Scorn sentence examples

scorn
  • This scorn was not offensive to his master.

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  • His tactics would never earn anything but scorn from Kris, but they worked.

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  • The good knight is bound to endless fantastic courtesies towards men and still more towards women of a certain rank; he may treat all below that rank with any decree of scorn and cruelty.

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  • "Of course not," added Jim, with a touch of scorn; "those little wooden legs of yours are not half as long as my own."

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  • The word is of Armenian formation and signifies a son of Paulik or of little Paul; the termination -ik must here have originally expressed scorn and contempt.

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  • No writer shows a juster scorn of all mere rhetoric and exaggeration.

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  • Her blunt manners, her unconcealed scorn of the male favourites that disgraced the court, and perhaps also her sense of unrequited merit, produced an estrangement between her and the empress, which ended in her asking permission to travel abroad.

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  • The tale goes that the scorn of the daughter of a neighbouring king induced Harald to take a vow not to cut nor comb his hair until he was sole king of Norway, and that ten years later he was justified in trimming it; whereupon he exchanged the epithet "Shockhead" for the one by which he is usually known.

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  • Thus it remained a school for the " wise and prudent "; and when Julian tried to enlist the sympathies of the common rude man for the doctrines and worship of this school, he was met with scorn and ridicule.

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  • This feeling explains his detestation of foreign manners and superstitions, his loathing not only of inhuman crimes and cruelties but even of the lesser derelictions from selfrespect, his scorn of luxury and of art as ministering to luxury, his mockery of the poetry and of the stale and dilettante culture of his time, and perhaps, too, his indifference to the schools of philosophy and his readiness to identify all the professors of stoicism with the reserved and close-cropped puritans, who concealed the worst vices under an outward appearance of austerity.

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  • The word " Induction," which occurs in only three or four passages throughout all his works (and these again minor ones), is never used by him with the faintest reminiscence of the import assigned to it by Bacon; and, as will be seen, he had nothing but scorn for experimental work in physics.

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  • But I do not scorn to descend thence to the Piraeus, where Socrates sketched the plan of his republic. I shall mount to the double summitlof Parnassus; I shall revel in the joys of Tempe."

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  • As a classical scholar, his scorn of littlenesses sometimes led him into the neglect of minutiae, but he had the higher merit of interpreting ideas.

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  • She declined with scorn the proposal made by Elizabeth through Knollys, that she should sign a second abdication in favour of her son.

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  • Its amenities awoke both the enthusiasm and the scorn of many writers of antiquity.

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  • Yet Dionysius himself sought fame as a poet, and his success at Athens shows that his compositions did not deserve the full scorn of his enemies.

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  • With this double ideal in view, Petrarch poured scorn upon the French physicians and the Italian Averroists for their illiberal philistinism, no less than for their materialistic impiety.

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  • It is fallen man whom he pursues with his fierce scorn; his view of man's nature - intellect as well as character - is to be read in the light of his unflinching Augustinianism.

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  • As the stronger side of Gotama's teaching was neglected, the debasing belief in rites and ceremonies, and charms and incantations, which had been the especial object of his scorn, began to spread like the Birana weed warmed by a tropical sun in marsh and muddy soil.

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  • An appeal to the pope they would have laughed to scorn; but the ccsnfidence felt in the probity of the French king was so great that Montfort advised his friends to accede to the proposal.

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  • He then sought a wife at Rhegium, but was refused with scorn, while Locri gladly gave him Doris.

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  • The alliance concluded by him with France reveals him at once as rising superior to the narrow prejudices of his race and faith, which rejected with scorn any union with the unbeliever, and as gifted with sufficient political insight to appreciate the advantage of combining with Francis I.

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  • To this notion, which took its rise in a confusion of thought, he attached capital importance, and he treated with scorn Kepler's suggestion that a certain occult attraction of the moon was in some way concerned in the phenomenon.

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  • He pours much hackneyed scorn on the common herd, declares the sovereign to be the source of law, and asserts that popular freedom is dangerous.

