Senses sentence example

senses
  • He pushed the door to a dark room open, using his senses to key in on where the person was.

    36
    20
  • So this killer senses the threat isn't finished.

    27
    14
  • At last, we know not what it is to live in the open air, and our lives are domestic in more senses than we think.

    12
    7
  • He has to learn how... and maybe he senses your anxiety.

    27
    23
  • Jule's wariness made his senses heighten.

    6
    3
    Advertisement
  • She scrambled off him, senses reeling.

    4
    1
  • Great. A little tingly, like my senses are heightened somehow.

    7
    4
  • An old-fashioned man would have lost his senses or died of ennui before this.

    11
    8
  • Her senses became saturated quickly by his scent and heat.

    4
    2
  • It raced through her body, lulling her into a strange trance of heightened senses while he drank.

    3
    1
    Advertisement
  • She didn't fully understand the demon senses that Darkyn indicated were part of her now.

    5
    3
  • Without the senses of a deity, she was unaware of him.

    9
    7
  • She slowed, hating that she no longer had the heightened senses of a deity.

    4
    2
  • He smelled like dark chocolate, spices and man, a combination that ensnared her senses and made her want to taste him.

    6
    4
  • She started after him, senses scattered.

    5
    3
    Advertisement
  • Jonny tripped his senses again.

    2
    0
  • Yully snapped back to her senses, her eyes opening.

    2
    1
  • His nearness rattled her senses in a way that reminded her of how she felt around Gabriel.

    3
    2
  • His solid frame and heat were creeping into her senses, tugging at her resolve to resist.

    2
    1
  • He was saturating her senses, seducing her somehow.

    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • Her senses addled, Deidre was forced to retreat.

    2
    1
  • She tried to turn away, but the smell filled her senses with inhuman hunger and desperation.

    2
    1
  • She ran her hand down his arm and side, unable to shake the desire to saturate her senses with every part of him.

    4
    3
  • She tasted sweet and saucy, like the woman herself, her heat, scent and silky skin filling his senses in a way that left him wanting more of her.

    2
    1
  • The human senses that made her gasp at the colors of spring flowers were also ill-made to defend them against Immortals and deities.

    3
    2
    Advertisement
  • She stood in the warm silence, senses intoxicated by their bond, his scent and body.

    2
    1
  • She repeated the sentence over and over to try to block out what her senses told her about the size of the monster.

    2
    1
  • His scent tickled her senses, his nearness making her warm body warmer.

    2
    1
  • He squinted, senses heightening.

    1
    0
  • It is, however, in her daily life that one can best measure the delicacy of her senses and her manual skill.

    7
    6
    Advertisement
  • Prince Andrew collected all his strength in an effort to recover his senses, he moved a little, and suddenly there was a ringing in his ears, a dimness in his eyes, and like a man plunged into water he lost consciousness.

    3
    2
  • The trickle of a familiar stream heightened her dulled senses, and she forced herself onward, through the brush and to the stream.

    0
    0
  • Xander tilted his head to the side, following the teenaged God with his senses.

    0
    0
  • Xander used his senses to find the girl within the bright building.

    0
    0
  • Xander left his bedroom, irritated, and stretched his senses.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He started his Tai Chi routine, focusing externally while the night filled his heightened senses.

    0
    0
  • Even with his belly full, Xander's senses were nearly ensnared by the scent of food.

    0
    0
  • The girl wasn't alone; she was with a woman, one that was completely invisible to his senses.

    0
    0
  • In all his years, he'd never met a human capable of slipping by his senses.

    0
    0
  • Xander stretched his senses to seek out any other minds in the condo.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • As soon as she was more than three feet away, she disappeared from his enhanced senses.

    0
    0
  • His senses picked up six Guardians.

    0
    0
  • Xander's senses picked up nothing, but they wouldn't.

    0
    0
  • As before, even seeing her, his extra senses didn't identify anyone stood before him until he was within three feet of Jessi.

    0
    0
  • When Jessi tripped his senses, he tensed so quickly, he nearly leapt out of his seat.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • She disappeared from his senses.

    0
    0
  • He tensed as she tripped his senses again.

    0
    0
  • She focused hard on the clasp, her senses filling with him.

    0
    0
  • He reached past her, his heat and scent stirring her senses once more.

    0
    0
  • It swallowed her senses, but she wasn't about to lose complete control to someone like Xander.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Desire sharpened her senses, which did her no good with the pain radiating down her arm.

    0
    0
  • She didn't think she could, not with her senses scrambled.

    0
    0
  • Guilt and need warred as her senses became saturated with his oak-amber scent, the warmth of his body at her back.

    0
    0
  • He held her for another minute, until her senses returned.

    0
    0
  • He strode out of the kitchen, leaving her alone to try to regain her senses.

    0
    0
  • As soon as Jessi crossed outside of three feet, she disappeared from his senses.

    0
    0
  • Your skill appears to be that your mind can't be manipulated, and you are … undetectable to our heightened senses.

    0
    0
  • The gifts are almost like enhanced senses.

    0
    0
  • Xander kept up with her easily, the solid, warm body beside her affecting her senses in ways that made her angrier.

    0
    0
  • He followed them into the worn down building, senses alert.

    0
    0
  • His velvety mouth and full lips, combined with his amber-oak scent, intoxicated her senses.

    0
    0
  • His senses were at their max.

    0
    0
  • Or else he'd send in someone who could move under the senses of the Guardians.

    0
    0
  • His senses picked up on the Guardians and Gods gathered in the red barn.

    0
    0
  • You know you're invisible to my senses.

    0
    0
  • Xander's heightened senses were able to see everything from above – except Jessi.

    0
    0
  • Xander jogged into the fog, using his senses to guide him.

    0
    0
  • Relying solely on his mortal senses, the Other unleashed a bolt of purple lightening.

    0
    0
  • Blood filled his senses, and his gaze drifted to the Original Other.

    0
    0
  • His comforting scent and heat filled her senses.

    0
    0
  • In fact, so far as the direct evidence of our senses tells us, matter appears to be indefinitely divisible.

