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septa

septa

septa Sentence Examples

  • pores may be confluent with the cyclosystem presents itself as a radiating partitions, thus having a superficial resemblance to a madreporarian coral with its radiating septa (figs.

  • The right and left halves are completely divided by septa, no mixture of the venous and arterial blood being possible, an advance upon reptilian conditions, even the highest.

  • Thus the body cavity is divided into a sequence of chambers by transverse septa; and even among the Hirudinea, Spadella cephaloptera (Busch).

  • St, Septa dividing body-cavity transversely.

  • This is the typical arrangement, which is exhibited in the majority of the Polychaeta and Oligochaeta; in these the successive chambers of the coelom are separated by the intersegmental septa, sheets of muscle fibres extending from the body wall to the gut and thus forming partitions across the body.

  • The successive cavities are not, however, completely closed from each other; there is some communication between adjoining segments, and the septa are sometimes deficient here and there.

  • - " Errant" Polychaetes with well-marked prostomium possessing tentacles and palps with evident and locomotor parapodia, supported (with few exceptions) by strong spines, the aciculi; muscular pharynx usually armed with jaws; septa and nephridia regularly metameric and similar throughout body; free living and predaceous.

  • Parapod.ia hardly projecting; palps of prosomium forming branched gills; no pharynx or eversible buccal region; no septa in thorax, septa in abdomen regularly disposed.

  • Special sacs developed from the intersegmental septa lodge the developing ova and sperm.

  • - Diagrams of various Earth of several Geoscolicidae, the nephridiopores indicate the segments; to each segment corresponds internally a chamber of the coelom which is separated from adjacent segments by transverse septa,which are only unrecognizable in the genus Aeolosoma and in the head region of other Oligochaeta.

  • In the latter case, the numerous bands of muscle attaching the pharynx to the parietes have obliterated the regular partition by means of septa.

  • The gonads are, moreover, limited and fixed in numbers, and are practically invariably attached to the intersegmental septa, usually to the front septum of a segment, more rarely to the posterior septum.

  • The Oligochaeta contrast with the Polychaeta in the general presence of outgrowths of the septa in the genital segments, which are either close to, or actually involve, the gonads, and into which may also open the funnels of the gonad ducts.

  • The intersegmental septa are absent save for the division of the first segment.

  • This coelom is lined by peritoneal cells and is divided into a series of metameres by septa which correspond to the segmentation of the FIG 15.

  • In Acanthobdella the testes are, however, not contained in the general coelom, and the nephridia lie in the septa.

  • These septa are, however, rather incomplete and are not fastened to the gut; and, as in Acanthobdella, the nephridia are embedded vv FIG.

  • Shell almost completely uncoiled, in one plane, with internal septa.

  • The upper whorls of the shell are seen to be divided into separate chambers by the formation of successively formed " septa."

  • In correspondence with the tri-regional differentiation of the body in its external configuration, the coelom (body-cavity, perivisceral cavity) is divided into three portions completely separated from one another by septa: - (I) proboscis-coelom, or first body-cavity; (2) the collar-coelom, or second body-cavity; (3) truncal coelom, or third body-cavity.

  • These vascular membranes are called the lateral septa.

  • The intestine is slung by a median dorsal and ventral mesentery which divides the body cavity into two symmetrically shaped halves; it is " stayed " by two transverse septa, the anterior or gastroparietal band running from the stomach to the body wall and the posterior or ileoparietal band running from the intestine to the body wall.

  • None of these septa is complete, and the various parts of the central body cavity freely communicate with one another.

  • In his history of the Arietidae Hyatt points out that toward the close of the Cretaceous this entire group of ammonites appears to have been affected with some malady; the unrolled forms multiply, the septa are simplified, the ornamentation becomes heavy, thick, and finally disappears in the adult; the entire group ends by dying out and leaving no descendants.

  • About the fifth week of human embryonic life the tunica albuginea appears in the male, from which septa grow to divide the testis into lobules, while the epithelial cords form the seminiferous tubes, though these do not gain a lumen until just before puberty.

  • It can be divided into three regions - (i.) head, f (ii.) trunk, and (iii.) tail, separated from one another by two transverse septa.

  • The spores themselves may be unicellular without a septum or multicellular with one or more septa.

  • At other times the spores are divided by both transverse and longitudinal septa producing the muriform (murali-divided) spore so called from the resemblance of the individual chambers to the stones in a wall.

