Schiller sentence example

schiller
  • The city contains a fine statue of Schiller, designed by Thorvaldsen; a bronze statue of Christopher, duke of Wurttemberg; a monument to the emperor William I.; an equestrian statue of King William I.
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  • Towards the end of the r8th century Mannheim attained great celebrity in the literary world as the place where Schiller's early plays were performed for the first time.
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  • The city has several parks, including the Franklin of 90 acres, the Goodale of 44 acres, and the Schiller of 24 acres, besides the Olentangy, a well-equipped amusement resort on the banks of the river from which it is named, the Indianola, another amusement resort, and the United States military post and recruiting station, which occupies 80 acres laid out like a park.
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  • The dramatic capabilities of the subject are, however, great, and it afterwards attracted Schiller, who, however, seems to have abandoned it in favour of the similar theme of the Russian Demetrius.
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  • Here he lived in close intercourse with Schiller, Goethe, Herder and the most distinguished literary men of the time.
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  • Critical discussions of the history will be found in Schiller, Gesch.
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  • After holding minor educational posts, he obtained in 1791, through the influence of Herder, the appointment of rector of the gymnasium at Weimar, where he entered into a circle of literary men, including Wieland, Schiller, and Goethe.
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  • To these we may add the gifted but unfortunate Sigismund Czak6, Lewis Dobsa, Joseph Szigeti, Ignatius Nagy, Joseph Szenvey (a translator from Schiller), Joseph Gaal, Charles Hugo, Lawrence Toth (the Magyarizer of the School for Scandal), Emeric Vahot, Alois Degre (equally famous as a novelist), Stephen Toldy and Lewis Doczi, author of the popular prize drama Csok (The Kiss).
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  • Himself a scholar and author, he was a notable patron of letters, and was the friend of Goethe, Schiller and Wieland.
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  • His chief claim to remembrance is that it was he who first put Schiller's earlier dramas on the stage, and it is to him that the poet's Briefe an den Freiherrn von Dalberg (Karlsruhe, 1819) are addressed.
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  • In 1899 a theatre was opened close to the town for the sole purpose of performing Schiller's play of Wilhelm Tell.
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  • Each gild numbered various classes of members, ranging from beginners, or Schiller (corresponding to trade-apprentices), and Schulfreunde (who were equivalent to Gesellen or journeymen), to Meister, a Meister being a poet who was not merely able to write new verses to existing melodies but had himself invented a new melody.
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  • The Schiller statue, erected in 1863, is the work of a Frankfort artist, Johann Dielmann.
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  • His father, Christian Gottfried Korner (1756-1831), a distinguished Saxon jurist, was Schiller's most intimate friend.
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  • As a dramatist Korner was remarkably prolific, but his comedies hardly touch the level of Kotzebue's and his tragedies, of which the best is Zriny (1814), are rhetorical imitations of Schiller's.
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  • Schiller (Geschichte der romischen Kaiserzeit, Gotha, 1883) is more on a level with recent inquiries.
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  • Among the last-mentioned are the square at the railway station - the Ernst August-Platz - with an equestrian statue of King Ernest Augustus in bronze; the triangular Theater-Platz, with statues of the composer Marschner and others; and the Georgs-Platz, with a statue of Schiller.
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  • The interior is very fine, and in one of the wings is a series of rooms dedicated to the poets Goethe, Schiller, Herder and Wieland, with appropriate mural paintings.
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  • Of more pathetic interest is the Schillerhaus, in the Schillerstrasse, containing the humble rooms in which Schiller lived and died.
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  • The atmosphere of the whole town is, indeed, dominated by the memory of Goethe and Schiller, whose bronze statues, by Rietschel, grouped on one pedestal (unveiled in 1857) stand in front of the theatre.
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  • Finally, in the cemetery is the grand ducal family vault, in which Goethe and Schiller also lie, side by side.
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  • His aim was as definite as that of Thucydides, or Schiller, or Napier or any other writer who has made his subject a particular war; only he determined to treat it in a certain way.
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  • In literature, its leading names were Winckelmann, Lessing and Voss, and Herder, Goethe and Schiller.
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  • With Goethe, who viewed with interest and appreciation the poetical fashion of treating fact characteristic of the Naturphilosophie, he continued on excellent terms, while on the other hand he was repelled by Schiller's less expansive disposition, and failed altogether to understand the lofty ethical idealism that animated his work.
