Says sentence example

says
  • Daddy says I look just like Mom.
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  • In any case, as the song says, The times, they are a-changin'—and they are changing in a manner that governments probably can't keep up with.
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  • He says it's only a few miles away and we'll be right back.
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  • Sofi says his path is dark.
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  • I keep telling him that as long as he gives her money, she'll never get out of trouble, but he just says she's the only sister he has and he has the money.
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  • She's okay and says thanks.
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  • Uncle Henry says 'Eureka' means 'I have found it.'
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  • He says he prefers to come here for the present.
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  • "Sofi says you can heal," he said curiously.
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  • That's when I knew what everyone says about old mines being dangerous is true.
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  • It was the basis for the movie War Games in which the military's computer finally figures out it can't win in a nuclear launch scenario and says of such a war, Strange game.
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  • He says he's self employed.
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  • She says He (meaning God) is my dear father.
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  • So I say the horses and chickens are mine and Alex says the other animals are his.
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  • He laughs at me for being unwilling to hurt anyone else, but he says no one should feel shame about who they are.
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  • I should like to send a kiss to Vittorio, the little prince of Naples, but teacher says she is afraid you will not remember so many messages.
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  • In a prefatory note which Miss Sullivan wrote for St. Nicholas, she says that people frequently said to her, "Helen sees more with her fingers than we do with our eyes."
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  • He says the gentleman was not particularly interested, but said he would see if anything could be done.
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  • Dr. Bell writes that Helen's progress is without a parallel in the education of the deaf, or something like that and he says many nice things about her teacher.
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  • So who says pants are men's clothing?
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  • I know of no case in history that says otherwise.
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  • The doctor says her mind is too active; but how are we to keep her from thinking?
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  • "As soon as Napoleon's interpreter had spoken," says Thiers, "the Cossack, seized by amazement, did not utter another word, but rode on, his eyes fixed on the conqueror whose fame had reached him across the steppes of the East.
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  • A beekeeper, seeing the bee collect pollen from flowers and carry it to the hive, says that it exists to gather honey.
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  • She even enters into the spirit of battle; she says, "I think it is right for men to fight against wrongs and tyrants."
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  • Yes. Savelich says I must!
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  • "Chance created the situation; genius utilized it," says history.
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  • Who says there's a spider?
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  • Why, one might just as well say that a two-year-old child converses fluently when he says 'apple give,' or 'baby walk go.'
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  • He says the count was the last representative but one of the great century, and that it is his own turn now, but that he will do all he can to let his turn come as late as possible.
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  • "But did you notice, it says, 'for consultation'?" said Pierre.
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  • One historian says that an event was produced by Napoleon's power, another that it was produced by Alexander's, a third that it was due to the power of some other person.
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  • He wants us to do everything he says without question.
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  • His mother says there was a lot of experimental stuff done on him while he was out of it.
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  • The doctor says he is better.
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  • Is there a logical end to that—a physical or economic law of some kind that says only 10 percent or 20 percent or 30 percent of people can ever be this wealthy?
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  • If she wants water she says, "Give Helen drink water."
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  • After a moment she went on: A. says God is everywhere, and that He is all love; but I do not think a person can be made out of love.
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  • Why not, says Miss Sullivan, make a language lesson out of what they were interested in?
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  • No, she is not stupid, she is an excellent girl," he sometimes said to himself "she never makes a mistake, never says anything stupid.
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  • She says: 'I shall love him always, but let him be free.'
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  • He pretends to fall into a swoon and says senseless things that should have ruined him.
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  • A poet admires the bee sucking from the chalice of a flower and says it exists to suck the fragrance of flowers.
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  • Your boss says you're the best thing that ever happened to the diner.
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  • He says it's urgent!
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  • From what Fred says after snooping on the Internet, Mr. Westlake is quite wealthy.
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  • Now, Brother Felix says I can read almost as well as he.
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  • This is because history repeats itself—at least, as the great historian Will Durant says, "in outline form."
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  • "There is no way to become original, except to be born so," says Stevenson, and although I may not be original, I hope sometime to outgrow my artificial, periwigged compositions.
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  • In one of his letters, speaking of how God in every way tells us of His love, he says, "I think he writes it even upon the walls of the great house of nature which we live in, that he is our Father."
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  • Writing of the moment when she learned that everything has a name, she says: We met the nurse carrying my little cousin; and teacher spelled 'baby.'
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  • He says, "That's good."
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  • Of this, he says, every man shall judge for himself.
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  • The sergeant, who was evidently wiser than his general, goes up to Auersperg and says: 'Prince, you are being deceived, here are the French!'
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  • And Fedya, with his noble spirit, loved him and even now never says a word against him.
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  • Karl Ivanich always says that sleep is more important than anything, whispered Princess Mary with a sigh.
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  • So he was brought, quite blind, straight to her, and he goes up to her and falls down and says, 'Make me whole,' says he, 'and I'll give thee what the Tsar bestowed on me.'
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  • Another says clever things and one doesn't care to listen, but this one talks rubbish yet stirs an old fellow up.
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  • He says she's moved them into the Otradnoe enclosure.
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  • "He says he expected it," she remarked.
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  • Napoleon's historian Thiers, like other of his historians, trying to justify his hero says that he was drawn to the walls of Moscow against his will.
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  • He says they may! whispered Natasha.
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  • Father, he says, 'All my children are the same to me: it hurts the same whichever finger gets bitten.
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  • The news of that battle of Tarutino, unexpectedly received by Napoleon at a review, evoked in him a desire to punish the Russians (Thiers says), and he issued the order for departure which the whole army was demanding.
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  • I say: 'Papa wants to sleep!' but she says, 'No, he's laughing.'
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  • "Says you," she muttered as she bit her lip.
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  • It says it's a moving sale.
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  • She says you hit her.
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  • Aaron says Rob invited himself to come here.
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  • He says, the court of investigation before which I was brought consisted of eight people: four blind, four seeing persons.
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  • My teacher says, if children learn to be patient and gentle while they are little, that when they grow to be young ladies and gentlemen they will not forget to be kind and loving and brave.
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  • When she is talking with an intimate friend, however, her hand goes quickly to her friend's face to see, as she says, "the twist of the mouth."
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  • When she is riding in the carriage she will not allow the driver to use the whip, because, she says, "poor horses will cry."
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  • Her friend, Mr. John Hitz, whose native tongue is German, says that her pronunciation is excellent.
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  • Teacher says it was a day-dream, and she thinks you would be delighted to hear it.
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  • So the master of words is master of thoughts which the words create, and says things greater than he could otherwise know.
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  • One man says, in his despair or indifference to life, take up a handful of the earth at your feet, and paint your house that color.
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  • "I suppose there's no harm in going after such a thing to-day," says he.
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  • Michaux, more than thirty years ago, says that the price of wood for fuel in New York and Philadelphia "nearly equals, and sometimes exceeds, that of the best wood in Paris, though this immense capital annually requires more than three hundred thousand cords, and is surrounded to the distance of three hundred miles by cultivated plains."
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  • And Boris says it is quite possible.
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  • And he says Buonaparte is in Braunau!
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  • When he entered, Prince Andrew, his eyes drooping contemptuously (with that peculiar expression of polite weariness which plainly says, "If it were not my duty I would not talk to you for a moment"), was listening to an old Russian general with decorations, who stood very erect, almost on tiptoe, with a soldier's obsequious expression on his purple face, reporting something.
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  • Well, she says you are to forget all that....
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  • When later on in his memoirs Count Rostopchin explained his actions at this time, he repeatedly says that he was then actuated by two important considerations: to maintain tranquillity in Moscow and expedite the departure of the inhabitants.