    0
    0
  • As in children, imagination and the senses prevailed in those men of the past.

    0
    0
  • The Latin term is consecratio, which of course has a variety of senses, including simple burial.

    0
    0
  • Apotheosis may also be used in wider senses.

    0
    0
  • The history, indeed, of many a word lies hid in its equivocal uses; and it in no way derogates from the dignity of the highest poetry to gain strength and variety from the ingenious application of the same sounds to different senses, any more than from the contrivances of rhythm or the accompaniment of imitative sounds.

    0
    0
  • Perceiving further, that in order to understand these relations I should sometimes have to consider them one by one, and sometimes only to bear them in mind or embrace them in the aggregate, I thought that, in order the better to consider them individually, I should view them as subsisting between straight lines, than which I could find no objects more simple, or capable of being more distinctly represented to my imagination and senses; and on the other hand that, in order to retain them in the memory or embrace an aggregate of many, I should express them by certain characters, the briefest possible."

    0
    0
  • Examining next what immediately follows the knowledge of pure intellect, he will pass in review all the other means of knowledge, and will find that they are two (or three), the imagination and the senses (and the memory).

    0
    0
  • In general, Aquinas maintained in different senses the real existence of universals ante rem, in re and post rem.

    0
    0
  • Deep into the night he would continue his studies, stimulating his senses by occasional cups of wine, and even in his dreams problems would pursue him and work out their solution.

    0
    0
  • It is, however, less liable to cause confusion, and in many other ways more convenient to employ the better known term Marsupialia in both senses.

    0
    0
  • They did not make much use of the word " intuition," which may indeed be taken in different senses, e.g.

    0
    0
  • The term is borrowed from Sight, of all the physical senses the one which most rapidly instructs the mind.

    0
    0
  • In zoology, the mollusca are divided into cephalous and acephalous (Acephala), according as they have or have not an organized part of their anatomy as the seat of the brain and special senses.

    0
    0
  • That coat-armour has been lavishly granted and often assumed without right, that the word "gentleman" has acquired various secondary senses, proves nothing; that is the natural result of a state of things in which the status of gentry carries with it no legal advantage, and yet is eagerly sought after on social grounds.

    0
    0
  • The senses are "bad witnesses" (KaKoi, uapTvpes); only the wise man can obtain knowledge.

    0
    0
  • He particularly congratulated himself on having discovered the " philosophical argument " against transubstantiation, " that the text of Scripture which seems to inculcate the real presence is attested only by a single sense - our sight, while the real presence itself is disproved by three of our senses - the sight, the touch, and the taste."

    0
    0
  • The word "fish" is used in many technical senses.

    0
    0
  • He conducted experiments to show that certain abstract forms and proportions are naturally pleasing to our senses, and gave some new illustrations of the working of aesthetic association.

    0
    0
  • The senses with their changing and inconsistent reports cannot cognize this unity; it is by thought alone that we can pass beyond the false appearances of sense and arrive at the knowledge of being, at the fundamental truth that "the All is One."

    0
    0
  • Its ten Sephiroth are made up of the grosser elements of the former three worlds; they consist of material substance limited by space and perceptible to the senses in a multiplicity of forms. This world is subject to constant changes and corruption, and is the dwelling of the evil spirits.

    0
    0
  • Thus the telegraph posts along a certain road have a space-order very obvious to our senses; but they have also a time-order according to dates of erection, perhaps more important to the postal authorities who replace them after fixed intervals.

    0
    0
  • The term "reason" is also used in several narrower senses.

    0
    0
  • Ueberweg cites a passage from his theological works which apparently bears out this view, for William there expressly distinguishes the two senses of the word " same."

    0
    0
  • The great age of Scholasticism presents, indeed, a substantial unanimity upon this vexed point, maintaining at once, in different senses, the existence of the universals ante rem, re and post rem.

    0
    0
  • To this Scotus opposed an indeterminism of the extremest type, describing the will as the possibility of determining itself motivelessly in either of two opposite senses.

    0
    0
  • In these senses the word is now obsolete.

    0
    0
  • Now there are two senses in which knowledge may claim to be absolute.

    0
    0
  • The most general application of the word in these transferred senses is that of an influential supporter or protector.

    0
    0
  • The individual ego is only possible as opposed to a non-ego, to a world of the senses; thus God, the infinite will, manifests himself in the individual, and the individual has over against him the non-ego or thing.

    0
    0
  • In 1855 he published his first large work, The Senses and the Intellect, followed in 1859 by The Emotions and the Will.

    0
    0
  • His own philosophical writings already published, especially The Senses and the Intellect (to which was added, in 1861, The Study of Character, including an Estimate of Phrenology), were too large for effective use in the class-room.

    0
    0
  • Tertullian (c. 160-240) uses it in both senses, of an oath, as in the passage of his treatise About Spectacles, where he says that no Christian " passes over to the enemy's camp without throwing away his arms, without abandoning the standards and sacraments of his chief."

    0
    0
  • True, nothing is in the intellect which has not been in the senses, but we must add except the intellect itself.

    0
    0
  • The soul contains the notions of being, substance, unity, identity, cause, perception, reasoning and many others which the senses cannot give.

    0
    0
  • This goodness, therefore, alone exists; matter, motion, growth and decay are figments of the senses; they have no existence for Reason.

    0
    0
  • These, the two senses recognized by Congregationalism, remained the only ones known to primitive Christianity.

    0
    0
  • In these senses the word has frequently been referred to Lat.

    0
    0
  • It is different, too, for different senses with the same observer, and different even for the same sense when the external stimuli differ in intensity.

    0
    0
  • Territorial sovereignty is used in a variety of senses.

    0
    0
  • He was so wonder-struck that he could not walk to his place, but stood as if he had lost his senses, and kept muttering, "All this for a woman!"

    0
    0
  • In philosophy the word has several closely related technical senses.

    0
    0
  • The wider view, according to which the hypothesis of direct transmission of physical influences expresses only part of the facts, is that all space is filled with physical activity, and that while an influence is passing across from a body, A, to another body, B, there is some dynamical process in action in the intervening region, though it appears to the senses to be mere empty space.