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  • The largest and most noteworthy are Burnet park (about 100 acres), on high land in the western part of the city, Lincoln park, occupying a heavily wooded ridge in the east, and Schiller, Kirk and Frazer parks.
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  • The unity oaf the sun can only be explained either idealistically 1 For Dr Schiller's views, see further Pragmatism.
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  • He survived into the era of Kant, Goethe and Schiller, but he was not of it, and it would have been unreasonable to expect that he should in old age pass beyond the limits of his own epoch.
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  • The most interesting of the seven tales is the fourth, the story of the Russian princess, in which we recognize at once the prototype of Gozzi's well-known Turandot, which was afterwards adapted by Schiller for the German stage.
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  • Various anticipations of pragmatism in the history of philosophy are noted in Schiller's Plato or Protagoras ?
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  • He employed himself at intervals upon a life of Schiller and a translation of Wilhelm Meister.
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  • Goethe afterwards spoke warmly of the life of Schiller, and desired it to be translated into German.
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  • Schiller's play (1804) gave the tale a world-wide renown.
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  • In general see two excellent works by Franz Heinemann, TellIconographie, Lucerne, 1902 (reproductions, with text, of the chief representations of Tell in art from 1507 onwards), and Tell-Bibliographie (including that of Schiller's play), published in 1908 at Bern.
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  • The setting up in 1895 in the market-place in Altdorf of a fine statue (by the Swiss sculptor Richard Kissling) of Tell and his son, and the opening in 1899 just outside Altdorf of a permanent theatre, wherein Schiller's play is to be represented every Sunday during the summer months, show that the popular belief in the Tell legend is still strong, despite its utter demolition at the hands of a succession of scientific Swiss historians during the 19th century.
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  • In 1757 Schiller's father again took service in the army and ultimately rose to the rank of captain.
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  • The strict military discipline of the school lay heavily on Schiller, and intensified the spirit of rebellion, which, nurtured on Rousseau and the writers of the Sturm and Drang, burst out in the young poet's first tragedy; but such a school-life had for a poet of Schiller's temperament advantages which he might not have known had he followed his own inclinations; and it afforded him glimpses of court life invaluable for his later work as a dramatist.
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  • In 1776 some specimens of Schiller's lyric poetry had appeared in a magazine, and in1777-1778he completed his drama, Die Rduber, which was read surreptitiously to an admiring circle of schoolmates.
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  • Meanwhile Die Rduber, which Schiller had been obliged to publish.
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  • The strength of this remarkable tragedy lay, not in its inflated tone or exaggerated characterization - the restricted horizon of Schiller's school-life had given him little opportunity of knowing men and women - but in the sure dramatic instinct with which it is constructed and the directness with which it gives voice to the most pregnant ideas of the time.
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  • In this respect, Schiller's Rduber is one of the most vital German dramas of the 18th century.
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  • In January 1782 it was performed in the Court and National Theatre of Mannheim, Schiller himself having stolen secretly away from Stuttgart in order to be present.
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  • He had Schiller put under a fortnight's arrest, and forbade him to write any more "comedies" or to hold intercourse with any one outside of Wurttemberg.
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  • Schiller, embittered enough by the uncongenial conditions of his Stuttgart life, resolved on flight, and took advantage of some court festivities in September 1782 to put his plan into execution.
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  • In July 1783 Schiller received a definite appointment for a year as "theatre poet" in Mannheim, and here both Fiesco and Kabale and Liebe were performed in 1784.
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  • In this drama Schiller's powers as a realistic portrayer of people and conditions familiar to him are seen to best advantage.
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  • Although Schiller failed to win an established position in Mannheim, he added to his literary reputation by his address on Die Schaubiihne als eine moralische Anstalt betrachtet (1784), and by the publication of the beginning of Don Carlos (in blank verse) in his journal, Die rheinische Thalia (1785).
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  • As Korner's guest in Dresden and at Loschwitz on the Elbe, Schiller completed Don Carlos, wrote the dramatic tale, Der Verbrecher aus Infamie (later entitled Der Verbrecher aus verlorener Ehre, 1786) and the unfinished novel, Der Geisterseher (1789).
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  • Korner's interest in philosophy also induced Schiller to turn his attention to such studies, the first results of which he published in the Philosophische Briefe (1786).
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  • Don Carlos, meanwhile, appeared in book form in 1787, and added to Schiller's reputation as a poet.
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  • In adopting verse instead of prose as a medium of expression, Schiller showed that he was prepared to challenge comparison with the great dramatic poets of other times and other lands; but in seeking a model for this higher type of tragedy he unfortunately turned rather to the classic theatre of France than to the English drama which Lessing, a little earlier, had pronounced more congenial to the German temperament.
