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scotch

scotch

scotch Sentence Examples

  • Yes, I am going to need a lot of scotch, please.

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  • Approaching from behind, she noticed a bottle of scotch on the table, along with the two glasses.

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  • They'd make it a game night or sit around getting wasted on twenty-year old scotch recounting countless, crazy times they had through the years.

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  • He began drinking the scotch fast, hoping to find some reprieve.

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  • Normally, he would have had a bottle of scotch and some ice sent to the room, but today there was no time.

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  • Oooh, a scotch drinker.

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  • Great, scotch neat please.

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  • He'd opened a fresh bottle of scotch.

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  • Dude, I really think it would help if you drank that scotch.

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  • Staring through her, he took a long drink of scotch.

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  • No, I need scotch.

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  • Jackson noticed the tremor in Connor's hands, so poured him a scotch.

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  • Fred took a long drink from the scotch.

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  • Fred took another swig from the scotch.

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  • Later, after everyone had gone, Dean sent out for pizza and both men knocked off a large pie with the works and enough scotch to get silly.

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  • He belonged to a noble family of Scotch descent, tracing its origin to Walter Stutt, who in 1420 accompanied the earls of Buchan and Douglas to the court of France, and whose family afterwards rose to be counts of Tracy.

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  • To English people, therefore, the Presbyterian is still the "Scotch Church," and they are as a whole slow to connect themselves with it.

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  • At Charleston a mixed congregation of Scotch Presbyterians and English Puritans was organized in 1690.

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  • The Presbyterians from the Scotch Established Church combined with the American Presbyterian Church, but the separating churches of Scotland organized independent bodies.

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  • The Anti-Burgher Synod sent Alexander Gellatly and Andrew Arnot in 1752, and two years later they organized the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania; they were joined in 1757 by the Scotch Church in New York City, which.

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  • The Burgher Synod in 1764 sent Thomas Clarke of Ballybay, Ireland, who settled at Salem, Washington county, New York, and in 1776 sent David Telfair, of Monteith, Scotland, who preached in Philadelphia; they united with the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania; in 1771 the Scotch Synod ordered the presbytery to annul its union with the Burghers, and although Dr Clarke of Salem remained in the Associate Presbytery, the Burgher ministers who immigrated later joined the Associate Reformed Church.

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  • Ministers and people with few exceptions - the most notable being the Scotch Highlanders who had settled in the valley of the Mohawk in New York and on Cape Fear river in North Carolina - sided with the patriot or Whig party: John Witherspoon was the only clergyman in the Continental Congress of 1776, and was otherwise a prominent leader; John Murray of the Presbytery of the Eastward was an eloquent leader in New England; and in the South the Scotch-Irish were the backbone of the American partisan forces, two of whose leaders, Daniel Morgan and Andrew Pickens, were Presbyterian elders.

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  • In 1782 the presbyteries of the Associate and Reformed churches united, forming the Associate and Reformed Synod of North America; but as there were a few dissenters in both bodies the older Associate and Reformed Presbyteries remained as separate units - the Associate Presbytery continued to exist under the same name until 1801, when it became the Associate Synod of North America; in 1818 it ceased to be subordinate to the Scotch General Synod.

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  • The oak requires shelter in the early stages of growth; in England the Scotch pine is thought best for this purpose, though Norway spruce answers as well on suitable ground, and larch and other trees are sometimes substituted.

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  • HUGH SWINTON LEGARE (1797-1843), American lawyer and statesman, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, on the 2nd of January 1797, of Huguenot and Scotch stock.

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  • Conifers are rare, and the Scotch pine, which is abundant on the sandy plains, takes the place of the Abies.

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  • The Scotch pine still grows on all sandy spaces, and the maple (Acer tatarica and A.

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  • at the Hague, and took part in the expedition to Scotland and the Scotch invasion of England in 1652.

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  • ROBERT RAINY (1826-1906), Scotch Presbyterian divine, was born on the 1st of January 1826; his father, Dr Harry Rainy, professor of forensic medicine in Glasgow University, was the son of a Sutherlandshire minister.

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  • He had come to the front as a champion of the liberal party in the Union controversy within the Free Church, and in combating Dean Stanley's Broad Church views in the interests of Scotch evangelicism; and about 1875 he became the undisputed leader of the Free Church.

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  • At the age of fourteen he was permitted by Scotch law to name his own curators, or guardians, and selecting William Pitt and Dundas for this office he spent much of his time at their houses, thus meeting many of the leading politicians of the day.

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  • Moreover, he wrote an article in the Edinburgh Review of July 1805 criticizing Sir William Gill's Topography of Troy, and these circumstances led Lord Byron to refer to him in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers as "the travell'd thane, Athenian Aberdeen."

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  • In 1840 he introduced a bill to settle the vexed question of patronage; but disliked by a majority in the general assembly of the Scotch church, and unsupported by the government, it failed to become law, and some opprobrium was cast upon its author.

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  • FIR, the Scandinavian name originally given to the Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris), but at present not infrequently employed as a general term for the whole of the true conifers (Abietineae); in a more exact sense, it has been transferred to the "spruce" and "silver firs," the genera Picea and A bies of most modern botanists.

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  • A variety of the spruce, abounding in some parts of Nor way, produces a red heartwood, not easy to distinguish from that of the Norway B pine (Scotch fir), and imported with it into England as "red deal" or "pine."

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  • The spruce bears the smoke of great cities better than most of the Abietineae; but in suburban localities after a certain age it soon loses its healthy appearance, and is apt to be affected with blight (Eriosoma), though not so much as the Scotch fir and most of the pines.

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  • His close relation with the Scotch Church secured important material assistance for the college of which he now became president, and he toured New England to collect contributions.

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  • The best collections of Robin Hood poems are those of Ritson (8vo, 1795) and Gutch (2nd ed., 1847), and of Professor Child in the 5th volume of his invaluable English and Scotch Popular Ballads (Boston, 1888).

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  • strigosa, Schreb, "the bristle-pointed oat," is the origin of the Scotch oat, according to Buckman.

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  • Parallels may be found in "Prairie oyster," the yolk of an egg with vinegar, pepper, &c. added; or "Scotch woodcock," a savoury of buttered eggs on anchovy toast.

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  • The Scotch collie is lighter and more elegant, and has a sharper muzzle.

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  • The Scotch deerhound is a larger and heavier variety of the English greyhound, with rough and shaggy hair.

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  • Scotch Terrier.

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  • ALLAN RAMSAY (1713-1784), Scotch portrait-painter, the eldest son of the author of The Gentle Shepherd, was born at Edinburgh in 1713.

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  • In the drier parts the Scotch fir (Pinus sylvestris) makes its appearance.

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  • His father, Spence Monroe, was of Scotch, and his mother, Elizabeth Jones, was of Welsh descent.

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  • He left two other works in MS. - Memoirs of Reformers and Ministers of the Church of Scotland, and Analecta: or Materials for a History of Remarkable Providences, mostly relating to Scotch Ministers and Christians.

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  • The position is well expressed in the Scotch Confession (1559).

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  • The trees principally represented are oak and beech, with some newer plantations of Scotch fir.

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  • He also published anonymously, in 1745, the lives of English, Scotch and Irish saints, under the title of Britannia Sancta, an interesting work which has, however, been superseded by that of Alban Butler.

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  • Numbers of Scotch sailors and of English deserters served in the Dutch fleet in this war - the bad administration of the navy and the constant ill-treatment of the crews having caused bitter discontent.