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  • Napoleon, too, carried away his own personal tresor, but on seeing the baggage trains that impeded the army, he was (Thiers says) horror-struck.
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  • That rule says that an attacker should concentrate his forces in order to be stronger than his opponent at the moment of conflict.
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  • Military science says that the more troops the greater the strength.
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  • 'I don't grieve for myself,' he says, 'God, it seems, has chastened me.
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  • Modern history replying to these questions says: you want to know what this movement means, what caused it, and what force produced these events?
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  • Thiers, a Bonapartist, says that Napoleon's power was based on his virtue and genius.
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  • Another man says the locomotive moves because its wheels go round.
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  • That is the way it should be, Mama says.
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  • Do what he says.
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  • Do everything he says.
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  • Besides, the cops only had eyes for me, like the song says.
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  • He says the mate of the Dark One can do whatever she wants.
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  • He says he's Alex's father.
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  • The doctor says he should recover completely, though.
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  • "The doctor says you can come home Friday if you continue to improve," she said.
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  • Katie says I'd better find a way to communicate with you.
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  • If a woman says no and a man does it anyway, isn't that rape?
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  • The doctor says I can talk, but I think he is trying to avoid a law suit.
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  • There's nothing else on the planet that forces you to really see and accept who you are as the day the doctor says you're dying.
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  • Rhyn says to send you his way when you're done here.
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  • "If you're a tenth of the man everyone says you are, you'll stop when I ask you to," she whispered.
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  • When a woman says something like that, she's waiting for you to fill in the details.
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  • Do as Darkyn says, Deidre.
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  • Do what the demon says and almost have a fifty percent chance of surviving.
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  • I don't care what anyone says, not Dr. Williams, not my sister, not you!
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  • "Toby says you're going to kill me," she said, heart hammering.
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  • A good leader makes a good team the best, as my father says.
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  • Warden says one every moon cycle.
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  • It says it's an island off the coast of Ireland.
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  • "Can you tell me what it says?" she prodded.
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  • The Code says I shouldn.t, not that I can.t.
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  • From what Gio says, she.ll want to stay, and I doubt she.d consider mating with someone like me abhorrent.
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  • But, if you do as Sasha says and break the bond, I will keep her safe, I swear it, Kris said.
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  • The guy I spoke to said he beat the ever-living shit out of them all at once, until they agreed to come back and do what Kris says.
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  • He says to enter the main house by the first entrance you find.
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  • My brother says your home is very different, that we need to teach you everything.
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  • Talal says you have no knowledge of our war.
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  • While I've never seen what lies within, legend says it's the key to the planet's survival.
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  • Mansr says there will be water as long as I'm on Anshan.
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  • The guy says you lied to him on the phone.
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  • Who says I'm just taking it up?
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  • Weller says Shipton claims he doesn't.
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  • Oh, I guess I'm just being foolish like Claire says.
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  • She only says he held her.
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  • "Gladys says they really got along great," Cynthia said, with a smile.
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  • She says he's captivated by her writing.
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  • So, he's a jerk—but that doesn't mean everything he says is a lie.
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  • She says they have plenty of snow up there.
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  • Any admission by her usually means a lot more than what she says.
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  • The doctor says the next few hours and days will tell the difference.
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  • "Ten bucks says I know who he's looking for," Dean answered.
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  • A woman, dreaming of her pending marriage, scratched in tiny letters with her diamond, 'So in love, says everyone,' on the pane of her bedroom window.
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  • The paper says she was extremely distraught and sedated, and under a suicide watch.
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  • She says she ain't hungry.
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  • The doctor says long term, it looks good.
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  • Like the note says.
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  • Sure. It says, 'I'm going to hell for what I did,' doesn't it?
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  • 'So in love, says everyone.'
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  • Janet says I got to earn my keep.
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  • One of them bundles says it's Mrs. Shipton's stuff but all it has in it is the white dress.
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  • It's temporary custody at first until some court stuff takes place and we're married but the lawyer says Shipton definitely signed.
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  • So in love says everyone....
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  • "Either way," he said, "'So in love, says everyone.'"
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  • I think the best advice I can give, is try to understand that everything she does and says initially comes from fear and shock.
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  • Sure, he says he wants a woman who doesn't work out of the home, but he thinks she should spend all her time doing housework and raising children.
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  • He says women should stay home and watch the kids, but I've heard him talk about some of the girls that do.
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  • He says they're too lazy to work.
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  • The doctor says you're going to be here for a few more days.
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  • The doctor says I can go home tomorrow.
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  • The doctor says I can go home tomorrow, though.
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  • What house? she says.
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  • Unfortunately, Arnie needs a babysitter, someone who can hush up anything he says that he shouldn't.
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  • Greenie says you have to go back to work.
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  • It says it's at the edge of the city and open.
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  • Mike says along the Mississippi, all the towns are like this.
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  • Dan says the condos were leveled about two days after the helo went down.
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  • Elise says you used to call her to kill bugs in your room.
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  • Auntie Hannah says she'd be my mom for all time, so I wouldn't have to have any other moms.
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  • I know, I know, Kris says I'm an angel and angels are supposed to protect humans and you're anything but human but I still want to stay with you.
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  • Gabe says she's a bitch.
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  • I'm getting out of here.  If what she says is true, you can come visit whenever you want.
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  • He says nobody in their right mind would skip out on her.
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  • Sure, it looks like a phony and we've got to check it out, but my money says it's a drowning.
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  • He says he doesn't want me to worry.
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  • The newspaper says someone talked with Byrne—an employee.
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  • They're gone and the street says they're history and now there's a contract out on me!
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  • She says you've been really good about all this.
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  • He says this Baratto thing is too hot to waste time.
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  • She added, "Leland Anderson's wife Marian says you're a schmuck for not solving the Byrne thing and causing her to lose her bet."
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  • If you're an honest, law-abiding guy, like everyone says Jeffrey Byrne was or is, why don't you just turn it in to the closest police station?
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  • My chief says for us not to break our butts wasting any more time chasing him down.
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  • Who says the motor home belonged to Cleary?
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  • It says right here, 'One large patch, three small ones and a tube of gunk to stick 'em with.
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  • We still have to wait a little while and there are lots of details to iron out, but Ms. Rosewater says it looks positive.
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  • Who says Byrne bought them?
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  • I managed to push the picture of Byrne in his face and he says the guy didn't look nothing like that and I should get lost.
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  • We got his picture—even if it is a few years old—and my money says he hasn't changed much.
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  • Sorry about the leg, but Mr. Winston says to keep the light off.
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  • Mr. Winston says you know the whole business— how the dough fell out of the sky.
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  • I belong to Alice... at least, that's what she says.
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  • He says blond hair and amethyst eyes are a killer combination.
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  • Says the veterinarian who envisioned steak lines on the buffalo.
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  • If he really has lots of money, like everyone says, why did he move up here?
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  • Katie says you're questioning my intentions toward you and your property.
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  • "She says she loves me," he finally said around it.
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  • "She's gone to work all day," he continued, "and when she gets home she says she's tired.
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  • That's what Alex says, but I don't want to adopt a baby and then have the mother change her mind after we've learned to love it.
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  • Mums says a couple should never go to bed angry.
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  • The doctor says late December.
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  • Katie says I need to see a shrink.
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  • Lori says she's afraid to go back with you.
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  • Do as your father says.
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  • Sofi says to tell you they're in the wine cellar.
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  • "That's not what Sofi says," Yully said at last.
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  • This time, Xander says Darian's fate is not the same as his predecessor.
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  • Xander says they can't kill him, but maybe they can keep him from destroying our world.
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  • She says they're alive but she can't find them.
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  • It says my uncle killed my mate and daughter, not the bandits.
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  • My son nears the age where my uncle says the demon must claim him as a host.