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  • The unwieldiness of the plot and its inconsistencies show, too, that Schiller had not yet mastered the new form of drama; but Don Carlos at least provided him with an opportunity of expressing ideas of political and intellectual freedom with which, as the disciple of Rousseau, he was in warm sympathy.
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  • A new chapter in Schiller's life opened with his visit to Weimar in July 1787.
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  • The chief attraction for Schiller was, however, Frau von Kalb with whom he had been passionately in love in Mannheim; but not very long afterwards he made the acquaintance at Rudolstadt of the family von Lengefeld, the younger daughter of which subsequently became his wife.
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  • Meanwhile the preparation for Don Carlos had interested Schiller in history, and in 1788 he published the first volume of his chief historical work, Geschichte des Abfalls der vereinigten Niederlande von der spanischen Regierung, a book which at once gave him a respected position among the historians of the 18th century.
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  • Schiller's other historical writings comprise a Sammlung historischer Memoires, which he began to publish in 1790, and the Geschichte des dreissigjcihrigen Krieges (1791-1793).
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  • Before, however, the History of the Thirty Years' War was finished, Schiller had turned from history to philosophy.
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  • Schiller resolved to devote the leisure of these years to the study of philosophy.
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  • In the summer of 1790 he had lectured in Jena on the aesthetics of tragedy, and in the following year he studied carefully Kant's treatise on aesthetics, Kritik der Urteilskraft, which had just appeared and appealed powerfully to Schiller's mind.
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  • Ober Anmut and Wiirde, published in 1793, was a further contribution to the elucidation and widening of Kant's theories; and in the eloquent Briefe fiber die cisthetische Erziehung des9Menschen (1795), Schiller proceeded to apply his new standpoint to the problems of social and individual life.
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  • These remarkable letters were published in Die Horen, a new journal, founded in 1794, which was the immediate occasion for that intimate friendship with Goethe which dominated the remainder of Schiller's life.
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  • By degrees, however, Schiller's historical publications, and, in a higher degree, the magnificent poems, Die Gotter Griechenlands (1788) and Die Kiinstler (1789), awakened Goethe's respect, and in 1794, when the younger poet invited Goethe to become a collaborator in the Horen, the latter responded with alacrity.
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  • In the meantime a holiday in Schiller's Wurttemberg home had brought renewed health and vigour.
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  • An immediate outcome of the new friendship was Schiller's admirable essays, published in the Horen (1795-1796) and collected in 1800 under the title Ober naive and sentimentalische Dichtung.
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  • While Schiller's standpoint was too essentially that of his time to lay claim to finality, it is, on the whole, the most concise statement we possess of the literary theory which lay behind the classical literature of Germany.
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  • For Schiller himself this was the bridge that led back from philosophy to poetry.
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  • These poems appeared in the Musenalmanach, a new publication which Schiller began in 1796, the Horen, which had never met with the success it merited, coming to an end in 1797.
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  • In the Musenalmanach were also published the "Xenien" (1797), a collection of distichs by Goethe and Schiller, in which the two friends avenged themselves on the cavilling critics who were not in sympathy with them.
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  • The Almanach of the following year, 1798, was even more noteworthy, for it contained a number of Schiller's most popular ballads, "Der Ring des Poly-krates," "Der Handschuh," "Ritter Toggenburg," "Der Taucher," "Die Kraniche des Ibykus" and "Der Gang nach dem Eisenhammer;" "Der Kampf mit dem Drachen" following in 1799, and "Das Lied von der Glocke" in 1800.
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  • As a ballad poet, Schiller's popularity has been hardly less great than as a dramatist; the bold and simple outline, the terse dramatic characterization appealed directly to the popular mind, which did not let itself be disturbed by the often artificial and rhetorical tone into which the poet falls.
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  • But the supreme importance of the last period of Schiller's life lay in the series of master-dramas which he gave to the world between 1799 and 1804.
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  • The plan of Wallenstein was of long standing, and it was only towards the end, when Schiller realized the impossibility of saying all he had to say within five acts, that he decided to divide it into three parts, a descriptive prologue, Wallensteins Lager, and the two dramas Die Piccolomini and Wallensteins Tod.
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  • Without entirel y break ing with the pseudo-classic method he had adopted in Don Carlos - the two lovers, Max Piccolomini and Thekla, are an obvious concession to the tradition of the French theatre - Wallenstein shows how much Schiller's art had benefited by his study of Greek tragedy; the fatalism of his hero is a masterly application of an antique motive to a modern theme.
