Saul sentence example

saul
  • 5), or a tamarisk ('eshel), or pomegranate(rimmon), as at the high place in Gibeah where Saul abode.
    2
    0
  • 43-54 These kings reigned at some date anterior to the time of Saul.
    1
    0
  • Saul, whose chief herdsman, Doeg, was an Edomite (I Sam.
    5
    4
  • (2) The eldest son of Saul, who, together with his father, freed Israel from the crushing oppression of the Philistines (I Sam.
    1
    0
  • See further David, Saul.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Saul and his attendant are invited by the seer-priest Samuel into the banqueting chamber (lishkah) where thirty persons partake of the sacrificial meal.
    1
    0
  • The young Saul was chosen by lot and gained unanimous recognition by delivering Jabesh in Gilead from the Ammonites.
    2
    1
  • The heroic figure who stands at the head is Saul (" asked "), and two accounts of his rise are recorded.
    0
    0
  • (2) But other traditions represent the people scattered and in hiding; Israel is groaning under the Philistine yoke, and the unknown Saul is raised up by Yahweh to save his people.
    0
    0
  • At all events the first of a series of annalistic notices of the kings of Israel ascribes to Saul conquests over the surrounding peoples to an extent which implies that the district of Judah formed part of his kingdom (I Sam.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is precisely in Saul's time that the account of the Judaean monarchy, or perhaps of the monarchy from the Judaean standpoint, now begins.
    0
    0
  • When the narratives describe the life of the young David at the court of the first king of the northern kingdom, when the scenes cover the district which he took with the sword, and when the brave Saul is represented in an unfavourable light, one must allow for the popular tendency to idealize great figures, and for the Judaean origin of the compilation.
    0
    0
  • After being the popular favourite of Israel in the little district of Benjamin, he was driven away by the jealousy and animosity of Saul.
    0
    0
  • Yet again, Saul had been chosen by Yahweh to free his people from the Philistines; he had been rejected for his sins, and had suffered continuously from this enemy; Israel at his death was left in the unhappy state in which he had found it; it was the Judaean David, the faithful servant of Yahweh, who was now chosen to deliver Israel, and to the last the people gratefully remembered their debt.
    0
    0
  • Although the rise of the Hebrew state, at an age when the great powers were quiescent and when such a people as the Philistines is known to have appeared upon the scene, is entirely intelligible, it is not improbable that legends of Saul and David, the heroic founders of the two kingdoms, have been put in a historical setting with the help of later historical tradition.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The traditions of the Ephraimite Joshua and of Saul the first king of (north) Israel virtually treat Judah as part of Israel and are related to the underlying representations in (a).
    0
    0
  • Jehu's son Jehoahaz saw his army made " like the dust in threshing," and the desperate condition of the country recalls the straits in the time of Saul (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • The warfare which followed was like that which Saul and David waged against the Philistines.
    0
    0
  • Tradition Introduc= made him a descendant of the ancient nobles of lion t0 Saul.
    0
    0
  • There, too, he acquired that skill in music which led to his first introduction to Saul (I Sam.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • appears from the close that neither Saul nor his captain Abner had heard of him before (vv.
    0
    0
  • 52), and David soon became both a popular hero and an object of jealousy to Saul.
    0
    0
  • But this passage is the sequel to the rejection of Saul in xv., and Samuel's position agrees with that of the late writer in vii., viii.
    0
    0
  • and xii.3 The shorter text, represented by the Septuagint, gives an account of Saul's jealousy which is psychologically more intelligible.
    0
    0
  • 4 According to this text Saul was simply possessed with such a personal dislike and dread of Conflicts with David as might easily occupy his disordered brain.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Saul.
    0
    0
  • Saul's daughter Michal loved him; and her father, whose jealousy continued to increase, resolved to put the young captain on a perilous enterprise, promising him the hand of Michal as a reward of success, but secretly hoping that he would perish in the attempt.
    0
    0
  • At this point it is necessary to look back on the proposed marriage of David with Saul's eldest daughter Merab (xviii.
    0
    0
  • When the time came for Saul to fulfil his promise, Merab was given to Adriel of Abel-Meholah (perhaps an Aramaean).
    0
    0
  • 12-31, where Saul had promised his daughter to the one who should overthrow Goliath (ver.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • 25), so that Saul's insane fears were constantly exasperated by personal contact with him.
    0
    0
  • At another time Saul actually gave commands to assassinate his son-in-law, but the breach was made up by Jonathan, whose chivalrous spirit had united him to David in a covenant of closest friendship (xix.
    0
    0
  • The circumstances of the final outburst of Saul's hatred, which drove David into exile, are not easily disentangled.
    0
    0
  • 1-6 (to " Philistine "), the first and last clauses of 8, Io-I I, the reason given for Saul's fear in 12, 17-19, the second half of 21.
    0
    0
  • Its aim is to paint Saul's character as black as possible.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A plan was arranged by which Jonathan should draw from the king an expression of his feelings, and a tremendous explosion revealed that Saul regarded David as the rival of his dynasty, and Jonathan as little better than a fellow-conspirator.
    0
    0
  • 5) and by the priest Abiathar, the only survivor of a terrible massacre by which Saul took revenge for the favours which David had received at the sanctuary of Nob.