  • d'Orbigny's name for a genus of Perforate Foraminifera, distinguished by the flattened, lenticular discoid shell of many turns, finely perforated; chambers subdivided by incomplete septa into squarish chamberlets.

  • In many Basidiomycetes minute branches arise below the septa; their tips curve over the outside of the latter, and fuse with the cell above just beyond it, forming a clamp-connexion.

  • The outermost hyphae may even put forth thinner hyphae, radiating into the soil like root-hairs, and the convergent tips may be closely appressed and so divided by septa as to resemble the root-apex of a higher plant (Armillaria mellea).

  • They also undergo cutting up by numerous septa into short cells, and these often divide again in all planes, so that a pseudoparenchyma results, the walls of which may be thickened and swollen internally, or hardened and black on the exterior.

  • Such hyphae may be multicellular, or they may consist of simple tubes with numerous nuclei and no septa (Phycomycetes), and are then non-cellular.

  • In Merulius lacrymans Hartig has observed thin-walled hyphae with large lumina, the septa of which are perforated like those of sieve-tubes.

  • Uredospores, septa of Basidiomycetes), spirals, reticulations, rings, &c. (capillitium fibres of Podaxon, Calostoma, Battarrea), occur as in the vessels of higher plants, while sculptured networks, pittings and so forth are as common on fungus-spores as they are on pollen grains.

  • Fumago - a single mycelial cell divides by septa in all three planes until a more or less solid clump results.

  • The body is composed of a large number of segments; the prostomium bears a pair of tentacles; the nervous system consists of a brain and longitudinal ventral nerve cords closely connected with the epidermis (without distinct ganglia), widely separated in Saccocirrus, closely approximated in Protodrilus, fused together in Polygordius; the coelom is well developed, the septa are distinct, and the dorsal and ventral longitudinal mesenteries are complete; the nephridia are simple, and open into the coelom.

  • It resembles Dinophilus in the possession of a ventral pharyngeal pouch (which bears teeth in Histriodrilus only), the small number of segments, and absence of distinct septa, the absence of a vascular system, the presence of distinct ganglia on the ventral nerve cords, and of small nephridia which do not appear to open internally.

  • The three valves bear the septa in the centre and the opening takes place through the back of the chambers.

  • A, Oral tentacles (28 to 32 in full-grown animals, 20 to 24 in half-grown specimens); B, praeoral hood or praeoral epipleur; C, plicated ventral surface of atrial chamber; D l, D 17, D26, gonads, twenty-six pairs, coincident with myotomes io to 36; E, metapleur or lateral ridge on atrial epipleur; F, atripore, coincident with myotome 36; G', G ' 5, G34, double ventral fin rays, extending from myotomes 37 to 52, but having no numerical relation to them; H, position of anus, between myotomes 51 and 52; I, notochord, projecting beyond myotomes; K7, K27, K62, myotomes or muscular segments of body-wall, 62 in number; L '°°, L230, L253, dorsal fin rays, about 250 in number, the hard substance of the ray being absent at the extreme ends of the body (these have no constant numerical relation to the myomeres); M, notochord as seen through the transparent myotomes, the thin double-lined spaces being the connective-tissue septa and the broader spaces the muscular tissue of the myotomes; N, position of brown funnel of left side (atrio-coelomic canal); 0, nerve tube resting on notochord.

  • Bows are made of it by the union of two pieces with many bands; and, the septa being bored out and the lengths joined together, it is employed, as we use leaden pipes, in transmitting water to reservoirs or gardens.

  • - Medusae more or less cubical in form, with four perradial rhopalia alternating with four interradial tentacles or groups of tentacles; oral arms short; stomach a wide cavity bearing four interradial groups of phacellae and giving off four broad perradial pouches completely separated from each other by four interradial septa (i.e.

  • ring-canal absent); gonads divided each into two by the septa, hence eight in number; subgenital pits small or absent.

  • The cavities both of the calices and coenenchymal tubes of Heliopora are closed below by horizontal partitions or tabulae, hence the genus was formerly included in the group Tabulata, and was supposed to belong to the madreporarian corals, both because of its lamellar skeleton, which resembles that of a Ma.drepore, and because each calicle has from twelve to fifteen radial partitions or septa projecting into its cavity.

  • The structure of the zooid of Heliopora, however, is that of a typical Alcyonarian, and the septa have only a resemblance to, but no real homology with, the similarly named structures in madreporarian corals.

  • This skeleton is largely composed of a number of radiating plates or septa, and it differs both in origin and structure from the calcareous skeleton of all Alcyonaria except Heliopora.

