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satellites

satellites Sentence Examples

  • I shut down the satellites supporting comms on the East Coast, but it'll only take another two or three minutes before the backups on the sats are enabled.

  • The planets were shown to have visible disks, and to be attended by satellites whose distance and position angle relative to the planet it was desirable to measure.

  • The same considerations serve to explain the moon and other satellites.

  • The following are the chief islands: - Thasos, in the extreme north, off the Macedonian coast; Samothrace, fronting the Gulf of Saros; Imbros and Lemnos, in prolongation of the peninsula of Gallipoli (Thracian Chersonese); Euboea, the largest of all, lying close along the east coast of Greece; the Northern Sporades, including Sciathos, Scopelos and Halonesos, running out from the southern extremity of the Thessalian coast, and Scyros, with its satellites, north-east of Euboea; Lesbos and Chios; Samos and Nikaria; Cos, with Calymnos to the north; all off Asia Minor, with the many other islands of the Sporades; and, finally, the great group of the Cyclades, of which the largest are Andros and Tenos, Naxos and Paros.

  • Besides the three larger islands numerous satellites belong to the subregion, as Lord Howe, Norfolk and Kermadec islands, with the Chatham, Auckland and Macquarie groups.

  • In a minor degree this conclusion is strengthened by observing the satellites.

  • Discarding those of Uranus, in which the orbits of the satellites are highly inclined to the ecliptic, and in which manifestly some exceptional influences have been at work, we find that the satellites revolve around the primaries also in the same direction (Exceptions are Saturn ix.

  • The effect of such contraction would be to draw the materials of the ring into a single mass, and thus we would have a planet formed, while the satellites of that planet would be developed from the still nascent planet in the same way as the planet itself originated from the sun.

  • In a letter, Del movimento della cometa apparsa it mese di decembre 1664, published in 1665 under the pseudonym Pier Maria Mutoli, he was the first to suggest the idea of a parabolic path; and another of his astronomical works was Theorica mediceorum planetarum ex causis physicis deducta (Florence, 1666), in which he considered the influence of attraction on the satellites of Jupiter.

  • The only phenomena of the sort available are eclipses of Jupiter's satellites, especially of the first.

  • It has been supposed that certain electrons revolve like satellites in orbits around the atoms with which they are associated, a view which receives strong support from the phenomena of the Zeeman effect, and on this assumption a theory has been worked out by P. Langevin, 2 which accounts for many, of the observed facts of magnetism.

  • Wren's great work was the erection of the cathedral of St Paul's, and the many churches ranged round it as satellites.

  • The bodies of this class consist of eight major planets moving round the sun at various distances, and of an unknown number of minor planets, much smaller than the major planets, forming a separate group. Thirdly, satellites, or secondary planets revolving around the major planets, and therefore accompanying them in their revolutions around the sun.

  • The outer group of major planets comprises: Jupiter, 24,24, with seven satellites; Saturn, T?, with ten satellites; Uranus, a or 1, with four satellites; Neptune, with one satellite.

  • The same statements are true of the orbits of the satellites around their primaries.

  • The general rule is that the satellites also move round in the same direction, and in orbits of moderate inclination.

  • Exceptions occur in the case of the satellites of Uranus, which are nearly perpendicular to the plane of the orbit.

  • From a series of measures of the angle between Jupiter's satellites and the planet, made in June and July 1794 and in August and September 1795, Schur finds the mass of Jupiter =I / Io 4 8.55 1.45, a result which accords well within the limits of its probable error with the received value of the mass derived from modern researches.

  • 096, for Satellites I., II., III.

  • The old tribunals where customary law was administered by ignorant satellites of the great, amid unspeakable corruption, have all been replaced by organized courts with qualified judges appointed from the Bangkok law school, and under the direct control of the ministry in all except the most outlying parts.

  • Moreover, the Septembriseurs- Robespierre, Danton, Marat and their lesser satellites - realized that not only their influence but their safety depended on keeping the Revolution alive.

  • He wrote besides: Tables ecliptiques des satellites de Jupiter, inserted in the third edition of J.

  • His Essai sur la theorie des satellites de Jupiter (1766), an expansion of a memoir presented to the Academy in 1763, showed much original power; and it was followed up in 1771 by a noteworthy dissertation Sur les inegalites de la lumiere des satellites de Jupiter.