    0
    0
  • Thus the attempt to find out a constitution for the aether will involve a synthesis of intimate correlation of the various types of physical agencies, which appear so different to us mainly because we perceive them through different senses.

    0
    0
  • What is put before us, whether by the senses or by the statements of others, is instinctively accepted as a veracious report, till experience has proved the i P oss P P P bility of deception.

    0
    0
  • The opposition, being taken as absolute, implies the impeachment of the veracity of the senses in the interest of the rational truth proclaimed by the philosophers in question.

    0
    0
  • Starting with " particular perceptions " or isolated ideas let in by the senses, he never advances beyond these " distinct existences."

    0
    0
  • The fact that the conclusion is in " direct and total opposition" to the apparent testimony of the senses is a fresh justification of philosophical scepticism.

    0
    0
  • For, indeed, scepticism with regard to the senses is considered in the Inquiry .to be sufficiently justified by the fact that they lead us to suppose " an external universe which depends not on our perception," whereas " this universal and primary opinion of all men is soon destroyed by the slightest philosophy."

    0
    0
  • The term Eudaemonia has been taken in a large number of senses, with consequent variations in the meaning of Eudaemonism.

    0
    0
  • Muller, our leading authority, adopts the confusing plan of calling them second maxillae in the Cypridinidae (including Asteropidae), maxillipeds in the Halocypridae and Cyprididae, and first legs in the Bairdiidae, Cytheridae, Polycopidae and Cytherellidae, so that in his fine monograph he uses the term first leg in two quite different senses.

    0
    0
  • It may be objected that hereby the term pleon is used in two different senses, first applying to the abdomen alone and then to the abdomen plus the last thoracic segment.

    0
    0
  • It is true that even by the most thorough-going allegorists the literal sense of Scripture was not openly and entirely disregarded; but the very fact that the study of Hebrew was never more than exceptional, and so early ceased to be cultivated at all, is eloquent of indifference to the original literal sense, and the very principle of the many meanings inherent in the sacred writings was hostile to sound interpretation; greater importance was attached to the " deeper " or " hidden " senses, i.e.

    0
    0
  • In some senses, this learned and consummately clever man may be looked upon as the real founder of the Society as history knows it.

    0
    0
  • Such hallucinations are commonly provoked by crystal-gazing, but auditory hallucinations may be caused by the use of a shell (shell-hearing), and the other senses are occasionally affected.

    0
    0
  • The other half, Eastern in two senses, is both wider and higher than the nave.

    0
    0
  • The ethics of these principles were worked out in Discours sur le bonheur, La Volupte, and L' Art de jouir, in which the end of life is found in the pleasures of the senses, and virtue is reduced to self-love.

    0
    0
  • Happiness in this world consists proximately in virtue as a harmony between the three parts, rational, spirited and appetitive, of our souls, and ultimately in living according to the form of the good; but there is a far higher happiness, when the immortal soul, divesting itself of body and passions and senses, rises from earth to heaven and contemplates pure forms by pure reason.

    0
    0
  • The above are good senses of the word, but it is also used in the sense of devoting things and persons to destruction; and in this sense it is tantamount to cursing.

    0
    0
  • He himself identifies phenomenon, appearance, effect or impression produced on consciousness through any of the senses.

    0
    0
  • Next, he supposes that mind obeys the same law of evolution, and exemplifies integration by generalization, differentiation by the development of the five senses, and determination by the development of the order of consciousness.

    0
    0
  • It may be urged in reply that the synthetic philosophy could be made consistent by transferring the knowable resistance and persistence of the unknowable noumenon to knowable phenomena on the one hand, and on the other hand by maintaining that all phenomena from the original nebula to the rise of consciousness are only ` 0 impressions produced on consciousness through any of the senses," after all.

    0
    0
  • But sometimes also it means what appears, or can appear, to the senses, as distinguished from what does not appear, but can be inferred to exist.

    0
    0
  • Now, Kant and his followers start from this second and narrower meaning, and usually narrow it still more by assuming that what appears to the senses is as mental as the sensation, being undistinguishable from it or from the idea of it, and that an appearance is a mental idea(Vorstellung) of sense; and then they conclude that we can know by inference nothing but such mental appearances, actual and possible, and therefore nothing beyond sensory experience.

    0
    0
  • I perceive pressure, heat, color, sound, flavor and odor in my five senses.

    0
    0
  • The former error needs something deeper than a Kantian critique of reason, or an Avenarian criticism of experience; it needs a criticism of the senses.

    0
    0
  • We want an answer to this question - What must we know by the senses in order to enable us to know what we infer by reason in the sciences?

    0
    0
  • Having thus begun by touch and tactile inference, we confirm and extend our inferences of bodies in Nature by using the rest of the senses.

    0
    0
  • This is not to forget that the five senses are not our whole stock or to confine inference to body.

    0
    0
  • In the first place, there are great differences between the sensible and the external object; they differ in secondary qualities in the case of all the senses; ' and even in the case of touch, heat felt within is different from the vibrating heat outside.

    0
    0
  • Thirdly, the external world and the senses always act on one another by cause and effect and by pressure, although we only feel pressure by touch.

    0
    0
  • The Scottish School never realized that every sensation of the five senses is a perception of a sensible object in the bodily organism; and that touch is a perception, not only of single sensible pressure, but also of double sensible pressure, a perception of our bodily members sensibly pressing and pressed by one another, from which, on the recurrence of a single sensible pressure, we infer the pressure of an external thing for the first time.

    0
    0
  • In Part II., ch i., he makes three assumptions about the senses, and, without stopping to prove them, or even to make them consistent, deduces from them his thesis that the evidence of the senses is not a foundation of belief in Nature.

    0
    0
  • In no case is the evidence of the senses fallacious or mendacious; the fallacy is in the inference.

    0
    0
  • There is none in the subsidiary senses, because none of them perceives the pressures exerted on them.