  • (2) The septa, radial plates of FIG.

  • - Corallum of Caryophyllia; semi-diagrammatic. th, Theca; c, costae; sp, septa; p, palus; col, columella.

  • (3) The theca or wall, which in many corals is not an independent structure, but is formed by the conjoined thickened peripheral ends of the septa.

  • (4) The columella, a structure which occupies the centre of the calicle, and may arise from the basal plate, when it is called essential, or may be formed by union of trabecular offsets of the septa, when it is called unessential.

  • True costae always correspond to the septa, and are in fact the peripheral edges of the latter.

  • Synapticulae are calcareous bars uniting adjacent septa.

  • The septa in recent corals always bear a definite relation to the mesenteries, being found either in every entocoele or in every entocoele and exocoele.

  • Hence in corals in which there is only a single cycle of mesenteries the septa are correspondingly few in number; where several cycles of mesenteries are present the septa are correspondingly numerous.

  • in some species of Madrepora - only two septa are fully developed, the remainder being very feebly represented.

  • The cells forming the limbs of the ectodermic folds secrete nodules of calcite, and these, fusing together, give rise to six (or twelve) vertical radial plates or septa.

  • As growth proceeds new septa are formed simultaneously with the new couples of secondary mesenteries.

  • In some corals, in which all the septa are entocoelic, each new system is embraced by a mesenteric couple; in others,in which the septa are both entocoelic and exocoelic, three septa are formed in Il FIG.

  • Thirty-two septa are present, six in the entocoeles of the primary cycle of mesenteries, I; six in the entocoeles of the secondary cycle of mesenteries, II; four in the entocoeles of the tertiary cycle of mesenteries, III, only four pairs of the latter being developed; and sixteen in the entocoeles between the mesenterial pairs.

  • These latter are in turn embraced by the couples of the tertiary cycle of mesenteries, and new septa are formed in the exocoeles on either side of them, and so forth.

  • In some corals the septa are solid imperforate plates of calcite, and their peripheral ends are either firmly welded together, or are united by interstitial pieces so as to form imperforate theca.

  • In others the peripheral ends of the septa are united only by bars or trabeculae, so that the theca is perforate, and in many such perforate corals the septa themselves are pierced by numerous perforations.

  • E, Section through a dividing calicle of Mussa, showing the union of two septa in the plane of division, and the origin of new septa at right angles to them.

  • In the former case the young daughter zooid, with its corallum, arises wholly outside the cavity of the parent zooid, and the component parts of the young corallum, septa, theca, columella, &c., are formed anew in every individual produced.

  • Corals have been divided into A porosa and Perforata, according as the theca and septa are compact and solid, or are perforated by pores containing canals lined by endoderm.

  • Various attempts have been made to classify corals according to the arrangement of the septa, the characters of the theca, the microscopic structure of the corallurn, and the anatomy of the soft parts.

  • On the other hand, the study of the anatomy and development of the zooids has thrown much light upon the manner in which the corallum is formed, and it is now possible to infer the structure of the soft parts from a microscopical examination of the septa, theca, &c., with the result that unexpected relationships have been shown to exist between corals previously supposed to stand far apart.

  • In many of these so-called rugose forms the septa have a characteristic arrangement, differing from that of recent corals chiefly in the fact that they show a tetrameral instead of a hexameral symmetry.

  • Thus in the family Stauridae there are four chief septa whose inner ends unite in the middle of the calicle to form a false columella, and in the Zaphrentidae there are many instances of an arrangement, such as that depicted in fig.

  • In this coral the calicle is divided into quadrants by four principal septa, the main septum, counter septum, and two alar septa.

  • The remaining septa are so disposed that in the quadrants abutting on the chief septum they converge towards that septum, whilst in the other quadrants they converge towards the alar septa.

  • The secondary septa show a regular gradation in size, and, assuming that the smallest were the most recently formed, it will be noticed that in the chief quadrants the youngest septa lie nearest to the main septum; in the other quadrants the youngest septa lie nearest to the alar septa.

  • The general structure of this coral leaves no doubt that it is closely allied to the Astraeidae, but in the young calicles a tetrameral symmetry is indicated by the presence of four large septa placed at right angles to one another.

  • of Thecidiosmilia, two septa, corresponding to the mainand counter-septa of Streptelasma, are first formed, then two alar septa, and afterwards the remaining septa, the latter taking on a generally radial arrangement, though the original bilaterality is marked by the preponderance of the main septum.

