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seed

seed

seed Sentence Examples

  • There is more to being a father than planting the seed.

  • It wouldn't physically be mine, but there's more to being a father than the time it takes to plant the seed.

  • As the saying went, there was more to being a father than planting the seed.

  • It doesn't matter who planted the seed.

  • A seed of a thought that emerged yesterday returned stronger.

  • axillary or terminal spikes; they have four stamens, which bear at the back four small herbaceous petal-like structures, and four free carpels, which ripen to form four small green fleshy fruits, each containing one seed within a hard inner coat;.

  • the seed contains a large hooked embryo.

  • Institutions possessing a special character are the monti frumentarii, public grain deposits, founded for the purpose of supplying peasant proprietors with seed corn, debts being paid in kind with interest after harvest.

  • Sheerness has some trade in corn and seed,, and there is steamboat connexion with Port Victoria, on the opposite side of the Medway; with Southend, on the opposite side of the Thames; and with Chatham and London, and the town is in some favour as a seaside resort.

  • The viscid pulp soon hardens, affording a protection to the seed; in germination the sucker-root penetrates the bark, and a connexion is established with the vascular tissue of the first plant.

  • nature which, under an appearance of simplicity, might sow the good seed of more adequate ideas on the world and man.

  • broad, and are divided interiorly by a spongy substance into three to five cells, each of which contains a large chestnut-like seed.

  • The following statistics are interesting: - The enormous development of the wheat-growing industry is These figures do not include the wheat ground into flour and sent by way of British Columbia to Asia and Australia, nor the wheat retained by the farmers for seed.

  • The plain of Toulouse, which with the rest of south-western France produces good draught oxen, the Parisian basin, the plains of the north to the east of the maritime region, the lower valley of the Rhflne and tile Bresse, where there is little or no natural pasturage, and forage is grown from seed.

  • The " nardoo " seed, on which the aborigines sometimes contrived to exist, is a creeping plant, growing plentifully in swamps and shallow pools, and belongs to the natural order of Marsileaceae.

  • The city manufactures cotton seed.

  • 5, Seed cut lengthwise.

  • Cotton growing under European direction began about 1900, with the result that in 1901-1902 over 100,000 lb of cotton grown from native, American and Egyptian seed were shipped to Bremen.

  • p. 551): "During 27 months I have scattered the seed of the Word of God in this miserable land; shall I say among thorns or on stony ground?

  • To the temple came the poor farmer to borrow seed corn or supplies for harvesters, &c. - advances which he repaid without interest.

  • The landlord found land, labour, oxen for ploughing and working the wateringmachines, carting, threshing or other implements, seed corn, rations for the workmen and fodder for the cattle.

  • If he stole the seed, rations or fodder, the Code enacted that his fingers should be cut off.

  • For the sowing of seed see Sowing.

  • Under terzieria the owner furnishes stock, implements and seed, and the tiller retains only one-third of the principal products.

  • In the affitto, or lease, the proprietor furnishes seed and the implements.

  • In bad years the tiller, moreover, gives up seed corn before beginning harvest.

  • The terms of agrarian contracts and leases (except in districts where mezzadria prevails in its essential form), are in many regions disadvantageous to the laborers, who suffer from the obligation to provide guarantees for payment of rent, for repayment of seed corn and for the division of products.

  • The Monti frumentarii or co-operative corn deposits, which lend seed corn to farmers, and are repaid after harvest with interest in kind, numbered f615 in 1894, and possessed apatrimonyof~24o,ooo.

  • Another who " got the seed " and " grew the flower " was Herbert Spencer.

  • Thus in the end of the 17th century the seed was sown which has at intervals brought forth recurrent crops of evolutional hypotheses, based, more or less completely, on general reasonings.

  • The plant world falls into two great divisions, the higher or flowering plants (Phanerogams), characterized by the formation of a seed, and the lower or flowerless plants (Cryptogams), in which no seed is formed but the plants are disseminated by means of unicellular bodies termed spores.

  • Aquatic plants occur among seed plants but these are readaptations of land plants to an aquatic environment.

  • After fertilization the female cell, now called the oospore, divides and part of it develops into the embryo (new sporophyte), which remains dormant for a time still protected by the ovule which has developed to become the seed.

  • The seed is a new structure characteristic of this group, which is therefore often referred to as the Seed-plants.

  • The seed is set free from the parent plant and serves as the means of dissemination.

