How to use Sea-level in a sentence

sea-level
  • In January 1893 ice was found at sea-level.

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  • In various regions, especially in France and Italy, great quantities of ice form in caves, which, in virtue of their depth below the earth's surface, their height above the sea-level, or their exposure to suitable winds, or to two or more of these conditions in combination, are unaffected by ordinary climatic changes, so that the mean annual temperature is sufficiently low to ensure the permanency of the ice.

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  • In the north-east is a larger lake, Lake Antoine, also occupying a crater, but it lies almost at the sea level.

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  • Its limits follow the coast-line more or less closely, the space between it and the sea often broadening out into low-lying tracts not much raised above the sea-level.

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  • North-western Tasmania in Pleistocene times had an._ extensive series of glaciers, of which the lower moraines were deposited only about 400 feet above sea level.

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  • Those living in areas below sea level were most affected by the tsunami. 

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  • It has been suggested that where there is low sediment supply mangrove accretion may not be able to keep pace with projected sea-level rises.

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  • The central acropolis is approximately 900 feet above sea level.

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  • Extending upward from sea level to 10,000 feet, the efficient zone provides aircrews with a near-ideal physiological environment.

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  • For many decades it rests quietly in the damp cellars below sea level.

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  • The activities consisted of kayaking, sea level traversing and rock climbing, as well as problem solving and team games.

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  • There are also indirect relationships between climate change and the mangrove ecosystem through changes in sea level.

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  • One gallon of aviation gasoline that has completely evaporated will form about 30 cubic feet of vapor at sea level.

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  • Sussex's field class to Nova Scotia examines aspects of its glacial history, sea-level change and coastal geomorphology.

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  • The cluster of beehive huts is reached up slate steps 700 feet above sea level.

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  • We are all mountain people Whether we live at sea level or at the highest elevations, we are all mountain people.

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  • The frost eroded limestone is littered with coral and sea shell fossils confirming this raised mountain was once below sea level.

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  • The participants included not only archeologists and historians but also naval architects and specialists in sea-level studies.

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  • For example, atmospheric pressure is greater at sea-level than on a mountain top.

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  • Intercalation of shallow marine deposits with these two units indicating active sedimentation during falling sea-level.

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  • These authors therefore suggest that sedimentation has kept pace with sea-level rise over recent millennia.

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  • Sample results of the STM modeling are presented in Figure 3. All simulations show that sea-level rise promotes physical changes in island shorelines.

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  • Toward the end of the Triassic, sea-level started to rise and a warm, shallow sea developed over what is now southern England.

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  • Both of the latter types of deposits are rarely exposed at the sea bed, and probably pre-date the Holocene sea-level transgression.

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  • Now, we may select any definite quantity of work we please as our unit, as, for example, the work done in lifting a pound a foot high from the sea-level in the latitude of London, which is the unit of work generally adopted by British engineers, and is called the "foot-pound."

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  • The actual elevation of a summit above sea-level does not necessarily affect its mountainous character; a gentle eminence, for instance, rising a few hundred feet above a tableland, even if at an elevation of say 15,000 ft., could only be called a hill.

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  • The great elevations above the sea-level of the central part of Asia, and of the table-lands of Afghanistan and Persia, tend to exaggerate the winter cold; while the sterility of the surface, due to the small rainfall over the same region, operates powerfully in the opposite direction in increasing the summer heat.

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  • Apart from the effects of varying precipitation and evaporation the atmosphere affects sea-level also by its varying pressure, the difference in level of the sea-surface from this cause between two given points being thirteen times as great as the difference between the corresponding readings of the mercurial barometer.

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  • Various oaks descend within a few hundred feet of the sea-level, increasing in numbers at greater altitudes, and becoming very frequent at 4000 ft., at which elevation also appear Aucuba, Magnolia, cherries, Pyrus, maple, alder and birch, with many Araliaceae, Hollbollea, Skimmia, Daphne, Myrsine, Symplocos and Rubus.

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  • Large quartzite boulder beaches lie stranded up to 50M above the current sea level.

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  • Simulations on over fifteen reef island settings found maximum shoreline erosion between three and thirty meters for a one meter increase in sea level.

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  • The expected sea-level rise will cause shortage of sediment in the coastal area, resulting in shoreline retreat.

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  • Coastal squeeze occurs where fixed sea defenses prevent the natural migration of saltmarsh inland as estuaries become subject to sea level rise.

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  • Other means for dating changes in relative sea level can be obtained from subaqueous speleothems.

