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sensation

sensation

sensation Sentence Examples

  • The sensation was almost physical.

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  • She shuddered as the distant sensation of burning returned.

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  • I have had the same strange sensation even in the heart of the city.

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  • She didn't exactly understand the sensation except that she didn't ever want that feeling to end.

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  • The sudden sensation of falling made him clutch the door frame.

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  • The sensation left her feeling exposed.

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  • A burning sensation began in her throat and she realized she was going to heave.

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  • There was no denying the sensation of sweat dripping off her body.

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  • The intense sensation startled her.

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  • Another sensation rose up within her fast and hard.

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  • Secondly: the " forms " of time and space, not referable to any sensation, and presupposed in every experience, come from the mind (" Transcendental Aesthetic ").

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  • The feel of the planet's life force through his body was staggering, the sensation similar to what he felt the first time he'd met his nishani.

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  • It is not the word, but the capacity to experience the sensation that counts in his education.

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  • This thought, if a wordless sensation may be called a thought, made me hop and skip with pleasure.

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  • He let his hands travel down her arm and side, enjoying the sensation of her body.

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  • He felt the uncanny sensation that she understood his tormented existence.

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  • No sooner had they gone than a hot, stinging sensation slid down one of his legs.

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  • The Sunday-school was in session when we arrived, and I wish you could have seen the sensation Helen's entrance caused.

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  • The sensation intrigued her after a lifetime of rejection and isolation.

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  • Even this sensation she loved.

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  • It was a weird sensation; I was moving like walking in water but I had no sense of my own body.

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  • The news caused the most widespread sensation, and public opinion in Italy was greatly agitated at what it regarded as an act of brigandage on the part of Austria, when Signor Tittoni in a speech at Carate Brianza (October 6th) declared that Italy might await events with serenity, and that these could find her neither unprepared nor isolated.

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  • Jenn laughed at the tickling sensation as his nose brushed her neck and squeezed him back.

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  • It was the first sensation that pulled her from her thoughts.

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  • Rhyn opened a portal and walked through the cool shadow place.  The shadow world felt … strange this time.  He looked around, unsettled by the sensation that someone else was there.  The black portal to Hell throbbed then dimmed, as if someone and come through.

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  • She whimpered at the sensation of knives going through her arm and almost fainted.

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  • She felt, as courtiers do when the Tsar enters, the sensation of fear and respect which the old man inspired in all around him.

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  • "She let the hawk fly upward from her wide right sleeve," went the song, arousing an involuntary sensation of courage and cheerfulness.

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  • Soul power rippled through him and with it, the sensation of the invisible shackles he'd worn his entire adult life melting away.

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  • A temporary sensation entered her mind, as if a breeze ruffled through her thoughts.

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  • As soon as he closed his eyes his ears seemed filled with the rattle of the wheels and the sensation of victory.

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  • The sensation of those terrible whistling sounds and of the corpses around him merged in Rostov's mind into a single feeling of terror and pity for himself.

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  • A strange sensation made her glance down and she saw the drop of blood hit the porch.

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  • This result created a great sensation, and proved that Transatlantic electric wave telegraphy was quite feasible and not inhibited by distance, or by the earth's curvature even over an arc of a great circle 3000 m.

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  • He looked and recognizing in her both the old and the new Sonya, and being reminded by the smell of burnt cork of the sensation of her kiss, inhaled the frosty air with a full breast and, looking at the ground flying beneath him and at the sparkling sky, felt himself again in fairyland.

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  • Yet the sensation of fire creeping through her remained.

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  • He was enjoying the sensation of her in his arms as much as he was there to comfort her.

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  • The word coming so close upon the sensation of cold water rushing over her hand seemed to startle her.

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  • She stood spread-eagle until it shrank to fit her, shuddered at the creepy sensation of life-like silk caressing her skin, and hurried out of the bathroom.

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  • She paused, the unfamiliar sensation a combination of adrenaline that made her blood quicken and electricity that made her skin tingle.

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  • She seemed to be moving so slowly, crisply aware of every sensation, every thought.

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  • The first unpleasant sensation was followed by a second: a throbbing headache.

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  • The feeling of the angel's soft, cold hand in his own reminded Rhyn of the first thing he'd touched in Hell that hadn't been stone.  Gabriel had brought him a book with a worn, leather-like cover, and he'd lost himself dwelling on the sensation of buttery leather under his fingertips after the hazy nightmare that had been his existence in Hell.

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  • It was the same sensation as when she opened the door to the guest bedroom in her apartment for the first time to see the mess the demons made of some poor human.

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  • Xander was instantly fascinated by the sensation of downy fur and cotton spun so finely, it was like silk.

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  • Thirdly: we cannot explain how these three elements - sensation; time anfl space; thought - work together.

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  • No one had taken any notice, for everyone knew the sensation which the cadet under fire for the first time had experienced.

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  • The disturbing sensation of being in a room with an otherworldly creature faded as he followed her into the hallway.

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  • She shivered at the sensation of his roughened jaw against her cheek and the heat of his bare chest.

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  • Xander smiled, enjoying the sensation of her wriggling body beneath him.

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  • It increased, the sensation of frying from the inside out.

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  • She staggered at the sensation, taking in the crumbled world around her.

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  • His account of the notion of external existence, as derived, not from pure sensation, but from the experience of action on the one hand and resistance on the other, may be compared with the account of Bain and later psychologists.

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  • In seeking ultimate reality in the circle of "active conscious sensation," he rules out all "metaphysic."

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  • The sensation of sound is produced by rapid fluctuation in the pressure of the atmosphere on the tympanum of the Charac- ear.

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  • But there are gaps in Kant's system - a imperfect gap between sensation and the sense-forms of time and space; a gap between sense-forms and thought; a gap between the lower but practicable processes of the Understanding and the higher but unrealizable ideas of Reason.

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  • He never experienced this sensation with women.

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  • Jessi leaned into him, thrilled at the sensation of his arms enveloping her in his heat.

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  • Her scent and sensation of her warm skin against his was intoxicating.

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  • She felt his touch a second before the sensation of Traveling descended over her.

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  • After the fish, which made a certain sensation, the count exchanged glances with the other committeemen.

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  • Jessi's eyes closed at the sensation of his soft lips, hot mouth and the rough stubble that teased her sensitive skin.

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  • Incomprehensibly, we are dependent upon sensation; and incomprehensibly, we place our sensations in time and space.

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  • With closed stoves much less heat is wasted, and consequ;ntly less fuel is burned, than with open grates, but they often cause an unpleasant sensation of dryness in the air, and the products of combustion also escape to some extent, rendering this method of heating not only unpleasant but sometimes even dangerous.

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  • The skin may itch, become red and experience a burning sensation.

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  • She shivered at the sensation.

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  • His touch sent fire through her, and she shivered at the sensation.

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  • He nearly shuddered at the intense sensation.

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  • It is no ultimate given point of departure; it is due to the reaction of thought upon sensation.

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  • Reason - under conditions of sensation - created the world of (valid) knowledge; Reason created the practical world of duty.

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  • He admits two sources of knowledge - sensation and refiexion; and God is to him the Great First Cause, especially of our own existence (or of the existence of finite minds).

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  • The supposition that sensation thus rests on a material process of absorption from external bodies naturally led up to the idea that plants and even inorganic subtances are precipient, and so to an indistinct recognition of organic life as a scale of intelligence.

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  • or vital principle, with heat or fire which pervades in unequal proportions, not only man and animals, but plants and nature as a whole, and through the agitation of which by incoming effluvia all sensation arises.

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  • He argues, from the principle quicquid est in effectibus esse et in causis, that the elements and the whole world have sensation, and thus he appears to derive the organic part of nature out of the so-called " inorganic."

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  • 5) he says that the universal existence of sensation in matter cannot be disproved, though he shows that when there are no organic arrangements the mental side of the movement (phantasma) is evanescent.

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  • He left open the question whether the capability of sensation belongs to all matter, or is confined to the combinations of certain materials.

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  • In philosophy he began with a strong predilection for the physical side of psychology, and at an early age he came to the conclusion that all existence is sensation, and, after a lapse into noiimenalism under the influence of Fechner's Psychophysics, finally adopted a universal physical phenomenalism.

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  • Of his admiration of Hume's style, of its nameless grace of simple elegance, he has left us a strong expression, when he tells us that it often compelled him to close the historian's volumes with a mixed sensation of delight and despair.

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  • In 1872 the anonymous publication of Supernatural Religion created considerable sensation.

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  • This incident caused a considerable sensation, and was the prelude to a long crisis in Hungarian affairs, during which the emperor-king, while quick to repair the unfortunate impression produced by his momentary pique, held inflexibly to his resolve in the matter of the common army.