  • The seed is enclosed when ripe in the fruit, a development of the ovary as a result of fertilization of the egg-cell.

  • We now know that many at least of the Cycadofilices bore seeds, of a type much more complex than that of most modern seed plants, and in some cases approximating to the seeds of existing Cycads.

  • Later, the axis branches by the formation of new growing-points, and in this way the complex system of axes forming the body of the ordinary vascular plant is built up. In the flowering plants the embryo, after developing up to a certain point, stopf growing and rests, enclosed within the seed.

  • On germination of the seed the radicle first grows out, increasing in size as a whole, and soon adding to its tissues by cell division at its apical growing-point.

  • In other cases this growing-point becomes active at once, there being little or no elongation of the hypocotyl and tbe cotyledon or cotyledons remaining in the seed.

  • Its nutritive pabulum is supplied to it in the shape of certain complex organic substances which have been stored in some part or other of the seed, sometimes even in its own tissues, by the parent plant from which it springs.

  • If we go back to the first instance cited, the embryo in the seed and its development during germination, we can ascertain what is necessary for its life by inquiring what are the materials which are deposited in the seed, and which become exhausted by consumption as growth and development proceed.

  • In many aquatic plants, the endosperm of the seed is absent or very scanty.

  • The rows of cells from which the laticiferous vessels are formed can be distinguished in many cases in the young embryo while still in the dry seed (Scott), but the latex vessels in process of formation are more easily seen when germination has begun.

  • Adaptive characters are often hereditary, for instance, the seed of a parasite will produce a parasite, and the same is true of a carnivorous plant.

  • The ovule develops into the seed; and the gynaeceum and even more remote parts of the flower, develop into the fruit.

  • Travers picked up a seed of Edwardsia in the Chatham Islands, evidently washed ashore from New Zealand (Linn.

  • 31 a enlarged in the breeding season; in the sparrow, for instance, from the size of a mustard seed to that 'of a small cherry.

  • deep. Propagation is effected by seed or increase of corms; the seed should be sown as soon as it is ripe in June or July.

  • But when Greek deities were introduced into Rome on the advice of the Sibylline books (in 495 B.C., on the occasion of a severe drought), Demeter, the Greek goddess of seed and harvest, whose worship was already common in Sicily and Lower Italy, usurped the place of Ceres in Rome, or rather, to Ceres were added the religious rites which the Greeks paid to Demeter, and the mythological incidents which originated with her.

  • The principal crops in addition to wheat are oats, barley, maize, linseed and bird seed.

  • The name expresses the most universal character of the class, the importance of which was first noticed by John Ray, namely, the presence of a pair of seed-leaves or cotyledons, in the plantlet or embryo contained in the seed.

  • In germination of the seed the root of the embryo (radicle) grows out to get a holdfast for the plant; this is generally followed by the growth of the short stem immediately above the root, the so-called "hypocotyl," which carries up the cotyledons above the ground, where they spread to the light and become the first green leaves of the plant.

  • With an eye to the future, he published their Ratio disciplinae, collected money for the "Hidden Seed" still worshipping in secret in Moravia, and had his son-in-law, Peter Jablonsky, consecrated a bishop, and Peter passed on the succession to his son Daniel Ernest Jablonsky.

  • Of the "Hidden Seed" the greater number were Germans; they were probably descended from a colony of German Waldenses, who had come to Moravia in 1480 and joined the Church of the Brethren; and, therefore, when persecution broke out afresh they naturally fled to the nearest German refuge.

  • "The seed of our coming is from Hawaiki; the seed of our nourishing, the seed of mankind."

  • It bores through and enters the developing seed, where it undergoes a moult and becomes legless.

  • Riley, who finds that the young larva, hatched from the egg laid on the pod, has three pairs of legs, and that these are lost after the moult that occurs when the grub has bored its way into the seed.

  • In Great Britain the beetle, after completing its development, winters in the seed, waiting to emerge and lay its eggs on the blossom in the ensuing spring.

  • The strange contrast between the succession of dynasties and kings cut off by assassination in the northern kingdom, ending in the tragic overthrow of 721 B.C., and the persistent succession through three centuries of the seed of David on the throne of Jerusalem, as well as the marvellous escape of Jerusalem in 701 B.C. from the fate of Samaria, must have invested the seed of David in the eyes of all thoughtful observers with a mysterious and divine significance.

  • Ioo) clearly reveal the powerful revival of Messianic hopes of a national deliverer of the seed of David.