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  • He speaks highly of Taran, says he is an honorable man.
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  • He says Memon agrees to your banquet, but in two days.
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  • She says that, but who's carrying the rifle?
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  • Everything he says makes me feel uncomfortable.
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  • Katie says he is too controlling.
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  • The doctor says I can take it out of the sling when I'm resting.
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  • He says it will remind me not to use it.
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  • She says Morino is not well.
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  • She also says Alex is there and he does not look well.
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  • Justin says I should get out more, but I came here to take a break from the miseries of social life.
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  • When I ask him if I can take you a message, he says no, to just wait until you come into town and have you call him.
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  • He calls at weird hours and you must do what he says.
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  • When Laurencio says we're done.
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  • That's not what the pic says.
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  • "Your cousin says you haven't dated anyone in four years," he said.
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  • That pic all over the web says differently.
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  • It says a lot about both of you.
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  • It says a lot about me, not him.
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  • He says he's happy to see you.
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  • I guess the necklace says it all.
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  • "Everyone says Caleb," Darian said over his shoulder with a grunt.
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  • The atomist has an easy answer; he says that the new body is made up by the juxtaposition of the atoms of iodine and mercury, which still exist in the red powder.
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  • " Character," says George Sand, " is in a great measure hereditary: if my readers wish to know me they must know my father."
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  • Farnell refers to the ancient association between the healing craft and the singing of spells, and says that it is impossible to decide which is the original sense.
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  • It also indicates how much contempt might be associated with this pretended worship. The people, says Suetonius (Jul.
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  • Elsewhere he says that he is "non ita dives" ii.
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  • The decree of the Congregation of Rites (May 18,1819) says nothing about apparels, but only lays down that the alb must be of white linen or hemp cloth.
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  • 2 Elster (Beitrage) says that the poem is the work of two poets: the first part by a Thuringian wandering minstrel, the second - which differs in style and dialect - by a Bavarian official.
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  • (a) As the Council expressly says, the infallibility of the pope is not other than that of the Church; this is a point which is too often forgotten or misunderstood.
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  • As Graetz says: "To Jeremiah and Mar Samuel Judaism owes the possibility of existence in a foreign country."
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  • On the death of her husband in 1811 Mrs Hood removed to Islington, where Thomas Hood had a schoolmaster who appreciated his talents, and, as he says, "made him feel it impossible not to take an interest in learning while he seemed so interested in teaching."
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  • He was present with his pupil at the battle of Steinkirk, and "faced fire," says Marshal Luxembourg, "like a grenadier."
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  • Science, he says, may be compared to a tree; metaphysics is the root, physics is the trunk, and the three chief branches are mechanics, medicine and Ouvres, viii.
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  • " I should be glad," he says, when talking of a publisher, 1 " if the whole book were printed in good type, on good paper, and I should like to have at least 200 copies for distribution.
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  • Undoubtedly, says Descartes, the world was in the beginning created in all its perfection.
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  • " I had no intention," 5 he says in the Method, " of attempting to master all 2 lb.
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  • Such are the four points of Cartesian method: (1) Truth requires a clear and distinct conception of its object, excluding all doubt; (2) the objects of knowledge naturally fall into series or groups; (3) in these groups investigation must begin with a simple and indecomposable element, and pass from it to the more complex and relative elements; (4) an exhaustive and immediate grasp of the relations and interconnexion of these elements is necessary for knowledge in the fullest sense of that word.4 " There is no question," he says in anticipation of Locke and Kant, " more important to solve than that of knowing what human knowledge is and how far it extends."
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  • The very moment when we begin to think, says Descartes, when we cease to be merely receptive, when we draw back and fix our attention on any point whatever of our belief, - that moment doubt begins.
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  • " The majority of men," he says himself, " do not think of God as an infinite and incomprehensible being, and as the sole author from whom all things depend; they go no further than the letters of his name."
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  • " Scarcely any supposition," 2 he says, " can be made from which the same result, though possibly with greater difficulty, might not be deduced by the same laws of nature; for since, in virtue of these laws, matter successively assumes all the forms of which it is capable, if we consider these forms in order, we shall at one point or other reach the existing form of the world, so that no error need here be feared from a false supposition."
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  • " It seems to me," he says, " that in receiving such and such an idea the mind is passive, and that it is active only in volition; that its Psychoi deas are put in it partly by the objects which touch the senses, partly by the impressions in the brain, and partly also by the dispositions which have preceded in the mind itself and by the movements of its will."
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  • about 1190), in his biography of Thomas Becket, gives a graphic sketch of the London of his day and, writing of the summer amusements of the young men, says that on holidays they were "exercised in Leaping, Shooting, Wrestling, Casting of Stones [in jactu lapidum], and Throwing of Javelins fitted with Loops for the Purpose, which they strive to fling before the Mark; they also use Bucklers, like fighting Men."
    0
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  • "The frolic went all over England," says Roger North; and the addresses of the Abhorrers which reached the king from all parts of the country formed a counterblast to those of the Petitioners.
    0
    0
  • Praetor ius's Cammerton, or chamber pitch, formulated in his diagrams for voices and instruments, is, he says, a whole tone higher; equivalent, therefore, to a' 475.65.
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    0
  • In one passage he distinctly says the old organ high pitch had been a whole tone above his Cammerton, with which we shall find his tertia minore combines to make the required interval.
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    0
  • This is the course taken by Jeremiah, who says boldly that God requires only obedience (Jer.
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  • Epiphanius (Vitae prophetarum) says that he came up from Babylon while still young, prophesied the return, witnessed the building of the temple and received an honoured burial near the priests.
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  • Robert Napier says that these results would have been reduced to order and demonstrated consecutively but for his father's death.
    0
    0
  • "Calvin," says Principal Lindsay, "did three things for Geneva all of which went far beyond its walls.
    0
    0
  • Dio Cassius says that Bocchus sent his sons to support Sextus Pompeius in Spain, while Bogud fought on the side of Caesar, and there is no doubt that after Caesar's death Bocchus supported Octavian, and Bogud Antony, During Bogud's absence in Spain, his brother seized the whole of Numidia, and was confirmed sole ruler by Octavian.
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  • Diodorus says that the rock at the back of the palace containing the royal sepulchres is so steep that the bodies could be raised to their last resting-place only by mechanical appliances.
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  • the barbarians," says Strabo (x.
    0
    0
  • " It is noteworthy," says Professor D.
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    0
  • " The day," says Ernest Renan, " in which the belief in an after-life shall vanish from the earth will witness a terrific moral and spiritual decadence.
    0
    0
  • "In all these works," says Plutarch, "Pheidias was the adviser and overseer of Pericles."
    0
    0
  • Franck, in his preface, says the original was in English; elsewhere he says it was in Latin; the theory that his German was really the original is unwarrantable.
    0
    0
  • Although the first definite endeavour to locate the Golden Chersonese thus dates from the middle of the 2nd century of our era, the name was apparently well known to the learned of Europe at a somewhat earlier period, and in his Antiquities of the Jews, written during the latter half of the 1st century, Josephus says that Solomon gave to the pilots furnished to him by Hiram of Tyre commands " that they should go along with his stewards to the land that of old was called Ophir, but now the Aurea Chersonesus, which belongs to India, to fetch gold."
    0
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  • In life, however, its appearance must be wholly unlike, for it rarely flies, hops actively on the ground or among bushes, with its tail erect or turned towards its head, and continually utters various and strange notes, - some, says Darwin, are "like the cooing of doves, others like the bubbling of water, and many defy all similes."
    0
    0
  • In the church meeting, says Paul, "I had rather speak five words with my understanding, that I might instruct others also, than ten thousand words in a tongue."