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  • Fielde show that an ant follows her own old track by a scent exercised by the tenth segment of the feeler, recognizes other inmates of her nest by a sense of smell resident in the eleventh segment, is guided to the eggs, maggots and pupae, which she has to tend, by sensation through the eighth and ninth segments, and appreciates the general smell of the nest itself by means of organs in the twelfth segment.

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  • Such principles are not derived from sensation, but are "suggested" on occasion of sensation, in such a way as to constitute the necessary conditions of our having perceptive experience at all.

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  • Nevertheless, Reid's insistence on judgment as the unit of knowledge and his sharp distinction between sensation and perception must still be recognized as of the highest importance.

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  • The most famous outcome of his inquiries is the law known as Weber's or Fechner's law which may be expressed as follows:- "In order that the intensity of a sensation may increase in arithmetical progression, the stimulus must increase in geometrical progression."

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  • Unfortunately, from the tenable theory that the intensity of a sensation increases by definite additions of stimulus, Fechner was led on to postulate a unit of sensation, so that any sensation s might be regarded as composed of n units.

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  • His general formula for getting at the number of units in any sensation is S = C log R, where s stands for the sensation, R for the stimulus numerically estimated, and c for a constant that must be separately determined by experiment in each particular order of sensibility.

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  • "Every sensation," says Professor James, "presents itself as an indivisible unit; and it is quite impossible to read any clear meaning into the notion that they are masses of units combined."

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  • Still, the idea of the exact measurement of sensation has been a fruitful one, and mainly through his influence on Wundt, Fechner was the father of that "new" psychology of laboratories which investigates human faculties with the aid of exact scientific apparatus.

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  • There had been, however, a good deal of other evidence available before 1876, which, had it been collated and seriously studied, might have discounted the sensation that the discovery of the citadel graves eventually made.

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  • Strauss makes a steadily increasing use of avowedly irrational discords, in order to produce an emotionally apt physical sensation.

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  • These intellectual principles are, of course, not without their own ground in physical sensation; but it is evident that Debussy appeals beyond them to a more primitive instinct; and on it he bases an almost perfectly coherent system of which the laws are, like those of i 2th-century music, precisely the opposite of those of classical harmony.

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  • There is a special pleasure in the subsidence of that meaning beneath a soothing sensation; but a system based thereon cannot be universal.

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  • 40 of the Tribun excited an immense sensation.

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  • Specimens may be judged to be dry when they no longer cause a cold sensation when applied to the cheek, or assume a rigidity not evident in the earlier stages of preparation.

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  • Internally lead has an astringent action on the mucous membranes, causing a sensation of dryness; the dilute solution of the subacetate forms an effective gargle in tonsillitis.

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  • As all intellectual phenomena have by experimentalists been reduced to sensation, so all emotion has been and is regarded as reducible to simple mental affection, the element of which all emotional manifestations are ultimately composed.

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  • The second solution is that every sensation has its specific affective quality, though by reason of the poverty of language many of these have no name.

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  • There is a sensation of burning, tingling and numbness in the mouth, and of burning in the abdomen.

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  • Hegel's is an intellectualist monism, explaining matter, sensation, personal individuality and will as forms of thought.

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  • It is not to be supposed that the full scope of his doctrine was present to the mind of Roscellinus; but Nominalism would hardly have made the sensation it did had its assertions been as innocent as Haureau would make them.

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  • Lenkei, Zoltan Ferenczy, Aladar Ballagi, Ladislas Negyessy, have shown themselves somewhat too ready to follow the latest Norwegian or Parisian sensation.

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  • But it contains little that is original, and although the work created a great sensation when it was first published, the effect soon passed away, and the book was practically forgotten.

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  • The only motive for advocating it is the prejudice of absolute idealism which would deny that sensation has any part whatever in the constitution of experience.

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  • As soon as we recognize the part of sensation, we have no reason to deny the common-sense position that each piece of experience has its own quality, which is modified indefinitely by the relations in which it stands.

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  • Mill and Herbert Spencer to support their derivation of all our experience from sensation.

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  • The publication of this letter caused a wide sensation in England and abroad, and profoundly agitated the court of Naples.

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  • Yet Leighton's picture, painted in quite a different style, created a sensation, and was purchased by Queen Victoria.

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  • Sensation is blunted.

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  • As it dilates the blood-vessels of the skin it increases the subjective sensation of warmth.

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  • On the 24th of July Anne was crowned with the king, when her refusal to take the sacrament according to the Anglican use created some sensation.

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  • In 1856 and 1857 he published two letters to Mr Gladstone on Italian affairs, which created a sensation, while he continued to propagate his views in the Italian press.

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  • In 1799 Darwin published his Phytologia, or the Philosophy of Agriculture and Gardening (1799), in which he states his opinion that plants have sensation and volition.

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  • Unfortunately, however, the solid work achieved was accompanied by much superficial excitement among emotional persons for whom the so-called " Great Awakening " was merely a passing sensation.

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  • hearing, and objectively the vibratory motion which produces the sensation of sound.

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  • We may easily satisfy ourselves that, in every instance in which the sensation of sound is excited, the body whence the sound proceeds must have been thrown, by a blow or other means, into a state of agitation or tremor, implying the existence of a vibratory motion, or motion to and fro, of the particles of which it consists.

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  • ix.) used a string loaded at the middle point so that the higher tones were several octaves above the fundamental, and so not likely to be mistaken for it; he found that with 37 vibrations per second a very weak sensation of tone was heard, but with 34 there was scarcely anything audible left.

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  • The simplest form of wave, so far as our sensation goes - that is, the one giving rise to a pure tone - is, we have every reason to suppose, one in which the displacement is represented by a harmonic curve or a curve of sines, y=a sin m(x - e).

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  • The chief experimental basis for supposing that a train of longitudinal waves with displacement curve of this kind arouses the sensation of a pure tone is that the more nearly a source is made to vibrate with a single simple harmonic motion, and therefore, presumably, the more nearly it sends out such a harmonic train, the more nearly does the note heard approximate to a single pure tone.

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  • The vibration in some way arouses the sensation of the corresponding tone.

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  • In sound sensation we have nothing corresponding to white light.

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  • Mag., 1907, 1 4, p. 59 6) found that the least energy stream required to excite sensation did not vary greatly between frequencies of 512 and 256, FIG.

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  • This "round robin" created a sensation which aroused public opinion and was instrumental in bringing about some desirable reforms in the War Department.

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  • The very sensation created by the novelty of his methods set standards and started reforms which have greatly improved the morale of the entire force.

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  • Moreover, the arguments by which Heraclitus supported this theory of the universal flux are employed by Protagoras to undermine the possibility of objective truth, by dissolving all knowledge into the momentary sensation or persuasion of the individual.

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  • Logic and physical science they held to be useless, for all knowledge is immediate sensation (see Protagoras).

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  • It is an ultimate mode of consciousness, strictly the presentation (through sensation or otherwise) of an object to consciousness; in its complete form, however, it seems to involve a judgment, i.e.

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  • The variable first maxillae are seldom pediform, their function being concerned chiefly with nutrition, sensation and respiration.

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  • The theoretical side of inner nature in its successive grades from sensation to the highest form of spirit, the abstracting reason which emphasizes the difference of subjective and objective, leaves an unsolved problem which receives satisfaction only in the practical, the individualizing activity.

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  • In England this essay, which was regarded and treated as a plea for deism, made a great sensation, calling forth several replies, among others from William Whiston, Bishop Hare, Bishop Hoadly, and Richard Bentley, who, under the signature of Phileleutherus Lipsiensis, roughly handles certain arguments carelessly expressed by Collins, but triumphs chiefly by an attack on trivial points of scholarship, his own pamphlet being by no means faultless in this very respect.

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  • In 1858 she revisited Russia, where she created a sensation as a spiritualistic medium.

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  • 4, 11 74 b 31-33) not as an activity, but as a supervening end (breyLyvOyepOV perfecting an activity He allows indeed that activity and pleasure are very closely related; that a pleasure of sense or thought perfects an act of sensation or of thinking, depends on it, and is so inseparably conjoined with it as to raise a doubt whether pleasure is end of life or life end of pleasure, and even whether the activity is the same as the pleasure.

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  • This intellectual discovery requires sensation and retention of sensation; so that sense (ea-Ono-Ls) receives impressions, imagination (0avravLa) retains them as images, intellect (Van) generalizes the universal, and, when it is intelligence of essence, is always true.

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  • Sensation is not the reception of the selfsame essence of an external body, but one's perception of one's sentient organism as affected, and especially of its organs resisting one another, e.g.

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  • Berkeley is compelled to see that an immediate perception is not a thing, and that what we consider permanent or substantial is not a sensation but a group of qualities, which in ultimate analysis means sensations either immediately felt or such as our experience has taught us would be felt in conjunction with these.

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  • It produced a great and immediate sensation.

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  • Haeckel answers that it has no origin, because sensation is an inherent property of all substance.