  • Raised from seed it may become a tree 40 to as much as 70 ft.

  • i, Male flower of Carex; 2, female flower of Carex; 3, seed of Carex, cut lengthwise.

  • The true seed of Israel separated themselves from all foreigners (not, however, without some opposition) and formed an exclusively religious body or " congregation."

  • His death prevented the achievement of his designs; but he had broken down the barrier, he had planted the seed of the Greek's influence in the four quarters of the Persian Empire.

  • The seeds, or properly fruits, are contained singly in a stony involucre or bract, which does not open until the enclosed seed germinates.

  • high and bears large pear-shaped fruits, green or deep purple in colour, with a firm yellowish-green marrow-like pulp surrounding a large seed.

  • But before he let her go Pluto made her eat the seed of a pomegranate, and thus she could not stay away from him for ever.

  • Sicily was a favourite haunt of the two 1 Some, however, regard Proserpina as a native Latin form, not borrowed from the Greek, and connected with proserpere, meaning the goddess who aided the germination of the seed.

  • Next came the sowing, the seed being pressed into the soil by the feet of sheep which were driven over the fields.

  • The seed appears to have been sometimes ploughed in, and at other times to have been covered by harrowing.

  • Some steep seed in soda and oil lees to get a larger produce.

  • Careful annual selection by hand of the best seed is the only way to prevent degeneration.

  • " At sowing do not plough large furrows, but little and well laid together, that the seed may fall evenly."

  • " Change your seed every year at Michaelmas, for the seed grown on other land will bring you more than that grown on your own."

  • It is next to be well ploughed and harrowed; and about 10 lb of clover seed must be sown on an acre in April or the end of March.

  • If you intend to preserve seed, then the second crop must be let stand till it come to a full and dead ripeness, and you shall have at the least five bushels per acre.

  • Being once sown, it will last five years; the land, when ploughed, will yield, three or four years together, rich crops of wheat, and after that a crop of oats, with which clover seed is to be sown again.

  • Under this management the produce seems to have been three times the seed; and yet, says the writer, " if in East Lothian they did not leave a higher stubble than in other places of the kingdom, their grounds would be in a much worse condition than at present they are, though bad enough."

  • In some years three or four sowings have to be made before a "plant" is produced, enormous loss in labour and cost of seed alone being thus involved.

  • Soaking the seed in strong-smelling substances, such as paraffin and turpentine, has been found efficacious, and in some districts paraffin sprayed over the seedlings has been practised with decided success.

  • In the genus Abies, the silver firs, the cones are erect, and their scales drop off when the seed ripens; the leaves spread in distinct rows on each side of the shoot.

  • C, Cone, seed and foliage.

  • D, Cone, seed and foliage.

  • C, Seed-bearing cone and a single scale with seed.

  • D, Seed and foliage.

  • Introduced into Britain at the beginning of the 17th century, the silver fir has become common there as a planted tree, though, like the Norway spruce, it rarely comes up from seed scattered naturally.

  • An active trade is carried on with Austria, especially through the Isakovets and Gusyatin custom-houses, corn, cattle, horses, skins, wool, linseed and hemp seed being exported, in exchange for wooden wares, linen, woollen stuffs, cotton, glass and agricultural implements.

  • Towards the city the red soil is intersected by creeks and morasses, whose margins yield crops of rice, mustard and til seed; while to the east of the town, a broad, alluvial, well-cultivated plain reaches as far as the junction of the Dhaleswari and Lakshmia rivers.

  • The general rule with regard to " waygoing crops " on arable farms is that the tenant is entitled to reap the crop sown before the term of removal (whether or not that be the natural termination of the lease), the right of exclusive possession being his during seed time.

  • Each fibre is formed by the outgrowth of a single epidermal cell of the testa or outer coat of the seed.

  • There remains one other important group, the so-called " kidney " cottons in which there are only long hairs, and the seed easily comes away clean as with " Sea Island," but, instead of each seed being separate, the whole group in each of the three compartments of the capsule is firmly united together in a more or less kidney-shaped mass.

  • By careful selection (the methods of which are described below) in the United States, the quality of the product was much improved, and on the recent revival of the cotton industry in the West Indies American " Sea Island " seed was introduced back again to the original home of the species.

  • During April (when the seed is usually sown) and May frequent light showers, which keep the ground sufficiently moist to assist germination and the growth of the young plants, are desired.

  • The seed is dropped from a planter, five or six seeds in a single line, at regular intervals i o to 1 2 in.