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  • These are also called the Upper Limestone Shale, a similar group being found in places below the limestone, and called the Lower Limestone Shale, or, in the north of England, the Tuedian group. Going northward the beds of limestone diminish in thickness, with a proportional increase in the intercalated sandstones and shales, until in Scotland they are entirely subordinate to a mass of coal-bearing strata, which forms the most productive members of the Scotch coalfields.

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  • Oil lamps are employed in many of the Scotch collieries, and are almost universally used in Belgium and other European countries.

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  • In the spring of 1782 Franklin had been informally negotiating with Shelburne, secretary of state for the home department, through the medium of Richard Oswald, a Scotch merchant, and had suggested that England should cede Canada to the United States in return for the recognition of loyalist claims by the states.

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  • His father was a Scotch merchant and his mother the daughter of a French officer and an Indian "princess."

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  • Long, commanding an exploring expedition to the Minnesota and Red rivers, reached Fort Daer in 1823, he found there about six hundred persons, a few being Scotch, but the greater part being half-breeds.

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  • He was admitted to the Scotch bar in December 1794, but, having abandoned the Tory principles in which he had been educated, he found that his Whig politics seriously prejudiced his legal prospects.

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  • The pair thus handfasted were, in accordance with Scotch law, entitled to live together for a year and a day.

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  • ell (cloth measure), abolished after 1553; known later as the Scotch ell = 37.06.

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  • = the foot of the Scotch or English cloth ell of 37.06 in., or 3 x 12.353.

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  • The banking system, which retains many features of the Scotch system, on which it was originally modelled, combines security for the note-holders and depositors with prompt increase and diminution of the circulation in accordance with the varying conditions of trade.

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  • Of the foreign-born in 1900 6400 were English-Canadians, 5542 were Irish, 1321 were English, 610 were French-Canadians, 590 were Italians, 576 were Scotch and 556 were Swedish.

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  • The larch is said not to succeed on arable land, especially where corn has been grown, but experience does not seem to support this view; that against the previous occupation of the ground by Scotch fir or Norway spruce is probably better founded, and, where timber is the object, it should not be planted with other conifers.

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  • In very dry and bleak localities, the Scotch fir will probably be more successful up to 900 ft.

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  • Such instances are found in the Scotch blue hare (Lepus timidus), in the Norway hare, in the North American hare (L.

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  • In 1683, several families, chiefly Scotch, led by Henry Erskine, third Lord Cardross (1650-1693), established on the island a settlement named Stuart's Town (probably in honour of Cardross's family); but three years later most of the settlers were murdered by Spaniards from Florida and the remainder fled to Charleston.

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  • Civil strife broke out in Scotland between John Knox and the queen-dowager - between the selfstyled "congregation of the Lord" and the adherents of the regent, whose French troops repelled the combined forces of the Scotch and their English allies from the beleaguered walls of Leith, little more than a month before the death of their mistress in the castle of Edinburgh, on the 10th of June 1560.

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  • On the 25th of March 1783 he was chosen their bishop by ten episcopal clergymen of Connecticut, meeting in Woodbury; as he could not take the British oath of allegiance, Seabury was shut out from consecration by the English bishops, and he was consecrated by Scotch bishops at Aberdeen on the 14th of November 1784.

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  • Claggett of Maryland in 1792, thus uniting the Scotch and the English successions.

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  • Andreas Gordon (1712-1751) of Erfurt, a Scotch Benedictine monk, first used a glass cylinder in place of a sphere.

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  • SIR HANS SLOANE (1660-1753), British collector and physician, was born on the 16th of April 1660 at Killyleagh in county Down, Ireland, where his father had settled at the head of a Scotch colony sent over by James I.

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  • Separate editions were published for the Scotch and Irish markets.

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  • the Scotch fir; birches are also Lippe abundant.

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  • The eastern counties of Stormont and Glengarry, and parts of the western peninsula, had been settled by Highlanders; the Canada Company, organized in 1825 by the Scottish novelist, John Galt, had founded the town of Guelph, had cleared large tracts of land in the western peninsula, and settled thereon hundreds of the best .class of English and Scotch settlers.

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  • "The party of two," he said, "reminds me of the Scotch terrier, which was so covered with hair that you could not tell which was the head and which was the tail."

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  • Having been made keeper of the privy seal in 1492, and having arranged a dispute between the Scotch and the Dutch, the bishop's concluding years were mainly spent in the foundation of the university of Aberdeen.

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  • Here the works of Cosmo Innes are valuable, Lectures on Scotch legal antiquities (Edinburgh, 1872); and Scotland in the middle ages (Edinburgh, 1860).

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  • The reading of 15thand 16thcentury verse in the light of these will bring home the critical error of treating such poems as Burns's Collar's Saturday Night, the Address to the Deil, and Scotch Drink as entirely expressions of the later poet's personal predilection.

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  • ARTHUR CUSHMAN MCGIFFERT (1861-), American theologian, was born in Sauquoit, New York, on the 4th of March 1861, the son of a Presbyterian clergyman of Scotch descent.

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  • The northern pine (Pinus sylvestris) has a number of othe r names and may be referred to under any of the following: Scotch fir, red deal, red fir, yellow deal, yellow fir, Baltic pine, Baltic fir.

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  • Accordingly Fries, like the Scotch school, places psychology or analysis of consciousness at the foundation of philosophy, and called his criticism of knowledge an anthropological critique.

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  • Recourse has been had to a regulation of the year 1818, by which persons may be imprisoned or " deported " without reason assigned; and three acts of the legislature have been passed for dealing more directly with the prevalent classes of crime: (1) an Explosives Act, containing provisions similar to those in force in England; (2) a Prevention of Seditious Meetings Act, which can only be applied specially by proclamation; and (3) a Criminal Law Amendment Act, of which the two chief provisions are - a magisterial inquiry in private (similar to the Scotch procedure) and a trial before three judges of the High Court without a jury.

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  • There were 17,415 foreign-born in the state in 1900, of whom 2 596 were English, 2146 Germans, 1727 Swedes, 1591 Irish, 1253 Scotch and 1220 Finns.

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  • The Greek aspirates were not the sounds which we represent by ph, th, ch (Scotch), but corresponded rather to the sound of the final consonants in such words as lip, bit, lick, the breath being audible after the formation of the consonant.

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  • Apart from other evidence, the use of B with the value of v, of H as well as I with the value of i, of 43 with the value of f, and X with that of the Scotch ch, would be proof that the alphabet was not borrowed till long after the Greek classical period, for not till later did 0, 4,, x become spirants and n become identified with L.

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  • Pop. (1890) 77,696; (1900) 94,969, of whom 40,974 were foreignborn (14,674 being French Canadian, 12,147 Irish, 4485 English Canadian, 4446 English, 1203 Greek, 1099 Scotch); (1910 census), 106,294.

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  • The surface of the islands is generally sandy, the soil thin and the climate keen; yet Scotch fir, spruce and birch are grown; and rye, barley, flax and vegetables are produced in sufficient quantity for the wants of the people.

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  • was watching affairs in Scotland with an observant eye, and other European sovereigns were not indifferent to the possibility of a Scotch alliance.

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  • The system of blending sherry in some respects recalls that of the blending of Scotch whiskies.

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  • Of the foreign-born element 6649, or about one-half, were Mexicans, 1360 were Germans and the rest chiefly English, Irish, Canadians, Italians, Scotch and Austrians.

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  • A volume of Scotch Sermons, published in 1880 by ministers holding liberal views, brought out the fact that the Disruption of 1843.

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  • SPOTSWOOD (SPOTTSWOOD or [[Spottiswood), Alexander]] (1676-1740), American colonial governor, was born, of an old Scotch family, in Tangier, Africa, in 1676.