  • As the microscopic character of the corallum of these extinct forms agrees with that of recent corals, it may be assumed that the anatomy of the soft parts also was similar, and the tetrameral arrange ment, when present, may obviously be referred to a stage when only the first two pairs of Edwardsian mesenteries were present and septa were formed in the intervals between them.

  • Space forbids a discussion of the proposals to classify corals after the minute structure of their coralla, but it will suffice to say that it has been shown that the septa of all corals are built up of a number of curved bars called trabeculae, each of which is composed of a number of nodes.

  • The trabeculae are united together by these thickened internodes, and the result is a fenestrated septum, which in older septa may become solid and aporose by continual deposit of calcite in the fenestrae.

  • The septa of modern perforate corals are shown to have a structure nearly identical with that of the secondary forms, but the trabeculae and their nodes are only apparent on microscopical examination.

  • Septa numerous, arranged pinnately with regard to four principal septa.

  • - Solitary, rarely colonial corals, with radially arranged septa and without tabulae.

  • - Mainly colonial, rarely solitary corals, with radial septa, but bilateral arrangement indicated by persistence of a main septum.

  • - Colonial corals allied to the Amphiastraeidae, but with radially symmetrical septa arranged in cycles.

  • Tabulae present, and two larger septa, an axial and abaxial, are always present, with traces of ten smaller septa.

  • Theca porous; septa compact and reduced in number.

  • Theca and septa perforate.

  • Septa numerous, generally radial, seldom pinnate.

  • Septa radial; dissepiments present; an epitheca surrounds the base of massive or maeandroid forms, but only surrounds individual corallites in simple or branching forms. Typical genera - Goniastraea, M.

  • - Solitary and colonial corals, with numerous radial septa united by synapticulae.

  • Septa radial; the primary septa usually compact, the remainder perforate.

  • - Solitary corals with rudimentary septa, and the calicle filled with vesicular endotheca.

  • - Diagram of the arrangement of the septa in a Zaphrentid coral.

  • m, Main septum; c, counter septum; t, t, alar septa.

  • (In this Devonian genus there is a single semicircular operculum furnished with a stout median septum and numerous feebly developed secondary septa.

  • In the young spike, which arises when the leaf is still very small, a band of tissue derived from superficial cells is distinguishable along either side; this sporangiogenic band gives rise to the sporogenous groups, the sterile septa between them, and the outer walls of the sporangia.

  • It is divided by septa into chambers (fig.

  • - Diagrammatic section of a quinquelocular ovary, composed of five carpels, the edges of which are folded inwards, and meet in the centre forming the septa, s.

  • - Diagrammatic section of a five-carpellary ovary, in which the septa (s) proceed inwards for a certain length, bearing the placentas and ovules (o).

  • In Caryophyllaceae, however, while the placenta is free in the centre, there are often traces found at the base of the ovary of the remains of septa, as if rupture had taken place, and, in rare instances, ovules are found on the margins of the carpels.

  • But in Primulaceae no vestiges of septa or marginal ovules can be perceived at any period of growth; the placenta is always free, and rises in the centre of the ovary.

  • Transverse septa have occasionally, but rarely, been detected in the smaller hyphae.

  • The tubes have their cavity dilated at intervals, and Penhallow has therefore compared them with the trumpet-hyphae of Laminariaceae, but no transverse septa are anywhere visible.

  • ascusan>Asci with 8 ascospores with 3 transverse and 1 longitudinal septa - were observed (Shoemaker, 1962) (Fig.

  • constricted at septa; tips curved, twisted or straight (Fig.

  • mollusce lines: the line marking the join between the septa and the inside wall of the shell of a cephalopod mollusk.

  • Spores are tardily septate, with 7 or more septa, irregularly spaced.

  • septumdia had 3-7 transverse septa and usually several longitudinal or oblique septa.

  • septumglands are divided into lobules by connective tissue septa.

  • septumnumber of transverse septa varied from 3-10, and 1 to several longitudinal septa were present.

  • septumglands are divided into lobules by connective tissue septa.

  • pores may be confluent with the cyclosystem presents itself as a radiating partitions, thus having a superficial resemblance to a madreporarian coral with its radiating septa (figs.

  • The right and left halves are completely divided by septa, no mixture of the venous and arterial blood being possible, an advance upon reptilian conditions, even the highest.

  • Thus the body cavity is divided into a sequence of chambers by transverse septa; and even among the Hirudinea, Spadella cephaloptera (Busch).