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  • It is triangular in form, rising very gradually from the sea-level to a height of about three hundred feet.

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  • The course although based at 800 foot above sea level is of a slightly undulating nature with no tiring inclines.

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  • Only 500 of the beautiful Ethiopian wolves survive, high in the Bale Mountains, which are 3,000m above sea level.

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  • The z co-ordinate is the height of the camera lens above sea level.

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  • Warmer polar winters will result in melting sea ice, which will cause a rise in sea level.

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  • This thermal expansion is increasing due to warmer global temperatures, and accounts for approximately half of sea level rise.

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  • The highest point of the islands is only eight feet above sea level and it is feared that rising waters will eventually cover the islands completely.

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  • Its base elevation of 7,870 feet and a summit of 9,900 feet makes it a good place to acclimate if you are coming from sea level.

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  • Vail is at a slightly lower elevation than most Colorado resorts, and may be most suitable for people coming from sea level.

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  • Eremurus Aitchisonii - A fine kind from Afghanistan, where it grows on ridges of the hills nearly 12,000 feet above sea-level, bearing in June dense spikes of pale reddish flowers, robust, and on stems from 3 to 5 feet high.

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  • A caespitosa is a rose-colored kind from the south of Europe, 5000 to 8000 feet above sea-level.

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  • It shows you how much time has elapsed during flight, the status of your landing gear and throttle, a damage meter, a sea level altimeter, and airspeed indicator and a fuel gauge.

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  • They also have the advantage of being unaffected by atmospheric pressure, which is important when cooking and baking in geographic areas that are mountainous or considerably below sea level.

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  • Participants also get the chance to drive through Imogene Pass, which is more than 13,000 feet above sea level.

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  • Above sea-level, the climate is hot, humid and unhealthy, and the conditions for permanent settlement are apparently unfavourable.

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  • Fresh water, rising and falling with the tide, is found in certain large caverns in Lifu, and by sinking to the sea-level a supply may be obtained in any part of the island.

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  • The country round Lake Eyre, where some of the land is actually below sea-level, comes under this heading.

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  • Some of these lake-beds are at or slightly below sea-level, so that a very slight depression of the land to the south of them would connect much of the interior with the Southern Ocean.

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  • These marine deposits are not found anywhere along the eastern coast of Australia; but they occur, and reach about the same height above sea-level, in New Guinea, and are widely developed in New Zealand.

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  • The contour lines showing the heights above sea-level are the directions along which species spread to form zones.

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  • The increasing number of measurements of the height of land in all continents and islands, and the very detailed levellings in those countries which have been thoroughly surveyed, enable the average elevation of the land above sea-level to be fairly estimated, although many vast gaps in accurate knowledge remain, and the estimate is not an exact one.

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  • The actual position of sea-level lies so near the summit of the crust-heap that the varied relief of the upper portion leads to the formation of a complicated coast- The con- line and a great number of detached portions of land.

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  • The typical continental form is triangular as regards its sea-level outline.

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  • The relief of the surface typically includes a central plain, Homology sometimes dipping below sea-level, bounded by lateral Homology of con- h i ghlands or mountain ranges, loftier on one side than.

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  • In some cases the depths are stated with reference to sea-level, instead of being taken from the surface, thus greatly facilitating the utilization of the records.

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  • In the use of ammeters in which the control is the gravity of a weight, such as the Kelvin ampere balances and other instruments, it should be noted that the scale reading or indication of the instrument will vary with the latitude and with the height of the instrument above the mean sea-level.

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  • The average elevation of the surface of the state above the sea-level is less than that of any other state except Louisiana, but there is not the monotony of unbroken level which descriptions and maps often suggest.

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  • Its highest elevation above sea-level is about 300 ft.

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  • Its depth is 213 ft., and its height above sea-level 3z ft.; it has no natural outlet.

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  • In the north along the shores of Smith Sound these traces of the gradual upheaval of the land, or sinking of the sea, are very marked; but they are also very distinct in the south, although not found so high above sea-level, which seems to show that the upheaval has been greater in the north.

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  • In Pleistocene times, then, when there were prolonged glacial ages, the sea-level was lowered and at the same time there was a reduction in sea temperature, so that the rate of reproduction of the coral polypes, and so the growth of reefs, was diminished.

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  • When the warmer interglacial periods recurred the polar and continental ice-caps melted and the sea-level became raised again - that is, there was submergence of the eroded plateaux formed as indicated above.

