How to use Seneca in a sentence

seneca
  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, and the Lehigh Valley railways, and by the Cayuga & Seneca Canal.

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  • Seneca cannot be too heavy nor Plautus too light."

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  • But above all, what gives the sentences of Marcus Aurelius their enduring value and fascination, and renders them superior to the utterances of Epictetus and Seneca, is that they are the gospel of his life.

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  • The verse shows great facility of metrical composition, but a considerable portion of it is transferred from the tragedies of Seneca.

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  • It contains also an account of the metres used by Boetius in the Consolatio, and a list of the passages which he has borrowed from the tragedies of Seneca.

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  • The leading earlier Cynics were Antisthenes, Diogenes of Sinope, Crates of Thebes, and Zeno; in the later Roman period, the chief names are Demetrius (the friend of Seneca), Oenomaus and Demonax.

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  • Demetrius and Demonax are highly eulogized by Seneca and Lucian respectively.

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  • A Latin tragedy on her fate is attributed, though wrongly, to Seneca.

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  • His tomb and villa are described by Seneca.

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  • The Theban legend, which reached its fullest development in the Thebais of Statius and in Seneca, reappeared in the Roman de Thebes (the work of an unknown imitator of Benoit de Sainte-More).

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  • The works of the ancient tragedians (especially Seneca, in preference to the Greek) came into vogue, and were slavishly followed by French and Italian imitators down to the 17th century.

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  • The active growth of the petroleum industry of the United States began in 1859, though in the early part of the century the petroleum of Lake Seneca, N.Y., was used as an embrocation under the name of " Seneca oil," and the "American Medicinal Oil" of Kentucky was largely sold after its discovery in 1829.

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  • We learn from Cicero, Vitruvius, Seneca, Suetonius, Pliny and others, that the Romans had both general and topographical maps.

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  • Already the principles of reason and humanity had been applied to the subject by Seneca.

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  • The first, dedicated to Tubero, is eulogized by Cicero in the De officiis, and Seneca refers to him frequently in the De beneficiis.

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  • Seneca even made the discussion of such problems into a regular discipline, claiming that their concrete character gave an interest in morality to those who had no love for abstractions; while they prevented those who had from losing themselves in the clouds.

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  • But, then, Cicero and Seneca took common-sense as their guide.

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  • Among the Greeks and Romans various speculations as to the cause of the how were indulged in; Aristotle, in his Meteors, erroneously ascribes it to the reflection of the sun's rays by the rain; Seneca adopted the same view.

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  • Medea is the heroine of extant tragedies of Euripides and Seneca; those of Aeschylus and Ennius (adapted from Euripides) are lost.

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  • His reading ranges from Arabian philosophers and naturalists to Aristotle, Eusebius, Cicero, Seneca, Julius Caesar (whom he calls Julius Celsus), and even the Jew, Peter Alphonso.

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  • The imitative and rhetorical tastes of Rome showed themselves in the composition of exotic tragedies, as remote in spirit and character from Greek as from Roman life, of which the only extant specimens are those attributed to the younger Seneca.

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  • A high ideal of culture, literary as well as practical, was realized in Germanicus, which seems to have been transmitted to his daughter Agrippina, whose patronage of Seneca had important results in the next generation.

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  • The dates of their publication are unknown, but Seneca, writing between A.D.

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  • The largest of these are Cayuga, Seneca, Keuka, Canandaigua, Owasco and Skaneateles.

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  • Up the Mohawk to Rome the old route is for the most part to be retained; but from Rome to Clyde there is to be a diversion so as to utilize Oneida Lake and Oneida and Seneca rivers.

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  • In Cambridge he completed his work on the New Testament, the Letters of Jerome, and Seneca; and then in 1514, when there seemed no prospect of ampler preferment, he determined to transfer himself to Basel and give the results of his labours to the world.

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  • In 1511 he was preparing to reprint his Adagia with Jodocus Badius, who in the following year was to have also Seneca and Jerome.

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  • That the agent was acting entirely on his own responsibility may be doubted; for within a few months Erasmus had decided to betake himself to Basel, bearing with him Seneca and Jerome, the latter to be incorporated in the great edition which Johannes Amerbach and Froben had had in hand since 15ro.

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  • The authors he recommends include " Aesop " and Sallust, the tragedies of Seneca and the epic poets, especially Virgil, whom he interprets in an allegorical sense.

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  • The Latin poets to be studied include Virgil, Lucan, Statius, Ovid's Metamorphoses, and (with certain limitations) Horace, Juvenal and Persius, as well as Plautus, Terence and the tragedies of Seneca; the prose authors recommended are Cicero, Livy and Sallust.