    0
    0
  • Finally, as touch perceives reciprocal pressure within, and tactile inference infers it without, touch is the primary evidence of the senses which is the foundation and logical ground of our belief in Nature as a system of pressing bodies.

    0
    0
  • Balfour, however, having from unproved assumptions denied the evidence of the senses, and the rational power of using them to infer things beyond oneself, has to look out for other, and non-rational, foundations of belief.

    0
    0
  • Whether it is guided as much by touch as by smell I cannot safely say; but it appears to me that both senses are used in the action.

    0
    0
  • This view is opposed to the various systems which regard the mind as a tabula rasa (blank tablet) in which the outside world as it were imprints itself through the senses.

    0
    0
  • Such philosophies are called rationalist or sensationalist according as they lay emphasis specially on the function of reason or that of the senses.

    0
    0
  • Thus the pious Hindu, confronted by the impossibility of obtaining perfect knowledge by the senses or by reason, finds his sole perfection in the contemplation of the infinite (Brahma).

    0
    0
  • Chamois are exceedingly shy; and their senses, especially those of sight and smell, very acute.

    0
    0
  • In large doses the action of digitalis on the circulation causes various cerebral symptoms, such as seeing all objects blue, and various other disturbances of the special senses.

    0
    0
  • The name is probably derived from "badge," device, on account of the marks on the head; or it may be identical with the term separately noticed below, the French blaireau being used in both senses.

    0
    0
  • The word is also used in some technical senses, more immediately resulting from the action of driving something in.

    0
    0
  • In the first of these senses the word is applied to objects ranging from the unworked stone to the pot or the wooden figure, and is thus hardly distinguishable from idolatry.

    0
    0
  • But not all things are intangible which our senses are not subtle enough to detect.

    0
    0
  • So little was the scientific conception of the solar system familiar to Epicurus that he could reproach the astronomers, because their account of an eclipse represented things otherwise than as they appear to the senses, and could declare that the sun and stars were just as large as they seemed to us.

    0
    0
  • Under the influence of his disease, his senses became morbidly torpid, and his imagination morbidly active.

    0
    0
  • He retained the full use of his senses during the paralytic attack, and in July he was sufficiently recovered to renew his old club life and to meditate further journeys.

    0
    0
  • What he usually aims at is either to record the more or less rapid movements of he ground which we can feel, or the slow but large disturbances which do not appeal to our unaided senses.

    0
    0
  • Other remarkable senses of words were possibly already acclimatized in the language of Arabian Jews or Christians.

    0
    0
  • In deep sleep the threshold-value of the stimuli for the various senses is very greatly raised, rising rapidly during the first hour and a half of sleep, and then declining with gradually decreasing decrements.

    0
    0
  • A remarkable case is well authenticated, where, owing to disease, a young man had lost the use of all the senses save of one eye and of one ear.

    0
    0
  • The threshold-value of the stimuli adequate for the various senses may be extraordinarily lowered.

    0
    0
  • In its logical aspect pragmatism originates in a criticism of fundamental conceptions like "truth," "error," "fact" 2 The New English Dictionary quotes for nine distinct senses of the word, of which the philosophic is the eighth.

    0
    0
  • It is perhaps desirable, in an article like this, to treat of algae in the widest possible sense in which the term may be used, an indication being at the same time given of the narrower senses in which it has been proposed to employ it.

    0
    0
  • The rules for the restraint of the senses, for confession and penance, are subordinated to the central idea of the supreme importance of purity of heart and the love of Christ.

    0
    0
  • Abstract argument has shown that change in the unity is impossible; yet the senses tell us that hot becomes cold, hard becomes soft, the living dies, and so on.

    0
    0
  • Disappointment in more senses than one awaited Goethe on his return to Weimar.

    0
    0
  • In Greek philosophy phenomena are the changing objects of the senses as opposed to essences (ra avra) which are one and permanent, and are therefore regarded as being more real, the objects of reason rather than of senses which are "bad witnesses."

    0
    0
  • He, therefore, abandoned the purely intellectual sphere and proposed an inquiry into the data given by the senses, from which he held that all true knowledge really comes.

    0
    0
  • He further held that all knowledge is sensation ("non ratione sed sensu") and that intelligence is, therefore, an agglomeration of isolated data, given by the senses.

    0
    0
  • He does not, however, succeed in explaining how the senses.

    0
    0
  • When I feel pleased or pained, or when I use my senses to perceive a pressure, a temperature, a flavour, an odour, a colour, a sound, or when I am conscious of feeling and perceiving, I cannot resist the belief that something sensible is present; and this belief that something exists is already a judgment, a judgment of existence, and, so far as it is limited to sense without inference, a true judgment.

    0
    0
  • If, on the other hand, all the constituents of inference are judgments, there are judgments of sense; and the evidence of the senses means that a judgment of sense is true, while a judgment of inference is true so far as it is directly or indirectly concluded from judgments of sense.

    0
    0
  • Logic cannot, it is true, decide what these things are, nor what the senses know about them, without appealing to metaphysics and psychology.

    0
    0
  • There must be convergence in a unitary principle, soul or consciousness, which is that which really functions in perception, the senses and their organs being merely its instruments.

    0
    0
  • He postulates his unity in senses and at stages in which it is inadmissible, and so supplies only a schema of relations otherwise won, a view supported by the way in which he injects certain determinations in the process, e.g.

    0
    0
  • It is this aggregation which we describe variously as birth, death, maturity, decay, and of which the senses give inaccurate reports.

    0
    0
  • They did not, however, profit by their discovery, because, amongst the Egyptians, writing was clearly a mystery in both senses - only possible at that period for masters in the craft, and also something, like the writing of medical prescriptions at the present day in Latin, which was not to be made too easily intelligible to the common people.

    0
    0
  • The force measures the shearing stress, and the couple the bending moment at P; we will reckon these quantities positive when the senses are as indicated in the figure.

    0
    0
  • By examining the senses in which the respective forces act at each joint we can ascertain which members are in tension and which are in thrust; in fig.

    0
    0
  • It is convenient to distinguish the two senses in which rotation may take place about an axis OA by opposite signs.