    0
    0
  • Forced to flee by the treachery of the very men whom he had succoured, he lived for a time in constant fear of being captured by Saul, and at length took refuge with Achish king of Gath and established himself in Ziklag.
    0
    0
  • Popular tradition, as though unwilling to let David escape from Saul, told of that king's continual pursuit of the outlaw, of the attempt of the men of Ziph (S.E.
    0
    0
  • At length, in the second year, he was called to join his master in a great campaign against Saul.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Philistines for once directed their forces towards the plain of Jezreel (Esdraelon) in the north; and Saul, forsaken by Yahweh, already gave himself up for lost.
    0
    0
  • Meantime Saul had fallen in battle, and northern Israel was in a state of chaos.
    0
    0
  • The noble elegy on the death of Saul and Jonathan, quoted from the Book of Jashar (2 Sam.
    0
    0
  • The embassy threw out a hint, - their lord was dead and David himself had been anointed king over Judah; but the relation between Jabesh-Gilead and Saul had been a close one, and it was not to be expected that its eyes would be turned upon the king of Judah when Saul's son was installed at the not distant Mahanaim.
    0
    0
  • The interest of the narratives is now directed away from the Philistines to the decaying fortunes of Saul's house.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The later views of the history of this period are represented in the book of Chronicles, where immediately after Saul's death David is anointed at Hebron king over all Israel (1 Chron.
    0
    0
  • 1-22), and of the host which came to him at Hebron to turn over to him Saul's kingdom (xii.
    0
    0
  • These chapters bring him farther north, and they commence by depicting David as a man of Bethlehem, high in the court of Saul, the king's son-in-law, and a popular favourite with the people.
    0
    0
  • The evidence has obviously some bearing upon the history of Saul, as also upon the intercourse between Judah and Benjamin which David's early history implies.
    0
    0
  • It was under the care of the king of Moab that David placed his parents when he fled from Saul (i Sam.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • There were men of stronger build than the weak Ishbaal and the crippled son of Jonathan, the survivors of Saul's house, and it is only to be expected that David's first care must have been to cement the union of the north and south.
    0
    0
  • This same magnanimity towards the survivors of Saul's house has left its mark upon many of the narratives, and helps to a truer understanding of the stories of his early life.
    0
    0
  • Thus it was quite in keeping with the romantic attachment between David and Saul's son Jonathan that when he became king of Israel he took Jonathan's son Meribbaal under his care (ix.).
    0
    0
  • 7 The deed was not merely generous, it was politic to have Saul's grandson under his eyes.
    0
    0
  • The Gibeonites demanded the latter, and five sons of Merab (the text by a mistake reads Michal) and two sons of Saul's concubine were sacrificed.
    0
    0
  • 8 Here, too, we learn of the tardy burial of the bones of Saul and Jonathan which had remained in JabeshGilead since the battle of Gilboa; - the history of David's dealings with the family of Saul has been obscured.
    0
    0
  • According to the prevailing traditions, Saul at his death had left North Israel disunited and humiliated.
    0
    0
  • The generous elevation of David's character is seen most clearly in those parts of his life where an inferior nature would have been most at fault, - in his conduct towards Saul, in the blameless reputation of himself and his band of outlaws in the wilderness of Judah, in his repentance under the rebuke of Nathan and in his noble bearing on the revolt of Absalom.
    0
    0
  • (from another source), where Saul's son recovers Israelite territory, but is supported by ix., where Mephibosheth is found at Lo-debar.
    0
    0
  • That the Israelites even applied the title of Baal to Yahweh himself is proved by the occurrence of such names as Jerubbaal (Gideon), Eshbaal (one of Saul's sons) and Beeliada (a son of David, 1 Chron.
    0
    0
  • An attempt on the part of Saul to exterminate the clan is mentioned in 2 Sam.
    0
    0
  • The same sentiment recurs in Yahweh's command to Saul to destroy Amalek utterly for its hostility to Israel (1 Sam.
    0
    0
  • Saul himself, according to one tradition, was slain by an Amalekite (2 Sam.
    0
    0
  • 7) Amalek is mentioned among the enemies of Israel - just as Greek writers of the 6th century of this era applied the old term Scythians to the Goths (Noldeke), - and the traditional hostility between Saul and Amalek is reflected still later in the book of Esther where Haman the Agagite is pitted against Mordecai the Benjamite.
    0
    0
  • Shiloh disappears from history; neither Saul nor even Samuel, whose youth had been spent with it, takes any further thought of it.
    0
    0
  • But it is not certain that the two belong to the same cycle of tradition; Kirjath-jearim and Baal-Judah are identified only in later writings, and the behaviour of Saul's daughter (2 Sam.
    0
    0
  • A convert chief named Dichu granted him a site for an establishment, and a wooden barn is stated to have been utilized for the purpose of worship, whence the modern Saul (Ir.
    0
    0
  • Some years before his death, which took place in 461, Patrick resigned his position as bishop of Armagh to his disciple Benignus, and possibly retired to Saul in Dalaradia, where he spent the remainder of his life.
    0
    0
  • The place of his burial was a matter of dispute in early Ireland, but it seems most likely that he was interred at Saul.