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  • An educational aim is also apparent in his editions of Terence and of Seneca, while his Latin translations made his contemporaries more familiar with Greek poetry and prose, and his Paraphrase promoted a better understanding of the Greek Testament.

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  • In the early plays he quotes Ovid and Seneca.

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  • It was remarked by Seneca that amongst the murderers of Caesar were to be found more of his friends than of his enemies.

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  • Adjoining it is the Forest Lawn cemetery, in which are monuments to President Millard Fillmore, and to the famous Seneca chief Red Jacket (1751-1830), a friend of the whites, who was faithful when approached by Tecumseh and the Prophet, and warned the Americans of their danger; by many he has been considered the greatest orator of his race.

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  • In November 1790 he negotiated a peace with the Seneca Indians, and he concluded treaties with the Six Nations in July 1791, in March 1792 and in November 1794.

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  • The mineral was made known to white men by the Indians, who sold it, under the name of Seneca oil, as a cure for various ills, and burned it at some of their ceremonies.

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  • Seneca (Epistle 9) shows how closely allied Stilpo was to the Stoics.

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  • Under the influence of Seneca he became a keen student of philosophy and rhetoric, and began practising as an advocate.

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  • He was acquainted with their noblest representative, Thrasea Paetus, and he also came under the influence of Seneca.

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  • His style betrays the unhealthy influence of Seneca.

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  • Seneca has given us a description of the application of hot water for securing the necessary temperature.

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  • Ramsay is inclined to attribute to the influence of Athenodorus the striking resemblances which can be established between Seneca and Paul, the latter of whom must certainly have been acquainted with his teachings.

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  • Among prose writers should be mentioned the grammarian Peder Syv,5 (1631-1702); Bishop Erik Pontoppidan (1616-1678), whose Grammatica Danica, published in 1668, is the first systematic analysis of the language; Birgitta Thott (1610-1662), a lady who translated Seneca (1658); and Leonora Christina Ulfeld, daughter of Christian IV., who has left a touching account of her long imprisonment in her Jammersminde.

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  • Annaeus Seneca the philosopher, was born at Corduba (Cordova) about the beginning of the Christian era.

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  • It is probable that he was banished to Corsica with his brother, and that both returned together to Rome when Agrippina selected Seneca to be tutor to Nero.

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  • He survived his brother Seneca, but was subsequently put to death by order of Nero (in 65) or committed suicide.

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  • In favour of the authorship of Lucilius are the facts that he was a friend of Seneca and acquainted with his writings; that he had for some time held the office of imperial procurator of Sicily, and was thus familiar with the locality; that he was the author of a poem on Sicilian subjects.

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  • It is objected that in the 79th letter of Seneca, which is the chief authority on the question, he apparently asks that Lucilius should introduce the hackneyed theme of Aetna merely as an episode in his contemplated poem, not make it the subject of separate treatment.

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  • But, as has been remarked by Dr Robert Grant (History of Physical Astronomy, p. 515), we are no more warranted in drawing so important a conclusion from casual remarks, however sagacious, than we should be justified in stating that Seneca was in possession of the discoveries of Newton because he predicted that comets would one day be found to revolve in periodic orbits.

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  • It consists of some translations of Livy and Seneca, and of a very large number of interesting and admirably written letters, many of which are addressed to Peiresc, the man of science of whom Gassendi has left a delightful Latin life.

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  • The first author who quotes them is Seneca.

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  • Annaeus Seneca was recalled from exile and appointed his tutor.

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  • His prestige and his good qualities, carefully fostered by Seneca, made him popular, while his childish vanity, ungovernable selfishness and savage temper were as yet unsuspected.

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  • Seneca had seen from the first that the real danger with Nero lay in the savage vehemence of his passions, and he made it his chief aim to stave off by every means in his power the dreaded outbreak.

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  • But Seneca's fear lest Nero's sleeping passions should once be roused were fully verified, and he seems to have seen all along where the danger lay, namely in Agrippina's imperious temper and insatiable love of power.

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  • In 55, however, Seneca found a powerful ally in Nero's passion for the beautiful freedwoman Acte, a passion which he deliberately encouraged.

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  • In 62 Burrus died, it was said by poison, and Seneca retired from the unequal contest.

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  • Piso, Faenius Rufus, Lucan and many of their less prominent accomplices, and even Seneca himself (though there seems to have been no evidence of his complicity) were executed.

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  • Seneca was chosen as the model of tragedy; Plautus and Terence supplied the groundwork of comedy.

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  • Meanwhile the drama was emerging from the medieval mysteries; and the classical type, made popular by Garnier's genius, was elaborated, as in Italy, upon the model of Seneca and the canons of the three unities.