  • St, Septa dividing body-cavity transversely.

  • This is the typical arrangement, which is exhibited in the majority of the Polychaeta and Oligochaeta; in these the successive chambers of the coelom are separated by the intersegmental septa, sheets of muscle fibres extending from the body wall to the gut and thus forming partitions across the body.

  • The successive cavities are not, however, completely closed from each other; there is some communication between adjoining segments, and the septa are sometimes deficient here and there.

  • In the Polychaeta, which are to be regarded as structurally simpler forms than the two groups just referred to, there is but little subdivision of the coelom of the segments, indeed a tendency in the reverse direction, owing to the suppression of septa.

  • - " Errant" Polychaetes with well-marked prostomium possessing tentacles and palps with evident and locomotor parapodia, supported (with few exceptions) by strong spines, the aciculi; muscular pharynx usually armed with jaws; septa and nephridia regularly metameric and similar throughout body; free living and predaceous.

  • Parapod.ia hardly projecting; palps of prosomium forming branched gills; no pharynx or eversible buccal region; no septa in thorax, septa in abdomen regularly disposed.

  • Special sacs developed from the intersegmental septa lodge the developing ova and sperm.

  • - Diagrams of various Earth of several Geoscolicidae, the nephridiopores indicate the segments; to each segment corresponds internally a chamber of the coelom which is separated from adjacent segments by transverse septa,which are only unrecognizable in the genus Aeolosoma and in the head region of other Oligochaeta.

  • In the latter case, the numerous bands of muscle attaching the pharynx to the parietes have obliterated the regular partition by means of septa.

  • The gonads are, moreover, limited and fixed in numbers, and are practically invariably attached to the intersegmental septa, usually to the front septum of a segment, more rarely to the posterior septum.

  • The Oligochaeta contrast with the Polychaeta in the general presence of outgrowths of the septa in the genital segments, which are either close to, or actually involve, the gonads, and into which may also open the funnels of the gonad ducts.

  • The intersegmental septa are absent save for the division of the first segment.

  • This coelom is lined by peritoneal cells and is divided into a series of metameres by septa which correspond to the segmentation of the FIG 15.

  • In Acanthobdella the testes are, however, not contained in the general coelom, and the nephridia lie in the septa.

  • Furthermore, in the mid region of the body this coelom is broken up by metamerically arranged septa, as in Acanthobdella.

  • These septa are, however, rather incomplete and are not fastened to the gut; and, as in Acanthobdella, the nephridia are embedded vv FIG.

  • Shell almost completely uncoiled, in one plane, with internal septa.

  • The upper whorls of the shell are seen to be divided into separate chambers by the formation of successively formed " septa."

  • In correspondence with the tri-regional differentiation of the body in its external configuration, the coelom (body-cavity, perivisceral cavity) is divided into three portions completely separated from one another by septa: - (I) proboscis-coelom, or first body-cavity; (2) the collar-coelom, or second body-cavity; (3) truncal coelom, or third body-cavity.

  • These vascular membranes are called the lateral septa.

  • which the genital pleurae are quite obsolete, and yet lateral septa occur (e.g.

  • The intestine is slung by a median dorsal and ventral mesentery which divides the body cavity into two symmetrically shaped halves; it is " stayed " by two transverse septa, the anterior or gastroparietal band running from the stomach to the body wall and the posterior or ileoparietal band running from the intestine to the body wall.

  • None of these septa is complete, and the various parts of the central body cavity freely communicate with one another.

  • The fruit is a capsule splitting along the septa (septicidal) (fig.

  • In his history of the Arietidae Hyatt points out that toward the close of the Cretaceous this entire group of ammonites appears to have been affected with some malady; the unrolled forms multiply, the septa are simplified, the ornamentation becomes heavy, thick, and finally disappears in the adult; the entire group ends by dying out and leaving no descendants.

  • About the fifth week of human embryonic life the tunica albuginea appears in the male, from which septa grow to divide the testis into lobules, while the epithelial cords form the seminiferous tubes, though these do not gain a lumen until just before puberty.

  • It can be divided into three regions - (i.) head, f (ii.) trunk, and (iii.) tail, separated from one another by two transverse septa.

  • The spores themselves may be unicellular without a septum or multicellular with one or more septa.

  • At other times the spores are divided by both transverse and longitudinal septa producing the muriform (murali-divided) spore so called from the resemblance of the individual chambers to the stones in a wall.