    0
    0
  • The calling up of the spirit of Samuel by the Witch at Endor when consulted by Saul is the classical example (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • It is an Haggadic revision of the Biblical history from Adam to the death of Saul.
    0
    0
  • to David when watched in his house by Saul, implies an absolute lack of the very elements of historical judgment.
    0
    0
  • 63, 76), and metal armour, though known farther west, scarcely appear in old oriental costume, and the passage which attributes bronze helmets and coats of mail to the Philistine Goliath and the Israelite il Saul cannot be held (on other grounds) to be necessarily reliable for the middle or close of the Iith century (1 Sam.
    0
    0
  • This means very much, though his modesty led him to call in the aid of his friend Saul to cope with the new and expanding situation (25 f.).
    0
    0
  • 1; Abba Saul, end of 2nd century.
    0
    0
  • The historical interest of Michmash is connected with the strategical importance of the position, commanding the north side of the Pass of Michmash, which made it the headquarters of the Philistines and the centre of their forays in their attempt to quell the first rising under Saul, as it was also at a later date the headquarters of Jonathan the Hasinonaean (1 Macc. ix.
    0
    0
  • 20, is quite impossible and the interpretation of the passage is really only appropriate to Saul ("the asked one"): the two names are sometimes confused in the Septuagint (Ency.
    0
    0
  • At Mizpah, after another solemn warning, the sacred lot is taken and falls upon Saul of Benjamin, who, however, is not at first unanimously accepted (x.
    0
    0
  • 27b; see Revised Version, margin), Saul - with Samuel (xi.
    0
    0
  • Samuel is a local seer consulted by Saul, and is bidden by Yahweh to see in the youth the future ruler.
    0
    0
  • Saul is privately anointed and receives various signs as proof of his new destiny (ix.
    0
    0
  • Next we find that Samuel's interest on behalf of the Israelite king is transferred to David, the founder of the Judaean dynasty, and it is his part to announce the rejection of Saul and Yahweh's new decision (xiii.
    0
    0
  • 17), to anoint the young David, and, as head of a small community of prophets, to protect him from the hostility of Saul (xvi.
    0
    0
  • That he was an Ephrathite and lived at Ramah may only be due to the incorporation of one cycle of specifically local tradition; the name of his grandfather Jeroham (or Jerahmeel, so Septuagint) suggests a southern origin, and one may compare the relation between Saul and the Kenites (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • The Saul who became the first king of N.
    0
    0
  • While the figure of Samuel grows in grandeur, the disastrous fate of Saul invited explanation, which is found in his previous acts of disobedience (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • See further David; Samuel, Books Of; Saul.
    0
    0
  • The hostility of the "sons of Zeruiah" towards the tribe of Benjamin is characteristically contrasted with David's own generosity towards Saul's fallen house.
    0
    0
  • Abishai proposed to kill Saul when David surprised him asleep (i Sam.
    0
    0
  • On this account Saul spared them when bidden by Yahweh to destroy Amalek; David, too, whilst living in Judah, appears to have been on friendly terms with them (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • 1-5; see Samson; ELI; Samuel; Saul; David).
    0
    0
  • 13), Saul (xiv.
    0
    0
  • In the stories of Samson and Samuel, the Philistines are located in the maritime plain, whereas, in the oldest traceable account of Saul's rise (apparently shortly before 1000 B.C.) they hold Israel (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • But there is no historical continuity between the two situations, and the immediate prelude to the achievements of Saul and Jonathan is lost.
    0
    0
  • Commencing abruptly (after some Benjamite genealogies) with the death of Saul, the history becomes fuller and runs parallel with the books of Samuel and Kings.
    0
    0
  • (David's elegy over Saul and Jonathan); and, very probably, in the Septuagint of 1 Kings viii.
    0
    0
  • The books of Samuel centre round the names of Samuel, Saul and David.
    0
    0
  • the double (and discrepant) accounts of the appointment of Saul as king (ix.
    0
    0
  • 2, 15), the y years of Saul (the two years of 1 Sam.
    0
    0
  • jecturally to Joshua and the elders, and io years to Saul, would amount exactly to 480 years.
    0
    0
  • 2), 20 years; Saul, y years; David, 40 years; and Solomon's first four years-in all 440-}-x-i-y years.
    0
    0
  • 4 Namely, Moses (in the wilderness), Joshua, Othniel, Ehud, Deborah, Gideon, Jephthah, Samson, Eli, Samuel, Saul and David.
    0
    0
  • For Saul, see I Sam.
    0
    0
  • It is in any case evident that the accession of Jehu and Athaliah must be brought down from 884 to 842 B.C.; and this will involve, naturally, a corresponding reduction of the dates of the previous kings of both kingdoms, and of course, at the same time, of those of Solomon, David and Saul.
    0
    0
  • There are some fundamental divergencies in the representations of the traditions of both David and Saul (qq.v.), and there is indirect and 1 Cf.
    0
    0
  • 14, where David girt in (or with) a linen ephod dances before the ark at its entry into Jerusalem and incurs the unqualified contempt of his wife Michal, the daughter of Saul.
    0
    0
  • With the prophets it is quite otherwise; they appear not individually but in bands; their prophesying is a united exercise accompanied by music, and seemingly dance-music; it is marked by strong excitement, which sometimes acts contagiously, and may be so powerful that he who is seized by it is unable to stand, 2 and, though this condition is regarded as produced by a divine afflatus, it is matter of ironical comment when a prominent man like Saul is found to be thus affected.