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  • He supposes that aesthesis and tropesis, as rudimentary sensation and will, are the very causes of condensation; that they belong to pyknatoms, to ponderables and imponderables, to chemical atoms and molecules.

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  • It appears to his imagination that the affinity of two atoms of hydrogen to one of oxygen, the attraction of the spermatozoon to the ovum, and the elective affinity of d pair of lovers are all alike due to sensation and will.

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  • When he applies sensation and will to nature, and through plants to the lowest animals, he considers their sensation and will to be rudimentary and unconscious.

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  • In his Belfast address (1874), while admitting that matter as understood by Democritus is insufficient, because atoms without sensation cannot be imagined to produce sensation, he contended, nevertheless, that matter properly understood is " the promise and potency of all terrestrial life."

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  • In thus endowing all matter with sensation like Haeckel he was not avoiding materialism.

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  • (c) He explains the rise of consciousness by supposing that, while it requires brain as a condition, it consists in the emancipation of intelligence from will at the moment when in sensation the individual mind finds itself with an idea without will.

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  • Nevertheless he was too much a child of his age to keep things known steadily before him; having asked the metaphysical question he proceeded to find a psychological answer in a theory of sensation, which asserted the mere hypothesis that the being which we ascribe to things on the evidence of sensation consists in their being felt.

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  • He generalized Weber's law in the form that sensation generally increases in intensity as the stimulus increases by a constant function of the previous stimulus; or increases in an arithmetical progression as the stimulus increases in a geometrical ratio; or increases by addition of the same amount as the stimulus increases by the same multiple; or increases as the logarithm of the stimulus.

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  • Having satisfied himself in what he called " outer psychophysics," that the stimulus causes only the nervous process and not sensation, he passed to what he called " inner psychophysics," or the theory of the relation between nervous and psychical processes.

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  • What is the relation between nervous process and sensation?

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  • What causes sensation?

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  • The first question he answered from his imagination by supposing that, while the external world is stimulus of the nervous process, the nervous process is the immediate stimulus of the sensation, and that the sensation increases by a constant fraction of the previous stimulus in the nervous system, when Weber's law proves only that it increases by a constant fraction of the previous stimulus in the external world.

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  • The second question he answered from his parallelistic metaphysics by deducing that even within the organism there is only a constant dependency of sensation on nervous process without causation, because the nervous process is physical but the sensation psychical.

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  • This answer supposed that the whole physical process from the action of the external stimulus on the nervous system to the reaction of the organism on the external world is one series, while the conscious process beginning with sensation is only parallel and as it were left high and dry.

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  • What then is the cause of the sensation ?

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  • Having long assumed that the whole world is animated throughout, and that there are always two parallel series, physical and psychical, he concluded that, while a physical stimulus is causing a physical nervous process, a psychical accompaniment of the stimulus is causing the sensation, which, according to him, is the psychical accompaniment of the nervous process; and that, as the whole physical and the whole psychical series are the same, differing only as outer and inner, this identity holds both of stimulus and its psychical accompaniment and of nervous process and its accompanying sensation.

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  • Proceeding on this suggestion, and misled by the mathematical expression which he had given to Weber's law, Fechner held that a conscious sensation, like its stimulus, consists of units, or elements, by summation and increments of which conscious sensations and their differences are produced; so that consciousness, according to this unnecessary assumption, emerges from an integration of unconscious shocks or tremors.

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  • But he had also to endure countless objections to his mathematical statement of Weber's law, to his unnecessary assumption of units of sensation, and to his unjustifiable transfer of the law from physical to physiological stimuli of sensations, involving in his opinion his parallelistic view of body and mind.

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  • Now, Kant and his followers start from this second and narrower meaning, and usually narrow it still more by assuming that what appears to the senses is as mental as the sensation, being undistinguishable from it or from the idea of it, and that an appearance is a mental idea(Vorstellung) of sense; and then they conclude that we can know by inference nothing but such mental appearances, actual and possible, and therefore nothing beyond sensory experience.

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  • But his point is that the very sensation of phenomena or appearances implies the things which appear.

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  • It is curious that Avenarius should have brought forward this artificial hypothesis as the natural view of the world, without reflecting that on the one hand the majority of mankind believes that the environment (R) exists, has existed, and will exist, without being a counterpart of any living being as central part (C); and that on the other hand it is so far from being natural to man to believe that sensation and thought (E) are different from, and merely dependent on, his body (C), that throughout the Homeric poems, though soul is required for other purposes, all thinking as well as sensation is regarded as a purely bodily operation.

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  • He does not mean that will is the only mental operation; for he recognizes idea derived from sensation, and feeling, as well as will.

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  • Further, Wundt declares that the psychical compound of sensations, with which, according to him, we actually start, is not a complex sensation, but a compound idea; so that I am expected to believe that, when I hear the chord of D, I am not conscious of single sensations of D, F, A, and have only a compound idea of the chord - as if the hearing of music were merely a series of ideas!

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  • Wundt, however, has a reason for substituting compound idea for sensation: he accepts Lotze's hypothesis of local signs, and adds a hypothesis of temporal signs.

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  • It follows that every psychical compound into which temporal and spatial ideas enter must itself be an idea; and, as time at any rate accompanies all our sensations, it follows that every psychical compound of sensations, containing as it does, always temporal, if not also spatial, ideas, must be a compound idea, and not, as nativists suppose, Schuppe for instance, a compound sensation.

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  • Sensation, as Aristotle said, is not of itself: it is the apprehension of a sensible object in the organism.

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  • But natural realism, as finally interpreted by Hamilton, was too dogmatic, too unsystematic, and too confused with elements derived from Kantian idealism to withstand the brilliant criticism of Mill's Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy (1865), a work which for a time almost persuaded us that Nature as we know it from sensations is nothing but permanent possibilities of sensation, and oneself only a series of states of consciousness.

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  • Taken for granted the Kantian hypothesis of a sense of sensations requiring synthesis by understanding, and the Kantian conclusion that Nature as known consists of phenomena united by categories as objects of experience, Green argued, in accordance with Kant's first position, that knowledge, in order to unite the manifold of sensations by relations into related phenomena, requires unifying intelligence, or what Kant called synthetic unity of apperception, which cannot itself be sensation, because it arranges sensations; and he argued, in accordance with Kant's second position, that therefore Nature itself as known requires unifying intelligence to constitute the relations of its phenomena, and to make it a connected world of experience.

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  • It is, according to him, something more than sensation, but less than perception; it is common to us with lower animals such as dogs; its operation consists in co-ordinating sensations into an aggregate which the subject throws back into space, and thereby has a consciousness of a total object outside itself, e.g.

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  • It will be remembered that Fechner regarded every composite body as the appearance of a spirit; so that when, for example, molecular motion of air is said to cause a sensation of sound in me, it is really a spirit appearing as air which causes the sensation in my spirit.

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  • He ingeniously suggested that the external agent is one feeling regarded objectively, and the internal effect another feeling regarded subjectively; " and therefore," to quote his own words, " to say that it is a molecular movement which produces a sensation of sound, is equivalent to saying that a sensation of sight produces a sensation of hearing."

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  • He does not say what happens when we use vision alone and still infer that an external stimulus causes the internal sensation.

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  • From Reid he adopted the belief in an external world beyond sensation, from Biran the explanation of personality by will, from Schelling the identification of all reason in what he called " impersonal reason," which he supposed to be identical in God and man, to be subjective and objective, psychological and ontological.

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  • We start, according to him, from a psychological triplicity in consciousness, consisting of sensation, personal will and impersonal reason, which by a priori laws of causality and substance carries us to the ontological triplicity of oneself as ego willing, the non-ego as cause of sensation, and God as the absolute cause beneath these relative causes.

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  • Fouillee (q.v.) rightly objects that we must not thus impute thought and intention to Nature, and yet does not scruple to impute to it life, sensation and want.

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  • He vacillated a great deal about our mode of perceiving the external world; but his final view (edition of Reid's works, note D*) consisted in supposing that (1) sensation is an apprehension of secondary qualities purely as affections of the organism viewed as ego; (2) perception in general is an apprehension of primary qualities as relations of sensations in the organism viewed as non-ego; while (3) a special perception of a so-called " secundo-primary " quality consists in " the consciousness of a resisting something external to our organism."

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  • The Scottish School never realized that every sensation of the five senses is a perception of a sensible object in the bodily organism; and that touch is a perception, not only of single sensible pressure, but also of double sensible pressure, a perception of our bodily members sensibly pressing and pressed by one another, from which, on the recurrence of a single sensible pressure, we infer the pressure of an external thing for the first time.

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  • But in order to make space a form of external things, Martineau had to take the external in space, by which Kant meant one sensation out of another, in the very different meaning of the self here and the not-self there.

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  • Vision does not perceive a sensation of colour; it perceives a visible picture, e.g.

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  • So touch perceives not a sensation of pressure, but a pressure which is a material fact in the organism.

