Senegal sentence example

senegal
  • It is the only port of Senegal affording safe anchorage for the largest ships.
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  • of the sea on the north-eastern escarpment of the Futa Jallon highlands, the massif where also rise the head-streams of the Senegal and some of the Niger tributaries, besides the Rio Grande and many other rivers flowing direct to the Gulf of Guinea.
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  • For further information see Senegal, Gold Coast, Ivory Coast, French Guinea, Portuguese Guinea, Liberia, &C. For the history of European discoveries, consult G.
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  • It was not until 1818 that the sources of the Gambia were reached, the discoverybeing made by a Frenchman, Gaspard Mollien,who had travelled by way of the Senegal and Bondu.
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  • The attempts at penetration into the extreme south, abandoned after the massacre by Tuareg of a mission sent in 1881, under Colonel Paul Flatters, to study the question of railway communication with Senegal, were begun again in 1890, in which year the British government recognized the western Sahara as within the French sphere.
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  • to the Sources of the Senegal and Gambia ..., edited by T.
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  • At that period geographers regarded the Senegal as the termination of the Niger, a theory held until Mungo Park's demonstration of the eastward course of that stream.
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  • Besides the important harbours already referred to, the French fleet has naval bases at Oran in Algeria, Bizerta in Tunisia, Saigon in Cochin China and Hongaj in Tongking, DiegoSuarez in Madagascar, Dakar in Senegal, Fort de France in Martinique, Nouma in New Caledonia.
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  • In India the franchise is exercised without distinction of color or nationality; in Senegal the electors are the inhabitants (black and white) of the communes which have been given full powers.
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  • by the French colony of Upper Senegal and Niger, E.
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  • As most of the rivers have rapids or falls actually at the sea coast or close to it, they are, with the exception of the Cavalla, useless for penetrating far inland, and the whole of this part of Africa from Cape Palmas north-west to the Senegal suggests a sunken land.
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  • The flora of the rainless region of south-western Asia is continuous with the desert flora of northern and eastern Africa, and extends from the coast of Senegal to the meridian of 75° E., or from Asia.
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  • Deniker, " Les Maures de Senegal," L' Anthr.
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  • In July 1816 the French frigate "Medusa," which carried officers on their way to Senegal to take possession of that country for France, was wrecked off Arguin, 350 lives being lost.
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  • by the colony of Upper Senegal and Niger, E.
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  • DAKAR, a seaport of Senegal, and capital of French West Africa, in 14° 40' N., 17° 24' W.
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  • It shares with Rufisque and St Louis the external trade of Senegal and the adjacent regions.
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  • Dakar thus came into direct communication with the countries of Upper Senegal and the middle Niger.
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  • by French possessions (Dahomey, Upper Senegal and Niger colony, and Chad territory), S.E.
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  • The establishment of these firms was admittedly a political move which coincided with the extension of French influence from Senegal into the interior.
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  • C. vulgaris or niloticus of most of Africa, is found from the Senegal to Egypt and to Madagascar, reaching a length of i 5 ft.
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  • FULA (FULBE, FELLATAH or Peuls), a numerous and powerful African people, spread over an immense region from Senegal nearly to Darfur.
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  • They are most numerous in Upper Senegal and in the countries under French sway immediately south of Senegambia, notably Futa Jallon.
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  • After serving in the Crimea and in China, and being governor of Senegal, he was promoted to rear-admiral in 1869.
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  • The name Moor is however still applied to the populations speaking Arabic who inhabit the country extending from Morocco to the Senegal, and to the Niger as far east as Timbuktu, i.e.
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  • north of the Senegal and separated on the north-west from Adrar Suttuf by wide valleys and sand dunes.
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  • by Portuguese Guinea and Senegal, E.
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  • by Upper Senegal and the Ivory Coast, and S.
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  • Besides the Niger, Gambia and Senegal, all separately noticed, a large number of streams running direct to the Atlantic rise in Futa Jallon.
