This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

satirist

satirist

satirist Sentence Examples

  • JONATHAN SWIFT (1667-1745), dean of St Patrick's, Dublin, British satirist, was born at No.

    1
    0
  • But just as the agreeable jester rose into the earnest satirist, one of the most striking peculiarities of his style became a more manifest defect.

    0
    0
  • So that in Rome also Cynicism was partly the butt of the satirist and partly the ideal of the thinker.

    0
    0
  • The fools are given a local colour, and Barclay appears as the unsparing satirist of the social evils of his time.

    0
    0
  • 84-98) show that Timon possessed some of the, qualities of a great satirist, together with a command of the hexameter; but he had no loftier aim than to awaken laughter.

    0
    0
  • JOHN OLDHAM (1653-1683), English satirist, son of a Presbyterian minister, was born at Shipton Moyne, near Tetbury, Gloucestershire, on the 9th of August 1653.

    0
    0
  • There is also a natural vapour bath (80°-95° F.) in the Grotta Giusti (so-called from the satirist Giuseppe Giusti, a native of the place), at Monsummano near by, discovered in 1849.

    0
    0
  • 1, 851) is a remarkable satirist and epigrammatist (Kdrpdti emlekek).

    0
    0
  • 1849), political satirist.

    0
    0
  • The fragments of the old tragedian Pacuvius and of the satirist Lucilius show that Lucretius had made use of their expressions and materials.

    0
    0
  • Thomas Brown (Satirist) >>

    0
    0
  • He, the satirist of the true-born Englishman, was himself a model, with some notable variations and improvements, of the Englishman of his period.

    0
    0
  • With the completion of the three books of Odes he cast aside for a time the office of the vates, and resumed that of the critical spectator of human life, but in the spirit of a moralist rather than a satirist.

    0
    0
  • The immorality of Roman society not lvew literary only affords abundant material to the satirist, but deepens the consciousness of moral evil in purer and more thoughtful minds.

    0
    0
  • The new extraneous element introduced into Roman literature draws into greater prominence the characteristics of the last great representatives of the genuine Roman and Italian spirit - the historian Tacitus and the satirist Juvenal.

    0
    0
  • GAIUS LUCILIUS (c. 180-103 B.C.), the earliest Roman satirist, of whose writings only fragments remain, was born at Suessa Aurunca in Campania.

    0
    0
  • But the new creative effort in language was accompanied by considerable crudeness of execution, and the novel word-formations and varieties of inflexion introduced by Pacuvius exposed him to the ridicule of the satirist Lucilius, and, long afterwards, to that of his imitator Persius.

    0
    0
  • THOMAS MURNER (1 475 - 1 537 ?), German satirist, was born on the 24th of December 1475 at Oberehnheim near Strassburg.

    0
    0
  • Among the natives of Arezzo the most famous are the Benedictine monk Guido of Arezzo, the inventor of the modern system of musical notation (died c. 1050), the poet Petrarch, Pietro Aretino, the satirist (1492-1556), and Vasari, famous for his lives of Italian painters.

    0
    0
  • Persius the satirist and the painter Daniele da Volterra were both natives of the town.

    0
    0
  • A bitter satirist appeared in the person of Christopher Opalinski (1609-1656).

    0
    0
  • The unsparing satirist described the professor's face as the "gloomiest" in the whole procession of ecclesiastics which took place on Good Friday.

    0
    0
  • Those small critics who are always desirous to lower established reputations ran about proclaiming that the anonymous satirist was superior to Pope in Pope's own peculiar department of literature.

    0
    0
  • If the satirist were merely analysing his own composition, such criticism would have little point.

    0
    0
  • Jens Baggesen is the greatest comic poet that Denmark has produced; and as a satirist and witty lyrist he has no rival among the Danes.

    0
    0
  • As a satirist and comic poet he followed Baggesen, and in all branches of the poetic art stood a little aside out of the main current of romanticism.

    0
    0
  • BERNARD DE MANDEVILLE (1670-1733), English philosopher and satirist, was born at Dordrecht, where his father practised as a physician.

    0
    0
  • He was the first Swedish satirist, and introduced Boileau to his countrymen.

    0
    0
  • JUVENAL (DECIMus Junius Juvenalis) (c. 60-140), Roman poet and satirist, was born at Aquinum.

    0
    0
  • The allusions which fix the dates when his satires first appeared, and the large experience of life which they imply, agree with the statement that he did not come before the world as a professed satirist till after middle age.

    0
    0
  • In the second, addressed to Juvenal himself, the epithet facundus is applied to him, equally applicable to his " eloquence " as satirist or rhetorician.

    0
    0
  • Two lines in the poem suggest that the satirist, who inveighed with just severity against the worst corruptions of Roman morals, was not too rigid a censor of the morals of his friend.