    0
    0
  • A Brabantine chronicle says that he was killed by an insane secretary (a clerico suo quasi dementi).
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  • 134-6), says that he found "death slow in coming," and some have concluded that this indicates death by suicide.
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  • Good, he says, is the fulfilment of man's destiny, evil the thwarting of it.
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  • 1: 58), where he says that Plautus was regarded as a second Epicharmus: Plautus ad exemplar Siculi properare Epicharmi - a passage which is important as suggesting that Plautus was under some obligation to the Sicilian representatives of the old Dorian comedy; cf.
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  • 420, where Polonius says, "The best actors in the world.
    0
    0
  • Chadwick (Studies on AngloSaxon Institutions, 1905) says that "the sense of subordination must have been inherent in the word from the earliest time," but it has no connexion with the German dienen, to serve.
    0
    0
  • But, like all other words of the kind, the word thegn was slowly changing its meaning, and, as Stubbs says (Const.
    0
    0
  • De Granier died in September 1602, and the new bishop entered on the administration of his vast diocese, which, as a contemporary says, "he found brick and left marble."
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    0
  • In the Novum Organum, after giving a long list of the sources of heat, he says: "From these examples, taken collectively as well as singly, the nature whose limit is heat appears to be motion..
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  • God, he says, is to be regarded not as an absolute but as an Infinite Person, whose nature it is that he should realize himself in finite persons.
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  • "I buried myself," he says, "in my laboratory, and in fourteen months read a course of chemical lectures to a very full audience."
    0
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  • 12.53), comparing these writers with the old Ionic logographers, says that they paid no attention to ornament, and considered the only merits of a writer to be intelligibility and conciseness.
    0
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  • If there were such a thing as a triangle contained by absolutely straight lines, its three angles would no doubt measure what Euclid says; but straight lines and true triangles nowhere exist in reruns natura.
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  • On ethics, Locke says very little, although that little is hedonist and determinist.
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  • You call it unjust, he says in effect, that you should be punished.
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    0
  • If George Eliot is guilty of a platitude when she says that " consequences are unpitying," then Butler's argument is empty: but not otherwise.
    0
    0
  • Trace out the clue of causation to the end, says Hegel in effect, and it introduces you, not to a single first cause beyond nature, but to the totality of natural process - a substance, as it were, in which all causes inhere.
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  • Modern doubt does not say there is no God; it says, We don't know.
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    0
  • says that in future no scutage or aid, beyond the three recognized feudal aids, shall be levied except by the consent of the general council of the nation (commune concilium regni nostri), while the three recognized aids shall only be levied at a reasonable rate.
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  • says knights must not be compelled to give money instead of performing castle-guard, if they are willing to perform this service.
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  • says that the lands of convicted felons shall be handed over to the lords of such lands and not kept by the king beyond a year and a day.
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  • simply says, "To no one will we sell, to no one will we refuse or delay, right or justice."
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  • says that the royal officials must know something of the law and must be desirous of keeping it.
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    0
  • says that certain royal minions, who are mentioned by name, are to be removed from their offices.
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  • says that as soon as peace is made all foreign mercenaries are to be banished.
    0
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  • Edmund Burke says "Magna Carta, if it did not give us originally the House of Commons, gave us at least a House of Commons of weight and consequence."
    0
    0
  • Green says "The rights which the barons claimed for themselves they claimed for the nation at large."
    0
    0
  • Thus he says that nature fashions organs in the order of their necessity, the first being those essential to life.
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    0
  • Very curious, in relation to modern evolutional ideas, is the Stoical doctrine that our world is but one of a series of exactly 1 Zeller says that through this distinction Aristotle first made possible the idea of development.
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  • He vaguely anticipates the modern idea of the world as a survival of the fittest when he says that many races may have lived and died out, and that those which still exist have been protected either by craft, courage or speed.
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  • 5) he says that the universal existence of sensation in matter cannot be disproved, though he shows that when there are no organic arrangements the mental side of the movement (phantasma) is evanescent.
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  • This, he says, must not be conceived as resulting from the action of external causes, but is due to a natural disposition (Anlage).
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  • Nature (says Zeller) is to Hegel a system of gradations, of which one arises necessarily out of the other, and is the proximate truth of that out of which it results.
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    0
  • He says Lamarck's original animal is something metaphysical, not physical, namely, the will to live.
    0
    0
  • In the preface, Lamarck says that the work was written in 1776, and presented to the Academy in 1780; but it was not published before 2794, and at that time it presumably expressed Lamarck's mature views.
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  • Tradition says he was ensnared and poisoned by Stephania, the widow of Crescentius.
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  • c. 1090), who says that his account of the solemn translation to Canterbury in 1023 was received from the dean, Godric, one of Alphege's own scholars.
    0
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  • Fournier (p. 219) says that in France it was not till the 17th century that there grew up a custom of having different officials for the metropolitan, one for him as bishop, a second as metropolitan, and even a third as primate, with an appeal from one to the other, and that it was an abuse due to the parlements which strove to make the official independent of the bishop. In England there has been, for a long time, a separate diocesan court of Canterbury held before the " commissary."
    0
    0
  • As bishop Stubbs says (Report of Eccl.
    0
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  • Van Espen says: " The whole right of appeal to the Roman pontiff omisso medio had undoubtedly its origin in this principle, that the Roman pontiff is ordinary of ordinaries, or, in other words, has immediate episcopal authority in all particular churches, and this principle had its own beginning from the False Decretals."
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  • In the 13th centur y Archbishop Peckham, says Maitland (p. 117), as archbishop "asserted for himself and his official (1) a general right to entertain in the first instance complaints made against his suffragans' subjects, and (2) a general right to hear appeals omisso medio."
    0
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  • He says (p. 253, ed.
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  • Marcus himself says, "To the gods I am indebted for having good grandfathers, good parents, a good sister, good teachers, good associates, good kinsmen and friends, nearly everything good."
    0
    0
  • During the reign of Antoninus Pius (138 to 161), the concord between him and Aurelius was complete; Capitolinus (c. 7) says "nec praeter duas noctes per tot annos mansit diversis vicibus."
    0
    0
  • But, as Tenneman says, he imparted to it "a character of gentleness and benevolence, by making it subordinate to a love of mankind, allied to religion."
    0
    0
  • The statute, however, would not seem to have had much effect; for in spite of a proclamation of Queen Elizabeth in 1560 imposing a fine of £ 20 for each offence on butchers slaughtering animals during Lent, in 1563 Sir William Cecil, in Notes upon an Act for the Increase of the Navy, says that "in old times no flesh at all was eaten on fish days; even the king himself could not have license; which was occasion of eating so much fish as now is eaten in flesh upon fish days."
    0
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  • Later writers, Posidonius, Diodorus, Strabo and others, call them smallish islands off (Strabo says, some way off) the north-west coast of Spain, which contained tin mines, or, as Strabo says, tin and lead mines - though a passage in Diodorus derives the name rather from their nearness to the tin districts of north-west Spain.
    0
    0
  • For example, Schimper, after describing the scierophyllous woodland of the Mediterranean district and of the Cape district, says:
    0
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  • With regard to the causation of variation Darwin says (Origin of Species, ch.
    0
    0
  • "This land Persis," says Darius, in an inscription at Persepolis, "which Ahuramazda has given to me, which is beautiful and rich in horses and men, according to the will of Ahuramazda and myself it trembles before no enemy."
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  • He says: " The surface of each of our great continental masses of land resembles that of a long and broad arch-like form, of which we see the simplest type in the New World.
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  • Some geographers distinguish a mountain from a hill by origin; thus Professor Seeley says " a mountain implies elevation and a hill implies denudation, but the external forms of both are often identical."