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  • Psychologically, Aristotle applied his dualism of matter and form to explain the antithesis of body and soul, so that the soul is the form, or entelechy, of an organic body, and he applied the same dualism to explain sensation, which he supposed to be reception of the sensible form or essence, without the matter, of a body, e.g.

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  • This struggle between spiritual and secular powers, owing to the tremendous sensation which it created throughout Christendom, showed the nations that at the head of the Church there was a great force for justice, always able to combat iniquity and oppression, and sometimes to defeat them, however powerful the evil and the tyrants might seem.

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  • (i) Philosophical rationalism is that theory of knowledge which maintains that reason is in and by itself a source of knowledge, and that knowledge so derived has superior authority over knowledge acquired through sensation.

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  • Locke) have admitted both sensation and reflection.

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  • The symptoms of strychnine poisoning usually appear within twenty minutes of the ingestion of a poisonous dose, starting with an uneasy sensation, stiffness at the back of the neck, twitching of the muscles and a feeling of impending suffocation.

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  • The occasional character of this piece explains the fact that at the time of its appearance it made no sensation.

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  • Thus the bill becomes a most delicate organ of sensation, and by its means the bird, while probing for food, is at once able to distinguish the nature of the objects it encounters, though these are wholly out of sight.

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  • 80 of Tracts for the Times, made a great sensation; see R.

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  • The sensation of fear or the restriction of movement and the obtaining of food without exertion evidently prevent the normal development of the creature.

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  • The pelts are exceedingly fine and close in texture and, although of little weight, are very durable, and articles made of them produce a sensation of warmth immediately they are put upon the body.

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  • The most powerful of the Belgian poets, Emile Verhaeren, is the most daring in his technical methods of expressing bizarre sensation, and has been called the " poet of paroxysm."

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  • He would then single out Man from the realm of nature, and, in a treatise De homine, show what specific bodily motions were involved in the production of the peculiar phenomena of sensation and knowledge, as also of the affections and passions thence resulting, whereby man came into relation with man.

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  • It was necessary, therefore, for Epicurus to go back to nature to find a more enduring and a wider foundation for ethical doctrine, to go back from words to realities, to give up reasonings and get at feelings, to test conceptions and arguments by a final reference to the only touchstone of truth - to sensation.

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  • (r) The only ultimate canon of reality is sensation; whatever we feel, whatever we perceive by any sense, that we know on the most certain evidence we can have to be real, and in proportion as our feeling is clear, distinct and vivid, in that proportion are we sure of the reality of its object.

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  • These bear witness to reality, not because we feel anything now, but because we felt it once; they are sensations registered in language, and again, if need be, translatable into immediate sensations or groups of sensation.

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  • The Epicurean canon is a rejection of logic; it sticks fast to the one point that " sensation is sensation, ?

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  • Sensation, it says, is unreasoning (&Xoyos); it must be accepted, and not criticized.

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  • We must indeed accept our feelings; but we must also believe much which is not directly testified by sensation, if only it serves to explain phenomena and does not contravene our sensations.

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  • In such theories not only animals and plants but even the smallest particles of matter are regarded as having some rudimentary kind of sensation or "soul," which plays the same part in relation to their objective activities or modifications as the soul does in the case of human beings.

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  • 1853), a work which created a great sensation at the time and remains of much value; W.

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  • He became chairman of a state commission of inquiry into the number and condition of idiots in Massachusetts, and the report of this commission, presented in 1848, caused a profound sensation.

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  • It has been found that disturbance of sensation, as well as disturbance of movement, is often incurred by its injury.

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  • Injuries of the cerebellum, if large, derange the power of executing movements, without producing any detectable derangement of sensation.

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  • If we assume that there is a material process at the basis of ideation, we may take the analogy of the concomitance between a spinal reflex movement and a skin sensation.

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  • But Auersperg's fame rests almost exclusively on his political poetry; two collections entitled Spaziergdnge eines Wiener Poeten (1831) and Schutt (1835) created a sensation in Germany by their originality and bold liberalism.

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  • 1847) had in 1879 written a solitary novel, Gertrude Coldbjornsen, which created a sensation, and was hailed by Brandes as exactly representing the " naturalism " which he desired to see encouraged; but Skram has written little else of importance.

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  • In 1841 and in 1842 she visited London, where her interpretations of Corneille and Racine were the sensation of the season.

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  • A speech made by Lasker on the 7th of February 1873, in which he attacked the management of the Pomeranian railway, caused a great sensation, and his exposure of the financial mismanagement brought about the fall of Hermann Wagener, one of Bismarck's most trusted assistants.

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  • He further held that all knowledge is sensation ("non ratione sed sensu") and that intelligence is, therefore, an agglomeration of isolated data, given by the senses.

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  • Lastly, the philosophers of the second physical succession - Empedocles, Anaxagoras, Leucippus - not directly attacking the great mystery of the One and the Many, but in virtue of a scientific instinct approaching it through the investigation of phenomena, were brought by their study of sensation to perceive and to proclaim the inadequacy of the organs of sense.

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  • If, argued Protagoras in a treatise entitled Truth, all things are in flux, so that sensation is subjective, it follows that " Man is the measure of all things, of what is, that it is, and of what is not, that it is not "; in other words, there is no such thing as objective truth.

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  • The sensation produced by the tragedy of the expedition was profound and a large fund was subscribed for the benefit of the relatives of the dead explorers and for the promotion of polar research.

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  • 19); a sensation of each of the five senses is always true of its proper object; without sense there is no science; sense is the origin of induction, which is the origin of deduction and science.

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  • r9) with a detailed system of empiricism, according to which sense is the primary knowledge of particulars, memory is the retention of a sensation, experience is the sum of many memories, induction infers universals, and intelligence is the true apprehension of the universal principles of science, which is rational, deductive, demonstrative, from empirical principles.

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  • But they held, and still hold that sensation and conception are alike mere apprehensions, and that the belief that things are or are not arises somehow after sensation and conception in judgment, from which it passes into inference.

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  • Sense, then, outer and inner, or sensation and consciousness, is the origin of sensory judgments which are true categorical beliefs in the existence of sensible things; and primary judgments are such true categorical sensory beliefs that things exist, and neither require conception nor are combinations of conceptions.

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  • So far from being a cause, conception is not even a condition of all judgments; a sensation of hot is sufficient evidence that hot exists, before the idea of hot is either present or wanted.

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  • The real order is sensation and sensory judgment, conception, memory and memorial judgment, experience and experiential judgment, inference, inferential judgment, inferential conception.

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  • Feeling and sensation, involving believing or judging, come before conception and language.

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  • Paradoxical as it may sound, the truth seems to be that primary judgment, beginning as it does with the simplest feeling and sensation, is not a combination of two mental elements into one, but is a division of one sensible thing into the thing itself and its existence and the belief that it is determined as existing, e.g.

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  • Lastly, the science of inference is not indeed the science of sensation, memory and experience, but at the same time it is the science of using those mental operations as data of inference; and, if logic does not show how analogical and inductive inferences directly, and deductive inferences indirectly, arise from experience, it becomes a science of mere thinking without knowledge.

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  • But judgment starts from sensation (Empfindung) and feeling (Gefiihl), and not from idea (Vorstellung).

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  • that a sensible pressure is existing, is explained by none of the foregoing theories, because it requires nothing but sensation and belief.

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  • It requires nothing beyond the sensation and belief in the given existence of the given pressure: not all judgment then requires categories of understanding, or notions of identity, difference and causality, or even of existence, such as Schuppe supposes.

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  • It requires no comparison in order to express it in words, for a judgment need not be expressed, and a sensory judgment of pressure is an irresistible belief that a real pressure exists, without waiting for words, or for a comparison which is wanted not to make a sensation a judgment, but to turn a judgment into language: not all judgment then requires comparison with a view to its expression, as supposed by Hobhouse.

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  • In reality, the sensation and the belief arc sufficient; when I feel a sensible pressure, I cannot help believing in its reality, and therefore judging that it is real, without any tertium quid - an idea of pressure, or of existence or of pressure existing - intervening between the sensation and the belief.

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  • Only after sensation has ceased does an idea, or representation of what is not presented, become necessary as a substitute for a sensation and as a condition not of the first judgment that there is, but of a second judgment that there was, something sensible.

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  • Otherwise there would be no judgment of sensible fact, for the first sensation would not give it, and the idea following the sensation would be still farther off.

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  • Moreover, it is transferred in the same irresistible way: frequently we cannot help either feeling pressure, or remembering it, or inferring it; and as there are involuntary sensation and attention, so there are involuntary memory and inference.

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  • In short, a primary judgment is a belief in something existing apart from our idea of it; and not because we have an idea of it, or by comparing an idea with, or referring an idea to, reality; but because we have a sensation of it, or a memory of it or an inference of it.

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  • Sensation, not conception, is the origin of judgment.