  • d'Orbigny's name for a genus of Perforate Foraminifera, distinguished by the flattened, lenticular discoid shell of many turns, finely perforated; chambers subdivided by incomplete septa into squarish chamberlets.

  • In many Basidiomycetes minute branches arise below the septa; their tips curve over the outside of the latter, and fuse with the cell above just beyond it, forming a clamp-connexion.

  • The outermost hyphae may even put forth thinner hyphae, radiating into the soil like root-hairs, and the convergent tips may be closely appressed and so divided by septa as to resemble the root-apex of a higher plant (Armillaria mellea).

  • They also undergo cutting up by numerous septa into short cells, and these often divide again in all planes, so that a pseudoparenchyma results, the walls of which may be thickened and swollen internally, or hardened and black on the exterior.

  • Such hyphae may be multicellular, or they may consist of simple tubes with numerous nuclei and no septa (Phycomycetes), and are then non-cellular.

  • In Merulius lacrymans Hartig has observed thin-walled hyphae with large lumina, the septa of which are perforated like those of sieve-tubes.

  • Uredospores, septa of Basidiomycetes), spirals, reticulations, rings, &c. (capillitium fibres of Podaxon, Calostoma, Battarrea), occur as in the vessels of higher plants, while sculptured networks, pittings and so forth are as common on fungus-spores as they are on pollen grains.

  • Fumago - a single mycelial cell divides by septa in all three planes until a more or less solid clump results.

  • The body is composed of a large number of segments; the prostomium bears a pair of tentacles; the nervous system consists of a brain and longitudinal ventral nerve cords closely connected with the epidermis (without distinct ganglia), widely separated in Saccocirrus, closely approximated in Protodrilus, fused together in Polygordius; the coelom is well developed, the septa are distinct, and the dorsal and ventral longitudinal mesenteries are complete; the nephridia are simple, and open into the coelom.

  • It resembles Dinophilus in the possession of a ventral pharyngeal pouch (which bears teeth in Histriodrilus only), the small number of segments, and absence of distinct septa, the absence of a vascular system, the presence of distinct ganglia on the ventral nerve cords, and of small nephridia which do not appear to open internally.

  • The three valves bear the septa in the centre and the opening takes place through the back of the chambers.

  • A, Oral tentacles (28 to 32 in full-grown animals, 20 to 24 in half-grown specimens); B, praeoral hood or praeoral epipleur; C, plicated ventral surface of atrial chamber; D l, D 17, D26, gonads, twenty-six pairs, coincident with myotomes io to 36; E, metapleur or lateral ridge on atrial epipleur; F, atripore, coincident with myotome 36; G', G ' 5, G34, double ventral fin rays, extending from myotomes 37 to 52, but having no numerical relation to them; H, position of anus, between myotomes 51 and 52; I, notochord, projecting beyond myotomes; K7, K27, K62, myotomes or muscular segments of body-wall, 62 in number; L '°Â°, L230, L253, dorsal fin rays, about 250 in number, the hard substance of the ray being absent at the extreme ends of the body (these have no constant numerical relation to the myomeres); M, notochord as seen through the transparent myotomes, the thin double-lined spaces being the connective-tissue septa and the broader spaces the muscular tissue of the myotomes; N, position of brown funnel of left side (atrio-coelomic canal); 0, nerve tube resting on notochord.

  • Bows are made of it by the union of two pieces with many bands; and, the septa being bored out and the lengths joined together, it is employed, as we use leaden pipes, in transmitting water to reservoirs or gardens.

  • - Medusae more or less cubical in form, with four perradial rhopalia alternating with four interradial tentacles or groups of tentacles; oral arms short; stomach a wide cavity bearing four interradial groups of phacellae and giving off four broad perradial pouches completely separated from each other by four interradial septa (i.e.

  • ring-canal absent); gonads divided each into two by the septa, hence eight in number; subgenital pits small or absent.

  • The cavities both of the calices and coenenchymal tubes of Heliopora are closed below by horizontal partitions or tabulae, hence the genus was formerly included in the group Tabulata, and was supposed to belong to the madreporarian corals, both because of its lamellar skeleton, which resembles that of a Ma.drepore, and because each calicle has from twelve to fifteen radial partitions or septa projecting into its cavity.

  • The structure of the zooid of Heliopora, however, is that of a typical Alcyonarian, and the septa have only a resemblance to, but no real homology with, the similarly named structures in madreporarian corals.

  • This skeleton is largely composed of a number of radiating plates or septa, and it differs both in origin and structure from the calcareous skeleton of all Alcyonaria except Heliopora.