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  • The success of Wallenstein, with which Schiller passed at once into the front rank of European dramatists, was so encouraging that the poet resolved to devote himself with redoubled ardour to dramatic poetry.
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  • Wallenstein was followed in 1800 by Maria Stuart, a tragedy, which, in spite of its great popularity in and outside of Germany, was felt by the critics to follow too closely the methods of the lachrymose "tragedy of common life" to maintain a high position among Schiller's works.
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  • A finer production in every way is Schiller's "romantic tragedy," Die Jungfrau von Orleans (1801).
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  • The resplendent medieval colouring of the subject, the essentially heroic character of Joan of Arc, gave Schiller an admirable opportunity for the display of his rich imagination and rhetorical gifts; and by an ingenious alteration of the historical tradition, he was able to make the drama a vehicle for his own imperturbable moral optimism.
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  • In unity of style and in the high level of its dramatic diction, Die Jungfrau von Orleans is unsurpassed among Schiller's works.
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  • Between this drama and its successor, Die Brazil von Messina, Schiller translated and adapted to his classic ideals Shakespeare's Macbeth (1801) and Gozzi's Turandot (1802).
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  • As far as the diction itself is concerned, the lyric outbursts of the chorus gave Schiller's genius an opportunity of which he was not slow to avail himself.
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  • Besides writing Tell, Schiller had found time in 1803 and 1804 to translate two French comedies by Picard, and to prepare a German version of Racine's Phedre; and in the last months of his life he began a new tragedy, Demetrius, which gave every promise of being another step forward in his poetic achievement.
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  • Schiller died at Weimar on the 9th of May 1805.
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  • The first edition of Schiller's Sitmtliche Werke appeared in 1812-1815 in 12 vols.
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  • In completing Wilhelm Meister, Goethe found a sympathetic and encouraging critic in Schiller, to whom he owed in great measure his renewed interest in poetry.
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  • After years of tentative approaches on Schiller's part, years in which that poet concealed even from himself his desire for a friendly understanding with Goethe, the favourable moment arrived; it was in June 1794, when Schiller was seeking collaborators for his new periodical Die Horen; and his invitation addressed to Goethe was the beginning of a friendship which continued unbroken until the younger poet's death.
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  • The friendship of Goethe and Schiller, of which their correspondence is a priceless record, had its limitations; it was purely intellectual in character, a certain barrier of personal reserve being maintained to the last.
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  • As far as actual work was concerned, Goethe went his own way as he had always been accustomed to do; but the mere fact that he devoted himself with increasing interest to literature was due to Schiller's stimulus.
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  • It was Schiller, too, who induced him to undertake those studies on the nature of epic and dramatic poetry which resulted in the epic of Hermann and Dorothea and the fragment of the Achilleis; without the friendship there would have been no Xenien and no ballads, and it was his younger friend's encouragement which induced Goethe to betake himself once more to the "misty path" of Faust, and bring the first part of that drama to a conclusion.
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  • On the other hand, even the friendship with Schiller did not help him to add to his reputation as a dramatist.
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  • In its original form the poem was the dramatization of a specific and individualized story; in the years of Goethe's friendship with Schiller it was extended to embody the higher strivings of r8th-century humanism; ultimately, as we shall see, it became, in the second part, a vast allegory of human life and activity.
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  • The third and final period of Goethe's long life may be said to have begun after Schiller's death.
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  • He never again lost touch with literature as he had done in the years which preceded his friendship with Schiller; but he stood in no active or immediate connexion with the literary movement of his day.
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  • In 1805, as we have seen, he suffered an irreparable loss in the death of Schiller; in 1806, Christiane became his legal wife, and to the same year belongs the magnificent tribute to his dead friend, the Epilog zu Schillers Glocke.
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  • Goethe's dramas, on the other hand, have not, in the eyes of his nation, succeeded in holding their own beside Schiller's; but the reason is rather because Goethe, from what might be called a wilful obstinacy, refused to be bound by the conventions of the theatre, than because he was deficient in the cunning of the dramatist.
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  • From the philosophic movement, in which Schiller and the Romanticists were so deeply involved, Goethe stood apart.
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  • Kant he by no means ignored, and under Schiller's guidance he learned much from him; but of the younger thinkers, only Schelling, whose mystic nature-philosophy was a development of Spinoza's ideas, touched a sympathetic chord in his nature.