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  • "The nodules, having been imbued with phosphatic matter from their matrix in the London Clay, were dislodged," says Buckland, "by the waters of the seas of the first period, and accumulated by myriads at the bottom of those shallow seas where is now the coast of Suffolk.
    0
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  • Esprit Flechier, bishop of Nimes, in this Histoire du cardinal Jimenes (Paris, 1693), says that Torquemada made her promise that when she became queen she would make it her principal business to chastise and destroy heretics.
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  • Some fled the country, but many (Mariana says 17,000) offered themselves for reconciliation.
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  • Soon afterwards he died, on the 16th of September 1498, "full of years and merit" says his biographer.
    0
    0
  • Thus the Zulu says to the ancestral ghost, "Help me or you will feed on nettles"; whilst the still more primitive Australian exclaims to the "dead hand" that he carries about with him as a kind of divining-rod, "Guide me aright, or I throw you to the dogs."
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  • A favourite contrast for which there is more to be said is that drawn between the m k agico-religious spell-ritual, that says in effect, "My will be done," and the spirit of "Thy will be done" that breathes through the highest forms of worship. Such resignation in the face of the divine will and providence is, however, not altogether beyond the horizon of primitive faith, as witness the following prayer of the Khonds of Orissa: "We are ignorant of what it is good to ask for.
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  • Prominent among them, and dwelling in the division occupied by the Celts, were the Helvetii, the Sequani and the Aedui, in the basins of the Rhodanus and its tributary the Arar (Saone), who, he says, were reckoned the three most powerful nations in all Gaul; the Arverni in the mountains of Cebenna; the Senones and Carnutes in the basin of the Liger; the Veneti and other Armorican tribes between the mouths of the Liger and Sequana.
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  • His great work, the forcing into common law of the principles of civil law, was unaccomplished; but Story says "he seemed about to accomplish [it]; for his arguments before the Supreme Court were crowded with the principles of the Roman Law, wrought into the texture of the Common Law with great success."
    0
    0
  • "Virtue," says Socrates, "is knowledge": in the ultimate harmony of morality with reason is to be found the only true existence of man.
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  • "Just as a steamengine," he says in Kraft and Stoff (7th ed., p. 130), "produces motion, so the intricate organic complex of force-bearing substance in an animal organism produces a total sum of certain effects, which, when bound together in a unity, are called by us mind, soul, thought."
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  • Butler says nothing about incomprehensible mysteries, and protests that reason is the only ground we have to proceed upon.
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    0
  • Philastrius, however, says: hominem autem ab angelis factum asserit, while according to Epiphanus xxiv.
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    0
  • Herodotus describes Hegesistratus as a bastard, and Thucydides says that Thessalus was legitimate.
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    0
  • " For our sins," says the Russian chronicler of the time, " unknown nations arrived.
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    0
  • " The manner of the carriage," says Lord Keeper North in 1676, " is by laying rails of timber.
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    0
  • what is usually called spiritualism) "is supported," says Serjeant Cox.
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    0
  • If tradition is any guide, human sacrifice seems in many important areas to be of secondary character; in spite of the great development of the rite among the Aztecs, tradition says that it was unknown till two hundred years before the conquest; in Polynesia human sacrifices seem to be comparatively modern; and in India they appear to have been rare among the Vedic peoples.
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    0
  • John Johnston in his Coronis martyrum says he died in exile in 1556.
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    0
  • "In the single row," says Evelyn (Sylva, p. 29, 1664), "it makes the noblest and the stateliest hedges for long Walks in Gardens or Parks, of any Tree whatsoever whose leaves are deciduous."
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    0
  • Diogenes Laertius says that his works filled ten volumes, but of these fragments only remain.
    0
    0
  • He says he translated "oute of Laten, Frenche, and Doche," but he seems to have been most familiar with the Latin version.
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    0
  • William Gilpin calls the cypress an architectural tree: "No Italian scene," says he, "is perfect without its tall spiral form, appearing as if it were but a part of the picturesquely disposed edifices which rise from the middle ground against the distant landscape."
    0
    0
  • " Many anxious and solitary days," says Gibbon, " did she consume with patient trial of every mode of relief and amusement.
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    0
  • Of 1748 he says, " This year, the twelfth of my age, I shall note as the most propitious to the growth of my intellectual stature."
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    0
  • After detailing the circumstances which unlocked for him the door of his grandfather's " tolerable library," he says, " I turned over many English pages of poetry and romance, of history and travels.
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    0
  • " He is willing," he says, to allow M.
    0
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  • In January 1756 he says: " I determined to read over the Latin authors in order, and read this year Virgil, Sallust, Livy, Velleius Paterculus, Valerius Maximus, Tacitus, Suetonius, Quintus Curtius, Justin, Florus, Plautus, Terence and Lucretius.
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  • After breakfast " he was expected," he says, to spend an hour with Mrs Gibbon; after tea his father claimed his conversation; in the midst of an interesting work he was often called down to entertain idle visitors; and, worst of all, he was periodically compelled to return the well-meant compliments.
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  • His father's library, though large in comparison with that he commanded at Lausanne, contained, he says, " much trash "; but a gradual process of reconstruction transformed it at length into that " numerous and select " library which was " the foundation of his works, and the best comfort of his life both at home and abroad."
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  • " I am not conscious," says he, " of having ever bought a book from a motive of ostentation; every volume, before it was deposited on the shelf, was either read or sufficiently examined "; he also mentions that he soon adopted the tolerating maxim of the elder Pliny, that no book is ever so bad as to be absolutely good for nothing.
    0
    0
  • The subject of this youthful effort was suggested, its author says, by a refinement of vanity - " the desire of justifying and praising the object of a favourite pursuit," namely, the study of ancient literature.
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    0
  • " In England," he says, " it was received with cold indifference, little read, and speedily forgotten.
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    0
  • At the commencement, he says, " all was dark and doubtful "; the limits, divisions, even the title of his work were undetermined; the first chapter was composed three times, and the second and third twice, before he was satisfied with his efforts.
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    0
  • " In London," says he, " I was lost in the crowd; I ranked with the first families in Lausanne, and my style of prudent expense enabled me to maintain a fair balance of reciprocal civilities..
    0
    0
  • Differing as they did in politics, Gibbon's testimony to the genius and character of the great statesman is highly honourable to both: " Perhaps no human being," he says, " was ever more perfectly exempt from the taint of malevolence, vanity, or falsehood."
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  • This is illustrated by his love of Switzerland, his intense interest in the fortunes of that country, his design of writing " The History of the Liberty of the Swiss " - a theme, he says " from which the dullest stranger would catch fire."
    0
    0
  • That the substance of the Physiologus was borrowed from commentaries on Scripture 4 is confirmed by many of the sections opening with a text, followed up by some such formula as "but the Physiologus says."
    0
    0
  • " The man," Aristotle says, " was by race a Jew out of Coele-Syria.
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    0
  • Pollio the Pharisee and Sameas his disciple were in special honour with him, Josephus says, when he re-entered Jerusalem and put to death the leaders of the faction of Antigonus.
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    0
  • The country, Josephus says, was full of " robbers " and " wizards."
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    0
  • A deserter announced his arrival to Vespasian, who rejoiced (Josephus says) that the cleverest of his enemies had thus voluntarily imprisoned himself.
    0
    0
  • Indeed even Gentiles helped them, so that the whole world (Dio Cassius says) was stirred.
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  • 2 This specimen had been given to Canning (a tribute, perhaps, to the statesman who boasted that he had "called a New World into existence to redress the balance of the Old") by Mr Schenley, a diplomatist, and was then thought to be unique in Europe; but, apart from those which had reached Spain, where they lay neglected and undescribed, James Wilson says (Illustr.
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  • " The voyd church was made fast, and the keys keeped by the magistrate," says Baillie.