    0
    0
  • But they seem to be more " nominis umbrae " than real men; they serve the purpose of enabling the satirist to aim his blows at one particular object instead of declaiming at large.

    0
    0
  • The third satire, imitated by Samuel Johnson in his London, presents such a picture as Rome may have offered to the satirist at any time in the 1st century of our era; but it was under the worst emperors, Nero and Domitian, that the arts of flatterers and foreign adventurers were most successful, and that such scenes of violence as that described at 2 77 seq.

    0
    0
  • In Book IV., comprising the famous tenth, the eleventh and the twelfth satires, the author appears more as a moralist than as a pure satirist.

    0
    0
  • Tacitus belonged to the highest official and senatorial class, Juvenal apparently to the middle class and to that of the struggling men of letters; and this difference in position had much influence in determining the different bent of their genius, and in forming one to be a great national historian, the other to be a great social satirist.

    0
    0
  • If the view of the satirist is owing to this circumstance more limited in some directions, and his taste and temper less conformable to the best ancient standards of propriety, he is also saved by it from prejudices to which the traditions of his class exposed the historian.

    0
    0
  • The difference between Tacitus and Juvenal in power of representation is that the prose historian is more of an imaginative poet, the satirist more of a realist and a grotesque humorist.

    0
    0
  • The picture drawn may be a caricature, or a misrepresentation of the fact - as that of the father of Demosthenes, " blear-eyed with the soot of the glowing mass," &c. - but it is, with rare exceptions, realistically conceived, and it is brought before us with the vivid touches of a Defoe or a Swift, or of the great pictorial satirist of the 18th century, Hogarth.

    0
    0
  • No Portuguese satirist possessed such a complete equipment for his office as Nicolao Tolentino, and though a dependent position depressed his muse, he painted the customs and follies of the time with almost photographic accuracy, and distributed his attacks or begged for favours in sparkling verse.

    0
    0
  • JOSE FRANCISCO DE ISLA (1703-1781), Spanish satirist, was born at Villavidanes (Leon) on the 24th of March 1703.

    0
    0
  • In only two points can Rabelais be said to be definitely polemic. He certainly hated the monkish system in the debased form in which it existed in his time; he as certainly hated the brutish ignorance into which the earlier systems of education had suffered too many of their teachers and scholars to drop. At these two things he was never tired of striking, but elsewhere, even in the grim satire of the Chats fourres, he is the satirist proper rather than the reformer.

    0
    0
  • His Pindaric Odes, written at this period or earlier, in the manner of Cowley, indicate the rudiments of a real satirist, but a satirist struggling with a most uncongenial form of expression.

    0
    0
  • He was now often in Dublin, at most twenty miles distant, and through Lady Berkeley and her daughters he became the familiar and chartered satirist of the fashionable society there.

    0
    0
  • The world, which perhaps ought to have been vexed, chose rather to be diverted; and the great satirist literally strains his power ut pueris placeat.

    0
    0
  • But it is as a brilliant humourist and satirist that he is remembered, in connexion with his fictitious character "Sam Slick."

    0
    0
  • As a satirist and humorist Lichtenberg takes high rank among the German writers of the 18th century.

    0
    0
  • And it's still possible to give up your responsible day job, move to Praha and become a satirist.

    0
    0
  • It had been a good performance of a poor play, written by an in-vogue American satirist.

    0
    0
  • It's funny that a political satirist is winning an award for having ginger hair.

    0
    0
  • Category: Today's thought According to American satirist PJ O'Rourke, there is no car faster than a hire car.

    0
    0
  • Top English social satirist Chris Morris has recut George W. Bush's ' State of the Nation ' address.

    0
    0
  • Erasmus was the leading scholar in Europe and also a brilliant satirist.

    0
    0
  • satirist economics had (something it badly needed, and still does ).

    0
    0
  • He was a master satirist, and even in a travelog such as this, his views shine through.

    0
    0
  • Artistic Director, Barrie Rutter, takes as his inspiration the cartoons and caricatures of celebrated eighteenth century satirist, James Gillray.

    0
    0
  • satirist of this century.

    0
    0
  • But just as the agreeable jester rose into the earnest satirist, one of the most striking peculiarities of his style became a more manifest defect.

    0
    0
  • So that in Rome also Cynicism was partly the butt of the satirist and partly the ideal of the thinker.

    0
    0
  • The fools are given a local colour, and Barclay appears as the unsparing satirist of the social evils of his time.

    0
    0
  • 84-98) show that Timon possessed some of the, qualities of a great satirist, together with a command of the hexameter; but he had no loftier aim than to awaken laughter.

    0
    0
  • JOHN OLDHAM (1653-1683), English satirist, son of a Presbyterian minister, was born at Shipton Moyne, near Tetbury, Gloucestershire, on the 9th of August 1653.