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  • This is the distinctive peculiarity of those churches in Scotland and the north of England which are known as Scotch Baptists.

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  • Those of them, however, who have farms in the savannahs and are accustomed to take long rides in all weathers, and those whose trade obliges them to take frequent journeys in the mountainous interior, or even to Europe and North America, are often as active and as little burdened with superfluous flesh as a Scotch farmer.

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  • - Scotch Fir (Pinus sylvestris).

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  • In Britain natural forests of Scotch fir of any extent are only now found in the Highlands, chiefly on the declivities of the Grampians.

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  • The Scotch fir is a very variable tree, and certain varieties have acquired a higher reputation for the qualities of their timber than others; among those most prized by foresters is the one called the Braemar pine, the remaining fragments of the great wood in the Braemar district being chiefly composed of this kind; it is mainly distinguished by its shorter and more glaucous leaves and ovoid cones with blunt recurved spines, and especially by the early horizontal growth of its ultimately drooping boughs; of all varieties this is the most picturesque.

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  • The heartwood of the finer kinds of Scotch fir is of a deep brownish-red colour, abounding in the resin to which its durability is probably due.

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  • depends greatly on the soil and position in which the trees are grown: the dry slopes of granitic or gneissic mountains, or the deep well-drained sandy gravels of the lower country seem to answer equally well; but on clay or wet peat the tree rarely a c Scotch Fir (Pinus sylvestris).

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  • Vast numbers of Scotch firs are raised in nurseries for artificial planting; the seed is sown in the spring, being just covered with earth, and the seedlings transplanted in the second year into rows for further culture, or taken direct from the seed-bed for final planting; sometimes the seed is sown where the trees are intended to grow.

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  • A plantation of Scotch fir requires frequent and careful thinning as the young trees increase in size; but pruning should be avoided as much as possible, excepting for the removal of dead wood.

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  • Closely allied to the Scotch pine, and perhaps to be regarded as a mere alpine form of that species, is the dwarf P. montana (or P. Pumilio), the " kummholz " or " knieholz " of the Germans - a recumbent bush, generally only a few feet high, but with long zigzag stems, that root occasionally at the knee-like bends where they rest upon the ground.

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  • The foliage much resembles that of the Scotch fir, but is shorter, denser and more rigid; the cones are smaller but similar in form.

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  • The tree is of quick growth and the wood strong and resinous, but it is less durable than Scotch fir, though much employed in ship-building; according to Emerson, trunks exist in Maine 4 ft.

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  • As a youth, says Clarendon, " the ill-bred familiarity of the Scotch divines had given him a distaste " for Presbyterianism, which he indeed declared " no religion for gentlemen," and the mean figure which the fallen national church made in exile repelled him at the same time that he was attracted by the " genteel part of the Catholic religion."

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  • The soil is fertile, and the indigenous flora has been greatly enriched by the importation of such plants as the agave, the Mexican opuntia, the American maple, the Australian eucalyptus, the Scotch fir and the so-called Portuguese cypress (Cupressus lusitanica) from the Azores.

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  • For many years two Scotch firms, Messrs J.

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  • In the last forty years of the 18th century pearls were exported from the Scotch fisheries to Paris to the value of £Ioo,000; round pearls, the size of a pea, perfect in every respect, were worth £3 or £4.

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  • Among the various elements comprising the foreign-born population were 119,598 Germans; 94,844 Irish; 45,428 English; 42,865 Italians; 19,745 Russians; 14,913 Hungarians; 14,728 Austrians; 14,357 Poles; 14,211 Scotch; and 10,261 Dutch.

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  • He was educated at Trinity College, Glenalmond, for the Scotch Episcopal ministry, and after further study at the university of Naples was ordained in 1859, and entered on a succession of curacies in the Church of England, in London and at Addington, Bucks.

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  • Danish peat-mosses again show the existence of man at a time when the Scotch fir was abundant; at a later period the firs were succeeded by oaks, which have again been almost superseded by beeches, a succession of changes which indicate a considerable lapse of time.

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  • In January 1784 the sale of the land included in the " Manor of Pittsburgh " was begun by the grandsons of William Penn,, John Penn (1729-1795), the second son of Richard Penn and lieutenant-governor of Pennsylvania in1763-1771and in 1 7731776; and John Penn (1760-1834), the fourth son of Thomas Penn; and in the following June a new series of town lots was laid out in which was incorporated Colonel Campbell's survey, Thereafter, settlers, chiefly Scotch and Irish, came rapidly.

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  • He sincerely believed that the ultimate purpose of freethinkers was to escape from moral restraints, and he had an unreasoning antipathy to Scotch Presbyterians and English Dissenters.

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  • Dr .Hermann Adler was born in Hanover in 1839, graduated at Leipzig, and received honorary degrees from Scotch and English universities, including Oxford.

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  • Slightly more than half of all foreigners are Germans; Irish, English and Scotch, French and English Canadians, Swiss and Scandinavians following.

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  • The " Scotch cart," a light two-wheeled vehicle is also much used.

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  • These breeds are all English, except the Border Leicester, Cheviot and Scotch Black-face, which belong to Scotland; the Welsh Mountain, which belongs to Wales; and the Roscommon, which is Irish.

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  • The Scotch Black face breed is chiefly reared in Scotland, but it is of N.

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  • It bears most resemblance to the Scotch Black-face, but carries a finer, heavier fleece, and is larger in head.

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  • It is almost restricted to the fells of Westmorland, and is probably nearly related to the Scotch Black-face.

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  • A Scotch settlement under letters patent from the Scotch Parliament was made by William Paterson in 1698 on the site of the present Porto Escoces (in the northeastern part of the republic), but in 1700 the Spanish authorities expelled the few settlers still there.

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  • Oxford infected St Andrews, and we find traces of more than one vigorous search made for Lollards among the teaching staff of the Scottish university, while the Lollards of Kyle in Ayrshire were claimed by Knox as the forerunners of the Scotch Reformation.

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  • Crude turpentine is further yielded by the Scotch fir, P. sylvestris, throughout northern Europe, and by the Corsican pine, P. Laricio, in Austria and Corsica.

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  • In the north of Europe rosin is obtained from the Scotch fir, P. sylvestris, and throughout European countries local supplies are obtained from other species of pine.

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  • The black Kerry breed and the black or brown Scotch cattle are also more or less nearly related; and a similar kinship is claimed for the Siemental cattle of Switzerland, although their colour is white and fawn.

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  • - Vertical section of the ovule of the Scotch Fir (Pinus sylvestris) in May of the second year, showing the enlarged embryo-sac b, full of endosperm cells, and pollen-tubes c, penetrating the summit of the nucellus after the pollen has entered the large micropyle.

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  • A correspondence took place between him and Burns, who considered his "Tullochgorum" "the best Scotch song Scotland ever saw," and procured his collaboration for Johnson's Musical Museum.

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  • The Presbyterian Church, whose adherents are found principally in Ulster and are the descendants of Scotch settlers, was originally formed in the middle of the 17th century, and in 1840 a reunion took place of the two divisions into which the Church had formerly separated.

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  • Already Cornwall had risen in insurrection that year, not liking the taxation imposed for the purpose of repelling the Scotch invasion.

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  • The treaty of Ardres had left two bones of contention: the cession of Boulogne to England and the exclusion of the Scotch from the terms of H~Iy II.

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  • A very clever Scotch adventurer named John Law now offered his assistance in dealing with the enormous debt of more than three milliards, and in providing the treasury.