    0
    0
  • More than this hardly lies in the expression "a divine spirit" (a'r5K min), which is used not only of the prophetic afflatus but of the evil frenzy that afflicted Saul's later days.
    0
    0
  • One Remarkable Drama Charles Heavysege'S (1816-1876) Saul (1857) Belongs To Canadian Literature.
    0
    0
  • Saul >>
    0
    0
  • 22 [151), but "Yahweh's anointed" is a common title of the king of Israel, applied in the historical books to Saul and David, in Lam.
    0
    0
  • x., Samuel ordaining Saul "took the vial of oil and poured it upon his head and kissed him," and soon afterwards "God gave Saul another heart"; so that when he met the band of prophets the contagion flew from them to him, "and the spirit of God came mightily upon him, and he prophesied among them."
    0
    0
  • The only one of the priests to escape from Saul's massacre, he fled to David at Keilah, taking with him the ephod (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • SAUL), and it is noteworthy that in this case, at least, a burial was not refused.
    0
    0
  • In the vicinity of the town are remnants of the monastery of Saul, a foundation ascribed to St Patrick, and of Inch Abbey (1180), founded by Sir John de Courcy.
    0
    0
  • ABNER (Hebrew for "father of [or is a] light"), in the Bible, first cousin of Saul and commander-in-chief of his army (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • He is only referred to incidentally in Saul's history (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • 5), and is not mentioned in the account of the disastrous battle of Gilboa when Saul's power was crushed.
    0
    0
  • At length Ishbaal lost the main prop of his tottering cause by remonstrating with Abner for marrying Rizpah, one of Saul's concubines, an alliance which, according to Oriental notions, implied pretensions to the throne (cp. 2 Sam.
    0
    0
  • Jephthah, one of the Israelite "judges," delivered Gilead from Ammon, who resumed the attack under its king Nahash, only to be repulsed by Saul.
    0
    0
  • To the first great kings, Saul and David, are ascribed conquests over Moab, Ammon and Edom.
    0
    0
  • 17, 18-22) was of greater interest than that of Saul, which is given in I Sam.
    0
    0
  • Acts xi.), and certainly by Barnabas and Saul, its converts were the first to be called "Christians."
    0
    0
  • Doubtless they, like other peoples, had their simple proverbs, embodying their general observations of life; a couple of these have been preserved in the Old Testament: " Is Saul also among the Prophets?"
    0
    0
  • The strange character of the names of the first kings in Israel and Judah (Saul, David and Solomon), noticed already by A.
    0
    0
  • The interest of the narratives clings around north Judah and Benjamin, and more attention is given to the rise of the Judaean dynasty, the hostility of Saul, and the romantic friendship between his son Jonathan and the young David of Bethlehem.
    0
    0
  • The account of his steps contains details touching Judah and its relation to Israel which cannot be reconciled with certain traditions of Saul and the Ephraimite Joshua.
    0
    0
  • It combines amid diverse material a hero of Bethlehem and rival of Saul with the idea of a conqueror of this district; it introduces peculiar traditions of the ark and sanctuary, and it associates David with Hebron, Calebites and the wilderness of Paran 3 The books of Samuel and Kings have become, in process of compilation, the natural sequel to the preceding books, but the conflicting features and the perplexing differences of standpoint recur elsewhere, and the relationship between them suggests that similar causes have been operative upon the compilation.
    0
    0
  • 5 represents him as a forerunner of Samuel and Saul), and gives a rather different impression of the hero of the folk-tales.
    0
    0
  • 2-14, 1 It may be conjectured that the introduction originally formed the prelude to the rise of Saul: the intervening narratives, though not necessarily of late origin themselves, having been subsequently inserted.
    0
    0
  • 9) is to be referred hither, but it is noteworthy that whilst Gibeah and Jabesh-Gilead, which appear here in a bad light, are known to be associated with Saul, the sufferer is a Levite of Bethlehem, the traditional home of David.
    0
    0
  • for Children of Israel), and claim descent from King Saul (whom they call by the Mahommedan corruption through a son whom they ascribe to him, called Jeremiah, who again had a son called Afghana.
    0
    0
  • Accordingly King Saul "ate no bread all the day nor all the night" in which the witch of Endor revealed to him the ghost of Samuel.
    0
    0
  • The book is said to have inspired Voltaire's Saul.
    0
    0
  • The sixth is Shaul, whose name happens to be identical with Saul, king of Israel, whilst the last Hadad (so I Chron.
    0
    0
  • The tradition thus finds an analogy in the Israelite "judges" before the time of Saul and David.
    0
    0
  • Saul, the first king of Israel, conquered Edom (1 Sam.
    0
    0
  • 3 That the Edomites preserved this tradition of Saul's sovereignty and (from their standpoint) enrolled him among their kings (Gen.
    0
    0
  • The account of the ferocious slaughter of the priests of Nob at Saul's command by Doeg the Edomite is a secondary tradition and probably of late origin (1 Sam.
    0
    0
  • 19-27 Saul and Jonathan).