  • (2) The septa, radial plates of FIG.

  • - Corallum of Caryophyllia; semi-diagrammatic. th, Theca; c, costae; sp, septa; p, palus; col, columella.

  • (3) The theca or wall, which in many corals is not an independent structure, but is formed by the conjoined thickened peripheral ends of the septa.

  • (4) The columella, a structure which occupies the centre of the calicle, and may arise from the basal plate, when it is called essential, or may be formed by union of trabecular offsets of the septa, when it is called unessential.

  • True costae always correspond to the septa, and are in fact the peripheral edges of the latter.

  • (7) Pali, spinous or blade-like upgrowths from the bottom of the calicle, which project between the inner edges of certain septa and the columella.

  • Synapticulae are calcareous bars uniting adjacent septa.

  • The septa in recent corals always bear a definite relation to the mesenteries, being found either in every entocoele or in every entocoele and exocoele.

  • Hence in corals in which there is only a single cycle of mesenteries the septa are correspondingly few in number; where several cycles of mesenteries are present the septa are correspondingly numerous.

  • in some species of Madrepora - only two septa are fully developed, the remainder being very feebly represented.

  • The cells forming the limbs of the ectodermic folds secrete nodules of calcite, and these, fusing together, give rise to six (or twelve) vertical radial plates or septa.

  • As growth proceeds new septa are formed simultaneously with the new couples of secondary mesenteries.

  • In some corals, in which all the septa are entocoelic, each new system is embraced by a mesenteric couple; in others,in which the septa are both entocoelic and exocoelic, three septa are formed in Il FIG.

  • Thirty-two septa are present, six in the entocoeles of the primary cycle of mesenteries, I; six in the entocoeles of the secondary cycle of mesenteries, II; four in the entocoeles of the tertiary cycle of mesenteries, III, only four pairs of the latter being developed; and sixteen in the entocoeles between the mesenterial pairs.

  • These latter are in turn embraced by the couples of the tertiary cycle of mesenteries, and new septa are formed in the exocoeles on either side of them, and so forth.

  • In some corals the septa are solid imperforate plates of calcite, and their peripheral ends are either firmly welded together, or are united by interstitial pieces so as to form imperforate theca.

  • In others the peripheral ends of the septa are united only by bars or trabeculae, so that the theca is perforate, and in many such perforate corals the septa themselves are pierced by numerous perforations.

  • E, Section through a dividing calicle of Mussa, showing the union of two septa in the plane of division, and the origin of new septa at right angles to them.

  • In the former case the young daughter zooid, with its corallum, arises wholly outside the cavity of the parent zooid, and the component parts of the young corallum, septa, theca, columella, &c., are formed anew in every individual produced.

  • Corals have been divided into A porosa and Perforata, according as the theca and septa are compact and solid, or are perforated by pores containing canals lined by endoderm.

  • Various attempts have been made to classify corals according to the arrangement of the septa, the characters of the theca, the microscopic structure of the corallurn, and the anatomy of the soft parts.

  • On the other hand, the study of the anatomy and development of the zooids has thrown much light upon the manner in which the corallum is formed, and it is now possible to infer the structure of the soft parts from a microscopical examination of the septa, theca, &c., with the result that unexpected relationships have been shown to exist between corals previously supposed to stand far apart.

  • In many of these so-called rugose forms the septa have a characteristic arrangement, differing from that of recent corals chiefly in the fact that they show a tetrameral instead of a hexameral symmetry.

  • Thus in the family Stauridae there are four chief septa whose inner ends unite in the middle of the calicle to form a false columella, and in the Zaphrentidae there are many instances of an arrangement, such as that depicted in fig.

  • In this coral the calicle is divided into quadrants by four principal septa, the main septum, counter septum, and two alar septa.

  • The remaining septa are so disposed that in the quadrants abutting on the chief septum they converge towards that septum, whilst in the other quadrants they converge towards the alar septa.

  • The secondary septa show a regular gradation in size, and, assuming that the smallest were the most recently formed, it will be noticed that in the chief quadrants the youngest septa lie nearest to the main septum; in the other quadrants the youngest septa lie nearest to the alar septa.

  • The general structure of this coral leaves no doubt that it is closely allied to the Astraeidae, but in the young calicles a tetrameral symmetry is indicated by the presence of four large septa placed at right angles to one another.

  • of Thecidiosmilia, two septa, corresponding to the mainand counter-septa of Streptelasma, are first formed, then two alar septa, and afterwards the remaining septa, the latter taking on a generally radial arrangement, though the original bilaterality is marked by the preponderance of the main septum.