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  • This constellation has been known by many other names - Arcas, Arctophylax, Arcturus minor, Bubuleus, Bubulus, Canis latrans, Clamator, Icarus, Lycaon, Philometus, Plaustri custos, Plorans, Thegnis, Vociferator; the Arabs termed it Aramech or Archamech; Hesychius named it Orion; Jules Schiller, St Sylvester; Schickard, Nimrod; and Weigelius, the Three Swedish Crowns.
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  • He was well read in German literature, Heine and Schiller being his favourites, and the study of the German masters and the old classical writers of Iceland opened his eyes to the corrupt state of Icelandic poetry and showed him the way to make it better.
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  • The story (alluded to by Milton, Rabelais, Mrs Browning and Schiller) of the pilot Thamus, who, sailing near the island of Paxi in the time of Tiberius, was commanded by a mighty voice to proclaim that "Pan is dead," is found in Plutarch (De orac. defectu, 17).
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  • From 1789 to 1811 the Weimar court theatrical company gave performances here of the plays of Schiller and Goethe, an attraction which greatly contributed to the well-being of the town.
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  • An intelligent patron of literature and art, he attracted to his court the leading scholars in Germany; Goethe, Schiller and Herder were members of this illustrious band, and the little state, hitherto obscure, attracted the eyes of all Europe.'
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  • In pieces such as Liszt's " Poemes symphoniques," Ce qu'on entend sur la montagne (1848-1856), after a poem by Victor Hugo, and Die Ideale (1853-1857), after a poem by Schiller, the hearer is bewildered by a series of startling orchestral effects which succeed one another apparently without rhyme or reason.
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  • It is characteristic that, while Paris had its Bossuets and Bourdaloues, Vienna was listening to Abraham a Sancta Clara, the punning Capuchin whom Schiller, regardless of dates, introduces into the opening scene of his Wallenstein.
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  • It was most numerously attended about the middle of the 18th century; but the most brilliant professoriate was under the duke Charles Augustus, Goethe's patron (1787-1806), when Fichte, Hegel, Schelling, Schlegel and Schiller were on its teaching staff.
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  • At this stage he was much in sympathy with the historicorationalistic criticism of the Old Testament, as carried on in Germany; giving his assent, for instance, to the naturalistic doctrine of Schiller's Die Sendung Moses.
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  • Literature, science and art are represented in different parts of the city by statues and busts of Rauch, Schinkel, Thaer, Beuth, Schadow, Winckelmann, Schiller, Hegel and Jahn.
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  • Its Latin names are Persea, Muller catenata (" chained woman"), Virgo devota, &c.; the Arabians replaced the woman by a seal; Wilhelm Schickard (1592-1635) named the constellation "Abigail"; Julius Schiller assigned to it the figure of a sepulchre, naming it the "Holy Sepulchre."
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  • Schiller was also translated, and a few plays of Shakespeare (Hamlet, &c.) from a French version.
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  • Of the numerous dramas and poems of which Joan of Arc has been the subject, mention can only be made of Die Jungfrau von Orleans of Schiller, and of the Joan of Arc of Southey.
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  • Various memorials in and near the town commemorate the visits of Schiller to the neighbourhood in 1787 and 1788.
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  • In the public park there is a bust of Schiller, a monument to Alexander von Humboldt, and a statue of the mystic Jakob BOhme (1575-1624); a monument has been erected in the town in commemoration of the war of 1870-71, and also one to the emperor William I.
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  • Her chief tragic roles were Ophelia a Juliet, Desdemona, Queen Anne in Richard III., Louisa Miller, Maria Stuart, Schiller's Princess Eboli, Marion Delorme, Victor Hugo's Tisbe and Slowacki's Mazeppa.
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  • After being educated at Berlin, Gottingen and Jena, in the last of which places he formed a close and lifelong friendship with Schiller, he married Fraulein von Dacherode, a lady of birth and fortune, and in 1802 was appointed by the Prussian government first resident and then minister plenipotentiary at Rome.
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  • Perhaps, however, the most generally interesting of his works, outside those which deal with language, is his correspondence with Schiller, published in 1830.
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  • Wieland was appointed tutor to her son; and the names of Herder, Goethe and Schiller shed an undying lustre on her court.
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  • Schiller has proposed the general term " humanism."
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  • Schiller and Gellert also resided for a time in Leipzig, and Sebastian Bach and Mendelssohn filled musical posts here.
