Schleswig sentence example

schleswig
  • I've also moved towns in North Schleswig and Alsace-Lorraine.
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  • Definitely incorporated with this country in 1853, it experienced another change of fortune after the short war of 1864 between Denmark on the one side and Prussia and Austria on the other, as by the peace of Vienna (30th of October 1864) it was ceded with Schleswig and Holstein to the two German powers.
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  • It suffered considerably during the wars between Schleswig and Holstein in the 15th century.
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  • In November 1864 it passed with Schleswig to Prussia.
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  • Already during his brother's lifetime, as duke of Schleswig, Valdemar had successfully defended Denmark against German aggression.
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  • In 1201 the city submitted to Valdemar of Schleswig, after his victory over the count of Holstein, but in 1225, owing to the capture of King Valdemar II.
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  • It is the point of departure and arrival of the steam ferry to Nyborg on Fiinen, lying on the Hamburg, Schleswig, Fredericia and Copenhagen route.
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  • The town, which obtained civic rights in 1200, also became the seat of the dukes of Schleswig, but its commerce gradually dwindled owing to the rivalry of Lubeck, the numerous wars in which the district was involved, and the silting up of the Schlei.
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  • In the wars of 1848 and 1864 Schleswig was an important strategical point on account of its proximity to the Dannewerk and was occupied by the different contending parties in turn.
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  • See Sach, Geschichte der Stadt Schleswig (Schleswig, 1875); and Jensen, Schleswig and Umgebung (Schleswig, 1905).
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  • A speech, denouncing the projected incorporation of Schleswig and Holstein with Denmark, delivered in the Chamber of Baden on the 6th of February 1845, spread his fame beyond the limits of his own state, and his popularity was increased by his expulsion from Prussia on the occasion of a journey to Stettin.
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  • Flensburg is a busy centre of trade and industry, and is the most important town in what was formerly the duchy of Schleswig.
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  • It attained municipal privileges in 1284, was frequently pillaged by the Swedes after 1643, and in 1848 became the capital, under Danish rule, of Schleswig.
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  • It is connected by a branch line with the main railway of Schleswig, and possesses a good harbour, which affords shelter for a large carrying trade.
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  • At Flensburg in Schleswig he secured control of the largest Baltic shipping concern, and proceeded to build a new fleet of ships, christening one of them the " Hindenburg."
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  • During the crisis in Schleswig and Holstein in 1850 he endeavoured in person to aid the duchies in their struggles.
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  • (1340), who for nine years had held Jutland and Funen and dominated the rest of Denmark, first opened Valdemar's way to the throne, and on midsummer day 1340 he was elected king at a Landsting held at Viborg, after consenting to espouse Helveg, the sister of his most important confederate, Valdemar, duke of Schleswig.
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  • In 1621 they had already received liberty to make a settlement in Schleswig, where they built the town of Friedrichstadt.
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  • In 1848 he supported Denmark against Germany; placed Swedish and Norwegian troops in cantonments in Fiinen and North Schleswig (1849-1850); and mediated the truce of Malmo (August 26th, 1848).
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  • In 1849, accordingly, he re-entered the service of Denmark, was appointed a royal chamberlain and in 1850 sent to represent the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein at the restored federal diet of Frankfort.
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  • Bismarck, the director of the policy of Prussia, was devising methods for the realization of his schemes, and it became clear after the war over the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein that the smaller German states would soon be obliged to decide definitely between Austria and Prussia.
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  • In its earliest form, as it appears in inscriptions on various articles found in Schleswig and in Scandinavian countries, it consisted of twenty-four letters, all of which occur in abecedaria in England.
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  • Great improvements took place likewise in armour and weapons; the equipment of the warriors whose relics have been found in the Schleswig bog-deposits, dating from the 4th and 5th centuries, appears to have been vastly superior to that which Tacitus represents as normal among the Germani of his day.
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  • He took a considerable part in the demonstrations of 1848, and was regarded as the leader of the "Eiderdanen," that is, of the party which regarded the Eider as the boundary of Denmark, and the duchy of Schleswig as an integral part of the kingdom.
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  • Torstensson, too, was unable to cross from Jutland to Fiinen for want of a fleet, and the Dutch auxiliary fleet which came to his assistance was defeated between the islands of Sylt and Rdnno on the west coast of Schleswig by the Danish admirals.