    0
    0
  • Spinoza received his first training under the senior rabbi, Saul Levi Morteira, and Manasseh ben Israel, a theological writer of some eminence whose works show considerable knowledge of philosophical authors.
    0
    0
  • 27) agrees with what is told of the tribe's warriors (see Ehud, Saul, Jonathan).
    0
    0
  • It was not the Old Testament saints, however, but only sinners and malefactors like Cain, Esau and Saul, who obeyed his summons.
    0
    0
  • Saul and Barnabas equally are separated for a certain missionary work by imposition of hands with prayer and fasting, and are so sent forth by the Holy Ghost.
    0
    0
  • But points of resemblance between Joshua the invader and Saul the founder of the (north) Israelite monarchy gain in weight when the traditions of both recognize the inclusion or possession of Judah, and thus stand upon quite another plane as compared with those of David the founder of the Judaean dynasty.
    0
    0
  • The Hebrew text in this passage, as emended by the LXX and in this form generally accepted, runs as follows: "And Saul said: ` O Jehovah, God of Israel, why dost Thou not answer Thy servant to-day?
    0
    0
  • And the lot fell upon Saul and Jonathan, and the people escaped.
    0
    0
  • And Saul said: ` Cast (the lot) between me and Jonathan my son, and on whomsoever Jehovah shall cause the lot to fall let him die.'
    0
    0
  • 982-1057), noticing that the royal list must be later than the time of Saul (also recognized by Martin Luther and others), proposed to assign the chapter to the age of Jehoshaphat.
    0
    0
  • Aquitaine bordered upon Mussulman Spain; the Avars of Hungary threatened Bavaria with their tireless horsemen; beyond the Elbe and the Saul the Slays were perpetually at war with the Saxons, and to the north of the Eider were the Danes.
    0
    0
  • An "evil spirit" possesses Saul (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • The book of Samuel completes the history of the " judges " of Israel, (11th century B.C.), and begins by relating the events which led to the institution of the monarchy under Saul, the part played by Samuel being especially prominent (r Sam.
    0
    0
  • As Saul loses the divine favour, David's position advances until, after the death of Saul and the overthrow of Israel, he gains the allegiance of a disorganized people (r Sam.
    0
    0
  • Three lines of interest are to be recognized: (a) that naturally taken by Israel (the northern kingdom) in the history of its first king, Saul; (b) the leading position of the prophets in the political and religious events; and (c) the superiority of the Judaean dynasty, a feature of paramount importance in the study of a book which has come ultimately through Judaean hands.
    0
    0
  • Thus, the saying " Is Saul also among the prophets?"
    0
    0
  • The episode, with the interview between Saul and Samuel, and with its interesting attitude to Saul and to the prophets, was evidently unknown to the writer of xv.
    0
    0
  • Other and more profound differences relating to the rise of the monarchy (§ 2), the career of Saul (§ 3) and David's conquest of Jerusalem (§ 4) represent irreconcilable historical background.
    0
    0
  • The first part of the book is concerned with Samuel and Saul.
    0
    0
  • But the overthrow of the Philistines is also ascribed to Saul (xiv.), there is no room for both in the history of the prophet (see vii.
    0
    0
  • In one (a) Samuel, after his victory, continues to rule peacefully as a theocratic judge over the Israelites, the people demand a king, and although their request is viewed as hostile to the worship of Yahweh the tribes are summoned at Mizpah and the sacred lot falls upon Saul of Benjamin (vii.
    0
    0
  • But in the other (b) the Philistines have occupied the heart of the land, the Israelites are thoroughly disorganized, and their miserable condition moves Yahweh to send as a deliverer the otherwise unknown Saul, who is anointed by Samuel, a seer of local renown (ix.
    0
    0
  • The conclusion of the former is found in Samuel's farewell address (xii.) and the entire representation of Samuel's position, Saul's rise, and the characteristic attitude towards the monarchy (viii.
    0
    0
  • For the more fragmentary account of Saul's rise (ix.
    0
    0
  • The compiler has used a story in which Saul is a private individual of Gibeah, whither the messengers came in the course of their mission (xi.
    0
    0
  • 4 seq., and frequently in the Book of Kings, with the additional feature that the age at accession, there usually confined to the Judaean kings, is here given for the Israelite Saul and his son Ishbosheth (i.e.
    0
    0
  • This summary gives a picture of Saul's ability and position which differs so markedly from the subsequent more extensive narratives of David's history that its genuineness has sometimes been questioned; nevertheless it is substantiated by the old poem quoted from the Book of Jashar in 2 Sam.
    0
    0
  • Here, however, much complication arises from the combination of traditions of distinct origin: independent records of Saul having been revised or supplemented by writers whose interest lay in David.
    0
    0
  • Little old tradition of Saul is preserved.
    0
    0
  • 3-25, here a famous prophet), where the Israelite catastrophe is foreshadowed, and Saul learns that he has lost the favour of Yahweh, and that his kingdom will pass to David (vv.
    0
    0
  • Yet another account of Saul's rejection is found in xiii.
    0
    0
  • 8-14, even before his defeat of the Philistines, and Saul is warned of the impending change (cf.
    0
    0
  • But the incident was evidently unknown to the author of chap. xv., and in this subordination of the history of Saul to that of David, in the reshaping of writings by specifically Judaean hands, we have a preliminary clue to the literary growth of the book.