  • A narrow deep furrow is usually run immediately in advance of the planter, to break up the soil under the seed.

  • of seed cotton.

  • When this has been accomplished the weight of the crop is reduced to about one-third, each 100 lb of seed cotton as picked yielding after ginning some 33 lb of lint and 66 lb of cotton seed.

  • The separation of lint from seed is accomplished in various ways.

  • The most primitive is hand-picking, the fibre being laboriously pulled from off each seed, as still practised in parts of Africa.

  • It consists essentially of two rollers either both of wood, or one of wood and one of iron, geared to revolve in contact in opposite directions; the seed cotton is fed to the rollers, the lint is drawn through, and the seed being unable to pass between the rollers is rejected.

  • Formerly in Egypt the cotton was treated as a perennial, but this practice has been generally abandoned, and fresh plants are raised from seed each year, as in America; one great advantage is that more than one crop can thus be obtained each year.

  • The history of no agricultural product contains more of interest and instruction for the student of economics than does that of cotton seed in the United States.

  • Cotton seed in those days was the object of so much aversion that the planter burned it or threw it into running streams, as was most convenient.

  • If the seed were allowed to lie about, it rotted, and hogs and other animals, eating it, often died.

  • Although used in the early days to a limited extent as a food for milch cows and other stock, and to a larger extent as a manure, no systematic efforts were made anywhere in the South to manufacture the seed until the later 'fifties, when the first cotton seed mills were established.

  • Experience shows that 1000 lb of seed are produced for every 50o lb of cotton brought to market.

  • On the basis, therefore, of a cotton crop of io,000,000 bales of 500 lb each, there are produced 5,000,000 tons of cotton seed.

  • If about 3,000,000 tons only are pressed, there remain to be utilized on the farm 2,000,000 tons of cotton seed, which, if manufactured, would produce a total of $100,000,000 from cotton seed.

  • In contrast with the farmers of the 'sixties, the southern planter of the 10th century appreciates the value of his cotton seed, and farmers, too remote from the mills to get it pressed, now feed to their stock all the cotton seed they conveniently can, and use the residue either in compost or directly as manure.

  • The average of a large number of analyses of Upland cotton seed gives the following figures for its fertilizing constituents: - Nitrogen, 3.07%; phosphoric acid, 1.02%; potash, 1.17%; besides small amounts of lime, magnesia and other valuable but less important ingredients.

  • Sea Island cotton seed is rather more valuable than Upland: the corresponding figures for the three principal constituents being nitrogen 3.51, phosphoric acid 1 69, potash 1.59%.

  • Using average prices paid for nitrogen, phosphoric acid and potash when bought in large quantities and in good forms, these ingredients, in a ton of cotton seed, amount to $9.00 worth of fertilizing material.

  • Compared with the commercial fertilizer which the farmer has to buy, cotton seed possesses, therefore, a distinct value.

  • The products of cotton seed have become important elements in the national industry of the United States.

  • The main product is the refined oil, which is used for a great number of purposes, such as a substitute for olive oil, mixed with beef products for preparation of compound lard, which is estimated to consume one-third of cotton seed oil produced in the States.

  • In comparative valuations of feeding stuffs it has been found that cotton seed meal exceeds corn meal by 62%, wheat by 67%, and raw cotton seed by 26%.

  • Cotton seed meal, in the absence of sufficient stock to consume it, is also used extensively as a fertilizer, and for this purpose it is worth, determining the price on the same basis as used above for the seed, from $19 to $20 per ton.

  • Though it is probably destined to be used even more extensively as a fertilizer before the demand for it as a feeding stuff becomes equal to the supply, practically all the cotton seed meal of the south will ultimately be used for feeding.

  • With the consideration of cotton seed oil and meal we have not, however, exhausted its possibilities.

  • Cotton seed hulls constitute about half the weight of the ginned seed.

  • After the seed of Upland cotton has been passed through a fine gin, which takes off the short lint or linters left upon it by the farmer, it is passed through what is called a sheller, consisting of a revolving cylinder, armed with numerous knives, which cut the seed in two and force the kernels or meats from the shells.

  • It was not long, however, before the stock-feeder in the South found that cotton seed hulls were an excellent substitute for hay.

  • Careful attention is now given to the employment of the seed in new cotton countries, and oil expression is practised in the West Indies.

  • Hull is the principal seat of the industry in Great Britain, and enormous quantities of Indian and Egyptian cotton seed are imported and worked up.

