigkeiten (Brunswick, 1872), p. 98 seq.; and, for a later impression, Queen Victoria to the king of the Belgians, 4th of June 1844, in Queen Victoria's Letters.

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  • Bach and C. Lotter, Bilder aus Alt-Stuttgart (Stuttgart, 1896); and the official Chronik der Hauptand Residenzstadt Stuttgart (1898, seq.).

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  • Bury points out (Ancient Greek Historians, 1909, pp. 1 33 seq.), he was by no means a blind admirer.

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  • G., 1874, pp. 173 seq.) has shown that they are the Kissians of the older Greek authors who are identified with the Susians by Aeschylus (Choeph.

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  • In the remainder of the empire the titles of metropolitan, save in the case of the metropolitan of all Russia, and of archbishop, were and are purely honorary, and their holders have merely a diocesan jurisdiction (see Mouravieff, History of the Russian Church, translated Blackmore, 1842, translator's notes at pp. 370, 39 0, 416 et seq.).

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  • The view most frequently expressed there (see Von Otto in Hilgenfeld's Zeitschrift, 18 77, p. 527 seq.) is that the Messianic kingdom will last for one thousand (some said two thousand) years.

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  • Egyptian monuments depict Semites with long bordered tunics reaching from neck to ankle; they have sleeves, which are sometimes curiously decorated, and are tied at the neck with tasselled cords; some times there is a peculiar design at the neck resembling a cross (Muller, Asien and Europa, pp. 298 seq.).

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  • This form of organization ultimately became universal, and already before the end of the 2nd century it was established in all the parts of Christendom with which we are acquainted, though in Egypt it seems to have been the exception rather than the rule, and even as late as the middle of the 3rd century many churches there were governed by a plurality of officers instead of by a single head (see Harnack, Mission and Ausbreitung des Christenthums, pp. 337 seq.).

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  • He became successively superintendent of the architectural school of the Royal Academy of Venice, inspector of antiquities under the Ministry of Public Instruction, commissioner for the monuments of Rome, and, in especial, director of the excavations in the Roman Forum and on the Palatine Hill, begun in 1899 (see 23.591 et seq.).

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  • The traditional or oral law was codified in the Mishna (see Talmud, § i seq.), the Canon was 1 E.g.

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  • Studien aus Wurttemberg (1888), p. 36 seq.; Nardin, "Essai sur les prophetes de l'eglise primitive," Thesis, (Paris, 1888); Weinel, "Die Wirkungen des Geistes and der Geister im nachapostolischen Zeitalter bis auf I renaeus," (1899); Selwyn, "The Christian Prophets 1 See Lucian's story about Peregrinus, and that chapter of the OcSax,i where the author labours to establish criteria for distinguishing false prophets from true.

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  • See his Ouvres, edited by his son (Paris, 1853 seq.); SainteBeuve, Causeries du lundi, vol.

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  • The simplest explanation is that they represent different traditions, the Gospel narrative being composed with more special reference to prophetic fulfilments, and being probably nearer the truth than the short explanatory note inserted by the author of the Acts (see Bernard, Expositor, June 1904, p. 422 seq.).

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  • Suakin was the headquarters of the Egyptian and British troops operating in the eastern Sudan against the dervishes under Osman Digna (see EGYPT, Military Operations, 1884, seq.).

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  • But expulsion is only resorted to in cases where members are guilty of offences rendering them unfit for a seat in the House, such as being in open rebellion, being guilty of forgery, perjury, fraud or breach of trust, misappropriation of public money, corruption, conduct unbecoming the character of an officer and a gentleman, &c. It is customary to order the member, if absent, to attend in his place, before an order is made for his expulsion (see May, Parliamentary Practice, 1906, p. 56 seq.).

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  • The testimony of his physician and of his confessor ought to be sufficient to discredit the oft-repeated story of slow poisoning (see Duhr, Jesuiten Fabeln, 4th ed., 1904, pp. 69 seq.).

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  • The opinion that immediately after the first outbreak of Vesuvius a torrent of lava was ejected over Herculaneum was refuted by the scholars of the 18th century, and their refutation is confirmed by Beule (Le Drame du Vesuve, p. 240 seq.).

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  • No historical use can be made of the artificial story, in Sanhedrin 43a, that Matthew was condemned to death by a Jewish court (see Laible, Christ in the Talmud, 71 seq.).

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  • His original epitaph was discovered in the catacombs (see Kraus, Roma sotterranea, p. 1 54 et seq.), but nothing more is known of him.

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