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  • Sensation irresistibly produces a judgment of existence without needing language.

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  • Locke, when Cartesianism had raised the problem of the contents of consciousness, and the spirit of Baconian positivism could not accept of anything that bore the ill-omened name of innate ideas, elaborated a theory of knowledge which is psychological in the sense that its problem is how the simple data with which the individual is in contact in sensation are worked up into a system.

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  • With Locke the mind is comparable to white paper on which the world of things records itself in ideas of sensation.

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  • Simple ideas of sensation are the only points of contact we have with things.

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  • It is Locke's initial attribution of the primary role in mental process to the simple ideas of sensation that precludes him from the development of the conception of another sort of ideas, or mental contents that he notes, which are produced by reflection on " the operations of our own mind within us."

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  • by (I) a sensory hallucination or (2) a massive sensation, both being of telepathic origin.

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  • Occasionally the death-warning is in the form of an apparition of some other person; it may also take the form of a temporary feeling of intense depression or other massive sensation.

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  • The first two volumes of Tristram Shandy were issued at York in 1759 and advertised in London on the 1st of January 1760, and at once made a sensation.

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  • Consciousness, it is held, is of two main kinds, sensation and reason.

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  • To the second problem there are two main answers, that of Associationism which denies to the mind any a priori existence and asserts that sensation is the only source of knowledge, and that which admits the existence of both transcendental and empirical knowledge.

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  • Indeed, many connoisseurs hold that when a Moselle ceases to show signs of the somewhat prolonged secondary fermentation, characterized by the slight prickling sensation produced on the palate (caused by the presence of bubbles of carbonic acid gas in the wine), that it has passed its best.

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  • In this dispute, which made a great sensation in the country, the popular party successfully defended Leslie, and thus obtained the sympathy of the enlightened portion of the community.

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  • Under the former head it is pointed out (i.) that the fundamental principle of Locke's Essay, that all our ideas are product of sensation and reflection, is briefly stated in the first aphorism of the Novum Organum, and (ii.) that the whole atmosphere of that treatise is characteristic of the Essay.

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  • SABBATAI SEBI (1626-1676), Jewish mystic, whose Messianic claims produced an unparalleled sensation throughout the world, was born in Smyrna.

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  • Abroad the Swedish revolution made a great sensation.

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  • The posthumous poems of the bishop of Strangnas, Adam Teodor StrOmberg (1820:1889), were collected by Wirsen, and created some sensation.

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  • It was the sensation caused in 1884 by the lawsuit brought against Strindberg's Married (a collection of short stories dealing realistically with some of the seamy sides of marriage) which brought to a head the rebellion against the elegant and superficial conventions which were strangling Swedish literature.

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  • In 1885 he produced a gloomy sketch of student life at Upsala, Erik Grane, which made a great sensation.

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  • His ironic romance, Martin Birck's Youth, created a sensation in 1901.

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  • The shooting of these boys created a feeling of horror throughout the country, and a sensation of uncertainty as to what measures of severity might not be practised in the future if Balmaceda won the day.

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  • His death produced but a feeble sensation in Rome, which was already pacified, and passed almost unnoticed in Italy.

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  • The sensation of pain is felt in the brain, and the cause of it may be in the sensory centres of the brain alone, as in cases of hysterical pain, with no lesion to cause it.

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  • While water containing much saline matter, and more especially water containing free carbonic acid, has a very stimulating action upon the skin, mud has a sedative effect, so that in a mud-bath one feels a pleasant soothing sensation as if bathing in cream.

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  • The most important point in this treatment consists in forced feeding, the want of appetite which is so prominent in many cases of phthisis being regarded as an abnormal sensation not to be regarded; and under the forced feeding, combined with open-air life, many marvellous recoveries are recorded.

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  • Facial neuralgia, or tic douloureux, affects the great nerve of sensation of the face (fifth nerve), and may occur in one or more of the three divisions in which the nerve is distributed.

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  • From the unity of soul it follows that all psychical processes - sensation, assent, impulse - proceed from reason, the ruling part; that is to say, there is no strife or division: the one rational soul alone has sensations, assents to judgments, is impelled towards objects of desire just as much as it thinks or reasons.

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  • In sensation a presentation is conveyed, by an air-current, from the sense organ, here the eye, to the mind, i.e.

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  • Their analysis of sensation supposes it to react, by a variation in tension, against the current from the sense-organ; and this is the mind's assent or dissent, which is inseparable from the sense presentation.

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  • Nor was the term sensation sufficiently definite.

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  • Zeno compared sensation to the outstretched hand, flat and open; bending the fingers was assent; the clenched fist was " simple apprehension," the mental grasp of an object; knowledge was the clenched fist tightly held in the other hand.

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  • At the same time Democritus distinguished between obscure (UKOTG1j) cognition, resting on sensation alone, and genuine (yvrjoL), which is the result of inquiry by reason, and is concerned with atoms and void, the only real existences.

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  • The work produced an immense sensation and created a new epoch in the treatment of the rise of Christianity.

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  • Blind, 1873), produced almost as great a sensation as his Life of Jesus, and not least amongst Strauss's own friends, who wondered at his one-sided view of Christianity and his professed abandonment of spiritual philosophy for the materialism of modern science.

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  • No Jewish book of the 19th century produced such a sensation as this, and Graetz won at a bound the position he still occupies as recognized master of Jewish history.

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  • The sensation was immense, and the pursuit became keener.

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  • Having established his priority, Pascal published his investigations, which occasioned a great sensation among his contemporaries, and Wallis was enabled to correct his methods.

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  • In man, both size and complexity contribute to the increased area of the cortex or outer layer of the brain, which has been fully ascertained to be the seat of the mysterious processes by which sensation furnishes the groundwork of thought.

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  • p. 697) thus defines it: " The cerebral cortex is the seat of the intellectual functions, of intelligent sensation or consciousness, of ideation, of volition, and of memory."

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  • The distinction does not seem to lie principally in the range and delicacy of direct sensation, as may be judged from such well-known facts as man's inferiority to the eagle in sight, or to the dog in scent.

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  • That such a principle must exist in all beings capable of sensation, or of anything analogous to human passions and feelings, will hardly be denied by those who perceive the force of arguments which metaphysically demonstrate the immaterial nature of the mind.

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  • We also possess in fragments a History of Physics, a treatise On Stones, and a work On Sensation, and certain metaphysical 'Airopiac, which probably once formed part of a systematic treatise.

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  • knowledge, opinion and sensation, having for their respective objects supra-celestials or ideas, celestials or stars, and infra-celestials or things.

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  • The element appears to have been first obtained in 1669 by Brand of Hamburg; Krafft bought his secret and in 1677 exhibited specimens in England, where it created an immense sensation.

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  • The speech created a great sensation in the British press.

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  • The first number caused a sensation, but it brought few converts.

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  • The initial indications of the disease were cutaneous itching, tingling and formication, which gave place to actual loss of cutaneous sensation, first observed in the extremities.

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  • Furthermore, he indicated that the brain and spinal cord may be divided into separate parts, each part having a special function - one part ministering to motion, the other to sensation, and that the origin of the -nerves from one or other or both of those sources endows them with the peculiar property of the division whence they spring.

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  • it is the object, and the sole object, of thought as opposed to sensation, sensation being concerned with variety and change].

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  • This again was followed by a psychology, which made thought [as well as sensation, which was conceived to differ from thought only in respect of its object] depend upon the excess of the one or the other of the two constituent elements, fire and night.

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  • Indirectly, through the dialectic of his pupil and friend Zeno and otherwise, the doctrine of the inadequacy of sensation led to the humanist movement, which for a time threatened to put an end to philosophical and scientific speculation.

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  • To Laromiguiere he attributes the lesson of decomposing thought, even though the reduction of it to sensation was inadequate.

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  • Royer-Collard taught him that even sensation is subject to certain internal laws and principles which it does not itself explain, which are superior to analysis and the natural patrimony of the mind.

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  • These laws are inextricably mixed in consciousness with the data of volition and sensation, with free activity and fatal action or impression, and they guide us in rising to a personal being, a self or free cause, and to an impersonal reality, a not-me - nature, the world of force - lying out of us, and modifying us.

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  • As I refer to myself the act of attention and volition, so I cannot but refer the sensation to some cause, necessarily other than myself, that is, to an external cause, whose existence is as certain for me as my own existence, since the phenomenon which suggests it to me is as certain as the phenomenon which had suggested my reality, and both are given in each other.

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  • As reason has apprehended these two simultaneous phenomena, attention and sensation, and led us The immediately to conceive the two sorts of distinct they are related, so, from the notion of this limitation, we find it impossible under the same guide not to conceive a supreme cause, absolute and infinite, itself the first and last cause of all.

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  • Starting from sensation as our basis, causality could never give us this, even though it be allowed that sensation is impersonal to the extent of being independent of our volition.