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    0
  • He was chosen moderator by acclamation, being, as Baillie says, " incomparablie the ablest man of us all for all things."
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    0
  • This month, Bede says, was the same as the mensis paschalis, " when the old festival was observed with the gladness of a new solemnity."
    0
    0
  • He says: "The apostles had no thought of appointing festival days, but of promoting a life of blamelessness and piety"; and he attributes the observance of Easter by the church to the perpetuation of an old usage, "just as many other customs have been established."
    0
    0
  • One authority says of the crowd which gathered there: "They had the hair of their heads very few of them longer than their ears, whereupon it came to pass that those who usually with their cries attended at Westminster were by a nickname called Roundheads."
    0
    0
  • But in our present state of existence the moments of this ecstatic union must be few and short; " I myself," says Plotinus simply,.
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    0
  • As a lecturer, he was inferior in charm and eloquence to Brown and Stewart; the latter says that "silent and respectful attention" was accorded to the "simplicity and perspicuity of his style" and "the gravity and authority of his character."
    0
    0
  • In the dedication of the Enquiry, he says: "The ingenious author of that treatise upon the principles of Locke - who was no sceptic - hath built a system of scepticism which leaves no ground to believe any one thing rather than its contrary.
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    0
  • "The structure of all languages," he says, "is grounded upon common sense."
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    0
  • His character is perhaps best described by a writer who says "his strength was not equal to his goodness."
    0
    0
  • His family belonged to the clan of the Achaemenidae - in the inscription on the pillars and columns of the palace of Pasargadae (Murghab) he says: "I am Cyrus the king, the Achaemenid" - the principal clan (cbprp'q) of the Persian tribe of the Pasargadae.
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  • 29) simply says that he fell against the Dahae, i.e.
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    0
  • Josephus says nothing of his being "eaten of worms," but the discrepancies between the two stories are of slight moment.
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    0
  • A third account omits all the apocryphal elements in the story and says that Agrippa was assassinated by the Romans, who objected to his growing power.
    0
    0
  • " and guided my pen,'; says Paris, "with much good will and diligence."
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    0
  • He has little to say of the inner history and policy of the kingdom of Theodoric: his interests lie, as Mommsen says, within a triangle of which the three points are Sirmium, Larissa and Constantinople.
    0
    0
  • There is a curious reference to Iamblichus, apparently the neo-platonist philosopher, whose name Jordanes, being, as he says himself, agrammatus, inserts by way of a flourish.
    0
    0
  • Otherwise, as Mommsen says, the Getica is a mera epitome, laxata ea et perversa, historiae Gothicae Cassiodorianae.
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    0
  • In November 1635 he had been nominated by Laud to a fellowship at All Souls, Oxford, where, says Wood (Aiken.
    0
    0
  • As Heber says, "No part of the administration of Ireland by the English crown has been more extraordinary and more unfortunate than the system pursued for the introduction of the Reformed religion."
    0
    0
  • "Theology," he says, "is rather a divine life than a divine knowledge."
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile he had tried, he says, to conquer his inclination for the unprofitable trade of poetry, but in the panic caused by the revelations of Titus Oates, he found an opportunity for the exercise of his gift for rough satire.
    0
    0
  • He says ("To the Memory of Mr Oldham," Works, ed.
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    0
  • "At the foot of sunny vineyards," says Treitschke, "the house of the Teutonic Order now stands at Botzen; on its door is still emblazoned the black cross - in the middle of the shield of the Habsburg-Lorrainers."
    0
    0
  • "There is no greater charm," says Pasteur, "for the investigator than to make new discoveries; but his pleasure is heightened when he sees that they have a direct application to practical life."
    0
    0
  • Condorcet's statement that Turgot corresponded with Smith is disproved by a letter of Smith to the duc de la Rochefoucauld, published in the Economic Journal (March 1896), p. 165, in which he says, "But tho' I had the happiness of his acquaintance: Turgot owed his appointment to the ministry to Maurepas, the" Mentor "of Louis XVI., to whom he was warmly recommended by the abbe Very, a mutual friend.
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  • He managed also to hear Blackstone's lectures at Oxford, but says that he immediately detected the fallacies which underlay the rounded periods of the future judge.
    0
    0
  • "If Mr Bentham's character is peculiar," he says, "so is his place of residence.
    0
    0
  • Thus Ordericus Vitalis says that "(Fulk) granted to the monks the archdeaconry which he and his predecessors held in fee of the archbishop of Rouen" (Hist.
    0
    0
  • Concerning Byrd's style as a writer, Professor Bassett says: " It would be hard to find before Franklin a better master of the art of writing clear, forceful and charming English."
    0
    0
  • Where in some towns," says the statute 4th Henry VII.
    0
    0
  • " In some places," he says, " a horse plough is better," and in others an oxen plough, to which, upon the whole, he gives the preference.
    0
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  • " In Somersetshire," he says, " they do shere theyr wheat very lowe; and the wheate strawe that they purpose to make thacke of, they do not threshe it, but cut off the ears, and bynd it in sheves, and call it rede, and therewith they thacke theyr houses."
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  • " An housbande," he says, " can not well thryue by his come without he have other cattell, nor by his cattell without come.
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    0
  • "It is a wyues occupation," he says, " to wynowe all maner of comes, to make malte, to washe and wrynge, to make heye, shere come, and, in time of nede, to helpe her husbande to fyll the mucke wayne or dounge carte, dryue the ploughe, to loode heye, come and suche other; and to go or ride to the market to sel butter, chese, mylke, egges, chekyns, capons, hennes, pygges, gese, and all maner of comes."
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  • Clover thrives best, he says, when you sow it on the barrenest ground, such as the worst heath ground in England.
    0
    0
  • Sir Richard Weston must have cultivated turnips before this; for Blith says that Sir Richard affirmed to himself that he fed his swine with them.
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    0
  • Ray, who made a tour along the eastern coast in that year, says, " We observed little or no fallow ground in Scotland; some ley ground we saw, which they manured with sea wreck.
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  • " Hoeing," he says, " may be divided into deep, which is our horse-hoeing; and shallow, which is the English hand-hoeing; and also the shallow horse-hoeing used in some places betwixt rows, where the intervals are very narrow, as 16 or 18 inches.
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  • Under this management the produce seems to have been three times the seed; and yet, says the writer, " if in East Lothian they did not leave a higher stubble than in other places of the kingdom, their grounds would be in a much worse condition than at present they are, though bad enough."
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  • Mill expressly says that his childhood was not unhappy.
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  • When he laid down the last volume, he says, he had become a different being.
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  • This he has called his third stage as a political economist, and he says that he was helped towards it by the lady, Mrs Taylor,' who became his wife in 1851.
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  • It is obvious from what he says that his inner life became very different after he threw off his father's authority.
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  • " Unless this one matter," he says, " be thoroughly understood, it is to no purpose proceeding any further in our inquiry."
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  • Shortly afterwards Bruce appears again to have sided with his countrymen; Annandale was wasted, while he, as Walter of Hemingford says, "when he heard of the king's coming, fled from his face and burnt the castle of Ayr which he held."
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  • In the campaign of 1304, when Edward renewed his attempt on Scotland and reduced Stirling, Bruce supported the English king, who in one of his letters to him says, "If you complete that which you have begun, we shall hold the war ended by your deed and all the land of Scotland gained."
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  • "Every sensation," says Professor James, "presents itself as an indivisible unit; and it is quite impossible to read any clear meaning into the notion that they are masses of units combined."
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  • Porphyry says of Origen, Kara Tds rrepi lrpay f caTWV Kai Belot) bo s as `EXX vt cav (Euseb.
