How to use Seedling in a sentence

seedling
  • On germination, however, the fungus behaves in the same way as one which has entered in the seedling stage.

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  • The main period of seedling emergence is April to May with a peak in April.

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  • Seedling plants from the cultivated vines often produce unisexual flowers, thus reverting to the feral type.

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  • The grafting is done when tomato seedling are about ten days old.

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  • Another departure from the normal is that in which the juvenile or seedling form of shoot persists in the adult tree; the numerous coniferous plants known as species of Retinospora are examples of this.

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  • It covers symptoms, disease cycle, mycotoxins in scabby grain, seedling blight phase of scab, and control methods.

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  • All plant parts were dried and weighed and the second seedling leaves were analyzed for total carbon and nitrogen and soluble carbohydrates.

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  • I have a dill seedling, safely tucked away under a plastic bottle cloche away from the mean old slugs.

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  • The results indicated that dispersal was more important than seedling establishment in controlling spread of these species.

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  • Only then is the seedling ready to be transferred to a larger container of very sandy, sterilized loam.

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  • Narcissus seedling You can clearly see that it has come up from a depth of 5cm plus.

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  • It shows the typical characteristics of Turbinicarpus species in the early seedling stage, i.e.. plumose or feather-like spination and low rounded tubercles.

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  • Sometimes birds take a liking to to radish seedlings, however once past the seedling stage, they leave them alone.

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  • Seedling rootstocks are raised and potted up before being brought into the glass house before grafting, so as to achieve a quick union.

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  • St. Boniface chopped down the tree to save the child and a new tree seedling miraculously grew in its place.

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  • The absorption of the cell-walls takes place very early in the germina-, ting seedling.

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  • In 1909 the state legislature passed an act authorizing any city, borough or township of the first class to acquire, subject to the approval of the commissioner of forestry, a municipal forest; and it authorized the distribution of seedling forest trees, at cost, to those who would plant and protect them, for growing private forests.

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  • Many parasites can enter a seedling, but are unable to attack the same host when older - e.g.

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  • Frequently, as in many Dicotyledons, the primary root, the original root of the seedling, persists throughout the life of the plant, forming, as often in biennials, a thickened tap-root, as in carrot, or in perennials, a much-branched root system.

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  • The first leaves borne on the seedling axis are often scalelike, and these are followed by two or more larger laminae, which foreshadow the pinnae of the adult frond.

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  • In addition to the first foliage-leaves and the adult type of leaf, there are often produced leaves which are intermediate both in shape and structure between the seedling and adult foliage.

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  • It is an annual plant, with hollow, erect, knotted stems, and pro duces, in addition to the direct developments from the seedling plant, secondary roots and secondary shoots (tillers) from the base.

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  • A study of the development of the pitcher, especially in the young pitchers of seedling plants, shows that the inflated portion is a development of the midrib of the leaf, while the wings, which are especially well represented in the terrestrial type of pitcher, represent the upper portion of the leaf-blade which has become separated from the lower portion by the tendril; the lid is regarded as representing two leaflets which have become fused.

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  • On the other hand, adaptations, especially those evoked by climatic or edaphic conditions, may only, be shown by the seedling if grown under the appropriate external conditions; here what is hereditary is not the actual adaptation, but the capacity for responding in a particular way to a certain set of external conditions.

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  • The embryo is generally surrounded by a larger or smaller amount of foodstuff (endosperm) which serves to nourish it in its development to form a seedling when the seed germinates; frequently, however, as in pea or bean and their allies, the whole of the nourishment for future use is stored up in the cotyledons themselves, which then become thick and fleshy.

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  • The radicle of a seedling was cut off, as it was completely decayed, and the two now separated cotyledons were planted.

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  • There are different methods of planting flowers, depending on whether the flower is a seed, seedling, or mature plant.

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  • Bring seedling trays outside for several hours a day or for the entire day, then bring them inside at night during the hardening-off period.

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  • Cutworms are insects that eat right through the main stem of a seedling, killing the plant.

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  • Gently pop the seedling out of the seed tray.

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  • If you cannot get the seedling out of the tray, using a kitchen spoon to scoop it out from the soil, taking as much soil with you as you can to protect the roots.