  • It was characterized by a main belief, tending towards monotheism, in the Light-deity Ahuramazda and his satellites, who appeared in contrast with him as powers of the nature of angels.

  • He was also a diligent and skilful observer, and busied himself not only with astronomical subjects, such as the double stars, the satellites of Jupiter and the measurement of the polar and equatorial diameters of the sun, but also with biological studies of the circulation of the sap in plants, the fructification of plants, infusoria, &c.

  • Among his contributions to astronomy may be noted his eleven zonecatalogues of 34,674 stars, his measurements, in 1836-1837, of nebulae and clusters, and his determination of the mass of Uranus from observations of its satellites (Mena.

  • Bothwell and others, his satellites or the queen's, were instantly placarded by name as the criminals.

  • With this last instrument he discovered in 1610 the satellites of Jupiter, and soon afterwards the spots on the sun, the phases of Venus, and the hills and valleys on the moon.

  • He demonstrated the rotation of the satellites of Jupiter round the planet, and gave rough predictions of their configurations, proved the rotation of the sun on its axis, established the general truth of the Copernican system as compared with that of Ptolemy, and fairly routed the fanciful dogmas of the philosophers.

  • focal length, he discovered the brightest of Saturn's satellites (Titan) in 1655, and in 1659 he published his Systema Saturnium, in which was given for the first time a true explanation of Saturn's ring, founded on observations made with the same instrument.

  • Cassini discovered Saturn's fifth satellite (Rhea) in 1672 with a telescope of 35 ft., and the third and fourth satellites in 1684 with telescopes made by Campani of looand 136-ft.

  • Newton's first telescope so far realized his expectations that he could see with its aid the satellites of Jupiter and the horns of Venus.

  • Notwithstanding this difference in the brightness of the objects, we were able with this reflecting telescope to see whatever we have hitherto discovered with the Huygenian, particularly the transits of Jupiter's satellites and their shadows over his disk, the black list in Saturn's ring, and the edge of his shadow cast on his ring.

  • We have also seen with it several times the five satellites of Saturn, in viewing of which this telescope had the advantage of the Huygenian at the time when we compared them; for, being in summer, and the Huygenian telescope being managed without a tube, the twilight prevented us from seeing in this some of these small objects which at the same time we could discern with the reflecting telescope."

  • equatorial at the United States Naval Observatory, Newcomb devoted it almost exclusively for the first two years to observations of the satellites of Uranus and Neptune, being of opinion that it was better to do one thing well than many things indifferently.

  • The results of these skilfully conducted observations were published in a memoir on The Uranian and Neptunian Systems. 3 From this research it appears that the orbits of all four satellites of Uranus are sensibly circular, and although no special search was made, he concludes that none of Sir William Herschel's supposed outer satellites can have any real existence.

  • From the motion of the satellites he finds that the mass of Uranus is - T - A o o th of that of the sun, while for the planet Neptune he finds a mass equal to 19 Toth of the sun, agreeing with the value previously found by him from the perturbations of Uranus within o th of its amount.

  • When Bute retired and George Grenville accepted the cares of official life, the higher post of first lord of the admiralty fell to Townshend's lot, but with his usual impetuosity he presumed to designate one of his satellites, Sir William Burrell (1732-1796), to a place under him at the board, and the refusal to accept the nomination led to his exclusion from the new administration.

  • But the Bulgarians had skilfully exploited their primacy during the first war to induce the European press and public to regard Serbians and Greeks as mere satellites,' and, as is not unusually the case with successful propaganda, they had come to believe in it themselves, fortified in the belief by fulsome compliments addressing them as the "Prussians of the Balkans" and the "Japanese of the West."

  • In the case of the satellites it is the period relative to the radius vector from the sun.

  • The equation of light is the time taken by light to traverse the sun's mean distance from the earth; it can be found by the acceleration or retardation of the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites according as Jupiter is approaching opposition or conjunction with the sun; a recent analysis shows that its value is 498.6", which leads to the same value of the parallax as above, but the internal discrepancies of the material put its authority upon a much lower level.