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  • He was a descendant of Hugh Williamson of North Carolina, and was of Scotch blood and Presbyterian training.

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  • WHITELAW REID (1837-), American journalist and diplomatist, was born of Scotch parentage, near Xenia, Ohio, on the 27th of October 1837.

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  • The elder, Sigismondo, after various military adventures, died at Reggio d'Emilia in 1543; and Malatesta, the younger, went to fight in the Scotch and English wars, and was never heard of again.

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  • He found a bottle of scotch and insisted we toast our success.

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  • Molly held out her hand and passed muster allowing this new person to scotch down and pat him.

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  • He'd opened a fresh bottle of scotch.

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  • She drank blood from a glass, just like scotch.

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  • Dude, I really think it would help if you drank that scotch.

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  • Normally, he would have had a bottle of scotch and some ice sent to the room, but today there was no time.

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  • Oooh, a scotch drinker.

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  • They'd make it a game night or sit around getting wasted on twenty-year old scotch recounting countless, crazy times they had through the years.

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  • Great, scotch neat please.

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  • Approaching from behind, she noticed a bottle of scotch on the table, along with the two glasses.

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  • Staring through her, he took a long drink of scotch.

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  • Jackson downed his drink, picked up his glass of blood, went to the bar and grabbed three bottles of scotch.

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  • Yes, I am going to need a lot of scotch, please.

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  • He began drinking the scotch fast, hoping to find some reprieve.

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  • No, I need scotch.

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  • Jackson noticed the tremor in Connor's hands, so poured him a scotch.

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  • At least it was scotch and not blood.

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  • He quickly finished his blood, went to the bar, and poured scotch in the glass to hide the remnants.

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  • He clicked off Art Tatum and "Willow Weep For Me" and after pulling out a bot­tle of scotch and two glasses, returned to Fred's room.

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  • Fred took a long drink from the scotch.

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  • Fred took another swig from the scotch.

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  • Later, after everyone had gone, Dean sent out for pizza and both men knocked off a large pie with the works and enough scotch to get silly.

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  • The enormous furry pink aardvark quickly picked over the moldy old scotch egg.

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  • Richard Archibald from Ballymoney Gled tae finally hear fae sae many Scotch folk that're aa fired up aboot thair ain leid.

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  • alum shale helps to scotch the suspicion that they are merely late deposits on it.

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  • Godfather 6cl Scotch 3cl amaretto Pour both ingredients into a shaker with ice.

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  • A half-empty bottle of Scotch whiskey stood between them on the bar, next to an overflowing ashtray.

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  • The Footprint scotch Eyed augers have the Jennings pattern double twist for hand operation.

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  • The nose is rich with heavenly sweetness, golden syrup on Scotch pancakes, toffee and honey baklava.

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  • To be able to tell people scotch beef is back is enough.

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  • I am much indebted to you, sir, for a scotch bonnet is fitted neither to my years nor my gravity.

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  • Close cousin to the scotch bonnet, they come in all colors.

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  • Imagine trying to suck scotch broth through a straw: rather than widening the straw, heâs chosen to puree the soup.

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  • cask strength bottling of Macallan from the Scotch Malt Whiskey Society.

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  • Scotch salmon at Billingsgate was then fetching 2s 6d [15p in decimal coinage] a pound wholesale.

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  • It is encouraging to see yet another industry response to the Scotch single malt connoisseur 's desire.

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  • Upon the roof of the aisles is the engrailed cross of the founders, St. Clairs, once hereditary Grand Masters of Scotch Masonry.

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  • Microbiological surveillance of hot plate.g.ods e.g. crumpets, scotch pancakes.

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  • By contrast, scotch malt whiskey distillers are generally looking for a more subtle oak influence.

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  • On Orkney is the world's northernmost scotch whiskey distillery, Highland Park.

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  • Passed a fine plantation of scotch firs, exactly 14 feet square.

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  • The scotch half-breed slowly retraced his steps to the camp they had left.

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  • hop scotch and many more.

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  • mainstay of the Scottish comedy scene for more than 30 years when Scotch and Wry first materialized in 1978.

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  • malt scotch whiskey is always ten years old, never nine or eleven?

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  • malt scotch whiskey.

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  • The Slender Scotch is the first burnet moth to emerge each year.

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  • This is going to go on all night... How about a scotch pancake?

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  • Lincoln recently had a bit of a nonsense over 4 or 5 scotch pines.

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  • In defiance of the rain he was stalking among the horses, wrapped in an old scotch plaid.

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  • plantation of Scotch firs, exactly 14 feet square.

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  • Paragraph 9 should provide the opportunity to promote Scotch red meat.

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  • Mr Gage and Mr Gibson both sang again, and then Mr Mackenzie played some scotch reels in splendid style.

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  • The unrivaled reputation of Scotch Premier has been built on a rich heritage of Scottish farmers producing quality beef.

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  • I used to wrap up in a big Scotch wool scarf.

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  • I know how you like to be the first to order a triple scotch and a packet of pork scratchings.

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  • We had a little scotch tasting session so after I felt a tad wobbly soon after.

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  • He is sitting in the den, sipping scotch and watching the evening news.

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  • I tell them about working as a forklift driver at the whiskey bond and since then drinking no scotch, nor any alcohol.

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  • Approximately 35 aficionados of the single malt scotch gathered to taste five different cask strength scotches which were provided by the society.

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  • If you pour enough water on a double scotch, it ceases to taste like whiskey.

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  • She then sat me on the sofa with a large scotch and told me how much she loved me.

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  • Even a good scotch could not soothe the restlessness inside and by now he was up to a bottle a day.

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  • scotch whiskey.

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  • scotch bonnet, they come in all colors.

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  • scotch eggs online soon in our new Shop.

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  • scotch pines.

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  • scotch pies, we planned our attack.

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  • scotch tape to prevent loss data.

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  • We know you will find the right whiskey gift from our range of single malt scotch whiskey's.

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  • We got snakes, circles, and goals, hop scotch and many more.

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  • I know how you like to be the first to order a triple scotch and a packet of pork scratchings.

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  • We had a little scotch tasting session so after I felt a tad wobbly soon after.

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  • Approximately 35 aficionados of the single malt scotch gathered to taste five different cask strength scotches which were provided by the society.

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  • using only Scotch tape and a piece of foil, turn it into a Christmas tree.

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  • Finding plesiosaurs and ichthyosaurs through working alum shale helps to scotch the suspicion that they are merely late deposits on it.

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  • The Scotch Whiskey Association and other trade associations failed in their attempts to protect their industry's trade rights.

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  • He noticed that he was dressed in a dark suit of scotch tweed, over which he wore a light overcoat.

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  • Scotch Pines in the neck Posted 2:02PM Mon 11 Aug 2003 Would a garden vac be any good for the pine cones?

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  • The bloated speckled turquoise wallaby slowly sniffed at the delicious scotch egg.

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  • Philip Hoessen is sipping from a large glass of Bell's scotch whiskey.

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  • He belonged to a noble family of Scotch descent, tracing its origin to Walter Stutt, who in 1420 accompanied the earls of Buchan and Douglas to the court of France, and whose family afterwards rose to be counts of Tracy.

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  • To English people, therefore, the Presbyterian is still the "Scotch Church," and they are as a whole slow to connect themselves with it.

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  • Presbyterianism had an independent development in the Carolinas, whither there was a considerable Scotch migration in 1684-1687.

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  • At Charleston a mixed congregation of Scotch Presbyterians and English Puritans was organized in 1690.

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  • The Presbyterians from the Scotch Established Church combined with the American Presbyterian Church, but the separating churches of Scotland organized independent bodies.