  • The following diagram, modified from one by Grimshaw, in accordance with the results obtained by the better class of modern mills, gives an interesting resume of the products obtained from a ton of cotton seed: - Products from a Ton of Cotton Seed.

  • Cotton seed, 2000 pounds.

  • (Fuel.) (WinterCotton seed yellow stearin.) (Cattle food) with the meal.

  • It is easily transported from place to place in seed-cotton, and for this reason the Egyptian government in 1904 prohibited the importation of American cotton seed.

  • The Egyptian cotton seed bug or cotton stainer belongs to another genus, being Oxycarenus hyalinipennis.

  • They do considerable damage to cotton seed.

  • The seed was saved and gave rise to a row of plants all of which grew healthily in an infected field, whereas 95% of ordinary Sea Island cotton plants from seed from a non-infected field planted alongside as a control were killed.

  • Improvement of Cotton by Seed Selection.

  • These pickers go carefully over the field, usually just before the second picking, and gather ripe cotton from the best plants only; this selected seed cotton is ginned separately, and the seed used for sowing the next year's crop.

  • The cotton from each is collected and kept separately, and at the end of the season carefully examined and weighed, and a final selection is then made which reduces the number to perhaps five; the cotton from each of these plants is gained separately and the seed preserved for sowing.

  • One plant is selected again from these 500, and the general crop of seed is used to sow about five acres for the 3rd year, from which seed is obtained for the general crop in the 4th year.

  • Carolina; but, through the selection of seed from early maturing individual plants, the cotton has been rendered much earlier, until now it is thoroughly adapted to the existing conditions.

  • The custom of carefully selecting the seed has grown with the industry and may be said to be inseparable from it.

  • - Seed should be selected from early and late opening bolls, according to requirements.

  • - The method employed is to select, for seed purposes, plants which are resistant to the particular disease.

  • In some instances a slight difference in the shape, mode of opening, &c., of the boll prevents this, and accordingly seed is selected from bolls which suffer least under the particular adverse conditions.

  • Attention has been paid in the West Indies to seed selection, by the officers of the imperial Department of Agriculture, with the object of retaining for West Indian Sea Island cotton its place as the most valuable cotton on the British market.

  • A supply of seed of a high grade of Sea Island cotton was obtained from Colonel Rivers's estate in the Sea Islands, S.

  • Since about 1875 the Russians have fostered the industry, introducing American Upland varieties, distributing seed free, importing gins, providing instruction, and guaranteeing the purchase of the crops.

  • Financial assistance and assurances as to sales and prices have been given liberally by the association where they are needed; ginning and buying centres have been established; experts have been engaged to distribute seed and afford instruction; and some land has been acquired for working under the direct management of the association.

  • It is noticeable that it was on French soil that the seed had been sown.3 Preached on French soil by a pope of French descent, the Crusades began - and they continued - as essentially a French (or perhaps better Norman-French) enterprise; and the kingdom which they established in the East was essentially a French kingdom, in its speech and its customs, its virtues and its vices.

  • The Eastern mission had been begun by St Francis, who had visited and attempted to convert the sultan of Egypt during the Fifth Crusade (1220); within a hundred years the little seed had grown into a great tree.

  • Tobacco culture, which declined after 1860 on account of the competition of Cuba and Sumatra, has revived since 1885 through the introduction of Cuban and Sumatran seed; the product of 1907 (6,937,500 lb) was more than six times that of 1899, the product in 1899 (1,125,600 lb) being more than twice that of 1889 (470,443 lb), which in turn was more than twenty times that for 1880 (21,182 lb)-the smallest production recorded for many decades.

  • It is famed, as in ancient times, for kitchen-gardens, especially for its cucumbers and seed for canaries.

  • Friends have always held that war is contrary to the precepts and spirit of the Gospel, believing that it springs from the lower impulses of human nature, and not from the seed of divine life with its infinite capacity of response to the Spirit of God.

  • The last things and the end of the world are relegated to the close of a long period of time (3000 years after Zoroaster), when a new Saoshyant is to be born of the seed of the prophet, the dead are to come to life, and a new incorruptible world to begin.

  • It is convenient to place in a small envelope gummed to an upper corner of the sheet any flowers, seeds or leaves needed for dissection or microscopical examination, especially where from the fixation of the specimen it is impossible to examine the leaves for oilreceptacles and where seed is apt to escape from ripe capsules and be lost.