    0
    0
  • are ignored in the narratives of the relations between David and Saul, of whose first meeting two 1 Characteristic expressions of Deuteronomic writers are found in r Sam.
    0
    0
  • The independent stories of David place him in the south of Judah, an outlaw with a large following, or a vassal of the Philistines; and his raids upon south Judaean clans are treated as attacks upon Saul's kingdom (xxvii.
    0
    0
  • Two very similar narratives describe Saul's pursuit of David in the Judaean desert (xxiv.
    0
    0
  • xxvi.) 2 The main points are Saul's confession and his recognition that David would prevail (xxvi.
    0
    0
  • 15-18 (the prelude to xxiv.), where a passage is inserted to describe the covenant between David and Saul's son Jonathan.
    0
    0
  • Barnes, Chron., p. 104), it is surely difficult, on historical grounds, to reconcile David's recurring fights with the Philistines with his subsequent escape from Saul to Achish of Gath (xxvii.; already anticipated in xxi.
    0
    0
  • Saul's jealousy, however, is in some way kindled, and there is already a hint at David's succession (xviii.
    0
    0
  • David has realized Saul's hatred; but Jonathan scarcely credits it, although in xix.
    0
    0
  • 1-7 Saul had instructed his attendants to slay the youth and his son had effected a reconciliation.
    0
    0
  • The keen interest in Jonathan is also conspicuous at the very commencement of Saul's career, where the youth (in ix.
    0
    0
  • Guth, Die dltere Schicht in den Erzdhlungen fiber Saul u.
    0
    0
  • of Jerusalem), the interest of the history is in David's former relations with Israel at Saul's court, and he is regarded as the future deliverer of the oppressed people.
    0
    0
  • These stories are, in fact, of a stamp with the detailed narratives already noticed (§ 3), and they conflict with the fragmentary traditions of David's steps to Jerusalem as seriously as the popular narratives of Saul conflicted with older evidence.
    0
    0
  • 12-iv.; they throw another light upon David's relations to Saul's family (xxi.
    0
    0
  • x., and for Saul, i Sam.
    0
    0
  • belongs to the joint traditions of David and Saul (cf.
    0
    0
  • The persistent emphasis upon such features as the rejection of Saul, his enmity towards David, the latter's chivalry, and his friendship for Jonathan, will partly account for the present literary intricacies; and, on general grounds, traditions of quite distinct origin (Calebite or Jerahmeelite; indigenous Judaean; North Israelite or Benjamite) are to be expected in a work now in post-exilic form.'
    0
    0
  • David's history is handled independently of Saul in I Sam.
    0
    0
  • 5 seq.) are quite distinct from the popular stories of giants of Gath, and now form part of the joint history of David and Saul.
    0
    0
  • 8 seq.), and this new defeat of Amalek, ascribed to David, proves a more successful undertaking than that which led to the rejection of Saul (xv.
    0
    0
  • Similarly, Saul's disaster leaves Israel again in the hands of the " Philistines " (xxxi.
    0
    0
  • 3 The sequel to the joint history has another version of Saul's death (2 Sam.
    0
    0
  • Here is quoted (from the " Book of Jashar ") the old poetical lament over the death of the valiant friends Saul and Jonathan, describing their successful warlike career, the wealth they brought the people, and the vivid sense of national misfortune (i.
    0
    0
  • In general, it appears that those narratives wherein the histories of Saul and David are combined-very much in the favour of the latterwere originally distinct from those where (a) Saul's figure is more in accord with the old poem from the Book of Jashar, and (b) where David's victories over prehistoric giants and his war like movements to Jerusalem pave the way for the foundation-from a particular Judaean standpoint-of his remarkably long dynasty.
    0
    0
  • The (probably ' The late genealogy of Saul in I Chron.
    0
    0
  • viii.) bear a certain resemblance to those of Saul (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • (Ahab to Jehu) finds more developed parallels in the narratives of Saul and Samuel, the peculiar treatment of the lives of David and Solomon (Judaean kings over a united Israel) and of the division of the monarchy has complicated the present sources.
    0
    0
  • xii.) belongs to the Deuteronomic and later account of Saul's rise, and closes the period of (a) the Israelite " judges " (see Judg.
    0
    0
  • Perplexity is caused, also, in the oldest account of Saul's rise (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • It may be conjectured that there was an original literary connexion between the two which has been broken by the insertion of traditions relating to Samuel and Saul. ?
    0
    0
  • and the rise of Saul.
    0
    0
  • (see Saul).
    0
    0
  • a Although writers sought to explain Saul's disastrous end (cf.
    0
    0
  • The significance of the tradition is unknown; some connexion with Saul's religious zeal at Gibeon has been conjectured (2 Sam.
    0
    0
  • traditions of Saul it was doubtless part of his kingdom.
    0
    0
  • i.-ix.), Saul's end is suddenly introduced (x., note v.
    0
    0
  • The Philistines had come up to make war against Saul and, as the rival camps lay opposite each other, this warrior came forth day by day to challenge to single combat.
    0
    0
  • The giant's arms were placed in the sanctuary, and it was his famous sword which David took with him in his flight from Saul (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • The narratives of David's early life point to some exploit by means of which he gained the favour of Saul, Jonathan and Israel, but the absence of all reference to his achievement in the subsequent chapters (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • reduced the whole of northern Syria, and by the fame of his victories induced the king of Egypt to send him presents, yet he did not venture to attack Kadesh and Damascus, so that this kingdom acted as a "buffer" between the king of Assyria and the rising kingdom of Saul.
    0
    0
  • Paul seems to have altogether abandoned his old name of Saul.
    0
    0
  • Therefore, it became a proverb; so, is Saul also among the prophets?
    0
    0
  • In 1971, the professional agitator, Saul Alinsky wrote Rules for Radicals: A Practical Primer for Realistic Radicals.
    0
    0
  • canna dae skaith til ma saul.
    0
    0
  • At the age of thirteen he wrote a cantata, " Saul and the Witch of Endor ", which as privately printed.
    0
    0
  • Now, in the first and only comprehensive history of this bitter controversy, Saul Cornell proves conclusively that both sides are wrong.
    0
    0
  • What was so foolish about this that God would now dethrone Saul and find a different king?
    0
    0
  • In a famous elegy David lamented Jonathan's death, with Saul, in battle on Mt.
    0
    0
  • What elegies can be compared with the pathos of David's lament over Jonathan and his bitter enemy Saul?
    0
    0
  • The only cavalry representative was Thomas Wilfred Saul of the 15 th hussars.
    0
    0
  • And Saul cast a javelin at him to smite him: whereby Jonathan knew that it was determined of his father to slay David.
    0
    0
  • Ye can dae whit ye lyke wi me â ye canna dae skaith til ma Saul.
    0
    0
  • Ye can DAE whit ye lyke wi me â ye canna dae skaith til ma saul.
    0
    0
  • The chief members of the Ibn Tibbon family were (I) JUDAH BEN SAUL (1120-1190), who was born in Spain but settled in Lunel.
    0
    0
  • The first account, although now essential to the canonical history, clearly gives a less authentic account of the change from the " judges " to the monarchy, while the second is fragmentary and can hardly be fitted into the present historical thread (see Saul).
    0
    0
  • 19 sqq.) over the death of two great Israelite heroes, Saul and Jonathan, knit together by mutual love, inseparable in life and death, whose unhappy end after a career of success was a national misfortune.
    0
    0
  • David accomplished the conquests of Saul but on a grander scale; " Saul hath slain his thousands and David his tens of thousands " is the popular couplet comparing the relative merits of the rival dynasts.
    0
    0
  • In this and in many other respects the records of the first monarchy have been elaborated and now reveal traces of differing conceptions of the events (see DAN; David; ELI; Samuel; Saul; Solomon).
    0
    0
  • The inferiority of Chronicles as a historical source and its varied examples of " tendency-writing " must be set against its possible access to traditions of contact with those of Saul in i Samuel, and the relation is highly suggestive for the study of their growth, as also for the perspective of the various writers.
    0
    0
  • Where it follows the chapters in Samuel it is important for textual and other critical problems, but it omits narratives in which it is not interested (David's youth, persecution by Saul, Absalom's revolt, &c.), and adds long passages (David's arrangements for the temple, &c.) which reflect the views of a much later age than David's.
    0
    0
  • (See Goliath.) But it must have been by some valiant deed that Saul was led to notice him (cf.
    0
    0
  • i.), is marked by the absence both of religious feeling and of allusions to his earlier experiences with Saul which David might have been expected to make.
    0
    0
  • His vengeance on the Amalekite who slew Saul - the account is a doublet of r Sam.
    0
    0
  • (See Abner and Saar,.) Abner had taken Saul's son Ishbaal and his authority was gradually consolidated in the north..
    0
    0
  • 12-16) is not free from difficulties, but it is intelligible that David should desire to ally himself as closely as possible with Saul's family (cf.
    0
    0
  • (See Saul.) It is not impossible that some traditions did not bring them together.
    0
    0
  • (See Rehoboam.) On the other hand, when Sheba, probably one of Saul's clan, headed a rising and was promptly pursued by Joab to Abel-beth-maacah on the west of Dan, honour was satisfied by the death of the rebel, and no further steps were taken (xx.).
    0
    0
  • A disastrous famine ravaged the land for three long years, and when Yahweh was consulted the reply came that there was " blood upon Saul and upon his house because he put the Gibeonites to death."
    0
    0
  • This historical view has probably left its trace upon the present traditions of Saul, whose defeat by the " Philistines " (here found in the north and not as usual in the south) left Israel in much the same position as when he was anointed king (cf.
    0
    0
  • But the stories of conflicts in a much larger area than the few cities in the immediate neighbourhood of Jerusalem (see above) can scarcely be read with the numerous narratives which recount or imply relations between the young David of Bethlehem and Saul or the Israelites.
    0
    0
  • Thus, he next appears as braving the suspicions which dogged the ex-persecutor Saul (Paul) - possibly an old acquaintance in Hellenist circles at Jerusalem (cf.
    0
    0
  • 25) we next get a glimpse of Barnabas as still chief among the spiritual leaders of the Antiochene Church, and as called by the Spirit, along with Saul, to initiate the wider mission of the Gospel, outside Syria even, in regions beyond (xiii.
    0
    0
  • 7 ff.), Saul seems to have come so decisively to the front, that henceforth, for the author of Acts he takes the lead, and Barnabas appears as his colleague (see xiii.
    0
    0
  • The typical example of such a state is that of the Jews till the establishment of the kingship under Saul (see JEws).
    0
    0
  • (see separate article), by the prophet who opposed Ahab's expedition to Ramoth-Gilead (1 Kings xxii.), 3 and by the son of Jonathan (see Saul).
    0
    0
  • 46 or 47, occurred the great famine which Agabus had foretold, and in which the Antiochene church sent help to that of Jerusalem by the ministry of Barnabas and Saul (Acts xi.
    0
    0
  • sq.); on the other, Saul's position as king necessitates the presumption that his sway extended over Judah and Israel, including those cities which otherwise appear to have been in the hands of aliens (I Sam.
    0
    0
  • The appearance of the nebhiim in the time of Samuel was, it would seem, as is explained in the article Hebrew Religion, one manifestation of the deep pulse of suppressed indignant patriotism which began to beat in the hearts' of the nation in the age of Philistine oppression, and this fact explains the influence of the movement on Saul and the interest taken in it by Samuel.
    0
    0
  • The rise of the kingdom of Israel under Saul is treated at length, but more prominence is given to the influence of the prophet Samuel; and not only is Saul's history written from a didactic and prophetical standpoint (cf.
    0
    0
  • Care is taken to record the transference of secular power and of Yahweh's favour from Saul to David, and David accomplishes more successfully or on a larger scale the achievements ascribed to Saul.
    0
    0
  • (like the preceding story of Samson) deal with Danites, but the migration can hardly be earlier than David's time; and xix.-xxi., by describing the extermination of Benjamin, form a link between the presence of the tribe in the late narratives of the exodus and its new prominence in the traditions of Saul (q.v.).
    0
    0
  • At all events, Benjamin claimed the honour of providing the great king of Israel whose heroic deliverance of Jabesh-Gilead is referred to elsewhere (see Saul), and it is noteworthy that the tribe only now attain historical importance.
    0
    0
  • This peculiar treatment of Saul's history by writers of the prophetical school (cf.
    0
    0
  • Saul himself appears to be represented as an inexperienced youth) is the centre of the narrative (see xiii.
    0
    0
  • This is analogous to the Judaean adaptation of the prophetical treatment of Saul's life, and it also reflects certain priestly rivalries (see Levites).
    0
    0
  • Samuel-A prophet and high priest of Israel who anointed kings, including Saul and David, in the name of God.
    0
    0
  • Additionally, Saul was a king anointed by Samuel, but who eventually disobeyed God and went insane.
    0
    0
  • Bloom grew up believing that Harry Saul Bloom was his father, but after Harry Bloom's death, Sonia Bloom revealed to her son that his father was actually family friend Colin Stone.
    0
    0
  • The first account of it in England was from Mr Saul, of Washington, who sent specimens of it to The Garden in 1880.
    0
    0
  • Of this shrub Mr John Saul, of Washington, U.S.A., has written: "Large bushes in my nursery were covered with flowers of the purest snow-white.
    0
    0
  • The history of the company is more interesting than most: it was founded by father and son, Saul and Bruce Katz.
    0
    0
  • What was all the more remarkable was that Saul and Bruce sold this amazing new footwear from the back of a van.In 1985, the company started manufacturing the ProWalker.
    0
    0
  • The Final Five are: Ellen and Saul Tigh, Sam Anders, Galen Tyrol and the President's executive aid Tory.
    0
    0
  • The Final Five are Colonel Saul Tigh, his wife Ellen, Chief of the Deck Galen Tyrol, President's Chief Aide Tory Foster and Ensign Samuel Anders.
    0
    0
  • Kim and Saul Paul Sirag can provide details.
    0
    0
  • War veteran and friend to Bill Adama, Saul Tigh serves as Galactica's executive officer.
    0
    0
  • "He led them forth like sheep," in Israel in Egypt, and the music of the Witch of Endor, and the appearance of Samuel's spirit in Saul) are as modern as Gluck's.
    0
    1
  • in the days of Saul and David) it was the priest with the ephod or image of Yahweh who gave answers to those who consulted him.
    0
    1
  • The lifeand-death struggle between Israel and the Philistines in the reign of Saul called forth under Samuel's leadership a new order of " men of God," who were called " prophets " or divinely inspired speakers.'
    1
    1
  • It is significant that Saul in his last unavailing struggle against the overwhelming forces of the Philistines sought through the medium of a sorceress for an interview with the deceased prophet Samuel.
    1
    1
  • We also read of the " evil spirit " that came upon Saul.
    1
    1
  • Saul in ix.
    2
    3
  • xviii., Saul's jealousy leaped at once to the conclusion that David's ambition would not stop short of the kingship. Such a suspicion would be intelligible if we could suppose that the king had heard something of the significant act of Samuel, which now stands at the head of the history of David in witness of that divine election and unction with the spirit of Yahweh on which his whole career hung (xvi.
    0
    1
  • Much of the life of Saul is obscure, and this too, it would seem, because tradition loved rather to speak of the founder of the ideal monarchy than of his less successful rival.
    0
    1