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  • Causality might tell us that a cause there is of sensation somewhere and of some sort; but that this cause is a force or sum of forces, existing in space, independently of us, and corresponding to our sensations, it could never tell us, for the simple reason that such a notion is not supposed to exist in our consciousness.

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  • Sensation might arise, for aught we know, so far as causality leads us, not from a world of forces at all, but from a will like our own, though infinitely more powerful, acting upon us, partly furthering and partly thwarting us.

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  • The publication of this letter, and later of other similar documents, naturally created a great sensation; and the government ultimately appointed a special commission of three judges to inquire into the charges and allegations that were made.

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  • The pamphlet made a great sensation.

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  • If the eye was placed at the focus, no sensation of light was observed, although small pieces of charcoal or blackened platinum foil were immediately raised to incandescence, thus giving rise to visible rays.

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  • This crime, which was believed to be due to Napoleon's direct orders, caused an immense sensation throughout Germany and did much to inflame popular sentiment against the French.

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  • anobaav to hear), a title frequently given to the science of sound, that is, to the description and theory of the phenomena which give rise to the sensation of sound.

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  • He shows elaborately how the pleasures and pains of " imagination, ambition, self-interest, sympathy, theopathy, and the moral sense " are developed out of the elementary pleasures and pains of sensation; by the coalescence into really complex but apparently single ideas of the " miniatures " or faint feelings which the repetition of sensations contemporaneously or in immediate succession tends to produce in cohering groups.

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  • Here he stated the principle, not before recognized, that the kind of sensation following stimulation of a sensory nerve does not depend on the mode of stimulation but upon the nature of the sense-organ.

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  • This uniformity is not based on the sameness of either the intellectual or the organic functions alone, but on the correspondence of the forms of thought and sensation with the forms of being.

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  • For while he maintains constantly his favourite maxim "that there is nothing in the intellect which has not been in the senses" (nihil in intellectu quod non pries fuerit in sensu), while he contends that the imaginative faculty (phantasia) is the counterpart of sense - that, as it has to do with material images, it is itself, like sense, material, and essentially the same both in men and brutes; he at the same time admits that the intellect, which he affirms to be immaterial and immortal - the most characteristic distinction of humanity - attains notions and truths of which no effort of sensation or imagination can give us the slightest apprehension (Op. ii..383).

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  • For the paradox of predication, which he had used to disprove the existence of plurality, was virtually a denial of all speech and all thought, and thus led to a more comprehensive scepticism than that which sprang from the contemporary theories of sensation.

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  • In a typical case a sensation of heat developing into a burning pain is felt in the throat and stomach.

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  • But in conceiving A we make, not n positions, still less n+t positions, but one position simply; for common sense removes the absolute position from its original source, sensation.

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  • The greatest sensation was caused by the arrest, on the 31st of August, of Seor Ferrer, a theoretical anarchist well known in many countries for his anti-clerical educational work and in Spain especially as the founder of the lay schools.

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  • The four discussions of which his book consists have been thus summed up: (1) All man's faculties may be reduced to physical sensation, even memory, comparison, judgment; our only difference from the lower animals lies in our external organization.

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  • (2) Self-interest, founded on the love of pleasure and the fear of pain, is the sole spring of judgment, action, affection; self-sacrifice is prompted by the fact that the sensation of pleasure outweighs the accompanying pain; it is thus the result of deliberate calculation; we have no liberty of choice between good and evil; there is no such thing as absolute right - ideas of justice and injustice change according to customs. (3) All intellects are equal; their apparent inequalities do not depend on a more or less perfect organization, but have their cause in the unequal desire for instruction, and this desire springs from passions, of which all men commonly well organized are susceptible to the same degree; and we can, therefore, all love glory with the same enthusiasm and we owe all to education.

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  • In 1486 he published his first book, Ars versificandi et carminum, which created an immense sensation and gained him the honour of being crowned as the first poet laureate of Germany, the ceremony being performed by the emperor Frederick III.

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  • There is a subjective sensation of mental brilliance, but, as in other cases, this is not borne out by the objective results.

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  • Following on a decided lowering of the pain and touch senses, which may even lead to complete loss of cutaneous sensation, there comes a sleep which is often accompanied by pleasant dreams. There appears to be no evidence in the case of either the lower animals or the human subject that the drug is an aphrodisiac. Excessive indulgence in cannabis indica is very rare, but may lead to general ill-health and occasionally to insanity.

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  • Matthew's little fingers pressed on her tender breasts, creating a new sensation.

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  • He strode to the house, and she trailed, fascinated by the sensation of stepping over the energy sources.

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  • She awoke to the sensation of him drinking from her.

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  • The grip around her arm was tight enough to cause a new sensation: pain.

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  • Comforted by the familiar sensation, she sensed she was better off trusting Fate than the Dark One.

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  • she dropped to her knees, crippled once again by the sensation that hadn.t bothered her when she was bound to Rhyn.

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  • They had become accustomed to the constant chill in their bones, yet this newfound warmth elicited a welcome sensation that not only rid the cold, but also calmed the incessant craving for blood.

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  • Rhyn opened a portal and walked through the cool shadow place.  The shadow world felt … strange this time.  He looked around, unsettled by the sensation that someone else was there.  The black portal to Hell throbbed then dimmed, as if someone and come through.

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  • Rhyn stepped into the portal.  He crossed fast and leapt through the portal leading to the Caribbean Sanctuary.  No sooner had he hit the sandy beach than the restraints of the underworld fled, knocking him off his feet.  His body bucked under the influence of power.  Sudden pain shot through him, followed by the sensation of his magic snapping back into a bond too strong for him to access.

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  • Xander slowed the pace as he had the night before, teaching her to savor the sensation of his lips, his flavor and the way his large hands moved over her body, gently guiding her where he wanted her to go.

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  • Conjecture the possibility of enjoying it at the intensity-level of sensation.

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  • The advertising creates a visceral sensation of fear for which reason it also sells well.

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  • There maybe a burning sensation in the stomach, the feeling of an 'empty stomach ' or even abdominal pain.

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  • Customers report using their hand to restrict airflow at the bottom of the device to increase sensation.

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  • aural sensation.

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  • The hum and the tierce in the chimed bell do not affect the initial sensation of pitch, despite the loudness of these partials.

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  • old-style bells often have more accentuated upper partials than true-harmonic bells, giving a very clear sensation of pitch from a distance.

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  • burning sensation in their upper abdomen.

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  • I had a distinct spinning sensation which made me feel as if I were on a giant cartwheel.

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  • These anti cellulite products are not another âmiracleâ cellulite sensation.

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  • Not only does she look exactly like the Canadian chart sensation she has all the right mannerisms to make the look totally convincing.

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  • Needle sensation did not correlate with serum cortisol levels.

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  • Niacin intake above 100mg daily may cause a temporary flushing sensation.

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  • enriched with peach extract, Aqua Flash Bronzer gives an instant sensation of coolness.

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  • epigastric sensation is the commonest aura, others include perceptual or autonomic auras.

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  • M: Every sensation is contemplated in perfect equanimity.

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  • Sensation, Dundee Science center devoted to the five senses with over 60 hands-on exhibits to explore.

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  • While this air may cause the sensation of abdominal fullness, it should not be painful.

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  • GOP bossman and sensation national review encountered a sea.

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  • harmonious sensation of creative satisfaction induced by hallucinogens.

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  • hypothalamus in the sensation of fatigue.

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  • She could almost be angry herself at such angry incivility; but she checked the resentful sensation; she remembered her own ignorance.

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  • inflamed causing swelling and a dull throbbing sensation in the tendon.

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  • itching sensation on the lip, followed by blisters which weep, forming a scab.

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  • transcending kitsch, Ferris wittily uses cliché to describe emotional absolutes, validating the gushy and saccharine as genuine sensation.

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  • lingual nerve provides general sensation to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue.

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  • Buy this smooth fine cotton lisle T-shirt and experience a whole new sensation.

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  • This sculpting massage evokes a floating sensation, allowing you to let go almost immediately.

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  • Click Here Further Details sensory neurophysiology: Somatic Sensation Excellent information on sensory neurophysiology.

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  • Topics include neuropsychology, sensation and perception, learning and memory, emotion, language, personality, and psychological disorders.

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  • niacin intake above 100mg daily may cause a temporary flushing sensation.

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  • numbing sensation in my right foot.

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  • numb sensation in their hands and feet.

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  • oblique rays were cut off, did the sensation of solidarity in the image disappear.

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  • oesophagusn feel the movement of the food or drink down the esophagus into the stomach, which may be an uncomfortable sensation.

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  • When the light is emitted there is a sharp sensation of a hot pinprick.

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  • pinprick sensation using a sterile needle.

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  • pleasurable sensation last longer than its natural duration into a problem.

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  • prickleer, Rachel started to feel a prickling sensation on her face.