  • In the other letters written in 1685 and 1686 he applies to Flamsteed for information respecting the orbits of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, respecting the rise and fall of the spring and neap tides at the solstices and the equinoxes, respecting the flattening of Jupiter at the poles (which, if certain, he says, would conduce much to the stating the reasons of the precession of the equinoxes), and respecting the difference between the observed places of Saturn and those computed from Kepler's tables about the time of his conjunction with Jupiter.

  • He mentioned four: (1) by a watch to keep time exactly, (2) by the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites, (3) by the place of the moon, (4) by a new method proposed by Mr Ditton.

  • The action of the sun upon the satellites of the several planets and the effects of this action are of the same general nature.

  • If a planet rotates on its axis so rapidly as to have a considerable ellipticity, and if it has satellites revolving very near the plane of the equator, the combined actions of the sun and of the equatorial protuberances may be such that the whole system will rotate almost as if the planes of revolution of the satellites were solidly fixed to the plane of the equator.

  • This is the case with the seven inner satellites of Saturn.

  • The practical methods of computing perturbations of the planets and satellites were first exhaustively developed by Pierre Simon Laplace in his Mecanique celeste.

  • Gravitation was thus shown to be the sole influence governing the movements of planets and satellites; the figure of the rotating earth was successfully explained by its action on the minuter particles of matter; tides and the precession of the equinoxes proved amenable to reasonings based on the same principle; and it satisfactorily accounted as well for some of the chief lunar and planetary inequalities.

  • He again won the prize of the Paris Academy in 1766 with an analytical discussion of the movements of Jupiter's satellites (Miscellanea, Turin Acad.

  • Campani, with which he discovered in 1671 Iapetus, the ninth in distance of Saturn's family of satellites; Rhea was detected in 1672 with a glass by the same maker of 34-ft.

  • Romer, on the other hand, deserves full credit for originating the transit-circle and the prime vertical instrument; and he earned undying fame by his discovery of the finite velocity of light, made at Paris in 1675 by comparing his observations of the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites at the conjunctions and oppositions of the planet.

  • James Bradley had described to the Royal Society on the 2nd of July 171 9 the curious cyclical relations of the three inner satellites; and their period of 437 days was independently discovered by Wargentin, who based upon it in 1746 a set of tables, superseded only by those of J.

  • by its disk on the 13th of March 1781; two of its satellites, Oberon and Titania, disclosed themselves on the it th of January 1787; while with the giant 48-in.

  • This raises to 26 the number of discovered satellites in the solar system.

  • In recent times photography has been so successfully applied to the mapping of our satellites as nearly to supersede visual observation.

  • Mere reflected lights, these satellites professed to share their masters horror of all individual and collective rights of such a ~e~,otlsm.

  • But the discovery which was at once perceived to be most important in itself, and most revolutionary in its effects, was that of Jupiter's satellites, first seen by Galileo on the 7th of January 1610, and by him named Sidera Medicea, in honour of the grand-duke of Tuscany, Cosmo II., who had been his pupil, and was about to become his employer.

  • Within two years of their first discovery, he had constructed approximately accurate tables of the revolutions of Jupiter's satellites, and he proposed their frequent eclipses as a means of determining longitudes, not only on land, but at sea.

  • He perceived the analogy between the power which holds the moon in the neighbourhood of the earth, and compels Jupiter's satellites to circulate round their primary, and the attraction exercised by the earth on bodies at its surface; 1 but he failed to conceive the combination of central force with tangential velocity, and was disposed to connect the revolutions of the planets with the axial rotation of the sun.

  • The hypothesis of the original nebular condition of the system, with the consequent explanation of the great phenomena of planetary formations and movements of the satellites and rings, is unquestionably to be assigned to Kant.

  • Shaking, Deidre wiped her face and followed the severe woman through the simple, stone fortress outfitted with electrical wiring and occasional satellites.

  • I shut down the satellites supporting comms on the East Coast, but it'll only take another two or three minutes before the backups on the sats are enabled.

  • A potential adversary in space would be faced with the dilemma of shooting first or risking the loss of critical satellites.

  • constellation of 24 satellites was achieved in 1994.

  • GPS handsets pick up signals from satellites orbiting the earth.