  • Of all the cane grown, an amount between one-sixth and one-quarter - and that the best - must be reserved for seed every other year, and this is a great handicap to the state in competing with other cane regions and with the sugar beet.

  • Many species are rich in gums and resins; the calambac, mastic, copal, cedar, &c. Many others are oleaginous, among them, peanuts, sun-flowers, the bene seed (sesame), corozo, almond and palmachristi.

  • After the Ten Year's War seed of Mexican and United States tobaccos was in great demand to re-seed the ruined vegas, and was introduced in great quantities; and although by a later law the destruction of these exotic species was ordered, that destruction was in fact quite impossible.

  • Ordinary commercial Cuban seed of to-day is largely, and often altogether, Mexican tobacco."

  • Machinery was lent to the farmers, and free grants of seed were made.

  • Seed is distributed, and agricultural machinery lent, by the government.

  • 1) having a thin outer skin (epicarp) enclosing the flesh of the peach (mesocarp), the inner layers of the carpel becoming woody to form the stone, while the ovule ripens into the kernel or seed.

  • It may, however, well be that both peach and almond are derived from some pre-existing and now extinct form whose descendants have spread over the whole geographic area mentioned; but this is a mere speculation, though indirect evidence in its support might be obtained from the nectarine, of which no mention is made in ancient literature, and which, as we have seen, originates from the peach and reproduces itself by seed, thus offering the characteristics of a species in the act of developing itself.

  • e, Skin or epicarp. m,Flesh or mesocarp. s, Stone or endocarp, within which is the seed or kernel.

  • The vegetable kingdom is the original source of albuminous substances, the albumins being found in greatest quantity in the seed.

  • The fruit is oblong, fleshy and contains one very hard seed which is deeply furrowed on the inside.

  • Hevea brasiliensis was introduced to Ceylon and Singapore from seedlings raised at Kew from Brazilian seed, specially collected by Mr H.

  • The 3, seed (2 nat.

  • The strained 4, seed.

  • (2) The Procharisteria at the end of winter, at which thanks were offered for the germination of the seed.

  • The white potato, known as " batata inglez " (English potato), is grown in elevated localities, but it deteriorates so greatly after the first planting that fresh imported seed is necessary every second or third year.

  • It has dull pink flowers, succeeded by seed vessels, each of which is crowned by two scarlet-coloured leafy lobes.

  • In this way was sown the seed of future trouble between the two races.

  • Embryo taken out of seed.

  • Seed cut lengthwise showing ment of flower.

  • Then some remedy had to be introduced which should be antagonistic, not to the disease in a physical sense, but to the spiritual seed of the disease.

  • All are sprung from the seed of Brahm.

  • When Prithi Chand represented that he ought to have received the turban bound on Guru Arjan's head in token of succession to his father, Arjan meekly handed it to him, without, however, bestowing on him the guruship. The Sikhs themselves soon revolted against the exactions of Prithi Chand, and prayed Arjan to assert himself else the seed of the True Name would perish.

  • vinifera, but show some very slight variations from the type of seed now prevalent.

  • This ripens into the berry and seed.

  • On the inner or central side of the seed is a ridge bounded on either side by a shallow groove.

  • This ridge indicates the point of union of the "raphe" or seed-stalk with the seed; it serves to distinguish the varieties of V.

  • In endeavouring to trace the filiation and affinities of the vine, the characters afforded by the seed are specially valuable, because they have not been wittingly interfered with by human agency.

  • At first these are marked only by small brown spots; but the spots spread and fuse together, the skin of the grape is destroyed, and the flesh decays, the seed only remaining apparently untouched.

  • This continues until the grape is reduced to a black hard mass, with the folds of skin pressed closely against the seed.

  • Production of flowers is uncertain under cultivation and seed is formed very rarely.

  • At the present day, thanks to the careful study of many years, the improvements of cultivation, the careful selection of seed and suitable manuring, especially with nitrate of soda, the average beet worked up contains 7% of fibre and 93% of juice, and yields in Germany 12.79% and in France 11.6% of its weight in sugar.

  • The method of using them most frequently adopted consists in applying them to the seeds of leguminous plants before sowing, the seed being dipped for a time in a liquid containing the bacteria.

  • In this manner organisms obtained from red clover can be grown and applied to the seed of red clover; and similar inoculation can be arranged for other species, so that an application of the bacteria most suited to the particular crop to be cultivated can be assured.