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  • The height of Thames Head above sea-level is 35 6 ft., but that of Seven Springs, the adoption of which as the source would extend the length of the river by several miles, is 700 ft.

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  • In some parts of southern Brazil the fruits and vegetables of the temperate zone do well, but within the tropics they thrive well only at a considerable elevation above sea-level.

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  • Lying for the most part below sea-level, the islands are protected by a continuous line of artificial dikes, which hide them from view on the seaward side, whence only an occasional church steeple is seen.

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  • There are signs that this coastal strip was until a geologically recent period below sea-level; and that the coast-line is still receding is evidenced by the history of the town of Muza, once a flourishing port, now 20 m.

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  • It may be described as a flat, open country, hemmed in by mountains on the north, west and south, but opening eastwards on to the great plain of the Carnatic; the average height of the plain above sea-level is about 900 ft.

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  • In KiushiO, Shikoku and the southern half of the main island, the months of July and August alone are marked by oppressive heat at the sea-level, while in elevated districts a cool and even bracing temperature may always be found, though the direct rays of the sun retain distressing power.

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  • The larger part of the water supply, however, is now derived by pumping from strata at about sea-level.

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  • The honeycomb of rock, and capillary action, retard the lighter fresh-water from sinking to the sea; the soakage from rain has therefore to move horizontally, over the strata about sea-level, seeking outlets.

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  • The regular tides are hardly perceptible, but, under the influence of barometric pressure and wind, the sea-level occasionally varies as much as ft.

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  • The plain lying between this coast range and the Andes dips below sea-level in the gulfs of Ancud and Corcovado (average width, 30 m.).

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  • But as things are the watersurface is broken by land, and the mean density of the substance of the land is 2 6 times as great as that of sea-water, so that the gravitational attraction of the land must necessarily cause a heaping up of the sea around the coasts, forming what has been called the continental wave, and leaving the sea-level lower in mid-ocean.

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  • Atmospheric precipitation poured into the sea by the great rivers must necessarily create a permanent rise of the sea-level at their mouths, and from this cause the level round the coasts of rainy lands must be greater than in mid-ocean.

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  • Wind also gives rise to differences of level by driving the water before it, and the prevailing westerly wind of the southern Baltic is the chief cause of the sea-level at Kiel being 51 in.

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  • Kriimmel has calculated the mean depth to be 2010 fathoms (12,060 ft.), while the mean elevation of the surface of the continents above sea-level is only 2300 ft.

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  • Nevertheless, the greatest depths of the ocean below sea-level and the greatest heights of the land above it are of the same order of magnitude, the summit of Mount Everest rising to 29,000 ft.

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  • The timber trees found towards the interior, and on the higher elevations, are of great size and beauty, the most valuable being teak (Tectona grandis), then-gan (Hopea odorata), ka-gnyeng (Dipterocarpus laevis), &c. The coast-line of the district, off which lies an archipelago of two hundred and seven islands, is much broken, and for several miles inland is very little raised above sea-level, and is drained by numerous muddy tidal creeks.

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  • The latter drains an enormous tract of country, which is so little elevated above the sea-level that it can never be of any agricultural or commercial value.

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  • The elevation of the city above sea-level is 7415 ft., only a few feet above the level of Lake Texcoco.

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  • Occupying 135 degrees of latitude, living on the shores of frozen or of tropical waters; at altitudes varying from sea-level to several thousands of feet; in forests, grassy prairies or deserts; here starved, there in plenty; with a night here of six months' duration, there twelve hours long; here among health-giving winds, and there cursed with malaria - this brown man became, in different culture provinces, brunette or black, tall or short, long-headed or short-headed, and developed on his own hemisphere variations from an average type.

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  • The marsh, drained by many channels, seldom rises over a dozen feet above sea-level.

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  • Its height above the sea-level is only 682 ft., so that it is said to be the lowest spot in Switzerland.

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  • Hence the Pacific basin may be regarded as a stable and homogeneous geographical unit, clearly marked off round nearly all its margin by steep sharp slopes, extending in places through the whole known range of elevation above sea-level and of depression below it - from the Cordilleras of South America to the island chains of Siberia and Australia.

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  • The coral islands are generally of the form well known under the name of atoll, rising but slightly above sea-level, flat, and generally of annular form, enclosing a lagoon.

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  • Owing to their tropical heat, low elevation above sea-level, and marshy soil, they are thinly peopled, and contain few important towns except the seaports.