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  • From Kurussa the Niger is navigable at high water all the way to Bamako in Upper Senegal, whence there is communication by rail and river with St Louis and Timbuktu.
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  • Several other main roads have been built by the French, and there is a very complete telegraphic system, the lines having been connected with those of Senegal in 1899.
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  • south of Senegal) and also to Futa Jallon.
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  • About the time that the British government became wearied of its efforts to open up the interior of West Africa, General Faidherbe was appointed governor of Senegal (1854), and under his direction vigorous efforts were made to consolidate French influence.
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  • True gum-arabic is the product of Acacia Senegal, abundant in both east and west tropical Africa.
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  • The pods of Acacia nilotica, under the name of neb-neb, and of other African species Acacia Senegal, flowering branch, natural size (after A.
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  • North of the Senegal the Sahara reaches the coast, and for over moo miles no river enters the ocean.
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  • The eastern headwaters of the Senegal thus drain a large area adjacent to the upper Niger.
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  • The first rise in the lower Senegal is due to the rains in the source region of the Faleme, the flood water passing down that stream more quickly than down the Bafing owing to its shorter course.
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  • The Senegal indeed has what is styled an interior delta, but, with the exception of the marigot named, all the divergent branches rejoin the main stream before the sea is reached.
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  • In the rainy season the barriers are submerged in succession, the reaches are filled and the plains of the lower Senegal are changed into immense marshes.
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  • Owing to these natural "locks," the Senegal never discharges less than 1700 or 1800 cubic ft.
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  • From July to October the level of the Senegal shows a series of fluctuations, with, however, a general increase till the end of August or beginning of September, when the maximum occurs.
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  • From Mafu to the sea, a distance of 215 m., the Senegal is navigable all the year round by vessels drawing not more than to ft.
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  • The existence of the Senegal appears to have been known to the ancients.
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  • A map of Senegal (1:100,000) is in progress since 1905.
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  • Senegal, West Africa >>
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  • After the junction of the Black and White rivers the united stream is known as the Senegal.
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  • Park himself added much to the knowledge of the upper basin of the Senegal.
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  • Class (I) includes the American colonies, Reunion, French India, Senegal.
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  • Another region so called is that part of the Sahara washed by the Atlantic. The name is also used to designate the territory under French jurisdiction west of Timbuktu and north of the Senegal.
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  • BONDU, a French protectorate in West Africa, dependent on the colony of Senegal.
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  • The country has since enjoyed considerable prosperity (see Senegal).
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  • As a rule, however, the fauna of the Upper Semliki valley, of parts of Ankole, Buganda and Unyoro, of the Northern, Rudolf and Eastern provinces, is of that " East African," " Ethiopic " character which is specially the feature of South and East Africa and of the Sudan right across from Abyssinia to the river Senegal.
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  • In 1892 Captain Binger made further explorations in the interior of the Ivory Coast, and in 1893 he was appointed the first governor of the colony on its erection into an administration distinct from that of Senegal.
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  • Originally, on the other hand, Guinea was supposed to begin as far north as Cape Nun, opposite the Canary Islands, and Gomes Azurara, a Portuguese historian of the 15th century, is said to be the first authority who brings the boundary south to the Senegal.
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  • The most probable tradition represents the Ashanti as deriving their origin from bands of fugitives, who in the 16th or 17th century were driven before the Moslem tribes migrating southward from the countries on the Niger and Senegal.
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  • For trade statistics see Senegal.
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  • GOREE, an island off the west coast of Africa, forming part of the French colony of Senegal.
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  • To encourage trade with the Levant, Senegal, Guinea and other places, privileges were granted to companies; but, like the more important East India Company, all were unsuccessful.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Senegal discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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  • The Great Scarcies, the Rio dos Carceres of the Portuguese, rises not far from the sources of the Senegal.
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  • the Senegal, and, in alliance with that potentate, to crush the Turks and liberate Palestine.