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  • queer sensation; the dead entries begin to be alive.

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  • This product can help quitters who really miss the sensation of putting something into their mouth.

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  • There is no sensation at all, and the treatment area does not redden or become hot.

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  • A newspaper report was later written and it sparked an international sensation which sparked off many more sightings.

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  • The sights and sounds of the world fill my senses and I revel in the sensation of the friendly breeze which strokes my skin.

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  • Cold sores usually start with a tingling, itching sensation on the lip, followed by blisters which weep, forming a scab.

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  • sensation of breathlessness.

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  • sensation of abdominal fullness, it should not be painful.

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  • A cold, tingling sensation entered my body, giving life to muscles that I thought I had lost the use of for ever.

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  • However, Rachel started to feel a prickling sensation on her face.

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  • Edema, burning sensation, blisters, rash, or pinching sensation at the application site was also noted.

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  • The itching sensation departs rapidly thereafter -with or without treatment.

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  • Move your finger between the lines and focus on the choking sensation.

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  • It gave me an idea of what to expect re the stinging sensation with the crowning.

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  • To the power of one She was America's teenage surfing sensation - at just 13.

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  • sensation super-bright our invited experts into the setting.

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  • Others feel pain or a burning sensation in their upper abdomen.

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  • David, Ian & Joe re-wrote the lyrics and sultry singing sensation Vivien Scotson was invited in to record the new lyrics too.

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  • Abba Illusion are the ultimate tribute to Sweden's pop sensation.

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  • shoestring potatoes, they were described as a taste sensation - " I love ' em " - to be precise!

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  • spacey synth work to create a sensation of fluidity.

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  • species of this genus, when tasted, gave rise to a burning sensation in the mouth (Cleland 1931 ).

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  • stabbing sensation whenever you cough or take a deep breath.

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  • Even worse was having the numerous stiches removed, the sensation was awful.

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  • stiches removed, the sensation was awful.

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  • supergroup equation in 1995 as a replacement for another singing sensation, Kate Rusby.

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  • Together they hit different taste buds, and that provides a better sensation.

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  • throbbing sensation in the tendon.

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  • tickle few cases your heightened metabolic rate may cause a slight tickling sensation in the stomach.

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  • tinglebtle, tingling sensation ran across my skin.

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  • If you do have poor sensation, you need to take special care to avoid injury, including when cutting toenails.

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  • tuberculoid leprosy sees the loss of sensation in some areas of the skin.

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  • Kant held that " things-in-themselves " (beyond sensation) were in principle unknowable - only " phenomena " are knowable.

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  • urbane self afterward, declaring Sofia gave " the sensation of danger without creating clear-cut chances " .

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  • vermilion color, maintenance of oral sphincter function and mouth opening size, and retention of sensation.

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  • You'll love the way the foam slowly reacts as you lie down, giving you an almost weightless sensation.

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  • The four faculties into which he divides the conscious life - perception, memory, judgment, will - are all varieties of sensation.

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  • Perception is sensation caused by a present affection of the external extremities of the nerves; memory is sensation caused, in the absence of present excitation, by dispositions of the nerves which are the result of past experiences; judgment is the perception of relations between sensations, and is itself a species of sensation, because if we are aware of the sensations we must be aware also of the relations between them; will he identifies with the feeling of desire, and therefore includes it as a variety of sensation.

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  • The very name (Aesthetics), which Baumgarten was the first to use, indicates the imperfect and partial nature of his analysis, pointing as it does to an element so variable as feeling or sensation as the ultimate ground of judgment in questions pertaining to beauty.

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  • The imagination that death will destroy these powers is unfounded, because (1) " this supposes we are compounded, and so discerptible, but the contrary is probable " on metaphysical grounds (the indivisibility of the subject in which consciousness as indivisible inheres, and its distinction from the body) and also experimental (the persistence of the living being in spite of changes in the body or even losses of parts of the body); (2) this also assumes that " our present living powers of reflection " must be affected in the same way by death " as those of sensation," but this is disproved by their relative independence even in this life; (3) " even the suspension of our present powers of reflection " is not involved in " the idea of death, which is simply dissolution of the body," and which may even " be like birth, a continuation and perfecting of our powers."

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  • The senses, in perception as contrasted with sensation, are held to give immediate knowledge.

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  • " Analytic " or tautological thought does not become " synthetic " or capable of embracing a real content except under the sting of sensation; why sensation should thus help it is obscure, yet the fact is plain.

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  • Being accustomed to gratify every sensation as it arises, they endure thirst, hunger, want of food and bodily discomfort badly.

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  • He further recognizes a progress in the production of vegetable and animal forms, though this part of his theory is essentially crude and unscientific. More important in relation to the modern problems of evolution is his thoroughly materialistic way of explaining the origin of sensation and knowledge by help of his peculiar hypothesis of effluvia and pores.

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  • In the view of Hobbes, the difficulty of the genesis of conscious minds is solved by saying that sensation and thought are part of the reaction of the organism on external movement.

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  • Diderot, too, in his varied intellectual activity, found time to speculate on the genesis of sensation and thought out of a combination of matter endowed with an elementary kind of sentience.

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  • De la Mettrie worked out a materialistic doctrine of the origin of things, according to which sensation and consciousness are nothing but a development out of matter.

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  • In this capacity he made a sensation by his L'Etat de la France a la fin de l'an VIII (1800), which he had been commissioned by Bonaparte to draw up, as a manifesto to foreign nations, after the coup d'Nat of the 18th Brumaire.

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  • On the occasion of the Galician outbreak of 1845, when the Ruthenian peasantry massacred some hundreds of Polish landowners, an outbreak generally attributed to the machinations of the Austrian government, Wielopolski wrote his famous Lettre d'un gentilhomme polonais au prince de Metternich (Brussels, 1846), which caused a great sensation at the time, and in which he attempted to prove that the Austrian court was acting in collusion with the Russian in the affair.

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  • Thus reason is opposed to sensation, perception, feeling, desire, as the faculty (the existence of which is denied by empiricists) by which fundamental truths are intuitively apprehended.

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  • In philosophy his fundamental principle is that of what he calls the "triad" - a triplicity which he finds to pervade all things, which in God is "power, intelligence and love," in man "sensation, sentiment and knowledge."

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  • It is impossible to enter here on the steps by which the theoretical ego is shown to develop into the complete system of cognitive categories, or to trace the deduction of the processes (productive imagination, intuition, sensation, understanding, judgment, reason) by which the quite indefinite non-ego comes to assume the appearance of definite objects in the forms of time and space.

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  • It is also in many cases possible to follow with the eye the motions of the particles of the sounding body, as, for instance, in the case of a violin string or any string fixed at both ends, when the string will appear through the persistence of visual sensation to occupy at once all the positions which it successively assumes during its vibratory motion.

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  • It follows from this that any periodic disturbance in air can be resolved into a definite series of simple harmonic disturbances of wave-lengths equal to the original wave-length and its successive submultiples, and each of these would separately give the sensation of a pure tone.

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  • The question now arises whether the sensation produced by a periodic disturbance can be analysed in correspondence with this geometrical analysis.

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  • But it is very difficult to suppose that the same sensation would be aroused by a truly periodic displacement represented by a smooth curve, and a displacement in which the period is only in the amplitude of the to-and-fro motion, and which is represented by a jagged curve.

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  • In the first place, he displays in its most naked form the common but unproved idealistic paradox of a sense of sensations, according to which touch apprehends not pressure but a sensation of pressure, sight apprehends not colour but a sensation of colour, and there is no difference between the sensory operation and the sensible object apprehended by any sense, even within the sentient organism.

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  • He begins with psychical elements, sensations and feelings, but he asserts that these always exist in a psychical compound, from which they can be discovered only by analysis and abstraction; and his paradox that a pure sensation is an abstraction is repeated by W.

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  • Who has proved that, when I scent an odour in my nostrils, I apprehend not odour but a sensation of odour; and so for the other senses?

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  • a green tree; and then deduces that the evidence of the senses proves now and then to be fallacious, because we may have an experience indistinguishable from that of a tree but incorrect; and further, that our perceptions are habitually mendacious, because all visual experiences are erroneous, as colour is a sensation while the thing consists of uncoloured particles.

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  • In modern philosophy the phenomenon is neither the "thing-in-itself," nor the noumenon or object of pure thought, but the thingin-itself as it appears to the mind in sensation (see especially Kant; and Metaphysics).

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  • The work on its appearance created an immense sensation among scholars, and was vehemently attacked in many quarters, but on the whole it was received as being much the nearest approximation yet made to the original text of the New Testament (see Bible: New Testament, " Textual Criticism").

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  • Sensation alone is insufficient to explain all our intellectual phenomena; all sensation is momentary and individual (cf.

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  • It marks only that we feel our knowledge to be inadequate, and for the reason that there may be another species of sensation than ours, that other beings may not be tied by the special laws of our constitution, and may apprehend, as Plato says, by the soul itself apart from the senses.