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  • Tragedies in the style of Seneca, rivalling Italian and French dramas of the epoch, were produced.

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  • She did much by the circulation of petitions to secure the passage in New York in 1848 of a law giving a married woman property rights; and in the same year on the 19th and 20th of June in Seneca Falls, whither the Stantons had removed in 1847 from Boston, was held, chiefly under the leadership of Mrs Mott and Mrs Stanton, the first Woman's Rights Convention.

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  • Obtaining a large tract (which was called Jerusalem in 1789) in the present Yates county, she founded in 1788 the village of Hopeton on the outlet of Keuka Lake about a mile from Seneca Lake.

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  • On the other hand, this corporeal thing is veritably and identically reason, mind, and ruling principle (X6-yos, vas, iiyE,uovtKOv); in virtue of its divine origin Cleanthes can say to Zeus, " We too are thy offspring," and a Seneca can calmly insist that, if man and God are not on perfect equality, the superiority rests rather on our side.

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  • Yet, while they accepted slavery as a permanent institution, philosophers as wide apart as Chrysippus and Seneca sought to mitigate its evils in practice, and urged upon masters humanity in the treatment of their slaves.

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  • The writings of the later Stoics have come down to us, if not entire, in great part, so that Seneca, Cornutus, Persius, Lucan, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius are known at first hand.

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  • Books of direction were written by Sextius in Greek (as afterwards by Seneca in Latin), almost the only Roman who had the ambition to found a sect, though in ethics he mainly followed Stoicism.

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  • In Seneca's time there was a professor, with few hearers it is true, even in a provincial town like Naples.

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  • Seneca is the most prominent leader in the direction which Roman Stoicism now took.

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  • In the soul Seneca recognizes an effluence of the divine spirit, a god in the human frame; in virtue of this he maintains the essential dignity and internal freedom of man in every human being.

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  • With Seneca this resignation took the form of a constant meditation upon death.

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  • But their attitude towards the "way out" (a-ycory7 1 7) of incurable discomforts is quite unlike the anxious sentimentalism with which Seneca dwells upon death.

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  • From Seneca we turn, not without satisfaction, to men of sterner mould, such as Musonius Rufus, who certainly deserves.

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  • His philosophy, however, is yet more concentrated upon practice than Seneca's, and in ethics.

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  • He attempted both comedy and tragedy, and his success in the latter branch is due to the fact that he was not content to seek inspiration from Seneca, as were most of the tragedians of the 16th century, but went straight to the fountain heads, Sophocles and Euripides.

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  • The tragic story is the subject of the Hecuba of Euripides, the Troades of Seneca and the Polyxena of Sophocles, of which only a few fragments remain.

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  • Plutarch, writers on rhetoric like the elder Seneca, moralists like Valerius Maximus, went to Livy for their stock examples.

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  • It is much to be regretted that Petrarch found the precious MS. so late in life, when the style of his own epistles had been already modelled upon that of Seneca and St Augustine.

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  • For him the authors of the Greek and Latin world were living men - more real, in fact, than those with whom he corresponded; and the rhetorical epistles he addressed to Cicero, Seneca and Varro prove that he dwelt with them on terms of sympathetic intimacy.

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  • Seneca and Augustine had been too much used by him as models of composition.

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  • Annaeus Seneca, who combined the parts of a moralist and a money-lender, had abruptly recalled large loans made from his private wealth to British chiefs.

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  • At first he was treated with great consideration by Nero, probably owing to the influence of Seneca, and became consul in A.D.

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  • Learning Latin, he published Dutch translations from Cicero, Seneca and Boetius.

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  • In 1848 she addressed the AntiSabbath Convention in Boston, and with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, whom she had first met in London in 1840, called a convention "to discuss the social, civil and religious condition and rights of women," which met at Seneca Falls and passed a "Declaration of Sentiments," modelled on the Declaration of Independence.

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  • The principal fragments of Cleanthes's works are contained in Diogenes Laertius and Stobaeus; some may be found in Cicero and Seneca.

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  • The writer of Mark's gospel was "an Italian, at home both in Rome and Alexandiria"; that of Matthew's gospel "a Roman, nourished by the spirit of Seneca"; The Pauline epistles were written in the West in antagonism to the Paul of the Acts, and so on.

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  • It was at this time (April 1532) that Calvin issued his first publication, a commentary in Latin on Seneca's tract De Clementia.

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  • It must have been at least after his Commentary on Seneca's De Clementia that his heart was "so subdued and reduced to docility that in comparison with his zeal for true piety he regarded all other studies with indifference, though not entirely forsaking them.

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  • The book is unfinished, and treats only of the first luminary, Cicero; the others intended were apparently Seneca and Pliny.