  • Nik and Mrs fiend remain a nefarious nucleus, able to attract the finest in contributing satellites for their ravishing reverberations.

  • But " Sic transit Gloria " when cables and satellites came on the scene the HF systems closed down one by one.

  • Other things to talk about Artificial satellites use gyroscopes to orient themselves without wasting reaction mass.

  • A central feature of their work will be the use of satellites to determine changes in the polar ice fields.

  • Aircraft - which can use iridium providing they don't exceed about Mach 2 at which point the orbiting satellites, can get confused!

  • iridium telephones and satellites.

  • This setup process will explain in simple layman 's terms how to get the best results from your Pro Cinema I satellites.

  • Quot but he because i get bear the logo up for satellites.

  • Radar altimetry is used on aircraft for altitude determination and on aircraft and satellites for topographic mapping and sea surface height estimation.

  • merchandise leisurewear envelope called the sites with a. Are many commercial satellites on which.

  • The Galilean moons of Jupiter are invisible to the naked eye, so at least 8 of Nibiru's satellites are bigger than them.

  • mounting brackets for the satellites are also included.

  • These, and similar studies of the Sun, make use of UV, EUV and X-ray observations from satellites.

  • orbiting satellites, surveillance cameras are a colossal waste of money.

  • Pounds m Paul satellites st million quot said henry.

  • The satellites have sufficient on-board propellant to maintain their orbit stations for at least 5 years.

  • radar altimetry is used on aircraft for altitude determination and on aircraft and satellites for topographic mapping and sea surface height estimation.

  • radiance data from satellites and aircraft.

  • reflectance data from earth observation satellites.

  • However it should be remembered that NOSS are military surveillance satellites, and as such, published data cannot be considered totally reliable.

  • High-resolution X-ray satellites have resolved a point source near the center of N 49, the likely X-ray counterpart of the soft gamma-ray repeater.

  • resistojet propulsion systems for small satellites is growing.

  • These huge ejections of solar plasma have a direct impact on orbiting satellites and land-based power and communications systems.

  • Don't forget that we also receive images from geostationary satellites which cover the whole world.

  • The effective area of all XMM mirror module s, in comparison with those of other X-ray satellites (linear scale ).

  • satellites in orbit.

  • subsystem products are designed for optical or radar observation on both civilian and military satellites.

  • The front satellites incorporate tweeters and mid-range drivers for detailed mid-to-high tonality, and the reinforced wood subwoofer provides dynamic bass.

  • topside sounder satellites was the equatorial anomaly.

  • transit Gloria " when cables and satellites came on the scene the HF systems closed down one by one.

  • transmitted by the satellites.

  • triangulation methods your receiver only needs to ' see ' two or three satellites to give a usable position fix.

  • The satellites themselves have a completely new tweeter, which has been ' borrowed ' from KEF's luxury Q Range speakers.

  • vanguard of European efforts to develop observation satellites.

  • The planets were shown to have visible disks, and to be attended by satellites whose distance and position angle relative to the planet it was desirable to measure.

  • The same considerations serve to explain the moon and other satellites.

  • The following are the chief islands: - Thasos, in the extreme north, off the Macedonian coast; Samothrace, fronting the Gulf of Saros; Imbros and Lemnos, in prolongation of the peninsula of Gallipoli (Thracian Chersonese); Euboea, the largest of all, lying close along the east coast of Greece; the Northern Sporades, including Sciathos, Scopelos and Halonesos, running out from the southern extremity of the Thessalian coast, and Scyros, with its satellites, north-east of Euboea; Lesbos and Chios; Samos and Nikaria; Cos, with Calymnos to the north; all off Asia Minor, with the many other islands of the Sporades; and, finally, the great group of the Cyclades, of which the largest are Andros and Tenos, Naxos and Paros.

  • Besides the three larger islands numerous satellites belong to the subregion, as Lord Howe, Norfolk and Kermadec islands, with the Chatham, Auckland and Macquarie groups.

  • In a minor degree this conclusion is strengthened by observing the satellites.

  • Discarding those of Uranus, in which the orbits of the satellites are highly inclined to the ecliptic, and in which manifestly some exceptional influences have been at work, we find that the satellites revolve around the primaries also in the same direction (Exceptions are Saturn ix.