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  • 1860), whose collection of poems, called Guitar and Accordion, humorous, amatory and pathetic, produced a great sensation in 1891.

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  • Chrysippus, therefore, conceded something to his opponents when he substituted for the Logos the new standards of sensation (aio-077vts) and general conception (7rpOMplas = anticipation, i.e.

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  • (B) In regard to his theory of knowledge: (4) he held that a thing cannot be known apart from the knowledge of all things besides; for, that we may know what a thing is, we must know how it differs from other things, which other things must therefore be known; (5) accordingly, in the ten books of a work called "Quota, he attempted a classification of plants and animals; (6) the results thus obtained he distinguished at once from " knowledge" (Eirevrr b un) and from " sensation" (aQBjacs), holding that " scientific observation" (Lrcar fl oI'uc??

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  • He was not occupied with the question of what to sacrifice for; the fact of sacrificing in itself afforded him a new and joyous sensation.

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  • I have a queer sensation; the dead entries begin to be alive.

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  • Panic attacks with hyperventilation and fear of suffocation often worsens the sensation of breathlessness.

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  • To the power of one She was America 's teenage surfing sensation - at just 13.

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  • A sensation super-bright our invited experts into the setting.

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  • Abba Illusion are the ultimate tribute to Sweden 's pop sensation.

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    0
  • As for the shoestring potatoes, they were described as a taste sensation - " I love ' em " - to be precise !

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  • The music itself is full of energy making full use of pounding bass lines and spacey synth work to create a sensation of fluidity.

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  • A species of this genus, when tasted, gave rise to a burning sensation in the mouth (Cleland 1931).

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  • Finally, the pain associated with lung problems tends to create a stabbing sensation whenever you cough or take a deep breath.

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  • She joined the folk supergroup Equation in 1995 as a replacement for another singing sensation, Kate Rusby.

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  • In a few cases your heightened metabolic rate may cause a slight tickling sensation in the stomach.

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  • A subtle, tingling sensation ran across my skin.

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  • Tuberculoid leprosy sees the loss of sensation in some areas of the skin.

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  • Rafael Benítez was his usual urbane self afterward, declaring Sofia gave " the sensation of danger without creating clear-cut chances ".

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  • Repair requires the matching of vermilion color, maintenance of oral sphincter function and mouth opening size, and retention of sensation.

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  • The allure of sex is perhaps only excelled by the visceral sensation of fear for which reason it also sells well.

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  • They don't allow a child to really feel what it is like to be soiled (although newer designs do more to give the child a sensation of wetness).

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  • Warming lubricants create a warming sensation for increased pleasure, especially for women.

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  • The act of purring can oftentimes put humans at ease, and many people agree that it is a wonderful sensation to pet a purring cat during a quiet evening at home.

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  • More than several dozen books strong, the Magic Tree House series by Mary Pope Osborne is a sensation with second-graders around the country, and many of the books have also been translated into Japanese.

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  • You have two options for imparting a strawberry sensation to your Daiquiri.

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  • At the first sign of that familiar tingling sensation, go to your kitchen and try this time-tested folk remedy.

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  • The primary side effect is a mild to moderate burning sensation at the site of the application.

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  • While cayenne has no real side effects other than the mild burning sensation, taking excessive amounts of anything can ultimately cause health problems.

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  • Uncomfortable and sometimes downright painful, yeast infections cause a burning, itching sensation.

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  • Revlon, the cosmetic color sensation, was born from this savvy of Charles, his brother Joseph and the help of chemist Charles Lachman.

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  • Jennifer Lopez's first perfume released 2002 was an instant sensation.

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  • Some reports indicate a mild tingling sensation after a Zoom bleaching session, which tends to disappear later.

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  • They have also added refresher chemicals to produce a pleasant tingling sensation upon application.

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  • The sensation is often described as prickly.

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  • Place this refreshing Decleor gel in the fridge first to increase the cooling sensation it's sure to impart.

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  • The plumper gave my lips, a tingly, minty sensation and had a pleasant scent.

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  • Fat adds flavor to food and leaves a feel good sensation on your taste buds.

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  • Include pictures of the dish before anyone tries it, as well as images of your family and friends experiencing this new taste sensation.

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  • Leather textured liners give better foot sensation and comfortably envelope the foot.

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  • It may feel like a tight band is squeezing your head or the pain may be a throbbing sensation across your entire head.

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  • You then allow the muscles to relax naturally, focusing on the sensation this relaxation produces.

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  • However, often people experience a stinging or burning sensation in addition to feeling itchy.

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  • The catchy ditty became an Internet sensation and took the world by storm.

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  • The standard American diet panders more to sweet and salty tastes, so the sensation of sour can require some adjustment.

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  • Hydrocodone binds to pain receptors and reduces the sensation of pain.

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  • I just puffed and coughed from the burning sensation that I felt in my chest and lungs.

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  • Regular exercise triggers the release of endorphins, so ex-smokers can get a pleasurable sensation by getting active.

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  • This sensation is real to users, and they will scratch and pick at their body until they create sores.

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  • Cindy Margolis seemed to become an overnight sensation, perhaps a result of being in the right place at the right time as the Internet was gaining speed.

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  • Singing sensation Usher decided he needs new management.

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  • I have the sensation that something is eating my brain."

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  • In 2007, Will Ferrell became part of a viral video sensation, starring in the online video The Landlord.

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  • Starring opposite Shia LaBoeuf, Fox became an overnight sensation with this role.

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  • In addition to his acting and reality television work, he is a major singing sensation in many parts of the world with several number-one hits under his belt.

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  • The Kirk Cameron biography begins with a child actor who became an overnight sensation on the sitcom Growing Pains.

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  • He became an overnight Hollywood sensation when he appeared in the movie Close Encounters of the Third Kind in 1977.

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  • Ashton Kutcher – As he picked up his award for "Online Sensation," he tweeted from the stage, included photos, and mentioned where to find him on Twitter.

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  • Adele - Having sold over 200,000 copies of her sophomore album 21 in the first week of its release, British singing sensation Adele is terrified of seagulls.

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  • Basketball star Michael Jordan, cycling champ Lance Armstrong, and soccer sensation David Beckham are just a few of the pro athletes who have teamed up with Nike to create clothing lines for sports fans of all ages.

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  • The 100 percent organic cotton shirt was inspired by soccer sensation David Beckham and features Manchester United screen-print on the left chest and the Nike corporate logo on the right chest.

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  • Karen Clarke is an expert in the field of children's special occasion clothes, having decked out hundreds of youngsters including the opera singing sensation Jackie Evancho.

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  • Sailing ships invite guests to step back in time and experience a true cruising sensation under the powers of currents, tides, and wind.

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  • Anti-bark collars provide an uncomfortable sensation to the dog whenever he barks.

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  • The uncomfortable sensation ranges from a mild static shock ot an ultrasonic noise to a spray of citronella or lemon, depending upon the device.

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  • The dog learns to not bark in order to avoid the unpleasant sensation.

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  • The dog learns to avoid the static sensation by not barking.

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  • It normally takes a few times of being exposed to the grinder for your dog to get used to the sensation of his nails being filed.

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  • Before you sit down with your dog to file his nails with the dog nail grinder, you should acclimate him to the noise and the sensation first.

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  • Barrii, hybrids), the best are Conspicuus and Sensation, but Golden Star, Crown Prince, Flora Wilson, Miriam, Barton, Orphee, General Murray, Albatross, Sea Gull, Maurice Vilmorin, and Dorothy E.

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  • Born Steven Demetre Georgiou in 1948 London, Cat Stevens was a pop sensation in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

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  • This historical tidbit adds to the innocence that has helped make the song an enduring international sensation.

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  • The melodic sweetness of this song fit right into the boys from Liverpool's early sound when they were more of a pop band than the experimental psychedelic studio sensation they became in the late 1960s.

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  • Christian pop sensation and Grammy award winner Amy Grant recorded a popular version of the song on her 2008 album Legacy ... Hymns & Faith.

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  • These salves give the skin a tingling sensation as they are absorbed.

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  • Just for Feet - Choose from nourishing foot balm or cool sensation foot spray to help rejuvenate tire feet.

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  • Try a few of these on prior to making your final purchase; some individuals find the sensation of liquid somewhat heavy.

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  • How about the sensation of soft cotton fabric?

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  • People may feel tired for no explainable reason, such as the sensation of having a general lack of sleep.

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  • Changes in breath odor, or a burning sensation on tongue or in the mouth.

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  • A tingling sensation may be felt and is often the result of metabolic problems, toxin explosion, infection or traumatic injury.

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  • It offers a calming sensation for the body.

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  • This neurological disorder is known for the uncomfortable and sometimes painful sensations in the legs that cause a burning, tugging or crawling sensation.

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