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  • Bestuzhev had previously rejected with scorn the proposals of the French government to mediate between Russia and Sweden on the basis of a territorial surrender on the part of the former; and he conducted the war so vigorously that by the end of 1742 Sweden lay at the mercy of the empress.

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  • trifler rather than as a monster of lust and cruelty, is the reproduction of a real or imaginary scene from the reign of Domitian, and is animated by the profoundest scorn and loathing both of the tyrant himself and of the worst instruments of his tyranny.

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  • He pours scorn upon the exorcists - who were clearly in league with the demons themselves - and upon the excesses of the itinerant and undisciplined "prophets" who roam through cities and camps and commit to everlasting fire cities and lands and their inhabitants.

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  • Granted that, ideally, scientific knowledge ought to be able to demonstrate all truth, is it safe, or humane, for a being who is imperfectly started in the process of knowledge to fling away with scorn those unanalysed promptings and misgivings " Which, be they what they may, Are yet the fountain light of all our day, Are yet a master light of all our seeing.

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  • The dominant race is the Uzbegs, who are fanatical Moslem Sunnites, scorn work, despise their Iranian subjects, and maintain their old division into tribes or clans.

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  • The latter proposal, though it was received with scorn at the time, had perhaps ultimately as much influence as the logic of Augustine in breaking the strength of the schism.

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  • The well-meaning but weak king Zedekiah he denounces with bitter scorn as a perjured traitor (xvii).

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  • 5); of great industry and versatility; combining imaginative enthusiasm and a vein of religious mysticism with a sceptical indifference to popular beliefs and a scorn of religious imposture; and tempering the grave seriousness of a Roman with a genial capacity for enjoyment (Hor.

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  • The Lombards who, after they had occupied the lands and cities of Upper Italy, still went on sending forth furious bands to plunder and destroy where they did not care to stay, never were able to overcome the mingled fear and scorn and loathing of the Italians.

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  • Douglas and Andrew P. Butler, up to the scorn of the world as the Don Quixote and Sancho Panza of " the harlot, Slavery."

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  • The epistles of Pope Siricius (who wished to stand well with the people) are full of scorn for these ascetics, and the Leonine sacramentary contains prayers which severely denounce them.

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  • Hence his scorn of the doctrine of the resurrection of the body held then in a very crude form, and his ridicule of any attempt to raise the vulgar masses from their degradation.

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  • Thus, you see, with my herbarium, my vibratory, and my semi-circumgyratory, I am in clover; and you may imagine with what scorn I think of the House of Commons, which, comfortable club as it is said to be, could offer me none of these comforts, or, more perfectly speaking, these necessaries of life."

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  • Indian family who had been slaveholders for generations, he had a keen love of sport and a genuine sympathy with country-folk, but he had at the same time something of the scorn for lower races to be found in the members of a dominant race.

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  • His politics might therefore have been described as Toryism tempered by sympathy, or as Radicalism tempered by hereditary scorn of subject races.

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  • Contrasted with the wise are fools, and on these the sages vent their scorn abundantly (xii.

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  • His temper was hot, kept under rigid control; his disposition tender, gentle and loving, with flashing scorn and indignation against all that was ignoble and impure; he was a good husband, father and friend.

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  • It provided punishments up to 20 years' imprisonment for anyone who published " any language intended to bring the form of Government of the United States or the Constitution into contempt, scorn, contumely and disrepute."

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  • So too his scorn for the Roman populace of his time, who cared only for their dole of bread and the public games, is unqualified.

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  • The slayers of Rizzio fled to England, and were outlawed; Darnley was permitted to protest his innocence and denounce his accomplices; after which he became the scorn of all parties alike, and few men dared or cared to be seen in his company.

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  • The ecclesiastics who were parted at his command from the laysisters (whom they kept ostensibly as servants), the thirteen bishops whom he deposed for simony and licentiousness at a single visitation, the idle monks who thronged the avenues to the court and found themselves the public object of his scorn - all conspired against the powerful author of their wrongs.