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  • The maturely dissected and recently glaciated uplands of New England are now somewhat depressed with respect to sea-level, so that the sea enters the valleys, forming bays and estuaries, while the interfiuve uplands and hills stand forth in headlands and islands.

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  • The coastal lowland between the sea arms is so flat that, although distinctly above sea-level, vegetation hinders drainage and extensive swamps or pocossins occur.

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  • The intermont plains are at all altitudes from sea-level to 4000 ft.; the plateaus from 5000 to 10,000 ft.; and the mountains from 8000 to 14,000 ft.

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  • One of the southwestern basins, with its floor below sea-level, has a plain of salt in its centre.

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  • Most of the plains are underlain by Cretaceous and early Tertiary shales and sandstones lying nearly unaltered and undisturbed where they were deposited, although now raised far above sea-level, particularly along the border of the Rocky Mountains where they were thrust up into foot-hills when the range itself was raised.

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  • Not far from Turin are also the castles of Moncalieri, Stupinigi, Rivoli, Racconigi, Agle, Venaria, and the ancient monastery of the Sagra di San Michele (753 metres above sea-level), famous for its view of the Alps as far as the beginning of the Lombard plain.

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  • The Leicester system is used because the greater part of the sewers are below sea-level, and it is necessary to use powerful pumps.

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  • Geologically and structurally Cyrenaica is a mass of Miocene limestone tilted up steeply from the Mediterranean and falling inland by a gentle descent to sea-level again at the line of depression, which runs from the gulf of Sidra through Aujila to Siwa.

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  • This plain, though broken in its southern portion by low hills, has generally an elevation of only a few hundred feet above sea-level.

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  • Mauna Loa (" Great Mountain "), on the S., is by far the largest volcano in the world; from a base measuring at sea-level about 75 m.

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  • On the leeward side, from near the sea level to elevations of 1500 ft., and on ground that was formerly barren, the algaroba tree has formed dense forests since its introduction in 1837.

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  • Andalusia consists of a great plain, the valley of the Guadalquivir, shut in by mountain ranges on every side except the S.W., where it descends to the Atlantic. This lowland, which is known as Andalucia Baja, or Lower Andalusia, resembles the valley of the Ebro in its slight elevation above sea-level (300-400 ft.), and in the number of brackish lakes or fens, and waste lands (despoblados) impregnated with salt, which seem to indicate that the whole surface was covered by the sea at no distant geological date.

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  • A few large streams enter the lower Apure from the south, but they are frequently entangled in lateral canals, due to the slight elevation of the plains above sea-level, the waters of the Apure, especially during flood time, having opened a great number of canos before reaching the Orinoco.

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  • After the folding the whole region was worn down nearly to sea-level, forming a low plain which bevelled across the geological structure of the entire state, including the Piedmont area to the south-east and the plateau area to the north-west.

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  • The third division of the province comprises by far the largest area, that, namely, which lies at or below sea-level.

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  • It is an error to suppose that these are indicated by absolute height above the sea-level.

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  • The circumstance that so much of Holland is below the sea-level necessarily exercises a very important influence on the drainage, the climate and the sanitary conditions of the country, as well as on its defence by means of inundation.

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  • It has been shown that the western provinces of Holland may be broadly defined as lying below sea-level.

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  • It lies on a plateau about 880 ft., above sea-level and commands pleasant views of diversified scenery.

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  • Lakes Superior and Huron both reach depths hundreds of feet below sea-level, but the next lake in the series, St Clair, towards which Lake Huron drains southward through St Clair river, is very shallow and marshy.

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  • This consists in a sudden rise of the sea-level, occasionally to the height of 3 ft., sometimes occurring only once, sometimes repeated at intervals of a minute for two hours, or even, at Mazzara, where it is most frequently observed, for twenty-four hours together.

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  • Marsala wine is a product of the western vineyards situated slightly above sea-level.

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  • In the north of the Delta, however, there was a sinking of the land, in consequence of which the accumulations on some of the ancient sites there extend below the present sea-level.

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  • The whole region is below sea-level, and save for the gap mentioned is encircled by the Libyan hills.

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  • The mountains in fact have been hewn out of the original bulk of the land in proportion as the valleys have been excavated_ The denudation would continue so long as the ground stood above the level of the sea; but there have been prolonged periods of depression, when the ground, instead of being eroded, lay below the sea-level and was buried sometimes under thousands of feet of accumulated sediment, which completely filled up and obliterated the previous drainage-lines.

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  • In the north-western counties, where the glaciers continued longest to descend to the sea-level, lakes retained by moraine-barriers may be found very little above the sea.