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  • The Senegal was reached in 1445, Cape Verde was passed in the same year, and in 1446 Alvaro Fernandes pushed on almost as far as Sierra Leone.
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  • In Senegal this species is replaced by C. anthus, while in Egypt occurs the much larger C. lupaster, commonly known as the Egyptian wolf.
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  • Thus Diniz Diaz, Nuno Tristam, and others reached the Senegal in 1445; Diaz rounded Cape Verde in the same year; and in 1446 Alvaro Fernandez pushed on almost to our Sierra Leone, to a point 10 leagues beyond Cape Verde.
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  • Of these the former, in his two voyages of 1455 and 1456, explored part of the courses of the Senegal and the Gambia, discovered the Cape Verde Islands (1456), named and mapped more carefully than before a considerable section of the African littoral beyond Cape Verde, and gave much new information on the trade-routes of north-west Africa and on the native races; while Gomez, in his first important venture (after 1448 and before 1458), though not accomplishing the full Indian purpose of his voyage (he took a native interpreter with him for use "in the event of reaching India"), explored and observed in the Gambia valley and along the adjacent coasts with fully as much care and profit.
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  • GALAGO, the Senegal name of the long-tailed African representatives of the lemur-like Primates, which has been adopted as their technical designation.
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  • senegalensis (or galago) of Senegal, G.
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  • The French now became rivals for the trade of the Gambia, but the treaty of Versailles in 1783 assigned the trade in the river to Britain, reserving, however, Albreda for French trade, while it assigned the Senegal to France, with the reservation of the right of the British to trade at Portendic for gum.
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  • The beginning of a return to prosperity came in 1816 when some British traders, obliged to leave Senegal on the restoration of that country to France after the Napoleonic wars, founded a settlement on St Mary's Isle.
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  • Meantime the French from Senegal pushed their frontier close to the British settlements, so that when the boundaries were settled by the agreement of the 10th of August 1889 with France, Great Britain was able to secure only a ten-kilometre strip on either side of the river.
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  • Of the remaining rivers of the Atlantic basin the Orange, in the extreme south, brings the drainage from the Drakensberg on the opposite side of the continent, while the Kunene, Kwanza, Ogowe and Sanaga drain the west coast highlands of the southern limb; the Volta, Komoe, Bandama, Gambia and Senegal the highlands of the western limb.
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  • North of the Senegal for over 1000 m.
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  • From Idrisi's description it would appear that he regarded the Shari, Lake Chad, the Benue, Niger and Senegal as one great river which emptied into the Atlantic. 2 That the Niger flowed west and reached the ocean was also stated by Leo Africanus.
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  • The Senegal being proved an independent river and the eastward flow of the Niger assumed, the theory that it ran into the Nile was revived, and almost to the very year in which the course of the river was actually demonstrated geographers and travellers, such as J.
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  • Leaving out of account the Welle-Ubangi (and Idrisi's description of the two Niles may infer a knowledge of that stream, which was supposed by Schweinfurth to form part of the Chad system), there is an almost continuous waterway from the mouth of the Senegal to that of the Nile.
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  • The upper waters of the Bakoy branch of the Senegal and those of the navigable Niger are less than 40 m.
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  • Krause (north from the Gold Coast, 1886-1887) and the French Captain Binger (Senegal to Ivory Coast, 1887-1889) first defined its southern limits by revealing the unexpected northward extension of the basins of the Guinea coast streams, especially the Volta and Komoe, a fact which explained the absence of important tributaries within the Niger bend.
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  • From 1904 onwards the French undertook works on the Niger between Bamako - whence there is railway communication with the Senegal - and Ansongo with a view to deepening the channel and removing obstructions to navigation.
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  • The Sudan contains the basin of the Senegal and parts of three other hydrographic systems, namely: the Niger, draining southwards to the Atlantic; the central depression of Lake Chad; and the Nile, flowing northwards to the Mediterranean.
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  • The greater part of what was the French Sudan is now known as rthe Upper Senegal and Niger Colony (see Senegal, French West Africa, &C.).