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  • Swift says that "with a singularity scarce to be justified he carried away more Greek, Latin and philosophy than properly became a person of his rank."
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  • Voigt says that he was the first monk in Florence in whom the love of letters and art became predominant over his ecclesiastical views.
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  • John Pits 1 says, but apparently without authority, that he became a Benedictine monk.
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  • "Nevertheless," says an eye-witness, "though earth, sea and sky were against us, the king's orders had to be obeyed and the daily march made."
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  • Darius says that he destroyed some temples, which Darius restored, and took away the herds and houses of the people (Behistun Inscr.
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  • Yet, in order to determine the difference of structure in their organs of voice, Cuvier, as he says in his Legons (iv.
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  • By way of examples of L'Herminier's observations, what he says of the two groups that had been the subject of Cuvier's and the elder Geoff roy's contest may be mentioned.
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  • Indeed it is, as the latter says, that of Linnaeus, improved by Cuvier, with an additional modification of Illiger'sall these three authors having totally ignored any but external characters.
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  • This insulting behaviour, and the language of the letter with which Andrew reappeared, marked the mission a failure: King Louis, says Joinville, "se repenti fort."
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  • Procopius says that they were far more civilized than the Huns of Attila, and the Turkish ambassador who was received by Justin is said to have described them as av-rucoi, which may merely mean that they lived in the cities which they conquered.
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  • The earliest churches were built with cemeteries for the dead; and thus we find the nucleus of the city of Venice, little isolated groups of dwellings each on its separate islet, scattered, as Cassiodorus 1 says, like sea-birds' nests over the face of the waters.
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  • In Easter term 1510 he went to Oxford, where Foxe says he was entered of Magdalen Hall.
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  • This anonymous writer,' he says, acquired his learning by teaching others, and adopted a dogmatic tone, which has caused him to be received at Paris with applause as the equal of Aristotle, Avicenna, or Averroes.
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  • Their opportunity came with the disaster which befell the Roman army under Valerian (q.v.) at Edessa, a disaster, says ' The full text, both Greek and Palmyrene, with an English translation, is given in NSI, pp. 313-340.
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  • Mr Webber, in summing up, says, " When Sea Island cotton was first introduced into the United States from the West Indies, it was a perennial plant, unsuited to the duration of the season of the latitude of the Sea Islands of S.
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  • " In one respect alone," says Matthew Arnold, " have the miracles recorded by the evangelists a more real ground than the mass of miracles of which we have the relation.
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  • " We are of the unalterable conviction," says Harnack, " that what happens in time and space is subject to the universal laws of movement; that accordingly there cannot be any miracles in this sense, i.e.
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  • " It is an acknowledged historical fact," says Butler, " that Christianity offered itself to the world, and demanded to be received, upon the allegation - i.e.
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  • Of the miracles of Jesus, Bushnell says, " The character of Jesus is ever shining with and through them, in clear self-evidence leaving them never to stand as raw wonders only of might, but covering them with glory as tokens of a heavenly love, and acts that only suit the proportions of His personal greatness and majesty " (Nature and the Supernatural, p. 364).
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  • "Without it," he emphatically says, "there can be no theology; it can only thrive in the calmness of a soul consecrated to God."
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  • As the crusaders advanced to Jerusalem, says Raymund of Agiles (c. xxxiii.), it was their rule that the first-corner had the right to each castle or town, provided that he hoisted his standard and planted a garrison there.
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  • Raymund at once submitted to the pope, but the Crusade continued none the less, because, as Luchaire says," the baronage of the north and centre of France had finished their preparations,"and were resolved to annex the rich lands of the south.
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  • absolute vanity), all' is vanity I "Life, says the author, has nothing of permanent value to offer.
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  • Further, says Koheleth, man is impelled to study the world,.
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  • The living, he says, at least know that they shall die, but the dead know nothing - the memory of them, their love, hate and envy, perishes, they have no reward, no part in earthly life (ix.
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  • 10, § 12) - hence its highly rhetorical character - from which Eusebius gives the extract about the Essenes; while this in its turn may have constituted the fourth book of a large work entitled ("sarcastically," says Eusebius, H.E.
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  • Thus he says that the silver which has been changed into gold by the projection of the red elixir is not rendered resistant to the agents which affect silver but not gold, and Albertus Magnus in his De Mineralibus - the De Alchemia attributed to him is spurious - states that alchemy cannot change species but merely imitates them - for instance, colours a metal white to make it resemble silver or yellow to give it the appearance of gold.
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  • 42, 3) says "one would compare the sound most nearly to the broken chord of a harp or a lute" (Juvenal xv.
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  • William of Newburgh appears to express the verdict of the most impartial contemporaries when he says that the bishop was zelo justitiae fervidus, utrum autem please secundum scientism novit Deus: " burning with zeal for justice, but whether altogether according to wisdom God knows."
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  • He recounts the details of at least two of these attacks, but says nothing about the much-quoted swoon of eight days, during which he is supposed to have seen in vision the scheme of the future Society.
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  • Ignatius, however, says nothing about so important a matter; indeed he understood the vision to mean that many things would be adverse to them, and told his companions when they reached the city that he saw the windows there closed against him.
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  • If he says that a subject is to allow himself to be moved and directed, under God, by a superior just as though he were a corpse or as a staff in the hands of an old man, he is also careful to say that the obedience is only due in all things "wherein it cannot be defined (as it is said) that any kind of sin appears."
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  • Bartole, the official biographer of Ignatius, says that he would not permit any innovation in the studies; and that, were he to live five hundred years, he would always repeat "no novelties" in theology, in philosophy or in logic - not even in grammar.
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  • "The whole story," says Mr H.
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  • Diogenes says that he left no writings, and the Eretrian school disappeared after a short and unobtrusive existence.
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  • They, however, had no confidence in the arch, which, as the Hindu says, "never sleeps but is always tending to its own destruction," so that the pointed arch, which had almost become the emblem of the Mahommedan religion, had to be dispensed with for the covered aisles which surrounded the great court, and in the triple entrance gateway the form of an arch only was retained, as it was constructed with horizontal courses of masonry for the haunches, and with long slabs of stone resting one against the other at the top. A similar construction was employed in the great mosque at Ajmere, built A.D.1200-1211at the same time as the Delhi mosque.
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  • He was at that period between seventeen and eighteen years old, and at nineteen, he says, "I married, or rather I was married."
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  • The principle on which their treatment proceeded is stated by him in the following memorable words: "To make vicious and abandoned people happy," he says, "it has generally been supposed necessary first to make them virtuous.
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  • 379) says that "ancient copies" omitted the words; and they are actually omitted by Codices B (Vaticanus, 4th century) and rt' (Sinaiticus, 4th century), together with Codex 67 (1 ith century).
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  • Burton (Highlands of Brazil, London, 1869) says that its shape "is that of a huge serpent, whose biggest end is about the Praga....
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  • "Alike both in race and language," says Walther Schultze, "the Chatti and the Hessi are identical."
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  • Herodotus says nothing of a difference in shape, but most authorities regard the form M, which with the value of s is practically confined to Doric areas, as being san.
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  • Edward called her the merriest of his concubines, and she exercised great influence; but, says More, "never abused it to any man's hurt, but to many a man's comfort and relief."
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  • More, who knew her in old age when she was "lean, withered and dried up," says that in youth she was "proper and fair, nothing in her body that you would have changed, but if you would have wished her somewhat higher."
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  • Froissart relates that he was burned to death through his bedclothes catching fire; Secousse says that he died in peace with many signs of contrition; another story says he died of leprosy; and a popular legend tells how he expired by a divine judgment through the burning of the clothes steeped in sulphur and spirits in which he had been wrapped as a cure for a loathsome disease caused by his debauchery.