    0
    0
  • For him there is only the One Absolute Being, the one reality that is all in all; whilst all the phenomenal existences and occurrences that crowd upon our senses are nothing more than an illusion of the individual soul estranged for a time from its divine source - an illusion only to be dispelled in the end by the soul's fuller knowledge of its own true nature and its being one with the eternal fountain of blissful being.

    0
    0
  • But the senses cannot lead to truth; thought and reflection must look at the thing on every side.

    0
    0
  • In this article the Renaissance will be considered as implying a comprehensive movement of the European intellect and will Method toward self-emancipation, toward reassertion of the natural rights of the reason and the senses, toward the conquest of this planet as a place of human occupation, and toward the formation of regulative theories both for states and individuals differing from those of medieval times.

    0
    0
  • The mind is not to be regarded as a sensitized film which automatically records the impressions of the senses.

    0
    0
  • Manifold errors also result from the weakness of the senses, which affords scope for mere conjecture; from the influence exercised over the understanding by the will and passions; from the restless desire of the mind to penetrate to the ultimate principles of things; and from the belief that " man is the measure of the universe," whereas, in truth, the world is received by us in a distorted and erroneous manner.

    0
    0
  • He brings against Bacon, of all men, the accusations of making induction start from the undetermined perceptions of the senses, of using imagination, and of putting a quite arbitrary interpretation on phenomena.

    0
    0
  • Primary and secondary senses of the term between them cover so much ground that it is not surprising to find taboo used in Polynesia as a name for the whole system of religion, founded as it largely is on prohibitions and abstinences.

    0
    0
  • In English law obligation is used in at least four senses - (1) any duty imposed by law; (2) the special duty created by a vinculum juris; (3) not the duty, but the evidence of the duty - that is to say, an instrument under seal, otherwise called a bond; (4) the operative part of a bond.

    0
    0
  • In 1897 he was struck down with insanity, and after three months' confinement in the asylum at Upsala, although he recovered his senses, all his joyousness and wildness had left him.

    0
    0
  • This position gives full scope for the senses of sight, hearing and smell to warn of the approach of enemies.

    0
    0
  • The presump tion of some merely external connexion, as between any other two corporeal things, is alone admissible and some form of the These derivative powers include the five senses, speech and the reproductive faculty, and they bear to the soul the relation of qualities to a substance.

    0
    0
  • The reality of the external object is a necessary condition, to exclude hallucinations of the senses; the exact correspondence between the external object and the internal percept is also necessary, but naturally hard to secure, for how can we compare the two?

    0
    0
  • Of this type Paul was the first, and he remained its primary, and in some senses its only, example.

    0
    0
  • That he used it in senses differing with the context is proved by r Cor.

    0
    0
  • So the notion of formal or constitutional authority attaching to the apostolate, in its various senses, is an anachronism for the apostolic age.

    0
    0
  • On the principle that like acts upon like, the particular senses are only affected by that which resembles them.

    0
    0
  • But no one in his senses would dream of claiming any such character for him.

    0
    0
  • Chaldaea was really the name of a country, used in two senses.

    0
    0
  • The word "Chaldaean" is used in Daniel in two senses.

    0
    0
  • This antithesis of ego and non-ego, self and not-self, may be understood in several senses according to the connexion in which it is used.

    0
    0
  • The name epimeron is sometimes applied to what is here called the pleuron, but the word has been used in widely different senses and it seems better to abandon it.

    0
    0
  • The word "history" is used in two senses.

    0
    0
  • The five books of Moses are made to represent the five senses.

    0
    0
  • But, beyond a doubt, man possesses, and in some way possesses by virtue of his superior brain, a power of co-ordinating the impressions of his senses, which enables him to understand the world he lives in, and by understanding to use, resist, and even in a measure rule it.

    0
    0
  • In Aristotle, again, the principle which sets all nature under the rule of thought, and directs it towards a rational end, is vows, or the divine spirit itself; while Aoyos is a term with many senses, used as more or less identical with a number of phrases, ou €v€Ka, ivEpyaaa, ivr€X aa, ovwia, e hos, popcIA, &c.

    0
    0
  • He warned his hearers against the fires of concupiscence, anger, ignorance, birth, death, decay and anxiety; and taking each of the senses in order he compared all human sensations to a burning flame which seems to be something it is not, which produces pleasure and pain, but passes rapidly away, and ends only in destruction.3 Accompanied by his new disciples, the Buddha walked on to Rajagaha, the capital of King Bimbisara, who, not unmindful of their former interview, came out to welcome him.

    0
    0
  • The word rcavuw, canon, has been employed in ecclesiastical literature in several different senses (see Canon above).

    0
    0
  • The two legs of a parabolic branch may converge to ultimate parallelism, as in the conic parabola, or diverge to ultimate parallelism, as in the semi-cubical parabola y 2 = x 3, and the branch is said to be convergent, or divergent, accordingly; or they may tend to parallelism in opposite senses, as in the cubical parabola y = x 3 .

    0
    0
  • Though practically invisible,' it appeals in its properties to other of our senses, so that the evidences of its presence are manifold.

    0
    0
  • The second book begins with a collection of bons mots, to which all present make their contributions, many of them being ascribed to Cicero and Augustus; a discussion of various pleasures, especially of the senses, then seems to have taken place, but almost the whole of this is lost.

    0
    0
  • It is certainly true that Disraeli was prepared, in all senses of the word, to take strong measures against such an end to the war as the San Stefano treaty threatened.

    0
    0
  • To prove this, our thoughts of space, time, infinity, power, substance, personal identity, causality, and others which " seem most remote from the supposed original " are examined in a " plain historical method," and shown to depend either on (a) perception of things external, through the five senses, or on (b) reflection upon operations of the mind within.

    0
    0
  • Although the second book is a sort of inventory of our ideas, as distinguished from the certainty and boundaries of our knowledge, Locke even here makes the assumption that the " simple ideas " of the five senses are practically qualities of things which exist without us, and that the mental " operations " discovered by " reflection " are those of a person continuously existing.