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  • Dig a little hole and place the seedling inside the hole so the root system is covered.

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  • Water well, and keep the newly planted seedling well-watered until it becomes established and grows at lease one more set of leaves.

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  • When you plant your seedlings, take a plastic bottle such as a milk jug or two-liter bottle of soda, cut the top off and "plant" the bottle around your seedling.

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  • Seedling plants of tobacco, like many other crops, are liable to attack by " cut worms," the caterpillars of species of Peridromia and Agrotis.

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  • In other species of the genus the seed germinates on a branch, and the seedling produces clasping roots, and roots which grow downwards hanging like stout cords, and ultimately reaching the ground.

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  • In the latter case the seedling has early to shift for itself, and to form roots and leaves for the supply of its needs.

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  • The ground being prepared and, if necessary, enriched, and the surface made fine and smooth, a hole is made with the dibble deep enough and large enough to receive the roots of the seedling plants without doubling them up, and the hole is filled in by working the soil close to the plant with the point of the dibble.

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  • It is the rapid spread of these yeast-conidia in manure and soil waters which makes it so difficult to get rid of smuts, &c., in the fields, and they, like the ordinary conidia, readily infect the seedling wheat, oats, barley or other cereals.

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  • Infection in these cases occurs in the seedling at the place where root and shoot meet, and the infecting hypha having entered the plant goes on living in it and growing up with it as if it had no parasitic action at all.

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  • There is at most 1 seedling in a quadrate.

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  • These were virulent on the previously resistant cultivars Brimstone and Fenman (at the seedling stage).

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  • For an environmentally conscious gift, you can give your guests an evergreen seedling to be taken home and planted.

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  • When large enough to handle, prick out individual seedling from pot and plant them in semishade condition under greenhouse.

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  • Another species, E. montevidensis, also known as E. floribunda, bears large, loose clusters of white flowers, and there are seedling forms known under different names, especially in seaside gardens.

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  • Though not quite a biennial, it is better in general cultivation to treat it as such, as from seedling plants, well grown on during the first year, the finest stems arise.

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  • N. Dr Laumonier (Wilks) is a very fine seedling of this group.

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  • Two-year-old seedling plants of it bloom in June and July, and amongst them will be found an endless variety of colors from white to the richest plum, the deep blues being very rich.

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  • There are many seedling forms of R. barbatum, one with fleshy-pink flowers being especially good.

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  • Fortunei (the S. japonica of gardens), S. rubella is a seedling form.

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  • Helvola - A seedling with pale yellow flowers 2 inches across, open during the afternoon and slightly raised above the water.

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  • Richardsoni - An American seedling with double pure white flowers standing well out of the water; they are of finely rounded petals, curving inwards, the outer row and the sepals slightly drooping.

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  • Lantanas need to be planted in seedling form.

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  • A B In Great Britain the flea beetles (Halticidae) are one of the most serious enemies; one of these, the turnip flea (Phyllotreta nemorum), has in some years, notably 1881, caused more than 500,00o loss in England and Scotland alone by eating the young seedling turnips, cabbage and other Cruciferae.

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  • Ericaceae, Pyrolaceae, Gentianaceae, Orchidaceae, ferns, &c. Recent experiments have shown that the difficulties of getting orchid seeds to germinate are due to the absence of the necessary fungus, which must be in readiness to infect the young seedling immediately it emerges from the seed.

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  • A pair of small strapshaped leaves succeed the two cotyledons of the seedling, and persist as the only leaves during the life of the plant; they retain the power of growth in their basal portion, which is sunk in a narrow groove near the edge of the crown, and the tough lamina, 6 ft.

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  • What mysterious force guided the seedling from the dark earth up to the light, through leaf and stem and bud, to glorious fulfilment in the perfect flower?

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  • An instance of this is given in the Philosophical Transactions (1768), where it is stated that one seedling plant in the Cambridge botanic garden was divided into eighteen parts, each of which was replanted and subsequently again divided, till it produced sixty-seven plants in one season.

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  • In delicate cases, such as seedling gloxinias and begonias, it is best to lift the little seedling on the end of a flattish pointed stick, often cleft at the apex, pressing this into the new soil where the plant is to be placed, and liberating it and closing the earth about it by the aid of a similar stick held in the other hand.

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