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  • Ever since the conclusion of the Great Northern War, Danish statesmen had been occupied in harvesting its fruits, namely, the Gottorp portions of Schleswig definitely annexed to Denmark in 1721 by the treaty of Nystad, and endeavouring to bring about a definitive general understanding with the house of Gottorp as to their remaining possessions in Holstein.
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  • He protested that the king of Denmark was bound to defend Schleswig "so long as there was a sword in Denmark and a drop of blood in the veins of the Danish people."
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  • The length of German coast on the North Sea or German Ocean is 293 m., and on the Baltic 927 km., the intervening land boundary on the north of Schleswig being only 47 km.
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  • On the coast of East Friesjand there are now only seven of these islands, of which Norderney is best known, while of tile North Frisian Islands, on the western coast of Schleswig, Sylt is the most considerahl~.
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  • The finely wooded heights which surround the bays of the east coast of Holstein and Schleswig may be regarded as a continuation of these Baltic elevations.
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  • On this northern line the Germans come in contact with the Danes who inhabit the northern parts of Schleswig within the limits of the German empire.
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  • The province of Schleswig (perhaps only the west coast) and the islands adjacent were inhabited by the Saxons, while the east coast, at least in later times, was occupied by the Angli.
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  • By this time all the country east of the lower Elbe seems to have been Slavonic. In the north, perhaps in the province of Schleswig, we hear now for the first time of the Danes.
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  • Otto, having profound faith in the power of the church to reconcile conquered peoples to his rule, provided for the benefit of the Danes the bishoprics of Schleswig, Ripen and Aarhus; and among those which he established for the Slays were the important bishoprics of Brandenburg and Havelberg.
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  • Another loss took place in 1460, when Schleswig and Holstein were united with Denmark.
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  • This excited vehement opposition among the Germans, on the ground that Holstein, although subject to the king of Denmark, was a member of the German confederation, and that in virtue of ancient treaties it could not be severed from Schleswig.
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  • Frederick VII., who had just succeeded Christian VIII., put down the rebellion, but Prussia, acting in the name of the confederation, despatched an army against the Daoes, and drove them from Schleswig.
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  • By the mediation of Great Britain an armistice was concluded, and the Prussian troops evacuated the northern districts of Schleswig.
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  • The democrats called their adherents to arm~ against the traitors who were preparing to sell the Schleswig Hoisteiners.
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  • By the intervention of Austrian troops peace was restored; and when, early in 1852, the government of Denmark, in providing a constitution for the whole monarchy, promised to appoint separate ministers for Schleswig and Holstein, and to do equal justice to the German and the Danish populations, the two powers declared themselves satisfied and the Austrian~ forces were withdrawn.
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  • An agitation in his favor had already begun in Holstein and, after the promulgation of the new Danish constitution, this was extended to Schleswig.
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  • Pending a settlement, Schleswig was to be occupied and adrniirnstered by Prussia, Holstein by Austria; while Lauenburg was made over absolutely to Prussia in return for a money payment This was so far a diplomatic victory for Prussia, as it ignored entirely the claims of the duke of Augustenburg.
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  • In 1883 the daughter of the duke of Augustenburg, the former claimant to the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein, married the heir to the Prussian throne, who became William II.
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  • Compared with the Polish question, that of the Danes in North Schleswig is of minor importance; they number less than.
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  • Since then the Prussian government, by prohibiting the use of Danish in the schools and public offices, and by the expulsion from the country of the numerous Danish optants who had returned to Schleswig, has used the customary means for compelling all subjects of the king to become German in language and feeling.1
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  • Some of the Conservative leaders, especially Baron von Stumm, the great manufacturer (one of Bismarcks chief advisers on industrial matters), demanded protection against the teaching of some of the professors with whose economic doctrines they did not agree; pastors who took part in the Christian-Social movement incurred the displeasure of the government; and Professor Delbruck was summoned before a disciplinary court because, in the Preussisc/~e Ja/zrbcher, which he edited, he had ventured to criticize the policy of the Prussian government towards the Danes in Schleswig.
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  • Less happy were the efforts of the Prussian government at the Germanization of Prussian Poland and Schleswig.