  • In many cases it has been found that inoculation, whether of the soil or of the seed, has not made any appreciable difference to the growth of the crop, a result no doubt due to the fact that the soil had already contained within it an abundant supply of suitable organisms. But in other instances greatly increased yields have been obtained where inoculation has been practised.

  • The seed is sown in nursery beds, and the plants set out in the field later.

  • Allowing for those which fail to germinate (perhaps 25%), loss in transplanting, weak and backward plants, &c., one ounce of seed should yield about 40,000 plants.

  • The greatest possible care is bestowed on the preparation of the seed bed - it must have good, very rich soil in fine tilth, be protected from winds, and yet well exposed to sunlight; the southern or south-eastern slope of an open place in a forest is often selected.

  • of seed.

  • about 120 days in all from the date the seed was sown.

  • When the plants show signs of flowering they are topped " to prevent seed formation, the terminal buds being removed, and only a certain number of leaves left on each plant to ripen.

  • The variations are classified as: (1) Variation in type due to crossing, change of soil and climate, especially, for example, when seed from the tropics is introduced to temperate regions.

  • (2) Variations within the type, due to natural tendency to vary, local conditions and maturity of seed.

  • When Cuban tobaccos were first introduced into Florida, the type broke up, but by carefully selecting the best plants and using them only as sources of seed for later crops, a good type was obtained.

  • No attempt should ever be made to raise large crops of tobacco from imported seed, but only a small crop, and the seed of the selected plants should be used for future propagation.

  • The successful production of cigar tobaccos from Cuban and Sumatran seed was a development of the late 19th century.

  • Grecian tobacco is grown from Turkish seed and closely resembles Turkish tobacco in character and uses.

  • South Africa, and to maintain the standard of the produce fresh supplies of seed were obtained annually from Turkey.

  • To guard against this competition, the export of tobacco seed from Turkey was prohibited in 1907.

  • The solitary seed has no perisperm or albumen, but has two large and curiously crumpled cotyledons concealing the plumule, the leaves of which, even at this early stage, show traces of pinnae.

  • Plants raised from the seed seldom become productive till they are twenty years old.

  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.

  • On the other hand the democratic tone which distinguishes Micah from Isaiah, and his announcement of the impending fall of the capital (the deliverance of which from the Assyrian appears to Isaiah as the necessary condition for the preservation of the seed of a new and better kingdom), are explained by the fact that, while Isaiah lived in the centre of affairs, Micah, a provincial prophet, sees the capital and the aristocracy entirely from the side of a man of the oppressed people, and foretells the utter ruin of both.

  • It is easily raised from seed and can also be propagated.

  • He planted the seed of the modern Liberal party as opposed to the pure Whigs.

  • It is " the selfexistent Lord," who, " with a thought, created the waters, and deposited in them a seed which became a golden egg, in which egg he himself is born as Brahma -, the progenitor of the worlds."4 The doctrine of creation by a thought is characteristically Indian.

  • In other species of the genus the seed germinates on a branch, and the seedling produces clasping roots, and roots which grow downwards hanging like stout cords, and ultimately reaching the ground.

  • 21 a by " Thou shalt not give any of thy seed to an Aramean woman to make her conceive " is censured, presumably because the prohibition of Molech worship is thereby ignored.

  • The following form which Seeberg gives as the creed of St Paul is an artificial combination of fragments of oral teaching, which naturally reappear in the teaching of St Peter, but finds no attestation in the later creeds of particular churches which would prove its claim to be their parent form: " The living God who created all things sent His Son Jesus Christ, born of the seed of David, who died for our sins according to the scriptures, and was buried, who was raised on the third day according to the scriptures, and appeared to Cephas and the XI I., who sat at the Der Katechismus der Urchristenheit, p. 85.

  • 7, Seed.

  • The tuft of hairs at the base facilitates rapid dispersion of the seed, early germination of which is rendered desirable owing to its tenuity.

  • Seed separated from the nut.

  • 6) received a new promise that the land would be given unto his seed.

  • 30) 2 the promise that his seed should possess the land seemed incapable of fulfilment.

  • As a reward for his obedience he received another promise of a numerous seed and abundant prosperity (xxii.

  • The principal exports of local produce are potatoes, cumin seed, vegetables, oranges, goats and sheep, cotton goods and stone.

  • 16) but "the rest of her seed," xii.

  • Representatives of all the new creeds hastened from the Continent to England, where they hoped to find a safe and fertile field for the particular seed they had to plant.

  • They are readily propagated by offsets or by seed.