  • The effect of such contraction would be to draw the materials of the ring into a single mass, and thus we would have a planet formed, while the satellites of that planet would be developed from the still nascent planet in the same way as the planet itself originated from the sun.

  • More recent and better adapted to study is Bauschinger's Bahnbestimmung der Himmelskorper (1 vol., Leipzig, 1906), which, alone of the three, treats orbits of satellites and double stars.

  • In a letter, Del movimento della cometa apparsa it mese di decembre 1664, published in 1665 under the pseudonym Pier Maria Mutoli, he was the first to suggest the idea of a parabolic path; and another of his astronomical works was Theorica mediceorum planetarum ex causis physicis deducta (Florence, 1666), in which he considered the influence of attraction on the satellites of Jupiter.

  • The only phenomena of the sort available are eclipses of Jupiter's satellites, especially of the first.

  • It has been supposed that certain electrons revolve like satellites in orbits around the atoms with which they are associated, a view which receives strong support from the phenomena of the Zeeman effect, and on this assumption a theory has been worked out by P. Langevin, 2 which accounts for many, of the observed facts of magnetism.

  • Wren's great work was the erection of the cathedral of St Paul's, and the many churches ranged round it as satellites.

  • The bodies of this class consist of eight major planets moving round the sun at various distances, and of an unknown number of minor planets, much smaller than the major planets, forming a separate group. Thirdly, satellites, or secondary planets revolving around the major planets, and therefore accompanying them in their revolutions around the sun.

  • The arrangement of the major planets, with the numbers of their respective satellites thus far known, in the order of distance from the sun, is as follows: The first group in order - the smaller major planets - comprises: Mercury, with no known satellite; Venus, ?,?, with no known satellite; The Earth, ®, with one satellite, the moon; Mars, with two satellites.

  • The outer group of major planets comprises: Jupiter, 24,24, with seven satellites; Saturn, T?, with ten satellites; Uranus, a or 1, with four satellites; Neptune, with one satellite.

  • The same statements are true of the orbits of the satellites around their primaries.

  • The general rule is that the satellites also move round in the same direction, and in orbits of moderate inclination.

  • Exceptions occur in the case of the satellites of Uranus, which are nearly perpendicular to the plane of the orbit.

  • From a series of measures of the angle between Jupiter's satellites and the planet, made in June and July 1794 and in August and September 1795, Schur finds the mass of Jupiter =I / Io 4 8.55 1.45, a result which accords well within the limits of its probable error with the received value of the mass derived from modern researches.

  • 096, for Satellites I., II., III.

  • In other cases, such as the measurement of the mutual distances and position angles of the satellites of Jupiter, for derivation of the elements of the orbits of the satellites and the mass of Jupiter, reference must also be made to measures of standard stars whose relative distance and position angle is accurately determined by independent methods (see Annals of the Cape Observatory, vol.

  • The old tribunals where customary law was administered by ignorant satellites of the great, amid unspeakable corruption, have all been replaced by organized courts with qualified judges appointed from the Bangkok law school, and under the direct control of the ministry in all except the most outlying parts.

  • Moreover, the Septembriseurs- Robespierre, Danton, Marat and their lesser satellites - realized that not only their influence but their safety depended on keeping the Revolution alive.

  • He wrote besides: Tables ecliptiques des satellites de Jupiter, inserted in the third edition of J.

  • His Essai sur la theorie des satellites de Jupiter (1766), an expansion of a memoir presented to the Academy in 1763, showed much original power; and it was followed up in 1771 by a noteworthy dissertation Sur les inegalites de la lumiere des satellites de Jupiter.

  • It was characterized by a main belief, tending towards monotheism, in the Light-deity Ahuramazda and his satellites, who appeared in contrast with him as powers of the nature of angels.

  • He was also a diligent and skilful observer, and busied himself not only with astronomical subjects, such as the double stars, the satellites of Jupiter and the measurement of the polar and equatorial diameters of the sun, but also with biological studies of the circulation of the sap in plants, the fructification of plants, infusoria, &c.

  • Among his contributions to astronomy may be noted his eleven zonecatalogues of 34,674 stars, his measurements, in 1836-1837, of nebulae and clusters, and his determination of the mass of Uranus from observations of its satellites (Mena.