    0
    0
  • There is also a natural vapour bath (80°-95° F.) in the Grotta Giusti (so-called from the satirist Giuseppe Giusti, a native of the place), at Monsummano near by, discovered in 1849.

    0
    0
  • 1, 851) is a remarkable satirist and epigrammatist (Kdrpdti emlekek).

    0
    0
  • 1849), political satirist.

    0
    0
  • The poet and satirist, John Skelton (d.

    0
    0
  • The fragments of the old tragedian Pacuvius and of the satirist Lucilius show that Lucretius had made use of their expressions and materials.

    0
    0
  • Thomas Brown (Satirist) >>

    0
    0
  • He, the satirist of the true-born Englishman, was himself a model, with some notable variations and improvements, of the Englishman of his period.

    0
    0
  • As a satirist he possessed great merit, though he sins from an excess of severity, and is sometimes malignant and unjust.

    0
    0
  • With the completion of the three books of Odes he cast aside for a time the office of the vates, and resumed that of the critical spectator of human life, but in the spirit of a moralist rather than a satirist.

    0
    0
  • The immorality of Roman society not lvew literary only affords abundant material to the satirist, but deepens the consciousness of moral evil in purer and more thoughtful minds.

    0
    0
  • The new extraneous element introduced into Roman literature draws into greater prominence the characteristics of the last great representatives of the genuine Roman and Italian spirit - the historian Tacitus and the satirist Juvenal.

    0
    0
  • The generous scorn and pathos of the historian acting on extraordinary gifts of imaginative insight and characterization, and the fierce indignation of the satirist finding its vent in exaggerating realism, doubtless to some extent warped their impressions; nevertheless their works are the last voices expressive of the freedom and manly virtue of the ancient world.

    0
    0
  • GAIUS LUCILIUS (c. 180-103 B.C.), the earliest Roman satirist, of whose writings only fragments remain, was born at Suessa Aurunca in Campania.

    0
    0
  • But the new creative effort in language was accompanied by considerable crudeness of execution, and the novel word-formations and varieties of inflexion introduced by Pacuvius exposed him to the ridicule of the satirist Lucilius, and, long afterwards, to that of his imitator Persius.

    0
    0
  • THOMAS MURNER (1 475 - 1 537 ?), German satirist, was born on the 24th of December 1475 at Oberehnheim near Strassburg.

    0
    0
  • Among the natives of Arezzo the most famous are the Benedictine monk Guido of Arezzo, the inventor of the modern system of musical notation (died c. 1050), the poet Petrarch, Pietro Aretino, the satirist (1492-1556), and Vasari, famous for his lives of Italian painters.

    0
    0
  • Persius the satirist and the painter Daniele da Volterra were both natives of the town.

    0
    0
  • A bitter satirist appeared in the person of Christopher Opalinski (1609-1656).

    0
    0
  • The unsparing satirist described the professor's face as the "gloomiest" in the whole procession of ecclesiastics which took place on Good Friday.

    0
    0
  • Those small critics who are always desirous to lower established reputations ran about proclaiming that the anonymous satirist was superior to Pope in Pope's own peculiar department of literature.

    0
    0
  • If the satirist were merely analysing his own composition, such criticism would have little point.

    0
    0
  • Jens Baggesen is the greatest comic poet that Denmark has produced; and as a satirist and witty lyrist he has no rival among the Danes.

    0
    0
  • As a satirist and comic poet he followed Baggesen, and in all branches of the poetic art stood a little aside out of the main current of romanticism.

    0
    0
  • BERNARD DE MANDEVILLE (1670-1733), English philosopher and satirist, was born at Dordrecht, where his father practised as a physician.

    0
    0
  • He was the first Swedish satirist, and introduced Boileau to his countrymen.

    0
    0
  • Vesp. 8; Eutrop. 8.19), the celebrated Greek writer Lucian the Satirist was born in the 2nd century (see Lucian), and more than a century later another Lucian, known as the Martyr, and Paul called "of Samosata."

    0
    0
  • JUVENAL (DECIMus Junius Juvenalis) (c. 60-140), Roman poet and satirist, was born at Aquinum.

    0
    0
  • The allusions which fix the dates when his satires first appeared, and the large experience of life which they imply, agree with the statement that he did not come before the world as a professed satirist till after middle age.

    0
    0
  • In the second, addressed to Juvenal himself, the epithet facundus is applied to him, equally applicable to his " eloquence " as satirist or rhetorician.

    0
    0
  • Two lines in the poem suggest that the satirist, who inveighed with just severity against the worst corruptions of Roman morals, was not too rigid a censor of the morals of his friend.

    0
    0
  • But they seem to be more " nominis umbrae " than real men; they serve the purpose of enabling the satirist to aim his blows at one particular object instead of declaiming at large.