  • The horse-drawn hoe is steered by means of handles in the rear, but its successful working depends on accurate drilling of the seed, because unless the rows are parallel the roots of the plants are liable to be cut and the foliage injured.

  • The seed, which should be plump, light in colour, with a thin skin covered by fine wrinkles, is sown in March and early April at the rate of from 8 to 2 pecks to the acre and lightly harrowed in.

  • All men have the same seed of evil in them that Adam had; they sin and die, like him.

  • Commercial cubebs consist of the dried berries, usually with their stalks attached; the pericarp is greyish-brown, or blackish and wrinkled; and the seed, when present, is hard, white and oily.

  • In its output of flax, grown almost entirely for the seed, the state held second rank with a product of 5,640,000 bush.

  • A considerable acreage is under beans, and in Thanet mustard, spinach, canary seed and a variety of other seeds are raised.

  • The phrase "to give one's seed to Molech" (Lev.

  • The flax is cultivated for the seed, and only slightly for the fibre.

  • In 1703 Samuel Morland, in a paper read before the Royal Society, stated that the farina (pollen) is a congeries of seminal plants, one of which must be conveyed into every ovum or seed before it can become prolific. In this remarkable statement he seems to anticipate in part the discoveries afterwards made as to pollen tubes, and more particularly the peculiar views promulgated by Schleiden.

  • He states that the germ is never to be seen in the seed till the apices (anthers) shed their dust; and that if the stamina be cut out before the apices open, the seed will either not ripen, or be barren if it ripens.

  • Botanists were for a long time content to know that the scattering of the pollen from the anther, and its application to the stigma, were necessary for the production of perfect seed, but the stages of the process of fertilization remained unexplored.

  • These are taken off and sown in drills, like seed.

  • Some varieties produce offsets sparingly and must be increased by seed - a slow and uncertain method.

  • New varieties are raised from seed.

  • Unless seed is required, the young capsules should be removed as.

  • Esparto may be raised from seed, but cannot be harvested for twelve or fifteen years after sowing.

  • Experiment showed that legitimate unions yield a larger quantity of seed than illegitimate.

  • 25 a popular etymology is given of his name - Adam's wife called his name Seth, "For God," saith she, "bath appointed, shath, me another seed instead of Abel."

  • The mention of Israel on the stele of Merenptah, discovered by Petrie in 1896 (" Israel [Ysirael] is desolated; its seed [or] is not "), is too vague and indefinite in its terms to throw any light on the question of the Exodus.

  • 16, where the argument rests upon the word " seed " (and not the plural " seeds ") in the proof-text, and the same word in Rabbinical writings is used to support other arguments.

  • During spring, autumn, and winter in particular, the blue-grass (Poa compressa and Poa pratensis) spreads a mat, green, thick, fine and soft, over much of the country, and it is a good winter pasture; about the middle of June it blooms, and, owing to the hue of its seed vessels, gives the landscape a bluish hue.

  • If Israel alone among nations can meet the Assyrian with the boast "with us is God," the reason is that in Zion the true God is known' - not indeed to the mass, but to the prophet, and that the "holy seed" 2 or "remnant" (contained in the name Shear yashubh) which forms the salt of the nation.

  • 13, "a holy seed is its stock," is rejected by many critics (Duhm, Cheyne, Marti and others) as a later insertion.

  • In Isaiah's days the answer had been affirmative; there appeared to be at least a potentiality of national regeneration in the holy seed when once it should be cleansed from the chaff by a work of judgment.

  • The fruit is about the size of a small hen's egg, and within its fibrous rind is the seed or so-called nut, the albumen of which is very hard and has a prettily mottled grey and brown appearance.

  • Maize or Indian corn was cultivated on patches of ground where, as in the Hindu jam, the trees and bushes were burnt and the seed planted in the soil manured by the ashes.

  • The fruits are free in clusters, and each is drawn out into a long wing with the seed in the middle.

  • Flowering plants bear a seed containing an embryo, with usually one or two cotyledons, or seed-leaves; while in flowerless plants there is no seed and therefore no true cotyledon.

  • Both bear their round or ovoid male catkins at the ends of the slender terminal branchlets; the ovoid cones, either terminal or on short lateral twigs, have thick woody scales dilated at the extremity, with a broad disk depressed in the centre and usually furnished with a short spine; at the base of the scales are from three to seven ovules, which become reversed or partially so by compression, ripening into small angular seed with a narrow wing-like expansion.

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