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  • The Anti-Burgher Synod sent Alexander Gellatly and Andrew Arnot in 1752, and two years later they organized the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania; they were joined in 1757 by the Scotch Church in New York City, which.

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  • The Burgher Synod in 1764 sent Thomas Clarke of Ballybay, Ireland, who settled at Salem, Washington county, New York, and in 1776 sent David Telfair, of Monteith, Scotland, who preached in Philadelphia; they united with the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania; in 1771 the Scotch Synod ordered the presbytery to annul its union with the Burghers, and although Dr Clarke of Salem remained in the Associate Presbytery, the Burgher ministers who immigrated later joined the Associate Reformed Church.

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  • Ministers and people with few exceptions - the most notable being the Scotch Highlanders who had settled in the valley of the Mohawk in New York and on Cape Fear river in North Carolina - sided with the patriot or Whig party: John Witherspoon was the only clergyman in the Continental Congress of 1776, and was otherwise a prominent leader; John Murray of the Presbytery of the Eastward was an eloquent leader in New England; and in the South the Scotch-Irish were the backbone of the American partisan forces, two of whose leaders, Daniel Morgan and Andrew Pickens, were Presbyterian elders.

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  • In 1782 the presbyteries of the Associate and Reformed churches united, forming the Associate and Reformed Synod of North America; but as there were a few dissenters in both bodies the older Associate and Reformed Presbyteries remained as separate units - the Associate Presbytery continued to exist under the same name until 1801, when it became the Associate Synod of North America; in 1818 it ceased to be subordinate to the Scotch General Synod.

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  • The oak requires shelter in the early stages of growth; in England the Scotch pine is thought best for this purpose, though Norway spruce answers as well on suitable ground, and larch and other trees are sometimes substituted.

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  • HUGH SWINTON LEGARE (1797-1843), American lawyer and statesman, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, on the 2nd of January 1797, of Huguenot and Scotch stock.

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  • Conifers are rare, and the Scotch pine, which is abundant on the sandy plains, takes the place of the Abies.

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  • The Scotch pine still grows on all sandy spaces, and the maple (Acer tatarica and A.

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  • at the Hague, and took part in the expedition to Scotland and the Scotch invasion of England in 1652.

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  • ROBERT RAINY (1826-1906), Scotch Presbyterian divine, was born on the 1st of January 1826; his father, Dr Harry Rainy, professor of forensic medicine in Glasgow University, was the son of a Sutherlandshire minister.

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  • He had come to the front as a champion of the liberal party in the Union controversy within the Free Church, and in combating Dean Stanley's Broad Church views in the interests of Scotch evangelicism; and about 1875 he became the undisputed leader of the Free Church.

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  • At the age of fourteen he was permitted by Scotch law to name his own curators, or guardians, and selecting William Pitt and Dundas for this office he spent much of his time at their houses, thus meeting many of the leading politicians of the day.

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  • Moreover, he wrote an article in the Edinburgh Review of July 1805 criticizing Sir William Gill's Topography of Troy, and these circumstances led Lord Byron to refer to him in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers as "the travell'd thane, Athenian Aberdeen."

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  • In 1840 he introduced a bill to settle the vexed question of patronage; but disliked by a majority in the general assembly of the Scotch church, and unsupported by the government, it failed to become law, and some opprobrium was cast upon its author.

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  • His writings also were ransacked for matter of accusation against him, "a committee of Scotch spiders being appointed to see if they can gather or make poison out of them."

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  • FIR, the Scandinavian name originally given to the Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris), but at present not infrequently employed as a general term for the whole of the true conifers (Abietineae); in a more exact sense, it has been transferred to the "spruce" and "silver firs," the genera Picea and A bies of most modern botanists.

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  • A variety of the spruce, abounding in some parts of Nor way, produces a red heartwood, not easy to distinguish from that of the Norway B pine (Scotch fir), and imported with it into England as "red deal" or "pine."

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  • In places suited to its growth it seems to flourish nearly as well as in the woods of Norway or Switzerland; but as it needs for its successful cultivation as a timber tree soils that might be turned to agricultural account, it is not so well adapted for economic planting in Britain as the Scotch fir or larch, which come to perfection in more bleak and elevated regions, and on comparatively barren ground, though it may perhaps be grown to advantage on some moist hill-sides and mountain hollows.

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  • The spruce bears the smoke of great cities better than most of the Abietineae; but in suburban localities after a certain age it soon loses its healthy appearance, and is apt to be affected with blight (Eriosoma), though not so much as the Scotch fir and most of the pines.

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  • JOHN WITHERSPOON (1723-1794), Scottish-American divine and educationalist, was born at Gifford, Yester parish, East Lothian, Scotland, on the 5th of February 1722/1723, the son of a minister of the Scotch Established Church, James Witherspoon (d.

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  • His close relation with the Scotch Church secured important material assistance for the college of which he now became president, and he toured New England to collect contributions.

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  • The best collections of Robin Hood poems are those of Ritson (8vo, 1795) and Gutch (2nd ed., 1847), and of Professor Child in the 5th volume of his invaluable English and Scotch Popular Ballads (Boston, 1888).

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  • strigosa, Schreb, "the bristle-pointed oat," is the origin of the Scotch oat, according to Buckman.

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  • Parallels may be found in "Prairie oyster," the yolk of an egg with vinegar, pepper, &c. added; or "Scotch woodcock," a savoury of buttered eggs on anchovy toast.

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  • - Bloodhound, otterhound, foxhound, harrier, beagle, basset hound (smooth and rough), dachshund, greyhound, deerhound, Borzoi, Irish wolfhound, whippet, pointer, setter (English, Irish and black and tan), retriever (flat-coated, curlycoated and Labrador), spaniel (Irish water, water other than Irish, Clumber, Sussex, field, English springer, other than Clumber, Sussex and field: Welsh springer, red and white and Cocker); fox terriers (smoothand wire-coated); Irish terrier, Scotch terrier, Welsh terrier, Dandie Dinmont terrier, Skye terrier (prick-eared and drop-eared), Airedale terrier and Bedlington terrier.

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  • The Scotch collie is lighter and more elegant, and has a sharper muzzle.

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  • The Scotch deerhound is a larger and heavier variety of the English greyhound, with rough and shaggy hair.

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  • Scotch Terrier.

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  • ALLAN RAMSAY (1713-1784), Scotch portrait-painter, the eldest son of the author of The Gentle Shepherd, was born at Edinburgh in 1713.

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  • In the drier parts the Scotch fir (Pinus sylvestris) makes its appearance.

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  • His father, Spence Monroe, was of Scotch, and his mother, Elizabeth Jones, was of Welsh descent.

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  • He left two other works in MS. - Memoirs of Reformers and Ministers of the Church of Scotland, and Analecta: or Materials for a History of Remarkable Providences, mostly relating to Scotch Ministers and Christians.

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  • The position is well expressed in the Scotch Confession (1559).

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  • The trees principally represented are oak and beech, with some newer plantations of Scotch fir.

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  • He also published anonymously, in 1745, the lives of English, Scotch and Irish saints, under the title of Britannia Sancta, an interesting work which has, however, been superseded by that of Alban Butler.

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  • Numbers of Scotch sailors and of English deserters served in the Dutch fleet in this war - the bad administration of the navy and the constant ill-treatment of the crews having caused bitter discontent.

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  • These are also called the Upper Limestone Shale, a similar group being found in places below the limestone, and called the Lower Limestone Shale, or, in the north of England, the Tuedian group. Going northward the beds of limestone diminish in thickness, with a proportional increase in the intercalated sandstones and shales, until in Scotland they are entirely subordinate to a mass of coal-bearing strata, which forms the most productive members of the Scotch coalfields.