    0
    0
  • The third satire, imitated by Samuel Johnson in his London, presents such a picture as Rome may have offered to the satirist at any time in the 1st century of our era; but it was under the worst emperors, Nero and Domitian, that the arts of flatterers and foreign adventurers were most successful, and that such scenes of violence as that described at 2 77 seq.

    0
    0
  • In Book IV., comprising the famous tenth, the eleventh and the twelfth satires, the author appears more as a moralist than as a pure satirist.

    0
    0
  • Tacitus belonged to the highest official and senatorial class, Juvenal apparently to the middle class and to that of the struggling men of letters; and this difference in position had much influence in determining the different bent of their genius, and in forming one to be a great national historian, the other to be a great social satirist.

    0
    0
  • If the view of the satirist is owing to this circumstance more limited in some directions, and his taste and temper less conformable to the best ancient standards of propriety, he is also saved by it from prejudices to which the traditions of his class exposed the historian.

    0
    0
  • The difference between Tacitus and Juvenal in power of representation is that the prose historian is more of an imaginative poet, the satirist more of a realist and a grotesque humorist.

    0
    0
  • The picture drawn may be a caricature, or a misrepresentation of the fact - as that of the father of Demosthenes, " blear-eyed with the soot of the glowing mass," &c. - but it is, with rare exceptions, realistically conceived, and it is brought before us with the vivid touches of a Defoe or a Swift, or of the great pictorial satirist of the 18th century, Hogarth.

    0
    0
  • No Portuguese satirist possessed such a complete equipment for his office as Nicolao Tolentino, and though a dependent position depressed his muse, he painted the customs and follies of the time with almost photographic accuracy, and distributed his attacks or begged for favours in sparkling verse.

    0
    0
  • JOSE FRANCISCO DE ISLA (1703-1781), Spanish satirist, was born at Villavidanes (Leon) on the 24th of March 1703.

    0
    0
  • In only two points can Rabelais be said to be definitely polemic. He certainly hated the monkish system in the debased form in which it existed in his time; he as certainly hated the brutish ignorance into which the earlier systems of education had suffered too many of their teachers and scholars to drop. At these two things he was never tired of striking, but elsewhere, even in the grim satire of the Chats fourres, he is the satirist proper rather than the reformer.

    0
    0
  • JONATHAN SWIFT (1667-1745), dean of St Patrick's, Dublin, British satirist, was born at No.

    0
    0
  • His Pindaric Odes, written at this period or earlier, in the manner of Cowley, indicate the rudiments of a real satirist, but a satirist struggling with a most uncongenial form of expression.

    0
    0
  • He was now often in Dublin, at most twenty miles distant, and through Lady Berkeley and her daughters he became the familiar and chartered satirist of the fashionable society there.

    0
    0
  • The world, which perhaps ought to have been vexed, chose rather to be diverted; and the great satirist literally strains his power ut pueris placeat.

    0
    0
  • But it is as a brilliant humourist and satirist that he is remembered, in connexion with his fictitious character "Sam Slick."

    0
    0
  • As a satirist and observer he is simply the "Cooper who 's written six volumes to prove he's as good as a Lord" of Lowell's clever portrait; his enormous vanity and his irritability find vent in a sort of dull violence, which is exceedingly tiresome.

    0
    0
  • As a satirist and humorist Lichtenberg takes high rank among the German writers of the 18th century.

    0
    0
  • And it 's still possible to give up your responsible day job, move to Praha and become a satirist.

    0
    0
  • It had been a good performance of a poor play, written by an in-vogue American satirist.

    0
    0
  • It 's funny that a political satirist is winning an award for having ginger hair.

    0
    0
  • Category: Today 's thought According to American satirist PJ O'Rourke, there is no car faster than a hire car.

    0
    0
  • Top English social satirist Chris Morris has recut George W. Bush 's ' State of the Nation ' address.

    0
    0
  • Erasmus was the leading scholar in Europe and also a brilliant satirist.

    0
    0
  • He was the closest thing to a satirist economics had (something it badly needed, and still does).

    0
    0
  • He was a master satirist, and even in a travelog such as this, his views shine through.

    0
    0
  • Artistic Director, Barrie Rutter, takes as his inspiration the cartoons and caricatures of celebrated eighteenth century satirist, James Gillray.

    0
    0
  • He was also a brilliant novelist and critic, and many consider him the greatest satirist of this century.

    0
    0
  • Political satirist and talk show host Jon Stewart was born on November 28, 1962, in New York City.

    0
    0
  • As a satirist and observer he is simply the "Cooper who 's written six volumes to prove he's as good as a Lord" of Lowell's clever portrait; his enormous vanity and his irritability find vent in a sort of dull violence, which is exceedingly tiresome.

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →