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savile

savile Sentence Examples

  • Early in 1683, however, through the influence of the king's mistress, the duchess of Portsmouth, Sunderland regained his place as secretary for the northern department, the chief feature of his term of office being his rivalry with his brotherin-law, George Savile, marquess of Halifax.

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  • A dramatic version of the "Alice" books by Mr Savile Clarke was produced at Christmas, 1886, and has since enjOyed many revivals.

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  • Sir Henry Savile (1549-1622) thereupon appointed him in 1619 to the Savilian chair of astronomy just founded by him at Oxford; Bainbridge was incorporated of Merton College and became, in 1631 and 1635 respectively, junior and senior reader of Linacre's lectures.

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  • PHILIP DORMER STANHOPE CHESTERFIELD, 4TH Earl Of (1694-1773), son of Philip Stanhope, third earl (1673-1726), and Elizabeth Savile, daughter of George Savile, marquess of Halifax, was born in London on the 22nd of September 1694; Philip, the first earl (1584-1656), son of Sir John Stanhope of Shelford, was a royalist who in 1616 was created Baron Stanhope of Shelford, and in 1628 earl of Chesterfield; and his grandson the 2nd earl (1633-1714) was grandfather of the 4th earl.

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  • The Royal Geographical Society, occupying a building close to Burlington House in Savile Row, maintains a map-room open to the public, holds lectures by prominent explorers and geographers, and takes a leading part in the promotion of geographical discovery.

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  • In Canning's ministry he was master of the mint, and when Lord Goderich succeeded to the lead Tierney was admitted to the cabinet; but he was already suffering from ill-health and died suddenly at Savile Row, London, on the 25th of January 1830.

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  • His Letters to Henry Savile, written at this period, are of great interest.

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  • Scotland, in the 16th, is represented by George Buchanan; England by Sir John Cheke, Roger Ascham, and Sir Henry Savile, and, in the 17th, by Thomas Gataker, Thomas Stanley, Henry Dodwell, and Joshua Barnes; Germany by Janus Gruter, Ezechiel Spanheim and Chr.

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  • In November 1903 a syndicate was of Grant (1575) was succeeded by that of Camden (1 595), founded mainly on a Paduan text-book, and apparently adopted in 1596 by Sir Henry Savile at Eton, where it long remained in use as the Eton Greek Grammar, while at Westminster itself it was superseded by that of Busby (1663).

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  • It includes Dr Andrewes, afterwards bishop of Winchester, who was familiar with Hebrew, Chaldee, Syriac, Greek, Latin and at least ten other languages, while his knowledge of patristic literature was unrivalled; Dr Overall, regius professor of theology and afterwards bishop of Norwich; Bedwell, the greatest Arabic scholar of Europe; Sir Henry Savile, the most learned layman of his time; and, to say nothing of others well known to later generations, nine who were then or afterwards professors of Hebrew or of Greek at Oxford or Cambridge.

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  • His great work is a treatise against the Pelagians, entitled De causa Dei contra Pelagium et de virtute causarum, edited by Sir Henry Savile (London, 1618).

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  • Further light was thrown on the relations of Franz Josef Land and Spitsbergen during 1897 by the discoveries of Captain Robertson of Dundee, and Wyche's Land was circumnavigated by Mr Arnold Pike and Sir Savile Crossley.

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  • Here archaic decorative terra-cottas were discovered in excavations carried on by Lord Savile.

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  • Graec. xlvii.-lxiv.); but this edition is greatly indebted to the one issued more than a century earlier (1612) by Sir Henry Savile, provost of Eton College, from a press established at Eton by himself, which Hallam (Lit.

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  • Savile, by H.

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  • The historical works of William of Malmesbury were edited by Savile in his Scriptores post Bedam (London, 1596); but the text of that edition is full of errors.

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  • The Historia Anglorum was first printed in Savile, Rerum Anglicarum scriptores post Bedam (London, 1596).

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  • Savile, Dr Pusey, an Historic Sketch, with Some Account of the Oxford Movement (1883), and especially the Life by Canon Liddon, completed by J.

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  • Now 34, his " bespoke couture " suits have been credited with injecting some modern flair into Savile Row.

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  • investigation into the horrific murder of 4-year-old (Francis) Savile Kent.

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  • Savile Row Company Luxury womens shirts in herringbone, colored, plain poplin or pastel stripes with feminine detailing.

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  • recline extras ' include Jimmy Savile reclining on a bed in a tracksuit describing how he lost his first 35 fights.

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  • Early in 1683, however, through the influence of the king's mistress, the duchess of Portsmouth, Sunderland regained his place as secretary for the northern department, the chief feature of his term of office being his rivalry with his brotherin-law, George Savile, marquess of Halifax.

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    0
  • A dramatic version of the "Alice" books by Mr Savile Clarke was produced at Christmas, 1886, and has since enjOyed many revivals.

    0
    0
  • Sir Henry Savile (1549-1622) thereupon appointed him in 1619 to the Savilian chair of astronomy just founded by him at Oxford; Bainbridge was incorporated of Merton College and became, in 1631 and 1635 respectively, junior and senior reader of Linacre's lectures.

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    0
  • PHILIP DORMER STANHOPE CHESTERFIELD, 4TH Earl Of (1694-1773), son of Philip Stanhope, third earl (1673-1726), and Elizabeth Savile, daughter of George Savile, marquess of Halifax, was born in London on the 22nd of September 1694; Philip, the first earl (1584-1656), son of Sir John Stanhope of Shelford, was a royalist who in 1616 was created Baron Stanhope of Shelford, and in 1628 earl of Chesterfield; and his grandson the 2nd earl (1633-1714) was grandfather of the 4th earl.

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  • The Royal Geographical Society, occupying a building close to Burlington House in Savile Row, maintains a map-room open to the public, holds lectures by prominent explorers and geographers, and takes a leading part in the promotion of geographical discovery.

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    0
  • In Canning's ministry he was master of the mint, and when Lord Goderich succeeded to the lead Tierney was admitted to the cabinet; but he was already suffering from ill-health and died suddenly at Savile Row, London, on the 25th of January 1830.

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  • His Letters to Henry Savile, written at this period, are of great interest.

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  • Scotland, in the 16th, is represented by George Buchanan; England by Sir John Cheke, Roger Ascham, and Sir Henry Savile, and, in the 17th, by Thomas Gataker, Thomas Stanley, Henry Dodwell, and Joshua Barnes; Germany by Janus Gruter, Ezechiel Spanheim and Chr.

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  • In November 1903 a syndicate was of Grant (1575) was succeeded by that of Camden (1 595), founded mainly on a Paduan text-book, and apparently adopted in 1596 by Sir Henry Savile at Eton, where it long remained in use as the Eton Greek Grammar, while at Westminster itself it was superseded by that of Busby (1663).

    0
    0
  • It includes Dr Andrewes, afterwards bishop of Winchester, who was familiar with Hebrew, Chaldee, Syriac, Greek, Latin and at least ten other languages, while his knowledge of patristic literature was unrivalled; Dr Overall, regius professor of theology and afterwards bishop of Norwich; Bedwell, the greatest Arabic scholar of Europe; Sir Henry Savile, the most learned layman of his time; and, to say nothing of others well known to later generations, nine who were then or afterwards professors of Hebrew or of Greek at Oxford or Cambridge.

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  • His great work is a treatise against the Pelagians, entitled De causa Dei contra Pelagium et de virtute causarum, edited by Sir Henry Savile (London, 1618).

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  • Further light was thrown on the relations of Franz Josef Land and Spitsbergen during 1897 by the discoveries of Captain Robertson of Dundee, and Wyche's Land was circumnavigated by Mr Arnold Pike and Sir Savile Crossley.

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  • Here archaic decorative terra-cottas were discovered in excavations carried on by Lord Savile.

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  • Graec. xlvii.-lxiv.); but this edition is greatly indebted to the one issued more than a century earlier (1612) by Sir Henry Savile, provost of Eton College, from a press established at Eton by himself, which Hallam (Lit.

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  • Savile, by H.

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  • The historical works of William of Malmesbury were edited by Savile in his Scriptores post Bedam (London, 1596); but the text of that edition is full of errors.

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  • The Historia Anglorum was first printed in Savile, Rerum Anglicarum scriptores post Bedam (London, 1596).

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  • Burnet's letters to his friend, George Savile, marquess of Halifax, were published by the Royal Historical Society (Camden Miscellany, vol.

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  • Savile, Dr Pusey, an Historic Sketch, with Some Account of the Oxford Movement (1883), and especially the Life by Canon Liddon, completed by J.

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  • In 1994 Boateng became the first Savile Row tailor to show a ready-to-wear collection during the International Fashion Shows in Paris.

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  • The ' extras ' include Jimmy Savile reclining on a bed in a tracksuit describing how he lost his first 35 fights.

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  • These exclusive designs include the Matteo, the double-breasted Savile, and more.

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