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  • The bed of the North Sea, which at no distant date in geological history was a land surface across which plants and animals migrated freely into Great Britain, sank beneath the sea-level, while the Atlantic advanced upon the western margin of the continent and filled the seaward ends of what had previously been valleys open to the sun.

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  • The average elevation above sea-level is about 600 ft.; the highest elevation is Charles Mound (1257 ft.), on the IllinoisWisconsin boundary line, one of a chain of hills that crosses Jo Daviess, Stephenson, Winnebago, Boone and McHenry counties.

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  • The surface is for the most part undulating, but on the whole little above sea-level; the highest elevations are in the south-east, where Cretaceous hills (the oldest geological formation on the island) reach heights of upwards of 350 ft.

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  • The coral banks which surround Sokotra and The Brothers are united and are not more than 30 fathoms below sea-level; a valley some loo fathoms deep divides them from the bank around Abd-el-Kuri, while between Abd-el-Kuri and Cape Guardafui are depths of over 500 fathoms.

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  • It was not till the Tertiary age, and even late in that age, that much of the land area of Afghanistan was raised above the sea-level.

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  • Sea-level is the assumed mean level of the sea, serving as a datum from which to calculate the elevation of land in surveying.

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  • But this elevation was not considered sufficient by Gay-Lussac, who therefore made a second ascent by himself on the 16th of September, when the balloon rose 7016 metres (about 23,000 ft.) above sea-level.

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  • The height of the town above the sea-level is 1788 ft.

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  • After the plain had been raised above sea-level to a higher elevation than it now occupies, it was much dissected by streams and then depressed, allowing the sea to invade the stream valleys.

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  • They burrow in the sands of every shore; they throng the weeds between tide-marks; they ascend all streams; they are found in deep wells, in caverns, in lakes; in Arctic waters they swarm in numbers beyond computation; they find lodgings on crabs, on turtles, on weed-grown buoys; they descend into depths of the ocean down to hundreds or thousands of fathoms; they are found in mountain streams as far above sea-level as some of their congeners live below it.

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  • If the sea be imagined as rising ioo ft., a new coast-line, with bays and estuaries indented in the valleys, would appear at the new sea-level.

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  • The western half of the province is flat and often below sea-level.

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  • Huaraz is situated in a narrow fertile valley of the Western Cordillera, at a considerable elevation above sea-level, and has a mild climate.

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  • In addition the purer and rarefied air of the Swiss mountains seems to produce a sense of exhilaration which is not felt nearer the sea-level.

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  • In some persons rarefied air is too stimulating, so that they find difficulty in sleeping, and for those who suffer from insomnia a warm moist air nearer the sea-level is preferable.

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  • The surface is irregular, with altitudes ranging from about sea-level to 900 ft.

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  • It is derived from springs which burst through the beds below sea-level with such force as to retain their freshness in the midst of the surrounding salt water.

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  • Few other regions have so many large lakes so variously ' This condition results from the fact that Maine and the adjacent region were worn down nearly to sea-level by stream erosion, except certain peaks and ridges inland; then the region was elevated and numerous river valleys were cut down below the general erosion surface formed before.

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  • Further evidence of this uplift is found in old beach lines now well above sea-level.

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  • The height of the parish church above the sea-level is 3468 ft.

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  • This remarkable phenomenon is explained by the position of Aussa in the centre of a saline lacustrine depression several hundred feet below sea-level.

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  • Its maximum recorded depth is 1008 ft., and its height above mean sea level is 602 ft., or about 21 ft.

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  • The outstanding orographic feature of the country is the terrace-formation of the land, which rises from sea-level by well-marked steps to the immense plateau which forms seven-eighths of South Africa.

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  • Perennial springs of large volume rarely occur in Great Britain at a sufficient height to afford supplies by gravitation; but from the limestones of Italy and many other parts of the world very considerable volumes issue far above the sea-level, and are thus available, without pumping, for the supply of distant towns.

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  • The crust of the earth, so far as it is permeable and above the sea-level, receives from rainfall its supply of fresh water.

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  • It would slowly, but constantly, percolate downwards and towards the sea, and would ooze out at or below the sea-level, rarely regaining the earth's surface earlier except in deep valleys.

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  • Precisely the same thing happens in the actual crust of the earth, except that, in the formations usually met with, the strata are so irregularly permeable that no such uniform percolation occurs, and most of the water, instead of oozing out near the sea-level, meets with obstructions which cause it to issue, sometimes below the sea-level and sometimes above it, in the form of concentrated springs.