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  • When they passed away there arosg in their places such writers as the younger Seneca, the epic poet Lucan, the epigrammatist Martial, the literary critic Quintilian, besides a host of lesser names.

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  • A Seneca Beloit mbeilin a 0 n p lank into English Miles County Seats County Boundaries.....

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  • A convex lens of rockcrystal was found by Layard among the ruins of the palace of Nimrud; Seneca describes hollow spheres of glass filled with water as being commonly used as magnifiers.

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  • After which Seneca launches into a lengthy moral diatribe against anger in any of its forms.

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  • In addition to the two tragedies of Sophocles, the legend formed the subject of a trilogy by Aeschylus, of which only the Seven against Thebes is extant; of the Phoenissae of Euripides; and of the Oedipus and Phoenissae of Seneca.

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  • His prose works on various subjects - Prometheus, Symposium (a banquet at which Virgil, Horace and Messalla were present), De cultu suo (on his manner of life) - were ridiculed by Augustus, Seneca and Quintilian for their strange style, the use of rare words and awkward transpositions.

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  • To these causes we attribute the pathological observation of Seneca and Tacitus, the new sense of purity in Persius called out by contrast with the impurity around him, the glowing if somewhat sensational exaggeration of Juvenal, the vivid characterization of Martial.

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  • Though it was not one of the great eras in the annals of literature, yet the century which produced Martial, Juvenal and Tacitus cannot be pronounced barren in literary originality, nor that which produced Seneca and Quintilian devoid of culture and literary taste.

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  • Similar glens and falls are found in the Seneca Valley, the best known being the widely renowned Watkins Glen, now reserved as a state park (see Watkins).

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  • Specimens of his apophthegms may be found in Diogenes Laertius and the florilegium of Stobaeus, while there are traces of his influence in Seneca.

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  • It is, however, clear that from his earliest years he began to speculate upon the nature of knowledge in the abstract, and its concrete applications, as in theology, and that with this object he studied largely the writings of Cicero and Seneca and recent English philosophers (especially Locke, Berkeley and Butler).

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  • In the 1st century of the Christian era, the nature of the time, with its active political struggles, naturally called Stoicism more into the foreground, yet Seneca, though nominally a Stoic, draws nearly all his suavity and much of his paternal wisdom from the writings of Epicurus.

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  • The success of Seneca's own management of Nero largely depended on his being able gradually to emancipate the emperor from his mother's control.

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  • The form of the Saturnalia is copied from Plato's Symposium and Gellius's Nodes atticae; the chief authorities (whose names, however, are not quoted) are Gellius, Seneca the philosopher, Plutarch (Quaestiones conviviales), Athenaeus and the commentaries of Servius (excluded by some) and others on Virgil.

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  • Seneca 's blood-stained tragedies reworked Greek myths, arguing for a return to stoic values.

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  • Gallio was the brother of Seneca, a Greek stoic philosopher who later became an adviser to the emperor Nero.

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  • Some attractions that are nearby include the Corning Museum of Glass, the Lake Ontario Wine Trail, a Renaissance Festival, Watkins Glen International, and the Women's Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls.

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  • Visiting the Seneca Lake wineries is a great way to spend time in the Finger Lakes wine region of New York state.

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  • Seneca Lake extends from Geneva in the north all the way to the south in Watkins Glen.

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  • The Seneca Lake Winery Trail was started in 1866 with the opening of the Seneca Lake Grape Wine Company.

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  • Long after the end of Prohibition, Charles Fournier decided to plant 20 acres of Vinifera on the east side of Seneca Lake in the early 1970's.

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  • Around the same time, Hermann Weimer was planting 140 acres of Vinifera on the western side of Seneca Lake.

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  • These two growers began the rebirth of the Seneca Lake wine region and were instrumental in its success today.

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  • Thus began the revitalization of the wine industry along Seneca Lake.

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  • The Seneca Lake Wine Trail began in 1986 to attract tourists and vinophiles to the area.

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  • Polar Passport - If you want to visit Seneca Lake wineries but don't like crowds, visit the area during the cooler months of the year.

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  • While there are new wineries emerging each year in the area, the following are the member wineries along the Seneca Lake Wine Trail.

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  • The Glenora winery is located on Seneca Lake in the heart of the Finger Lakes wine country.

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  • The beauty of the landscape along Seneca Lake is well worth the trip for any vinophile.

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  • It is located off of exit 42 on the New York State Thruway at the southwest end of Seneca Lake.

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  • They produce a wide variety of wines under several labels that include Great Western, Pleasant Valley, Seneca Harbor, Autumn Frost and Caywood Vineyards.

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