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  • Thus, by his enemies, Thorbecke was often held up to scorn as a pure materialist and no friend of the fine arts, because at a sitting of the states-general in 1862 he had said that it is not the duty of the state, nor in the true interest of art itself, for the government to "protect" art, since all state-aided art must be artificial, like any forced plant.

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  • In philosophy, properly so called, the humanistic scorn for medieval dullness and obscurity swept away theological metaphysics as valueless.

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  • The peculiar greatness and value of both Juvenal and Tacitus is that they did not shut their eyes to the evil through which they had lived, but deeply resented it - the one with a vehement and burning passion, like the " saeva indignatio " of Swift, the other with perhaps even deeper but more restrained emotions of mingled scorn and sorrow, like the scorn and sorrow of Milton when " fallen on evil days and evil tongues."

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  • Thus Calixtus, bishop of Rome 219 -223, decided to admit adulterers to exomologesis and so to communion; and Tertullian, now become a Montanist, pours out his scorn on him.

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  • But Garibaldi poured scorn on all suggestions of compromise; and Cavour saw that the situation could only be saved by the armed participation of Piedmont in the liberation of south Italy.

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  • As for the "treason" of General York, who had come to terms with the Russians, it moved him merely to scorn and contempt.

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  • pour scorn on who they feel necessary.

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  • But I scorn to take advantage of such a squirrel.

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  • scorn the very idea of exam revision.

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  • The boys scorn a man so drunk that he spouts nonsense and attracts a crowd around him.

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  • She had great scorn for the notion that one should be able to laugh at oneself.

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  • scorn to take advantage of such a squirrel.

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  • We laugh to scorn the very idea of exam revision.

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  • One tool they use to help you save time is a five-star rating system where guitarists can praise the best transcriptions and scorn those that are not so great.

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  • It's relatively "viral" - it's something that a gamer might send to another gamer to share enthusiasm (or scorn) for an upcoming product.

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  • "For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings,/ That then I scorn to change my state with kings."

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  • Make sure you can go the distance; if you can't, the only thing you'll win is Scorpio's scorn.

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  • Topping off the World War I Army uniforms was the "field cap," which actually became the object of much scorn to the people back in the states.

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  • came to the throne in 1774 Chartres still found himself looked on coldly at court; Marie Antoinette hated him, and envied him for his wealth, wit and freedom from etiquette, and he was not slow to return her hatred with scorn.

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  • For the actual conditions of social and political life in his own time he had a fine scorn.

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  • All of them, for whatever reason, poured scorn on the idea that consuming dairy could be bad for health.

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  • However, I think those pouring scorn on this notion will very soon come to feel a little rueful.

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  • Be careful about pouring scorn on someone's pet project.

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  • Johnson saw with more envy than became so great a man the villa, the plate, the china, the Brussels carpet, which the little mimic had got by repeating, with grimaces and gesticulations, what wiser men had written; and the exquisitely sensitive vanity of Garrick was galled by the thought that, while all the rest of the world was applauding him, he could obtain from one morose cynic, whose opinion it was impossible to despise, scarcely any compliment not acidulated with scorn.

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  • Secondly we have this dialectical " induction as to particulars by grouping of similars whose liability to rebuttal by an exception has been already noted in connexion with the limits of dialectic. This is the incomplete induction by simple enumeration which has so often been laughed to scorn.

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  • He adopted what to undergraduates appeared the effeminate pose of casting scorn on manly sports, wearing his hair long, decorating his rooms with peacock's feathers, lilies, sunflowers, blue china and other objets d'art, which he declared his desire to "live up to," affecting a lackadaisical manner, and professing intense emotions on the subject of "art for art's sake" - then a new-fangled doctrine which J.

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  • Its doctrinal thesis (which is supported with great philosophic acumen and rhetorical power) is the divinity and consubstantiality of the Word; incidentally the character of Basil, which Eunomius had aspersed, is vindicated, and the heretic himself is held up to scorn and contempt.

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  • and beauty will become a scorn " contains three such: 't175 mm 'D11 nn 51.t iir Ty 1 15p5 -rim nisi (see Charles, Apoc. Bar.