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  • Oil lamps are employed in many of the Scotch collieries, and are almost universally used in Belgium and other European countries.

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  • In the spring of 1782 Franklin had been informally negotiating with Shelburne, secretary of state for the home department, through the medium of Richard Oswald, a Scotch merchant, and had suggested that England should cede Canada to the United States in return for the recognition of loyalist claims by the states.

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  • His father was a Scotch merchant and his mother the daughter of a French officer and an Indian "princess."

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  • Long, commanding an exploring expedition to the Minnesota and Red rivers, reached Fort Daer in 1823, he found there about six hundred persons, a few being Scotch, but the greater part being half-breeds.

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  • He was admitted to the Scotch bar in December 1794, but, having abandoned the Tory principles in which he had been educated, he found that his Whig politics seriously prejudiced his legal prospects.

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  • The pair thus handfasted were, in accordance with Scotch law, entitled to live together for a year and a day.

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  • (See: Buchanan, Ancient Scotch Standards.)

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  • ell (cloth measure), abolished after 1553; known later as the Scotch ell = 37.06.

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  • = the foot of the Scotch or English cloth ell of 37.06 in., or 3 x 12.353.

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  • The banking system, which retains many features of the Scotch system, on which it was originally modelled, combines security for the note-holders and depositors with prompt increase and diminution of the circulation in accordance with the varying conditions of trade.

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  • Of the foreign-born in 1900 6400 were English-Canadians, 5542 were Irish, 1321 were English, 610 were French-Canadians, 590 were Italians, 576 were Scotch and 556 were Swedish.

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  • The larch is said not to succeed on arable land, especially where corn has been grown, but experience does not seem to support this view; that against the previous occupation of the ground by Scotch fir or Norway spruce is probably better founded, and, where timber is the object, it should not be planted with other conifers.

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  • In very dry and bleak localities, the Scotch fir will probably be more successful up to 900 ft.

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  • His excommunication by the presbytery of London, in 1830, for publishing his doctrines regarding the humanity of Jesus Christ, and the condemnation of these opinions by the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in the following year, were secondary episodes which only affected the main issue of his career in so far as they tended still further to isolate him from the sympathy of the church; but the "irregularities" connected with the manifestation of the "gifts" gradually estranged the majority of his own congregation, and on the complaint of the trustees to the presbytery of London, whose authority they had formerly rejected, he was declared unfit to remain the minister of the National Scotch Church of Regent Square.

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  • Such instances are found in the Scotch blue hare (Lepus timidus), in the Norway hare, in the North American hare (L.

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  • In 1683, several families, chiefly Scotch, led by Henry Erskine, third Lord Cardross (1650-1693), established on the island a settlement named Stuart's Town (probably in honour of Cardross's family); but three years later most of the settlers were murdered by Spaniards from Florida and the remainder fled to Charleston.

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  • Civil strife broke out in Scotland between John Knox and the queen-dowager - between the selfstyled "congregation of the Lord" and the adherents of the regent, whose French troops repelled the combined forces of the Scotch and their English allies from the beleaguered walls of Leith, little more than a month before the death of their mistress in the castle of Edinburgh, on the 10th of June 1560.

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  • On the 25th of March 1783 he was chosen their bishop by ten episcopal clergymen of Connecticut, meeting in Woodbury; as he could not take the British oath of allegiance, Seabury was shut out from consecration by the English bishops, and he was consecrated by Scotch bishops at Aberdeen on the 14th of November 1784.

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  • Claggett of Maryland in 1792, thus uniting the Scotch and the English successions.

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  • Of deciduous trees the sycamore, wych-elm, horse-chestnut, beech, lime, plane and poplar may be used, - the abele or white poplar, Populus alba, being one of the most rapidgrowing of all trees, and, like other poplars, well suited for nursing other choicer subjects; while of evergreens, the holm oak, holly, laurel (both common and Portugal), and such conifers as the Scotch, Weymouth and Austrian pines, with spruce and (South.) silver firs and yews, are suitable.

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  • Andreas Gordon (1712-1751) of Erfurt, a Scotch Benedictine monk, first used a glass cylinder in place of a sphere.

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  • SIR HANS SLOANE (1660-1753), British collector and physician, was born on the 16th of April 1660 at Killyleagh in county Down, Ireland, where his father had settled at the head of a Scotch colony sent over by James I.

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  • Separate editions were published for the Scotch and Irish markets.

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  • the Scotch fir; birches are also Lippe abundant.

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  • The eastern counties of Stormont and Glengarry, and parts of the western peninsula, had been settled by Highlanders; the Canada Company, organized in 1825 by the Scottish novelist, John Galt, had founded the town of Guelph, had cleared large tracts of land in the western peninsula, and settled thereon hundreds of the best .class of English and Scotch settlers.

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  • "The party of two," he said, "reminds me of the Scotch terrier, which was so covered with hair that you could not tell which was the head and which was the tail."

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  • Having been made keeper of the privy seal in 1492, and having arranged a dispute between the Scotch and the Dutch, the bishop's concluding years were mainly spent in the foundation of the university of Aberdeen.

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  • sel fin-fin, sel a la minute, &c.); (2) unboiled: common, chemical, fishery, Scotch fishery, extra fishery, double extra fishery and bay salt (Fr.

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  • Here the works of Cosmo Innes are valuable, Lectures on Scotch legal antiquities (Edinburgh, 1872); and Scotland in the middle ages (Edinburgh, 1860).

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  • The reading of 15thand 16thcentury verse in the light of these will bring home the critical error of treating such poems as Burns's Collar's Saturday Night, the Address to the Deil, and Scotch Drink as entirely expressions of the later poet's personal predilection.

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  • ARTHUR CUSHMAN MCGIFFERT (1861-), American theologian, was born in Sauquoit, New York, on the 4th of March 1861, the son of a Presbyterian clergyman of Scotch descent.

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  • The northern pine (Pinus sylvestris) has a number of othe r names and may be referred to under any of the following: Scotch fir, red deal, red fir, yellow deal, yellow fir, Baltic pine, Baltic fir.

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  • Accordingly Fries, like the Scotch school, places psychology or analysis of consciousness at the foundation of philosophy, and called his criticism of knowledge an anthropological critique.

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  • Recourse has been had to a regulation of the year 1818, by which persons may be imprisoned or " deported " without reason assigned; and three acts of the legislature have been passed for dealing more directly with the prevalent classes of crime: (1) an Explosives Act, containing provisions similar to those in force in England; (2) a Prevention of Seditious Meetings Act, which can only be applied specially by proclamation; and (3) a Criminal Law Amendment Act, of which the two chief provisions are - a magisterial inquiry in private (similar to the Scotch procedure) and a trial before three judges of the High Court without a jury.

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  • There were 17,415 foreign-born in the state in 1900, of whom 2 596 were English, 2146 Germans, 1727 Swedes, 1591 Irish, 1253 Scotch and 1220 Finns.

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  • The Greek aspirates were not the sounds which we represent by ph, th, ch (Scotch), but corresponded rather to the sound of the final consonants in such words as lip, bit, lick, the breath being audible after the formation of the consonant.

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  • Apart from other evidence, the use of B with the value of v, of H as well as I with the value of i, of 43 with the value of f, and X with that of the Scotch ch, would be proof that the alphabet was not borrowed till long after the Greek classical period, for not till later did 0, 4,, x become spirants and n become identified with L.