    0
    0
  • Locke here treats simple ideas of the five senses as qualities of outward things.

    0
    0
  • The hypothesis, that even our most profound and sublime speculations are all limited to data of the senses and of reflection, is crucially tested by the " modes " and " substances " and " relations " under which, in various degrees of complexity, we somehow find ourselves obliged to conceive those simple phenomena.

    0
    0
  • Such are modes of quantity in space, and time and number, under which Locke reports that we find ourselves mentally impelled towards immensity, eternity and the innumerable - in a word, towards Infinity which seems to transcend quantity; then there is the complex thought of Substance, to which we find ourselves mysteriously impelled, when the simple phenomena of the senses come to be regarded as qualities of " something "; again there is the obscure idea of the identity of persons, notwithstanding their constant changes of state; and there is, above all, the inevitable tendency we somehow have to refund a change into what we call its " Cause," with the associated idea of active power.

    0
    0
  • Space, he says, appears when we use our senses of sight and touch; succession he finds " suggested " by all the changing phenomena of sense, and by " what passes in our minds "; number is " suggested by every object of our senses, and every thought of our minds, by everything that either doth exist or can be imagined."

    0
    0
  • Every one, it would seem, can tell what value he sets on the pleasures of alimentation, sex, the senses generally, wealth, power, curiosity, sympathy, antipathy (malevolence), the goodwill of individuals or of society at large, and on the corresponding pains, as well as the pains of labour and organic disorders; 1 and can guess the rate at which they are valued by others; therefore if it be once granted that all actions are determined by pleasures and pains, and are to be tried by the same standard, the art of legislation and private conduct is apparently placed on an empirical basis.

    0
    0
  • The first trope emphasizes the disagreement of philosophers on all fundamental points; knowledge comes either from the senses or from reason.

    0
    0
  • In it, for the first time, the results of human and comparative anatomy, as well as of chemistry and other departments of physical science, were brought to bear on the investigation of physiological problems. The most important portion of the work was that dealing with nervous action and the mechanism of the senses.

    0
    0
  • The specific functions of the ego, as determined by the relative predominance of sense or intellect, are either functions of the senses (or organism) or functions of the intellect.

    0
    0
  • For while he maintains constantly his favourite maxim "that there is nothing in the intellect which has not been in the senses" (nihil in intellectu quod non pries fuerit in sensu), while he contends that the imaginative faculty (phantasia) is the counterpart of sense - that, as it has to do with material images, it is itself, like sense, material, and essentially the same both in men and brutes; he at the same time admits that the intellect, which he affirms to be immaterial and immortal - the most characteristic distinction of humanity - attains notions and truths of which no effort of sensation or imagination can give us the slightest apprehension (Op. ii..383).

    0
    0
  • The senses, the sole source of knowledge, are supposed to yield us immediately cognition of individual things; phantasy (which Gassendi takes to be material in nature) reproduces these ideas; understanding compares these ideas, which are particular, and frames general ideas.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, he at the same time admits that the senses yield knowledge - not of things - but of qualities only, and holds that we arrive at the idea of thing or substance by induction.

    0
    0
  • He ought to hold, and in disputing with Descartes he did apparently hold, that the evidence of the senses is the only convincing evidence; yet he maintains, and from his special mathematical training it was natural he should maintain, that the evidence of reason is absolutely satisfactory.

    0
    0
  • When the fire burns, or the water moistens, these terms merely express the habitual connexion which our senses perceive between one thing and another.

    0
    0
  • Farabi had pointed out that the universal and individual are not distinguished from each other as understanding from the senses, but that both universal and individual are in one respect intellectual, just as in another connexion they play a part in perception.

    0
    0
  • The senses are contradicted by one another, and disproved by reason.

    0
    0
  • Besides commenting on various physical treatises of Aristotle's, he wrote some philosophical essays, notably one on the Republic or Regime of the Solitary, understanding by that the organized system of rules, by obedience to which the individual may rise from the mere life of the senses to the perception of pure intelligible principles and may participate in the divine thought which sustains the world.

    0
    0
  • According to a later and more definite story, his disappointment drove him mad; he rushed out of his tent and fell upon the flocks of sheep in the camp under the impression that they were the enemy; on coming to his senses, he slew himself with the sword which he had received as a present from Hector.

    0
    0
  • If these things be so, then the evidence of the senses must be held in slight esteem.

    0
    0
  • Thus Anaxagoras distrusted the senses, and gave the preference to the conclusions of reflection.

    0
    0
  • From the various characteristics associated with this idea, the term has come to be applied by analogy in many different senses.

    0
    0
  • In addition, the fluid constituents, such as the lymph and blood, may have their composition and bulk considerably altered, while the special senses, the temperature, and, in short, every function and tissue, may be more or less affected.

    0
    0
  • His senses were quick and delicate; and, though of weak constitution, he escaped by strict regimen all serious illness.

    0
    0
  • Following on a decided lowering of the pain and touch senses, which may even lead to complete loss of cutaneous sensation, there comes a sleep which is often accompanied by pleasant dreams. There appears to be no evidence in the case of either the lower animals or the human subject that the drug is an aphrodisiac. Excessive indulgence in cannabis indica is very rare, but may lead to general ill-health and occasionally to insanity.

    0
    0
  • His skin and senses crawled with the sensations of being surrounded by vamps.

    0
    0
  • His senses thrummed with presence of so many vamps.

    0
    0
  • The walls of the underground facility were trembling from a shockwave of power that made her Guardian senses hum with danger.

    0
    0
  • The shockwaves faded, and she stood in the middle of an intersection, stretching out with her Guardian senses to find some kind of life.

    0
    0
  • She smelled it suddenly and jerked, scouring his body to find the blood whose scent stirred her senses.

    0
    0
  • The blood ensnared her senses at once, compelling her attention to the maroon droplets.

    0
    0
  • Even the scent of his blood barely impacted her senses.

    0
    0
  • He started towards her, senses trained to catch any movement from Darkyn before the demon attacked him.

    0
    0
  • Assuming the role of Death heightened his senses about dealing with Immortals.