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  • Youatt says there is also a marked difference in the temper and habits of the two.
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  • Herodotus, speaking of the sanctity in which some animals were held by the Egyptians, says that the people of every family in which a dog died shaved themselves - their expression of mourning - adding that this was a custom of his own time.
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  • One account says that it was caused by a broken bridge which delayed the Conqueror's advance to the north, but this is known to have been at Ferrybridge, three miles away; a second says that the new name was derived from a Norman town called Pontfrete, which, however, never existed; and a third that it was caused by the breaking of a bridge in 1153 on the arrival of the archbishop of York, St William,.
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  • It is the soul of the righteous that is here spoken of, and a rightly says that the angel of peace " leads him into eternal life."
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  • He says, "We know nothing, no, not even whether we know or not !"
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  • p. 530) says that, if the barbarians from whom the slaves were bought were informed of the mild treatment they received, they would entertain a great esteem for the Athenians.
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  • There ought, he says, to be held out to the slave the hope of liberty as the reward of his service.
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  • As Paley says, he loves " to record their fidelity to their masters, their sympathy in the trials of life, their gratitude for kindness and considerate treatment, and their pride in bearing the character of honourable men..
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  • No Roman slave, he says, "needed to despair of becoming both a freeman and a citizen."
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  • The words " slave" and " slavery " were, however, excluded from the constitution, " because," as Madison says," they did not choose to admit the right of property in man " in direct terms; and it was at the same time provided that Congress might interdict the foreign slave trade after the expiration of twenty years.
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  • They were not even adscripti glebae, though forbidden to migrate; an imperial ukase of 1721 says, " the proprietors sell their peasants and domestic servants, not even in families, but one by one, like cattle."
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  • Wallace says, be regarded as " an intermediate position between serfage and freedom."
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  • Up to this time Wesley says he had no notion of inward holiness, but went on "habitually and for the most part very contentedly in some or other known sin, indeed with some intermission and short struggles especially before and after Holy Communion," which he was obliged to attend three times a year.
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  • John Gambold, a member of the Holy Club, who afterwards became a Moravian bishop, says "he was blest with such activity as to be always gaining ground, and such steadiness that he Iost none.
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  • He says, "From the year 1725 to 1729, I preached much, but saw no fruit to my labour.
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  • Wesley was in his friend's congregation on April 1, but says," I could scarcely reconcile myself to this strange way of preaching in the fields ...
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  • "The old religion," Lecky says,"seemed everywhere loosening round the minds of men, and indeed it had often no great influence even on its defenders."
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  • Wesley says: "Joseph Humphreys was the first lay preacher that assisted me in England, in the year 1738."
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  • Alexander Knox says, "So fine an old man I never saw !
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  • As the British consular report for 1904 says, "Building.
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  • Zoroaster says of himself that he had received from God a commission to purify religion (Yasna, 44, 9).
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  • "Bosnia begins with the forest," says a native proverb, "Herzegovina with the rock"; and this account is, broadly speaking, accurate, although the Bosnian Karst is as bare as that of Herzegovina.
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  • By 1727 he was domiciled with Edward Gibbon (1666-1736) at Putney as tutor to his son Edward, father of the historian, who says that Law became " the much honoured friend and spiritual director of the whole family."
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  • " Not at all," says a bourgeois sophist (let it be Pierson, Hume or Kant), " the working-man's opinion on this question is a personal view, a subjective view; he would have been quite as justified in thinking that the employer is his benefactor and that the sausage is hashed leather, for he is unable to know a thing as it is (Ding an Sick)."
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  • Officials, he says, with grand titles and no responsible duties have been abolished, and departments with responsible chiefs created.
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  • Suidas says that the fleece was a book written on parchment, which taught how to make gold by chemical processes.
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  • " This treatise," he says, speaking of the Stromateis, " has not been contrived for mere display, but memoranda are treasured up in it for my old age to be a remedy for forgetfulness, - an image, truly, and an outline of those clear and living discourses, and those men truly blessed and noteworthy I was privileged to hear.
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  • It was in the keep, and not, as tradition says, in the much later "Black Tower" (also called "Duke Robert's Tower"), that Robert, duke of Normandy, was imprisoned by order of his brother Henry I.
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  • In a dream he saw a man named Victorious bearing innumerable epistles, one of which he received and read; the beginning of it contained the words "The Voice of the Irish"; whilst repeating these words he says, "I imagined that I heard in my mind the voice of those who were near the wood of Foclut (Fochlad), which is near the western sea, and thus they cried: ` We pray thee, holy youth, to come and walk again amongst us as before.'" The forest of Fochlad was in the neighbourhood of Killala Bay, but it is possible that it extended considerably to the south.
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  • Later the secret was betrayed and came to the ears of persons who, as he says, "urged my sins against my laborious episcopate."
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  • 8, 3), who says that the Caesar Julian " petit primos omnium Francos, videlicet eos quos consuetudo Salios appellavit."
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  • We do not know if he was the son of Chlodio; Gregory of Tours simply says that he belonged to Chlodio's stock - " de hujus stirpe quidam Merovechum regem fuisse adserunt," - and then only gives the fact at second hand.
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  • 19, says that "We, too, ought not to enter the Holy of Holies in our everyday garments ...
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  • 20) says that to wear talaris et tunicas manicatas was a disgrace among the ancient Romans, but that in his own day it was no longer so considered in the case of persons of good birth.
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  • With this the bishop of Exeter (Ornaments Rubric, p. 30) would seem to agree, when he says that "the customs of the present day do not fully accord with any reasonable interpretation of the rubric. The stole, now nearly universal, is only covered by the rubric if the word ' vestment ' be taken to include it (a very dubious point), and then only at Holy Communion."
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  • Bede says that when he returned to Frisia his see was fixed in Ultrajectum (Utrecht).
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  • As Wellhausen says (p. 171): "The poet appears to believe that in the very act of describing enthusiastically the ancient deed of deliverance, he brings home to us the new; we are left sometimes in doubt whether he speaks of the past to suggest the new by analogy, or whether he is concerned directly with the future, and simply paints it with the colours of the past."
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  • It) says that at the time of his invasion of Britain it was called Tamesis.
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  • "The case," says Henry Adams, "proved impeachment to be an impracticable thing for partisan purposes, and it decided the permanence of those lines of constitutional development which were a reflection of the common law."
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  • "A ma.n may be a heretic in the truth," says Milton in his Areopagitica (1644), "if he believes things only because his pastor says so, or the Assembly so determines, without knowing other reason, though his belief be true, yet the very truth he holds becomes his heresy.
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  • "In all this discourse," says Bishop Sanderson, one of the best of the English writers, "I take it upon me not to write edicts, but to give my advice."
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  • 65), quoting Phanias the peripatetic, says that he received money for his teaching, and Aristotle (Met.
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  • A Latin epitaph, discovered in the 18th century, says, however, that he was archdeacon of Paris, and declares that he died in the city of Avignon in 1449.
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  • And much more of the same kind, which, as Gilbert says, had come down " even to [his] own day through the writings of a host of men, who, to fill out their volumes to a proper bulk, write and copy out pages upon pages on this, that and the other subject, of which they know almost nothing for certain of their own experience."
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  • Io) says that it represented the brethren of Christ as his half-brothers.
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  • Procopius says (Anecd.
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  • The second article says that the Tribonian to whom it refers was of Side (in Pamphylia), was also Core) Suo ybpwv Twv uirap X wv, was a man of learning and wrote various books, among which are mentioned certain astronomical treatises, a dialogue On Happiness, and two addresses to Justinian.
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  • 155) says that it was the Libyan word for "king," that Battus was not called by the name until after his arrival at Libya, and that the oracle addressed him as "Battus" by anticipation.
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