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  • Pop. (1890) 77,696; (1900) 94,969, of whom 40,974 were foreignborn (14,674 being French Canadian, 12,147 Irish, 4485 English Canadian, 4446 English, 1203 Greek, 1099 Scotch); (1910 census), 106,294.

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  • The surface of the islands is generally sandy, the soil thin and the climate keen; yet Scotch fir, spruce and birch are grown; and rye, barley, flax and vegetables are produced in sufficient quantity for the wants of the people.

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  • was watching affairs in Scotland with an observant eye, and other European sovereigns were not indifferent to the possibility of a Scotch alliance.

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  • The system of blending sherry in some respects recalls that of the blending of Scotch whiskies.

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  • The chief forest trees of Finland are the Scotch fir (Pinus sylvestris, L.), the fir (Picea excelsa, Link.); two species of birch (B.

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  • Of the foreign-born element 6649, or about one-half, were Mexicans, 1360 were Germans and the rest chiefly English, Irish, Canadians, Italians, Scotch and Austrians.

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  • A volume of Scotch Sermons, published in 1880 by ministers holding liberal views, brought out the fact that the Disruption of 1843.

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  • SPOTSWOOD (SPOTTSWOOD or [[Spottiswood), Alexander]] (1676-1740), American colonial governor, was born, of an old Scotch family, in Tangier, Africa, in 1676.

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  • This is the distinctive peculiarity of those churches in Scotland and the north of England which are known as Scotch Baptists.

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  • Those of them, however, who have farms in the savannahs and are accustomed to take long rides in all weathers, and those whose trade obliges them to take frequent journeys in the mountainous interior, or even to Europe and North America, are often as active and as little burdened with superfluous flesh as a Scotch farmer.

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  • - Scotch Fir (Pinus sylvestris).

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  • In Britain natural forests of Scotch fir of any extent are only now found in the Highlands, chiefly on the declivities of the Grampians.

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  • The Scotch fir is a very variable tree, and certain varieties have acquired a higher reputation for the qualities of their timber than others; among those most prized by foresters is the one called the Braemar pine, the remaining fragments of the great wood in the Braemar district being chiefly composed of this kind; it is mainly distinguished by its shorter and more glaucous leaves and ovoid cones with blunt recurved spines, and especially by the early horizontal growth of its ultimately drooping boughs; of all varieties this is the most picturesque.

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  • The heartwood of the finer kinds of Scotch fir is of a deep brownish-red colour, abounding in the resin to which its durability is probably due.

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  • depends greatly on the soil and position in which the trees are grown: the dry slopes of granitic or gneissic mountains, or the deep well-drained sandy gravels of the lower country seem to answer equally well; but on clay or wet peat the tree rarely a c Scotch Fir (Pinus sylvestris).

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  • Vast numbers of Scotch firs are raised in nurseries for artificial planting; the seed is sown in the spring, being just covered with earth, and the seedlings transplanted in the second year into rows for further culture, or taken direct from the seed-bed for final planting; sometimes the seed is sown where the trees are intended to grow.

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  • A plantation of Scotch fir requires frequent and careful thinning as the young trees increase in size; but pruning should be avoided as much as possible, excepting for the removal of dead wood.

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  • Closely allied to the Scotch pine, and perhaps to be regarded as a mere alpine form of that species, is the dwarf P. montana (or P. Pumilio), the " kummholz " or " knieholz " of the Germans - a recumbent bush, generally only a few feet high, but with long zigzag stems, that root occasionally at the knee-like bends where they rest upon the ground.

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  • The foliage much resembles that of the Scotch fir, but is shorter, denser and more rigid; the cones are smaller but similar in form.

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  • The tree is of quick growth and the wood strong and resinous, but it is less durable than Scotch fir, though much employed in ship-building; according to Emerson, trunks exist in Maine 4 ft.

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  • The leaves, short and glaucous, like those of the Scotch fir, have deciduous sheaths; the cones have recurved scale-points like those of the cheer pine.

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  • As a youth, says Clarendon, " the ill-bred familiarity of the Scotch divines had given him a distaste " for Presbyterianism, which he indeed declared " no religion for gentlemen," and the mean figure which the fallen national church made in exile repelled him at the same time that he was attracted by the " genteel part of the Catholic religion."

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  • The soil is fertile, and the indigenous flora has been greatly enriched by the importation of such plants as the agave, the Mexican opuntia, the American maple, the Australian eucalyptus, the Scotch fir and the so-called Portuguese cypress (Cupressus lusitanica) from the Azores.

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  • For many years two Scotch firms, Messrs J.

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  • In the last forty years of the 18th century pearls were exported from the Scotch fisheries to Paris to the value of £Ioo,000; round pearls, the size of a pea, perfect in every respect, were worth £3 or £4.

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  • Among the various elements comprising the foreign-born population were 119,598 Germans; 94,844 Irish; 45,428 English; 42,865 Italians; 19,745 Russians; 14,913 Hungarians; 14,728 Austrians; 14,357 Poles; 14,211 Scotch; and 10,261 Dutch.

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  • He was educated at Trinity College, Glenalmond, for the Scotch Episcopal ministry, and after further study at the university of Naples was ordained in 1859, and entered on a succession of curacies in the Church of England, in London and at Addington, Bucks.

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  • Danish peat-mosses again show the existence of man at a time when the Scotch fir was abundant; at a later period the firs were succeeded by oaks, which have again been almost superseded by beeches, a succession of changes which indicate a considerable lapse of time.

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  • In January 1784 the sale of the land included in the " Manor of Pittsburgh " was begun by the grandsons of William Penn,, John Penn (1729-1795), the second son of Richard Penn and lieutenant-governor of Pennsylvania in1763-1771and in 1 7731776; and John Penn (1760-1834), the fourth son of Thomas Penn; and in the following June a new series of town lots was laid out in which was incorporated Colonel Campbell's survey, Thereafter, settlers, chiefly Scotch and Irish, came rapidly.

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  • He sincerely believed that the ultimate purpose of freethinkers was to escape from moral restraints, and he had an unreasoning antipathy to Scotch Presbyterians and English Dissenters.

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  • Dr .Hermann Adler was born in Hanover in 1839, graduated at Leipzig, and received honorary degrees from Scotch and English universities, including Oxford.

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  • Slightly more than half of all foreigners are Germans; Irish, English and Scotch, French and English Canadians, Swiss and Scandinavians following.

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  • The " Scotch cart," a light two-wheeled vehicle is also much used.

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  • The mountain breeds include the Cheviot, Scotch Black-face, Lonk, Rough Swaledale, Derbyshire Gritstone, Penistone, Limestone, Herdwick, Dartmoor, Exmoor and Welsh Mountain.

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  • These breeds are all English, except the Border Leicester, Cheviot and Scotch Black-face, which belong to Scotland; the Welsh Mountain, which belongs to Wales; and the Roscommon, which is Irish.

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  • The Scotch Black face breed is chiefly reared in Scotland, but it is of N.

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  • It bears most resemblance to the Scotch Black-face, but carries a finer, heavier fleece, and is larger in head.

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  • It is almost restricted to the fells of Westmorland, and is probably nearly related to the Scotch Black-face.

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  • A Scotch settlement under letters patent from the Scotch Parliament was made by William Paterson in 1698 on the site of the present Porto Escoces (in the northeastern part of the republic), but in 1700 the Spanish authorities expelled the few settlers still there.

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  • Oxford infected St Andrews, and we find traces of more than one vigorous search made for Lollards among the teaching staff of the Scottish university, while the Lollards of Kyle in Ayrshire were claimed by Knox as the forerunners of the Scotch Reformation.