  • As the microscopic character of the corallum of these extinct forms agrees with that of recent corals, it may be assumed that the anatomy of the soft parts also was similar, and the tetrameral arrange ment, when present, may obviously be referred to a stage when only the first two pairs of Edwardsian mesenteries were present and septa were formed in the intervals between them.

  • Space forbids a discussion of the proposals to classify corals after the minute structure of their coralla, but it will suffice to say that it has been shown that the septa of all corals are built up of a number of curved bars called trabeculae, each of which is composed of a number of nodes.

  • The trabeculae are united together by these thickened internodes, and the result is a fenestrated septum, which in older septa may become solid and aporose by continual deposit of calcite in the fenestrae.

  • The septa of modern perforate corals are shown to have a structure nearly identical with that of the secondary forms, but the trabeculae and their nodes are only apparent on microscopical examination.

  • Septa numerous, arranged pinnately with regard to four principal septa.

  • - Solitary, rarely colonial corals, with radially arranged septa and without tabulae.

  • - Mainly colonial, rarely solitary corals, with radial septa, but bilateral arrangement indicated by persistence of a main septum.

  • - Colonial corals allied to the Amphiastraeidae, but with radially symmetrical septa arranged in cycles.

  • Tabulae present, and two larger septa, an axial and abaxial, are always present, with traces of ten smaller septa.

  • Theca porous; septa compact and reduced in number.

  • Theca and septa perforate.

  • Septa numerous, generally radial, seldom pinnate.

  • Septa radial; dissepiments present; an epitheca surrounds the base of massive or maeandroid forms, but only surrounds individual corallites in simple or branching forms. Typical genera - Goniastraea, M.

  • - Solitary and colonial corals, with numerous radial septa united by synapticulae.

  • Septa radial; the primary septa usually compact, the remainder perforate.

  • - Solitary corals with rudimentary septa, and the calicle filled with vesicular endotheca.

  • - Diagram of the arrangement of the septa in a Zaphrentid coral.

  • m, Main septum; c, counter septum; t, t, alar septa.

  • (In this Devonian genus there is a single semicircular operculum furnished with a stout median septum and numerous feebly developed secondary septa.

  • In the young spike, which arises when the leaf is still very small, a band of tissue derived from superficial cells is distinguishable along either side; this sporangiogenic band gives rise to the sporogenous groups, the sterile septa between them, and the outer walls of the sporangia.

  • He subsequently examined the passage of gases through septa or partitions of indiarubber, unglazed earthenware and plates of metals such as palladium, and proved that gases pass through these septa neither by diffusion nor effusion nor by transpiration, but in virtue of a selective absorption which the septa appear to exert on the gases in contact with them.

  • It is divided by septa into chambers (fig.

  • In a syncarpous pistil, on the other hand, the carpels are so united that the edges of each of the contiguous ones, by their union, form a septum or dissepiment, and the number of these septa consequently indicates the number of carpels in the compound pistil (fig.

  • - Diagrammatic section of a quinquelocular ovary, composed of five carpels, the edges of which are folded inwards, and meet in the centre forming the septa, s.

  • - Diagrammatic section of a five-carpellary ovary, in which the septa (s) proceed inwards for a certain length, bearing the placentas and ovules (o).

  • In Caryophyllaceae, however, while the placenta is free in the centre, there are often traces found at the base of the ovary of the remains of septa, as if rupture had taken place, and, in rare instances, ovules are found on the margins of the carpels.

  • But in Primulaceae no vestiges of septa or marginal ovules can be perceived at any period of growth; the placenta is always free, and rises in the centre of the ovary.

  • The styles of a syncarpous pistil are either separate or united; when separate, they alternate with the septa; when united completely, the style is said to be simple (fig.

  • Transverse septa have occasionally, but rarely, been detected in the smaller hyphae.

  • The tubes have their cavity dilated at intervals, and Penhallow has therefore compared them with the trumpet-hyphae of Laminariaceae, but no transverse septa are anywhere visible.

  • Spores are tardily septate, with 7 or more septa, irregularly spaced.

  • Conidia had 3-7 transverse septa and usually several longitudinal or oblique septa.

  • The glands are divided into lobules by connective tissue septa.

  • The number of transverse septa varied from 3-10, and 1 to several longitudinal septa were present.

  • A few, like Philadelphia's SEPTA, even allow seniors to ride free.

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