  • Bothwell and others, his satellites or the queen's, were instantly placarded by name as the criminals.

  • With this last instrument he discovered in 1610 the satellites of Jupiter, and soon afterwards the spots on the sun, the phases of Venus, and the hills and valleys on the moon.

  • He demonstrated the rotation of the satellites of Jupiter round the planet, and gave rough predictions of their configurations, proved the rotation of the sun on its axis, established the general truth of the Copernican system as compared with that of Ptolemy, and fairly routed the fanciful dogmas of the philosophers.

  • focal length, he discovered the brightest of Saturn's satellites (Titan) in 1655, and in 1659 he published his Systema Saturnium, in which was given for the first time a true explanation of Saturn's ring, founded on observations made with the same instrument.

  • Cassini discovered Saturn's fifth satellite (Rhea) in 1672 with a telescope of 35 ft., and the third and fourth satellites in 1684 with telescopes made by Campani of looand 136-ft.

  • Newton's first telescope so far realized his expectations that he could see with its aid the satellites of Jupiter and the horns of Venus.

  • Notwithstanding this difference in the brightness of the objects, we were able with this reflecting telescope to see whatever we have hitherto discovered with the Huygenian, particularly the transits of Jupiter's satellites and their shadows over his disk, the black list in Saturn's ring, and the edge of his shadow cast on his ring.

  • We have also seen with it several times the five satellites of Saturn, in viewing of which this telescope had the advantage of the Huygenian at the time when we compared them; for, being in summer, and the Huygenian telescope being managed without a tube, the twilight prevented us from seeing in this some of these small objects which at the same time we could discern with the reflecting telescope."

  • equatorial at the United States Naval Observatory, Newcomb devoted it almost exclusively for the first two years to observations of the satellites of Uranus and Neptune, being of opinion that it was better to do one thing well than many things indifferently.

  • The results of these skilfully conducted observations were published in a memoir on The Uranian and Neptunian Systems. 3 From this research it appears that the orbits of all four satellites of Uranus are sensibly circular, and although no special search was made, he concludes that none of Sir William Herschel's supposed outer satellites can have any real existence.

  • From the motion of the satellites he finds that the mass of Uranus is - T - A o o th of that of the sun, while for the planet Neptune he finds a mass equal to 19 Toth of the sun, agreeing with the value previously found by him from the perturbations of Uranus within o th of its amount.

  • When Bute retired and George Grenville accepted the cares of official life, the higher post of first lord of the admiralty fell to Townshend's lot, but with his usual impetuosity he presumed to designate one of his satellites, Sir William Burrell (1732-1796), to a place under him at the board, and the refusal to accept the nomination led to his exclusion from the new administration.

  • But the Bulgarians had skilfully exploited their primacy during the first war to induce the European press and public to regard Serbians and Greeks as mere satellites,' and, as is not unusually the case with successful propaganda, they had come to believe in it themselves, fortified in the belief by fulsome compliments addressing them as the "Prussians of the Balkans" and the "Japanese of the West."

  • In the case of the satellites it is the period relative to the radius vector from the sun.

  • The equation of light is the time taken by light to traverse the sun's mean distance from the earth; it can be found by the acceleration or retardation of the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites according as Jupiter is approaching opposition or conjunction with the sun; a recent analysis shows that its value is 498.6", which leads to the same value of the parallax as above, but the internal discrepancies of the material put its authority upon a much lower level.

  • In the other letters written in 1685 and 1686 he applies to Flamsteed for information respecting the orbits of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, respecting the rise and fall of the spring and neap tides at the solstices and the equinoxes, respecting the flattening of Jupiter at the poles (which, if certain, he says, would conduce much to the stating the reasons of the precession of the equinoxes), and respecting the difference between the observed places of Saturn and those computed from Kepler's tables about the time of his conjunction with Jupiter.

  • He mentioned four: (1) by a watch to keep time exactly, (2) by the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites, (3) by the place of the moon, (4) by a new method proposed by Mr Ditton.

  • The action of the sun upon the satellites of the several planets and the effects of this action are of the same general nature.

  • If a planet rotates on its axis so rapidly as to have a considerable ellipticity, and if it has satellites revolving very near the plane of the equator, the combined actions of the sun and of the equatorial protuberances may be such that the whole system will rotate almost as if the planes of revolution of the satellites were solidly fixed to the plane of the equator.

  • This is the case with the seven inner satellites of Saturn.

  • The practical methods of computing perturbations of the planets and satellites were first exhaustively developed by Pierre Simon Laplace in his Mecanique celeste.

  • Gravitation was thus shown to be the sole influence governing the movements of planets and satellites; the figure of the rotating earth was successfully explained by its action on the minuter particles of matter; tides and the precession of the equinoxes proved amenable to reasonings based on the same principle; and it satisfactorily accounted as well for some of the chief lunar and planetary inequalities.

  • He again won the prize of the Paris Academy in 1766 with an analytical discussion of the movements of Jupiter's satellites (Miscellanea, Turin Acad.

  • Campani, with which he discovered in 1671 Iapetus, the ninth in distance of Saturn's family of satellites; Rhea was detected in 1672 with a glass by the same maker of 34-ft.

  • focus; the duplicity of the ring showed in 1675; and, in 1684, two additional satellites were disclosed by a Campani telescope of loo ft.

  • Romer, on the other hand, deserves full credit for originating the transit-circle and the prime vertical instrument; and he earned undying fame by his discovery of the finite velocity of light, made at Paris in 1675 by comparing his observations of the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites at the conjunctions and oppositions of the planet.

  • James Bradley had described to the Royal Society on the 2nd of July 171 9 the curious cyclical relations of the three inner satellites; and their period of 437 days was independently discovered by Wargentin, who based upon it in 1746 a set of tables, superseded only by those of J.

  • by its disk on the 13th of March 1781; two of its satellites, Oberon and Titania, disclosed themselves on the it th of January 1787; while with the giant 48-in.

  • This raises to 26 the number of discovered satellites in the solar system.

  • In recent times photography has been so successfully applied to the mapping of our satellites as nearly to supersede visual observation.

  • Mere reflected lights, these satellites professed to share their masters horror of all individual and collective rights of such a ~e~,otlsm.

  • But the discovery which was at once perceived to be most important in itself, and most revolutionary in its effects, was that of Jupiter's satellites, first seen by Galileo on the 7th of January 1610, and by him named Sidera Medicea, in honour of the grand-duke of Tuscany, Cosmo II., who had been his pupil, and was about to become his employer.

  • Within two years of their first discovery, he had constructed approximately accurate tables of the revolutions of Jupiter's satellites, and he proposed their frequent eclipses as a means of determining longitudes, not only on land, but at sea.

  • He perceived the analogy between the power which holds the moon in the neighbourhood of the earth, and compels Jupiter's satellites to circulate round their primary, and the attraction exercised by the earth on bodies at its surface; 1 but he failed to conceive the combination of central force with tangential velocity, and was disposed to connect the revolutions of the planets with the axial rotation of the sun.

  • The hypothesis of the original nebular condition of the system, with the consequent explanation of the great phenomena of planetary formations and movements of the satellites and rings, is unquestionably to be assigned to Kant.

  • With satellites images, we will plan better.

  • His satellites--the senior clerk, a countinghouse clerk, a scullery maid, a cook, two old women, a little pageboy, the coachman, and various domestic serfs--were seeing him off.

  • The phase functions will be applied to interpretation of cirrus radiance data from satellites and aircraft.

  • LCM2000 was made by analysis of spectral reflectance data from earth observation satellites.

  • However it should be remembered that NOSS are military surveillance satellites, and as such, published data cannot be considered totally reliable.

  • High-resolution X-ray satellites have resolved a point source near the center of N 49, the likely X-ray counterpart of the soft gamma-ray repeater.

  • International interest in SSTL 's development of water resistojet propulsion systems for small satellites is growing.

  • These huge ejections of solar plasma have a direct impact on orbiting satellites and land-based power and communications systems.

  • Do n't forget that we also receive images from geostationary satellites which cover the whole world.

  • The effective area of all XMM mirror module s, in comparison with those of other X-ray satellites (linear scale).

  • Under central control from HQ it can be used to take out satellites in orbit.