    0
    0
  • He opened his senses to locate the immortal he wanted, and then willed himself there.

    0
    0
  • He couldn.t bring himself to include Rhyn in the picture and hoped Katie came to her senses one day and dumped the half-demon before the worst happened, and she ended up extending the bloodline of the loose cannon that was her mate.

    0
    0
  • They couldn't recognize a predator if it sat at their feet, and she was surprised to find her senses much more honed to such a ploy despite their social statuses rivaling those of royalty's on earth.

    0
    0
  • The aroma from the goblets invaded Jackson's senses causing the burning in his throat to intensify, and his jaw to throb with pain.

    0
    0
  • Coming to his senses, he recoiled and stared at the woman as her own blood streamed down her neck and across his chin.

    0
    0
  • His bruised body shook, his frantic thoughts fed by his reeling senses.

    0
    0
  • The scent of blood ensnared Xander's senses like nothing else.

    0
    0
  • He always fed at night, and hunger made his senses sharper, especially when he was surrounded by so many potential sources of dinner.

    0
    0
  • Jonny just so happened to rescue a girl connected to someone immune to mind magic, someone who was likewise invisible to the extended senses of a vampire.

    0
    0
  • Everything in the room was geared to tease or soothe the senses, from the soft sheets to the dim lighting to the calming scents.

    0
    0
  • His senses registered the shocked Guardians that stopped what they were doing to stare at him.

    0
    0
  • Your skill appears to be that your mind can't be manipulated, and you are … undetectable to our heightened senses.

    0
    0
  • I know human nature and can read body language, so I can tell certain things, more than humans, because of the heightened senses of a vampire.

    0
    0
  • Xander's heightened senses were able to see everything from above – except Jessi.

    0
    0
  • The expressions "4" and "8/2" have the same denotation; but, they express different senses and different ways of conceiving the same number.

    0
    0
  • If you indulge the senses and escape the demands of everyday life, there can be only one choice.

    0
    0
  • The world o aa the senses is the same.

    0
    0
  • Nature's harvest yields an abundance of evocative scents to woo our senses.

    0
    0
  • Man becomes amorous through the senses, which, touch excepted, all reside in the head.

    0
    0
  • She then regained her senses and flew at Williams like a screaming banshee.

    0
    0
  • Our brains are continuously bombarded with enormous amounts of information from each of the senses.

    0
    0
  • The sinner senses darkness in his soul similar to that of a dark and dank cellar.

    0
    0
  • All have been exquisitely designed down to the last detail to be a feast for the senses as well as supremely comfortable.

    0
    0
  • For instance, your local delicatessen gives you a better service (in most senses) than your supermarket.

    0
    0
  • Florence's lofty domes and sacred art will make your senses reel.

    0
    0
  • Now classify what you have found according to the senses you defined in your dictionary entry.

    0
    0
  • Sensation, Dundee Science center devoted to the five senses with over 60 hands-on exhibits to explore.

    0
    0
  • A web site makes great eye candy, but can your web site engage senses other than sight?

    0
    0
  • The trip proved an eye-opener to the master in more senses than one.

    0
    0
  • Apart from false humility, who in their senses would turn down such an offer?

    0
    0
  • Furthermore no senses operate at this level and the nature of the Atman is ultimately ineffable.

    0
    0
  • Having been messed around by the village hall once again we had to change in the car park which certainly livened the senses.

    0
    0
  • This is called Maya, this is slavery to the senses!

    0
    0
  • There are two somewhat different senses in which the meridian of Greenwich is the standard meridian for nearly the entire world.

    0
    0
  • Only then will a complete metamorphosis take place from the lower senses to the activities of the upper senses.

    0
    0
  • Naive realism maintained the commonsense notion that physical objects existed independently of the senses.

    0
    0
  • Swirling strings perfectly orchestrated, rise above the funky backdrop to caress the senses, a great example of Barry's musical genius.

    0
    0
  • Phundria senses that much of the whole PC palaver just might have been a thorough waste of time.

    0
    0
  • Only what is clearly perceptible to the senses has validity - also in the political realm.

    0
    0
  • To answer a question I raised above - no, you cannot detect this periodicity with your internal senses.

    0
    0
  • Calm your senses as your body is soothed by a hot herbal poultice of sweet basil and a warm oil massage.

    0
    0
  • This epistemological primacy of knowledge of what we grasp by our senses is the basis for the primacy of the sensible in our language.

    0
    0
  • Your senses have become receptive to what is around.

    0
    0
  • The sights and sounds of the world fill my senses and I revel in the sensation of the friendly breeze which strokes my skin.

    0
    0
  • Her words caught Daniel's senses a glancing blow and then ricocheted away into infinity.

    0
    0
  • We have no sense organ for perceiving energy itself, our sense organ for perceiving energy itself, our senses tell us of nothing but matter.

    0
    0
  • We have no sense organ for perceiving energy itself, our senses tell us of nothing but matter.

    0
    0
  • In wonder, I ride my screeching metal steed, trying to accept the evidence of my senses.

    0
    0
  • In the following senses subdivision according to the notions of position or motion has not been attempted.

    0
    0
  • A true invitation to deep sleep, Sea & Senses is recommended for extremely tense clients.

    0
    0
  • At APU on Tuesday we were slightly underwhelmed by Thirteen Senses.

    0
    0
  • These products will soothe the senses and leave skin velvety soft with essential oils of vanilla, ylang ylang and rose.

    0
    0
  • One senses Pott's pleasure at painting the word " love " with such glowing warmth in A Meditation.

    0
    0
  • Send shock waves through your senses as you run, jump, fly, ride, water ski and.. .

    0
    0
  • The more senses sent out by the Weaver, the more willpower must be spent.

    0
    0
  • In fact, most zoologists assert that cats have the best senses among mammals.

    0
    0
  • Its subject is human life told in the allegory of King Heart in his castle, surrounded by his five servitors (the senses), Queen Plesance, Foresight and other courtiers.

    0
    0
  • This condition has been predicated of man, both body and soul, in many senses; and the term is used by analogy of those whose deeds or writings have made a lasting impression on the memory of man.