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  • Nyborg on the east is the port for the steam-ferry to Korsor in Zealand; Svendborg picturesquely overlooks the southern archipelago; Faaborg on the south-west lies on a fjord of the same name; Assens, on the west, a port for the crossing of the Little Belt into Schleswig, still shows traces of the fortifications which were stormed by John of Ranzau in 1 535; Middelfart is a seaside resort near the narrowest reach of the Little Belt; Bogense is a small port on the north coast.
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  • The separation from the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein, which were more than half German, intensified the national character; the Danes are intensely patriotic; and there is no portion of the Danish dominions except perhaps in the West Indian islands, where a Scandinavian language is not spoken.
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  • Ansgar preached in Denmark from 826 to 861, but it was not till after the subsidence of the Viking raids that Adaldag, archbishop of Hamburg, could open a new and successful mission, which resulted in the erection of the bishoprics of Schleswig, Ribe and Aarhus (c. 948), though the real conversion of Denmark must be dated from the baptism of King Harold Bluetooth (960).
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  • (94 o -9 86) subdued German territory south of the p Eider, extended the Danevirke, Denmark's great line of defensive fortifications, to the south of Schleswig and planted the military colony of Julin or Jomsborg, at the mouth of the Oder.
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  • There were signs too of the rise of a vigorous middle class, due to the extraordinary development of the national resources (chiefly the herring fisheries, horse-breeding and cattle-rearing) and the foundation of gilds, the oldest of which, the Edslag of Schleswig, dates from the early 12th century.
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  • Eastern Denmark was in the hands of one magnate; another magnate held Jutland and Fiinen in pawn; the dukes of Schleswig were practically independent of the Danish crown; the Scandian provinces had (1332) surrendered themselves to Sweden.
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  • Schleswig was recognized as a Danish fief, in contradistinction to Holstein, which owed vassalage to the Empire.
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  • (1838-1839) were also remarkable for the revival of political life, provincial consultative assemblies being established for Jutland, the Islands, Schleswig and Holstein, by the ordinance of the 28th of May 1831.
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  • The Liberal Eiderdansk party was for dividing Schleswig into three distinct administrative belts, according as the various nationalities predomin ated (language rescripts of '85),but German sentiment was opposed to any such settlement and, still worse, the great continental powers looked askance on the new Danish constitution as far too democratic. The substance of the notes embodying the exchange of views, in 1851 and 1852, between the German great powers and Denmark, was promulgated, on the 28th of January 1852, in the new constitutional decree which, together with the documents on which it was founded, was known as the Conventions of 1851 and 1852.
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  • The " legitimate " heir to the duchies, under the Salic law, Duke Christian of Sonderburg-Augustenburg, accepted the decision of the London conference in consideration of the purchase by the Danish government of his estates in Schleswig.
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  • Later in the year he introduced into the Rigsraad a common constitution for Denmark and Schleswig, which was carried through and confirmed by the council of state on the 13th of November 1863.
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  • The ministry was saved by a mere accident - the expulsion of Danish agitators from North Schleswig by the German government, which evoked a passion of patriotic protest throughout Denmark, and united all parties, the war minister declaring in the Folketing, during the debate on the military budget (January 1899), that the armaments of Denmark were so far advanced that any great power must think twice before venturing to attack her.
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  • At his own court at Schleswig he did his best to introduce the Reformation, despite the opposition of the bishops.
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  • It must be observed also that amber is found in Friesland and on the west coast of Schleswig, as well as in the Baltic, though not in equal abundance.
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  • Professor Mobius is of opinion that oysters over twenty years of age are rare, and that most of the adult Schleswig oysters are seven to ten years old.
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  • King Alfred and the chronicler ZEthelweard identified this place with the district which is now called Angel in the province of Schleswig (Slesvig), though it may then have been of greater extent, and this identification agrees very well with the indications given by Bede.
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  • Full confirmation is afforded by English and Danish traditions relating to two kings named Wermund and Offa, from whom the M e rcian royal family were descended, and whose exploits are connected with Angel, Schleswig and Rendsburg.
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  • Danish tradition has preserved record of two governors of Schleswig, father and son, in their service, Frowinus (Freawine) and Wigo (Wig), from whom the royal family of Wessex claimed descent.
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  • The province of Schleswig has proved exceptionally rich in prehistoric antiquities which date apparently from the 4th and 5th centuries.