  • Using surveillance from satellites, bugs and other sophisticated snooping devices, the NSA infiltrates every facet of Dean 's existence, tracing e..

  • This range of downlink RF subsystem products are designed for optical or radar observation on both civilian and military satellites.

  • The front satellites incorporate tweeters and mid-range drivers for detailed mid-to-high tonality, and the reinforced wood subwoofer provides dynamic bass.

  • The 100lb satellites were launched into near synchronous orbits, up to eight at a time, by Titan 3 rockets.

  • A GPS receiver can pinpoint any location on earth with the help of data transmitted by the satellites.

  • Using advanced triangulation methods your receiver only needs to ' see ' two or three satellites to give a usable position fix.

  • The satellites themselves have a completely new tweeter, which has been ' borrowed ' from KEF 's luxury Q Range speakers.

  • The French have been in the vanguard of European efforts to develop observation satellites.

  • Although the workings of systems are complex, involving a series of 24 satellites and various calculations using different variables, the end result is really quite straightforward in that it is easy to pinpoint a position.

  • GPS tracking watches are able to connect to GPS satellites orbiting the Earth, gaining valuable location information that can then be used and interpreted in a variety of different ways.

  • Some companies have their own satellites, while others rent bandwidth "real estate."

  • Until bandwidth becomes cheaper to rent or satellites cost less to run and maintain, for you to buy cheap satellite Internet access might require you to ask for any promotions or deals.

  • The earliest photovoltaic devices, created in the 1950s, were used by the U.S. on early satellites.

  • The technology in question was the special coating NASA gives the portholes on its satellites to protect them from radiation found in outer space.

  • I enjoyed the career mode, because you start with a certain amount of money, and you need to buy-in to tournaments or their satellites.

  • The receiver will typically have no display of its own and only acts as an antenna to grab the signal from GPS satellites orbiting the Earth.

  • By connecting to several of these satellites, it is able to determine its relative location (coordinates), sending this information to the BlackBerry.

  • They say that the GPSlim 240 "tracks up to 20 satellites at a time, re-acquires the satellite signal every one-tenth of a second and updates position data once a second."

  • First, your phone may already have a built-in GPS receiver -- like the Nokia N95 -- and as such, it is prepared to connect to the GPS satellites that orbit the Earth.

  • Instead, satellite phones connect directly to satellites that are orbiting the Earth.

  • The cellular satellites will have a difficult time connecting with your handset.

  • These larger antenna upgrades are more powerful and, thus, are better able to connect with cellular satellites.

  • As mentioned earlier, one of the most common reasons for dropped calls and poor reception is a poor connection with the satellites.

  • By contrast, a satellite phone connects to satellites that are orbiting the Earth.

  • By connecting to satellites, satphones are more likely to have coverage in more remote areas and over wider reaching areas.

  • As their name implies, satellite phones connect directly to satellites that are orbiting the Earth.

  • In the early stages, Motorola built and developed a network of 66 satellites, providing global communication to key corporate and enterprise level customers.

  • A satellite connection is exactly what it sounds like - a connection that uses satellites to connect to the Internet.

  • They can be pieces from broken satellites or end stage rocket casings from the space program.

  • With satellites (and magic), a GPS system can take you from where you are to where you need to be turn by turn.

  • GPS is a navigation system based on a series of satellites.

  • A network of 1100 service sub centers and satellites are located at community colleges, universities, vocational schools, chambers of commerce and economic development corporations.

  • The system is a space-based navigation system that uses multiple satellites to accurately triangulate your vehicle's position on the earth.

  • The array of satellites are set up to orbit so that there are always at least four satellites in the sky no matter where you are on Earth.

  • By the time the receiver has obtained the signals from the third and fourth satellites, the overlapping portion of all spheres focus to a point that identifies your position on the earth within a very accurate radius.

  • Typically four channels will do the trick, but more expensive models can simultaneously track ten or more satellites, greatly improving its accuracy.

  • For a GPS to be accurate in offering directions and navigation, it must be able to receive information from three satellites simultaneously.

  • Distance: The upper-end gadgets are all GPS based now, meaning they get your exact position anywhere by triangulating a network of satellites orbiting earth.

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