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  • On the upheaval of such rocks above the sea-level, fresh water from rainfall began to flow over their exposed surfaces, and, so far as the strata were permeable, to lie in their interstices upon the salt water.

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  • The weight of the water original salt water above the sea-level, and of the fresh below water so superimposed upon it, caused an overflow towards the sea.

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  • Here water is maintained above the sea-level by the annual rainfall, and may be drawn off by wells or borings.

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  • On such an island, in the centre of which a borehole is put down, brackish water may be reached far below the sea-level; the salt water forming a saucer, as it were, in which the fresh water lies.

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  • Such a saltwater saucer of fresh water is maintained full to overflowing by the rainfall, and owing to the frictional resistance of the sand and to capillary action and the fact that a given column of fresh water is balanced by a shorter column of sea water, the fresh water never sinks to the mean sea-level unless artificially abstracted.

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  • The mean sea-level is shown by the horizontal line aa, dotted where it passes through the land, and the natural mean level of saturation bb, above the sea-level, by a curved dot and dash line.

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  • The water, contained in the interstices of the sand above the mean sea-level, would (except in so far as a film, coating the sand particles, is held up by capillary attraction) gradually sink to the sea-level if there were no rainfall.

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  • For small supplies such a well may be perfectly successful; but however small the quantity drawn, it must obviously have the effect of diminishing the volume of fresh water, which contributes to the maintenance of the level of saturation above the sea-level; and with further pumping the fresh water would be so far drawn upon that the mean level of saturation would sink, first to a curved figure - a cone of depression - such as that represented by the new level of saturation dd, and later to the figure represented by the lines ee, in which the level of saturation has everywhere been drawn below the mean sea-level.

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  • The general lesson to be learned from these facts is, that if the purity of the water of any well not far removed from the sea is to be maintained, that water must not be pumped down much below the sea-level.

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  • Its elevation above sea-level is only 105 ft., and its climate is hot but not unhealthy.

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  • Its elevation above mean sea-level is 573 ft.; and its surface is nearly 9 ft.

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  • At the Manu junction the elevation above sea-level is 1070 ft., the river width 30oft., depth 8 ft., current 14 m.

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  • Chandless found its elevation above sea-level to be only 107 ft.

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  • The actual elevation of the canal above sea-level is not known, but is of primary importance to the study of the hydrography of South America.

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  • There are a few plains, like that of David, in Chiriqui province, but irregular surface is normal; and this irregularity is the result of very heavy rains with a consequent extremely developed drainage system cutting river valleys down nearly to the sea-level, and of marine erosion, as may be seen by the bold and rugged islands, notably those in the Gulf of Panama.

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  • Its height above mean sea-level is 315 ft.

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  • The average elevation above the sea-level is 1640 ft.; the lowest point is at Bottingen (410 ft.), where the Neckar quits the country; the highest is the Katzenkopf (3775 ft.), on the Hornisgrinde, on the western border.

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  • In its lowest parts this plain barely keeps above sea-level, but it rises gradually towards the interior, terminating in a ramification of valleys.

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  • The glaciers of the north-west peninsula also descend nearly to sea-level.

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  • The barometric pressure at sea-level in the south-west of Iceland during the period 1878-1900 varied between 30.8 and 27.1 in.

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  • It cannot be stated with the same definiteness that we can assign heights to our terrestrial mountains, because there is no fixed sea-level on the moon to which elevations can be referred.

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  • At the base of the cliffs in some places are narrow fringes of beach a few feet above the sea-level.

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  • They are divided by picturesque valleys, which, in same instances, have been cut down to sea-level and afford landing-places.

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  • Taking a stand near Lake Fergus, to the east of Lake St Clair, the observer will find himself nearly in the centre of an extensive plateau, with an elevation, especially on the northern side, of between three and five thousand feet above the sea-level.

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  • The reserve appears to be the best preserved fragment of ocean crust known above sea level.

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  • In order to adapt this formula to logarithms, we introduce a subsidiary angle p, such that cot p = cot l cos t; we then have cos D = sin 1 cos( - p) I sin p. In the above formulae our earth is assumed to be a sphere, but when calculating and reducing to the sea-level, a base-line, or the side of a primary triangulation, account must be taken of the spheroidal shape of the earth and of the elevation above the sealevel.

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  • On a Tibet Tour, you will travel almost 12,000 feet above sea-level to visit the land of Tibet, roof of the world.

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