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  • Further to the north and facing the bay is the university, founded in 1665 by Christian Albert, duke of Schleswig, and named after him "Christian Albertina."
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  • (15th of November 1863) the town was occupied by the Saxon troops acting as the executive of the German Confederation, and it was the base of the operations of the Austrians and Prussians against Schleswig in the spring of the following year.
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  • The oysters from the beds on the west coast of Schleswig are widely known under the misnomer of "Holstein natives."
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  • The shipbuilding of Kiel and other seaports, however, is important; and lace is made by the peasants of north Schleswig.
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  • The great bulk of the Holsteiners and a large proportion of the Schleswigers are of genuine German stock, but of the 148,000 inhabitants in the north part of Schleswig 139,000 are Danish-speaking.
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  • Among the Germans the prevalent tongue is Low German, but the North Frisians on the west coast of Schleswig and the North Sea islands (about 19,000 in all) still speak a Frisian dialect, which, however, is dying out.
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  • The boundary between the Danish and German languages is approximately a line running from Flensburg south-west to Joldelund and thence north-west to Tondern and the North Sea coast; not more than 15% of the entire population of the province speak Danish as their mother-tongue, but the proportion is far larger for Schleswig alone, where there is also a considerable bilingual population.
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  • Schleswig is the official capital of the province, but Altona and Kiel are the largest towns, the latter being the chief naval station of Germany.
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  • For the history of the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein see Schleswig-Holstein Question below.
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  • The last transaction in which Palmerston engaged arose out of the attack by the Germanic Confederation, and its leading states Austria and Prussia, on the kingdom of Denmark and the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein.
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  • In 1752 he published his Description of the Counties of Schleswig and Holstein.
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  • In 1847, however, he was obliged to return to Germany: he first went to Schleswig,.
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  • S.E., where an obelisk (1863) commemorates the effort made to preserve the Danish language in Schleswig.
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  • As the Danes gave only a provisional assent to the demand, Prussian and Austrian troops entered Schleswig.
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  • From Schleswig eastwards to Lubeck Bay the coast is pierced by a number of narrow openings or Fohrden, the result of encroachment of the sea caused by subsidence.
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  • In August 1864 the emperor, held back by French public opinion, which was favourable to Prussia, and by his idea of nationality, allowed Prussia and Austria to seize the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein.
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  • She had already given proofs of her superior statesmanship by recovering possession of Schleswig from the Holstein counts, who had held it absolutely for a generation, and who now received it back indeed as a fief (by the compact of Nyborg 1386), but under such stringent conditions that the Danish crown got all the advantage of the arrangement.
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  • Gotland she purchased from its actual possessors, Albert of Mecklenburg and the Livonian Order, and the greater part of Schleswig was regained in the same way.
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  • Besides the Frisians discussed above there is a people called North Frisians, who inhabit the west coast of Schleswig.
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  • He was entrusted with the negotiations by which the duke of Augustenburg was persuaded to assent to the arrangements by which he resigned his claims to Schleswig and Holstein.
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  • After the union of Schleswig and Holstein under the Danish crown, the Danevirke fell into decay, but in 1848 it was hastily strengthened by the Danes, who were, however, unable to hold it in face of the superiority of the Prussian artillery, and on the 23rd of April it was stormed.
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  • Reluctantly he assented to the policy which led to war with the combined power of Austria and Prussia, and to the separation of the duchies of Schleswig, Holstein and Lauenburg from Denmark (see Schleswig-Holstein Question).
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  • As the Danes soon afterwards took possession of Schleswig again, thePrussians once more drove them back, but, in view of the threatening attitude of the powers, Frederick William summoned up courage to flout the opinion of the German parliament, and on the 26th of August, without the central government being consulted, an armistice of seven months was agreed upon at Malmoe.
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  • He saw in the closest possible union between the kingdom and a Schleswig freed from all risk of German interference the essential condition for Denmark's independence; but he did not think that Denmark was strong enough to carry such a policy through unsupported, and he was therefore inclined to promote it by diplomatic means and international combinations, and strongly opposed to the Conventions of 1851-1852 (See Denmark: History), though he was among the first, subsequently, to accept them as an established fact and the future basis for Denmark's policy.
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