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  • In 1843 appeared her first volume of translations, Selections from the Dramas of Goethe and Schiller.
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  • In 1847 she published a translation of Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans; this was followed in 1850 by Faust, Tasso, Iphigenie and Egmont.
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  • Schiller at this period in vain sought to engage Kant upon his Horen.
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  • He was familiar with all German literature up to the date of his Kritik, but ceased to follow it in its great development by Goethe and Schiller.
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  • Vice President Philip Schiller, senior vice-president of worldwide product marketing, the Mac Pro will cost less than a comparably configured Dell PC.
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  • If the albite layers are too thick this schiller appears whitish which is less attractive.
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  • We may define these courses by the terms esoteric and exoteric - the former the philosophy of the school, cultivated principally at the universities, trying to systematize everything and reduce all our knowledge to an intelligible principle, losing in this attempt the deeper meaning of Leibnitz's philosophy; the latter the unsystematized philosophy of general culture which we find in the work of the great writers of the classical period, Lessing, Winkelmann, Goethe, Schiller and Herder, all of whom expressed in some degree their indebtedness to Leibnitz.
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  • Among these are the new palace, an imposing structure of the 18th century, finished in 1807; the old palace, a 16th-century building, with a picturesque arcaded court; the KOnigsbau, a huge modern building with a fine colonnade, containing ball and concert rooms; the so-called Akademie, formerly the seat of the Karlschule, where Schiller received part of his education, and now containing the royal library; and the court theatre, destroyed by fire in 1902, and subsequently rebuilt.
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  • Rudolph was crowned at Aix-la-Chapelle on the 24th of October 1273, and the feast which followed has been described by Schiller in Der Graf von Hapsburg.
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  • In front of the theatre are statues of Schiller, August Wilhelm Ifland the actor, and Wolfgang Heribert von Dalberg (1750-1806), intendant of the theatre in the time of Schiller.
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  • He came to England with his parents in 1799, but in1804-1805spent a winter with them at Weimar, where he met Goethe and Schiller, and received a bias to German literature which influenced his style and sentiments throughout his whole career.
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  • From Esslingen the Neckar becomes broader and deeper and its valley very picturesque, and after passing Cannstatt, from which point it is navigable for small craft, it flows through vine-clad hills by the pleasant village of Marbach, Schiller's birthplace, receives at Besigheim the waters of its most considerable tributary, the Enz, swirls down by Lauffen, and enters the beautiful vale of Heilbronn.
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  • Here Schiller arrives at his definition of beauty, as Freiheit in der Erscheinung, which, although it failed to remove Kant's difficulty that beauty was essentially a subjective conception, marked the beginning of a new stage in the history of German aesthetic theory.
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  • Here Schiller applied his aesthetic theories to that branch of art which was most peculiarly his own, the art of poetry; it is an attempt to classify literature in accordance with an a priori philosophic theory of "ancient" and "modern," "classic" and "romantic," "naive" and "sentimental"; and it sprang from the need Schiller himself felt of justifying his own "sentimental" and "modern" genius with the "naive" and "classic" tranquillity of Goethe's.
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  • Schiller's art, with its broad, clear lines, its unambiguous moral issues, and its enthusiastic optimism, has appealed with peculiar force to the German people, especially in periods of political despondency.
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  • In point of fact, Schiller's genius lacks that universality which characterizes Goethe's; as a dramatist, a philosopher, an historian, and a lyric poet, he was the exponent of ideas which belong rather to the Europe of the period before the French Revolution than to our time; we look to his high principles of moral conduct, his noble idealism and optimism, rather as the ideal of an age that has passed away than as the expression of the more material ambitions of the modern world.
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  • This collection of distichs, written in collaboration with Schiller, was prompted by the indifference and animosity of contemporary criticism, and its disregard for what the two poets regarded as the higher interests of German poetry.
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  • In his works on aesthetics he combined the views of Schelling with those of Winckelmann, Lessing, Kant,, Herder, Schiller and others.
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  • I took the greatest delight in these German books, especially Schiller's wonderful lyrics, the history of Frederick the Great's magnificent achievements and the account of Goethe's life.
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  • In the French course I read some of the works of Corneille, Moliere, Racine, Alfred de Musset and Sainte-Beuve, and in the German those of Goethe and Schiller.
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  • I have lately read "Wilhelm Tell" by Schiller, and "The Lost Vestal."...
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  • For activities involving bugs, the book Bug, Bugs, Bugs! by Pam Schiller includes a CD with songs and coloring pages with many crafts to choose.
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