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  • Gum senegal, a variety of gum arabic produced by Acacia Verek, occurs in pieces generally rounded, of the size of a pigeon's egg, and of a reddish or yellow colour, and specific gravity 1.436.
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  • is imported from the river Gambia, and from Senegal and Bathurst.
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  • Chagual gum, a variety brought from Santiago, Chile, resembles gum senegal.
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  • Senegal can also claim the lowest level of cancers on the African continent.
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  • gum Arabic is the product of Acacia Senegal, abundant in dry tropical west Africa from Senegal to northern Nigeria.
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  • Although the country is totally landlocked, it contains three important rivers the Niger, the Senegal and the Bani.
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  • SENEGAL, a river of West Africa, entering the Atlantic about 16° N., some io m.
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  • versant of the hills which here form a narrow divide between the basin of the Senegal and that of the upper Niger.
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  • through a valley bordered on either side by hills which throw out rocky spurs, over which the Senegal descends in a succession of falls, those of Guina (160 ft.) and of Felu (50 or 60 ft.) being the most important.
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  • From that town a railway connects with the navigable waters of the upper Niger at Bamako (see Senegal: Country, I.).
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  • is St Louis, the capital of the colony of Senegal.
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  • The comparative scantiness of its sources, the steepness of its upper course and the rapid evaporation which takes place after the short rainy season would make the Senegal an insignificant stream for more than half the year; but natural dams cross the channel at intervals and the water accumulates behind them in deep reaches, which thus act as reservoirs.
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  • Lake Cayor on the right side of the lower Senegal and Lake Panieful (Guier) on the left constitute reserve basins, receiving the surplus waters of the river during flood and restoring them in the dry season.
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  • The mouth of the Senegal, then called Senaga, was entered in 1445 by the Portuguese navigator Dinas Diaz (who thought it a western arm of the Nile), and in 1455 Cadamosto ascended the river for some distance.
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  • Mollien, Decouverte des sources du Senegal et de la Gamble- (Paris, ed.
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  • Ancelle, Les Explorations au Senegal et dans les contrees voisines (Paris, 1886); M.
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  • Olivier, Le Senegal (Paris, 1908); Captain Fromaget, "L'Hydrographie du fleuve Senegal," in B.S.G.
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  • The funds for these Upper Senegal andr Sahara)
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  • In addition to Algeria, which sends three senators and six deputies to Paris and is treated in many respects not as a colony but as part of France, the colonies represented in the legislature are: Martinique, Guadeloupe and Reunion (each electing one senator and two deputies), French India (one senator and one deputy),Guiana, Senegal and Cochin-China (one deputy each).
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  • The flora of the rainless region of south-western Asia is continuous with the desert flora of northern and eastern Africa, and extends from the coast of Senegal to the meridian of 75° E., or from Asia.
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  • This species is often considered as indigenous to India, but Dr Engler has pointed out that it is found wild in Upper Guinea, Abyssinia, Senegal, etc. It is the " tree cotton " of India and Africa, being typically a large shrub or small tree.
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  • It was to the zone between the Kong states and the hinterland of Liberia that Samory (see Senegal) fled for refuge before he was taken prisoner (1898), and for a short time he was master of Kong.
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  • In 1904 the term Mauretania was revived as an official designation by the French government, and applied to the territory north of the lower Senegal under French protection (see Senegal).
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  • DAKAR, a seaport of Senegal, and capital of French West Africa, in 14° 40' N., 17° 24' W.
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  • (Blanchet died in Senegal on the 6th of October 1900, a few days after his return from Adrar.) Atar is inhabited by Arab and Berber tribes, and is described as a wretched spot.
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  • Goree subsequently fell again into the hands of the English, but was definitely occupied by France in 1817 (see SENEGAL: History).
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  • (See also Senegal: History.) French Guinea was made a colony independent of Senegal in 1891, but in 1895 came under the supreme authority of the newly constituted governor-generalship of French West Africa.
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