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  • Be careful about pouring scorn on someone 's pet project.

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  • Other political parties have had similar experiences, yet do n't attract the scorn of Ruth et al.

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  • Derrida 's words in The Post Card also perhaps generate in most readers the passions of disbelief and even scorn.

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  • Accompanied by much triumphalism, celebration of President Hussein 's greatness, and scorn poured on his enemies.

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  • This conception is expressed in George Eliot's lines: ", O, may I join the choir invisible Of those immortal dead who live again In minds made better by their presence: live In pulses stirred to generosity, In deeds of daring rectitude, in scorn For miserable aims that end with self, In thoughts sublime that pierce the night like stars, And with their mild persistence urge man's search To vaster issues."

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  • Although a Quaker, he had a polemical spirit; men seeing Whittier only in his saintly age knew little of the fire wherewith, setting aside ambition and even love, he maintained his warfare against the " national crime," employing action, argument and lyric scorn.

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  • I love her like she was my daughter, but you said it, a woman's scorn and all that stuff.

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  • Gods, he would live an age with her scorn if it meant she were alive!

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  • dutiful son laughed his mother's correspondence to scorn.

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  • But there was only scorn and hatred for unknown arsonists who, many believe, may have started the devastating inferno.

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  • He will treat the scurrilous lampoon with noble scorn, reflecting that such things as these are the penalty of greatness.

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  • nothingness of scorn and noise.

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  • And let no women scorn other women, for they might well be better than they.

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  • scorn a man so drunk that he spouts nonsense and attracts a crowd around him.

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  • Boris was right to go and expose himself to their withering scorn.

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  • The latter path was championed by the nationalistic Slavophiles, who heaped scorn on the " decadent " West.

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  • Other political parties have had similar experiences, yet don't attract the scorn of Ruth et al.

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  • He cast scorn on the total prohibition of divorce and the idea of an indissoluble marriage bond.

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  • She reserves particular scorn for shopping for clothes or shoes.

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  • Rivalry brings deceitful disguises, mistaken identities and scorn - so much scorn.

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  • scorn on the idea that consuming dairy could be bad for health.

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  • There will never be the girl made that would not scorn you.

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  • accompanied by much triumphalism, celebration of President Hussein's greatness, and scorn poured on his enemies.

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  • withering scorn.

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  • Moved only to scorn and indignation by the rhetoric of these presumptuous enthusiasts, Frederick marched into the Leonine city, and took the imperial crown from the hands of Adrian IV.

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  • The generous scorn and pathos of the historian acting on extraordinary gifts of imaginative insight and characterization, and the fierce indignation of the satirist finding its vent in exaggerating realism, doubtless to some extent warped their impressions; nevertheless their works are the last voices expressive of the freedom and manly virtue of the ancient world.

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  • Like Cervantes at times, Mark Twain reveals a depth of melancholy beneath his playful humour, and like Moliere always, he has a deep scorn and a burning detestation of all sorts of sham and pretence, a scorching hatred of humbug and hypocrisy.

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  • Yet they rejected with scorn and derision the pacific overtures of their political opponents, the Potoccy, the Radziwillowie, and the Braniscy, Prince Michal openly declaring that of two tyrannies he preferred the tyranny of the Muscovite to the 2 Michal Kazimierz Radziwill alone was worth thirty millions.

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  • Above all it was this spirit that breathed through every line of the famous encyclical, Pascendi gregis, directed against the " Modernists " (see Roman Catholic Church: History), which denounced with bitter scorn and irony those so-called Catholics who dared to attempt to reconcile the doctrine of the Church with the results of modern science, and who, presumptuously disregarding the authority of the Holy See, maintained " the absurd doctrine that would make of the laity the factor of progress in the Church."

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  • Derrida's words in The Post Card also perhaps generate in most readers the passions of disbelief and even scorn.

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  • Perhaps it's my past but I am more able to do so without the infliction of scorn and ridicule poured upon the other girls of my profession by the town's less sinful inhabitants.

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