    0
    0
  • The senses, in perception as contrasted with sensation, are held to give immediate knowledge.

    0
    0
  • The two parts of Bonnet's hypothesis, namely, the doctrine that all living things proceed from pre-existing germs, and that these contain, one enclosed within the other, the germs of all future living things, which is the hypothesis of " emboitement," and the doctrine that every germ contains in miniature all the organs of the adult, which is the hypothesis of evolution or development, in the primary senses of these words, must be carefully distinguished.

    0
    0
  • The word is also used in various figurative senses, and more particularly for the "nautical log," an apparatus for ascertaining the speed of ships.

    0
    0
  • Real knowledge consists in comprehending this all-pervading harmony as embodied in the manifold of perception, and the senses are "bad-witnesses," because they apprehend phenomena, not as its manifestation, but as "stiff and dead."

    0
    0
  • Napoleon had little difficulty in disposing of the father, whose rage against his son blunted his senses in every other direction.

    0
    0
  • He attempted to deduce the existence of spirit, apart from, and yet entering from time to time into connexion with, the phenomena of the senses, by an examination of the relation between the ego of thought and the age of sensible experience as understood by Kant.

    0
    0
  • That he might perceive and understand the spiritual and the celestial senses of the word he enjoyed immediate revelation from the Lord, was admitted into the angelic world, and had committed to him the key of "correspondences" with which to unlock the divine treasures of wisdom.

    0
    0
  • The first part ends with a reply to objections based on the universal consent of men, on the assurance given by touch of the extra existence of the visible world, and on the truth and goodness of God (Descartes), which would be impugned if our senses deceived us.

    0
    0
  • Among the pre-Socratic nature-philosophers of Greece, Heraclitus and the Eleatics are the chief representatives of this polemic. The diametrical opposition of the grounds on which the veracity of the senses is impugned by the two philosophies (see Heraclitus, Parmenides, Eleatic School) was in itself suggestive of sceptical reflection.

    0
    0
  • Kant, however, had no epistemology for such a contention, because according to him both outer and inner senses give mere appearance, from which we could not know either body in itself, or soul in itself.

    0
    0
  • Who has proved that, when I scent an odour in my nostrils, I apprehend not odour but a sensation of odour; and so for the other senses?

    0
    0
  • I perceive pressure, heat, colour, sound, flavour, odour, in my five senses.

    0
    0
  • But very often refreshment is undoubtedly obtained from such narcotic sleep. It may be supposed that in the latter case the effect of the drug has been to ensure occurrence of that second predisposing factor mentioned above, of that withdrawal of sense impulses from the nerve centres that serves to usher in the state of sleep. In certain conditions it may be well worth while by means of narcotic drugs to close the portals of the senses for the sake of thus obtaining stillness in the chambers of the mind; their enforced quietude may induce a period in which natural rest and repair continue long after the initial unnatural arrest of vitality due to the drug itself has passed away.

    0
    0
  • The fundamental difficulty underlying this logic is the paradox more clearly expressed by Zeno and to a large extent represented in almost all modern discussion, namely that the evidence of the senses contradicts the intellect.

    0
    0
  • The native attitude of consciousness towards existence is reliance on the evidence of the senses; but a little reflection is sufficient to show that the reality attributed to the external world is as much due to intellectual conceptions as to the senses, and that these conceptions elude us when we try to fix them.

    0
    0
  • The obvious defects of this theory, (I) that the senses alone cannot apprehend matter itself, (2) that it is not clear how the multiplicity of phenomena could result from these two forces, and (3) that he adduced no evidence to substantiate the existence of these two forces, were pointed out at the time by his pupil, Patrizzi (see article on PATRIZZI, FRANCESCO).

    0
    0
  • Human knowledge consists in the comprehension of this all-pervading harmony as embodied in the manifold of perception; the senses are "bad witnesses" in that they report multiplicity as fixed and existent in itself rather than in its relation to the One.

    0
    0
  • It is a mere enumeration of a few known facts, makes no use of exclusions or rejections, concludes precariously, and is always liable to be overthrown by a negative instance.6 In radical opposition to this method the Baconian induction begins by supplying helps and guides to the senses, whose unassisted information could not be relied on.

    0
    0
  • It marks only that we feel our knowledge to be inadequate, and for the reason that there may be another species of sensation than ours, that other beings may not be tied by the special laws of our constitution, and may apprehend, as Plato says, by the soul itself apart from the senses.

    0
    0
  • Locke took no notice at the time, but his second winter at Otes was partly employed in An Examination of Malebranche's Opinion of Seeing all Things in God, and in Remarks upon some of Mr Norris's Books, tracts which throw light upon his own ambiguous theory of perception through the senses.

    0
    0
  • The ceaseless movement of growth and change, which presents matter in form after form as a continual search after a finality which in time and movement is not and cannot be reached, represents only the aspect the world shows to the physicist and to the senses.

    0
    0
  • In the eye of reason the full fruition of this desired finality is already and always attained; the actualization, invisible to the senses, is achieved now and ever, and is thus beyond the element of time.

    0
    0
  • Helen certainly derives great pleasure from the exercise of these senses.

    0
    0
  • The place where that may occur is always the same, and indescribably pleasant to all our senses.

    0
    0
  • He knew that none of the words now uttered by Napoleon had any significance, and that Napoleon himself would be ashamed of them when he came to his senses.

    0
    0
  • They have created a performance that will ravish the senses.

    0
    0
  • I was much afraid, and had lost my senses, so I cannot recollect who tied me.

    0
    0
  • Her words caught Daniel 's senses a glancing blow and then ricocheted away into infinity.

    0
    0
  • Celtic writers talked about worshipping God with the " five stringed harp " meaning all five senses.

    0
    0
  • Taut young muscles, supple limbs, senses instantly attuned to the slightest hint of threat.

    0
    0
  • The general impression is robust food, rather than dishes to titillate the senses.

    0
    0
  • It can be a bit worrying or unnerving to have our senses masked.

    0