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  • Crude turpentine is further yielded by the Scotch fir, P. sylvestris, throughout northern Europe, and by the Corsican pine, P. Laricio, in Austria and Corsica.

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  • In the north of Europe rosin is obtained from the Scotch fir, P. sylvestris, and throughout European countries local supplies are obtained from other species of pine.

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  • The black Kerry breed and the black or brown Scotch cattle are also more or less nearly related; and a similar kinship is claimed for the Siemental cattle of Switzerland, although their colour is white and fawn.

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  • - Vertical section of the ovule of the Scotch Fir (Pinus sylvestris) in May of the second year, showing the enlarged embryo-sac b, full of endosperm cells, and pollen-tubes c, penetrating the summit of the nucellus after the pollen has entered the large micropyle.

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  • A correspondence took place between him and Burns, who considered his "Tullochgorum" "the best Scotch song Scotland ever saw," and procured his collaboration for Johnson's Musical Museum.

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  • The Presbyterian Church, whose adherents are found principally in Ulster and are the descendants of Scotch settlers, was originally formed in the middle of the 17th century, and in 1840 a reunion took place of the two divisions into which the Church had formerly separated.

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  • Already Cornwall had risen in insurrection that year, not liking the taxation imposed for the purpose of repelling the Scotch invasion.

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  • The treaty of Ardres had left two bones of contention: the cession of Boulogne to England and the exclusion of the Scotch from the terms of H~Iy II.

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  • A very clever Scotch adventurer named John Law now offered his assistance in dealing with the enormous debt of more than three milliards, and in providing the treasury.

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  • He was a descendant of Hugh Williamson of North Carolina, and was of Scotch blood and Presbyterian training.

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  • WHITELAW REID (1837-), American journalist and diplomatist, was born of Scotch parentage, near Xenia, Ohio, on the 27th of October 1837.

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  • His Scotch and Gallic strains of ancestry are evident; his countenance was decidedly Scotch; his nervous speech and bearing and vehement temperament rather French; in his mind, agility, clarity and penetration were matched with logical solidity.

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  • In a proclamation issued for his arrest in 1683 he is described as "a tall lean man, dark brown hair, a great Roman nose, thin-jawed, heat in his face, speaks in the Scotch tone, a sharp piercing eye, stoops a little in the shoulders."

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  • The elder, Sigismondo, after various military adventures, died at Reggio d'Emilia in 1543; and Malatesta, the younger, went to fight in the Scotch and English wars, and was never heard of again.

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  • She is sitting by me as I write, her face serene and happy, crocheting a long red chain of Scotch wool.

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  • Paragraph 9 should provide the opportunity to promote Scotch red meat.

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  • Mr Gage and Mr Gibson both sang again, and then Mr Mackenzie played some Scotch reels in splendid style.

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  • The unrivaled reputation of Scotch Premier has been built on a rich heritage of Scottish farmers producing quality beef.

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  • I used to wrap up in a big Scotch wool scarf.

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  • I know how you like to be the first to order a triple scotch and a packet of pork scratchings.

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  • We had a little scotch tasting session so after I felt a tad wobbly soon after.

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  • He is sitting in the den, sipping scotch and watching the evening news.

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  • I tell them about working as a forklift driver at the whiskey bond and since then drinking no scotch, nor any alcohol.

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  • Approximately 35 aficionados of the single malt scotch gathered to taste five different cask strength scotches which were provided by the society.

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  • If you pour enough water on a double scotch, it ceases to taste like whiskey.

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  • She then sat me on the sofa with a large scotch and told me how much she loved me.

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  • Even a good scotch could not soothe the restlessness inside and by now he was up to a bottle a day.

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  • Each month the person with the highest score will win a bottle of Whyte & Mackay special blended scotch whiskey.

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  • ONLINE SHOP Buy your scotch eggs online soon in our new Shop.

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  • Whilst Geoff 's car load tucked into scotch pies, we planned our attack.

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  • Be sure to cover all the openings with scotch tape to prevent loss data.

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  • We know you will find the right whiskey gift from our range of single malt scotch whiskey 's.

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  • BTW ur website is shit, reminds me of an art gallery full of old people unknowingly wasting their lives drinking scotch.

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  • Using only scotch tape and a piece of foil, turn it into a Christmas tree.

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  • Back to Top Whiskey Sour To a double Scotch add the juice of half a lemon and half a teaspoonful of sugar.

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  • The Scotch Whiskey Association and other trade associations failed in their attempts to protect their industry 's trade rights.

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  • He noticed that he was dressed in a dark suit of Scotch tweed, over which he wore a light overcoat.

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  • Scotch Pines in the neck Posted 2:02PM Mon 11 Aug 2003 Would a garden vac be any good for the pine cones?

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  • The bloated speckled turquoise wallaby slowly sniffed at the delicious scotch egg.

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  • Philip Hoessen is sipping from a large glass of Bell 's Scotch whiskey.

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  • Gin, vodka and white rum are staples, along with Scotch, straight whiskey and blended whiskey.

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  • Scotch and soda is pleasing easy cocktail that has been around for years, as is rum and cola.

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  • Blue or White Scotch Brite: This is used for polishing after the wax has been removed.

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  • Green Scotch Brite is too abrasive and should therefore be avoided.

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  • Polish with Scotch Brite from tip to tail, and then head to the trails!

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  • It also pays to take the time to scotch guard pants before they are worn for sports or other forms of active play.

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  • It is a native plant, and the badge of the Scotch clan MLean.

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  • Menziesia Coerulea - A tiny alpine shrub, native of Scotch mountains and of northern European mountains.

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  • Scotch Roses were a group of some value in old days, before we had the splendid Roses of our day.

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  • The leaflets are small and numerous, not unlike those of the Scotch Rose, and in one variety the young stems are quite red.

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  • Turban Buttercup (Ranunculus Asiaticus) - An old garden plant, with double flowers of many colors, divided into various sections, such as the Dutch, Scotch, Persian and Turkish, each representing a distinct race.

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  • The Scotch and Dutch varieties are also fine for masses in beds, being all of highly effective colors.

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  • Medicinal wines have aromatic and flavor overtones of chemicals usually found in liquor such as Single Malt Scotch.

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  • Place the tick in a closed container (for species identification later, should symptoms develop) or dispose of it by flushing or by placing the tick between scotch tape.

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  • Norway Spruce, Scotch Pine, Aspen Silver Fir, and more are in the collection, along with coordinating garlands.

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  • The best selling varieties over the history of the Christmas tree are Scotch Pine, Douglas Fir, Fraser Fir, Balsam Fir, and White Pine.

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  • Scotch Guard is great for repelling stains and keeping liquid spills floating on top of the carpet weave, this reduces the amount of staining they can perform.

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  • Blotting up a spill soaks up the excess (and if you have Scotch Guard) most of it should be excess and you can get it up without any stain whatsoever.

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  • It's a good idea to protect the carpeting in your home with Scotch Guard, as this substance forms a barrier that reduces the likelihood of staining.

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  • For example, consider spraying the cushions with a fabric protector, such as Scotch Guard, prior to using them.

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  • Those who like to keep it simpler may prefer to serve beer or straight scotch.

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  • For instance you may not want to take a 12-year-old single malt scotch and pour it into a Godfather (1 ½ ounces of Scotch, ½ ounce Amaretto and ice).

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  • Scotch whisky was invented by a little old lady in Leningrad.

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  • You can buy the adhesives at a beauty store, or use pieces of masking or scotch tape if you are on a tight budget.

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  • He found a bottle of scotch and insisted we toast our success.

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