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saragossa

saragossa

saragossa Sentence Examples

  • Zurita, Anales de Aragon (Saragossa, 1610).

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  • At Saragossa Peter Arbue, a canon and an ardent inquisitor, was slain in 1485 whilst praying in a church; and the threats against the hated Torquemada made him go in fear of his life, and he never went abroad without an escort of forty familiars of the Holy Office on horseback and two hundred more on foot.

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  • His system was' adopted by Abu'l-walid ibn Jannah, of Saragossa (died early in the nth century), in his lexicon (Kitab al-usul, in Arabic) and other works.

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  • Its long and noble resistance, told by the Roman historian Livy in no less noble language, ranks with the Spanish defence of Saragossa in the Peninsular War.

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  • at Abini near Teti; and Spain has yielded objects recognized as Aegean from tombs near Cadiz and from Saragossa.

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  • The city is connected with Barcelona and Valencia by the coast railway, and with Saragossa by the Ebro valley line; it is also the terminus of a railway to San Carlos de la Rapita on the Mediterranean.

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  • At the head of a band of 300 free lances he offered his services first to the count of Barcelona; then, failing him, to Moktadir, the Arab king of Saragossa, of the race of the Beni Houd.

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  • As early as 1450 a company of Jewish converts in Spain, at the head of which were Paul de Heredia, Vidal de Saragossa de Aragon, and Davila, published compilations of Kabbalistic treatises to prove from them the doctrines of Christianity.'

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  • This victory, together with the in- Baylen, July trepid defence of Saragossa by the Spanish general l9 ' 1808.

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  • Palafox (20,000) was near Saragossa and observing Sanguessa; Castanos with the victors of Baylen" In this account of the war the losses and numbers engaged in different battles are given approximately only; and the former include killed, wounded and missing.

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  • Of the Spaniards, Palafox, after his defeat at Tudela had most gallantly defended Saragossa a second time (Dec. 20, 1808-Feb.

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  • Pamplona has a station on the Ebro railway connecting Alsasua with Saragossa.

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  • It was captured by Euric the Goth in 466 and by the Franks under Childebert in 542; it was dismantled by Charlemagne in 778, but repulsed the emir of Saragossa in 907.

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  • When the French invasion took place in 1808 he enlisted at Saragossa.

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  • Pons Boigues was published at Saragossa (1900).

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  • IBN PAQUDA BAHYA, a Jewish ethical writer who flourished at Saragossa in the 11th century.

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  • He was born before the year 99 o, in Cordova, studied in Lucena, left his native city in 1012, and, after somewhat protracted wanderings, settled in Saragossa, where he died before 1050.

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  • He entered the church and was provided for by a prebend at Saragossa.

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  • Childebert also made a series of expeditions against the Visigoths of Spain; in 542 he took possession of Pampeluna with the help of his brother Clotaire and besieged Saragossa, but was forced to retreat.

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  • The chief cities on its banks are Logrono, Calahorra, Tudela, Saragossa and Caspe.

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  • below Saragossa; the irrigation canal of Tauste skirts the opposite bank for a shorter distance; and the San Carlos or New Canal affords direct communication between Amposta at the head of the delta and the harbour of Los Alfaques.

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  • Charlemagne's march on Saragossa, and the capture of Huesca, Barcelona and Girone, gave rise to La Prise de Pampelune (14th century, based on a lost chanson); and Gui de Bourgogne (12th century) tells how the children of the barons, after appointing Guy as king of France, set out to find and rescue their fathers, who are represented as having been fighting in Spain for twenty-seven years.

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  • He was born probably at Saragossa towards the close of the 11th century.

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  • Afterwards he went to Valencia, then to Saragossa.

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  • After the fall of Saragossa (1119) he went to Seville, then to Xativa, where he is said to have returned to Islam to save his life.

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  • Railways from Madrid to the French frontier, and from Saragossa to Bilbao, cross the province.

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  • Aragon was divided in 1833 into the provinces of Huesca, Teruel and Saragossa; an account of its modern condition is therefore given under these names, which have not, however, superseded the older designation in popular usage.

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  • The central pass over the Pyrenees is the Port de Canfranc, on the line between Saragossa and Pau.

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  • in 7 folio volumes (Saragossa, 1668-1671; 1st ed.

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  • de Asso y del Rio (Saragossa, 1798).

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  • Ribera Tarrago (Saragossa, 1897), and Instituciones y reyes de Aragon, by V.

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  • AURELIUS CLEMENS PRUDENTIUS (348-c. 410), the most remarkable of the earlier Christian poets in the West, was probably born at Tarraco, though Saragossa and Calagurris have also been claimed as his birthplace.

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  • In Spain he obtained the legion of honour and the rank of a French baron for his heroism at the battle of Epila and the storming of Saragossa, and in 1809 was promoted to be general of brigade.

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  • he Messianic claims of Abraham Abulafia of Saragossa (born 1240) had a cabalistic basis, and the same studies encouraged the wildest hopes at a later time.

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  • He studied at the university of Saragossa, arid, having been ordained priest, became vicar-general to the bishop of Calahorra in 1782.

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  • and 2° 11' E., on the Mediterranean Sea, and at the head of railways from Madrid, Saragossa, and Perpignan in France.

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  • The early part of his troublous life was spent at Saragossa, but few personal details of it are recorded.

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  • of Morocco, Madrid, Lisbon and Oporto were added, and Spain was again invaded in 1119 and 1121, but the tide had turned, the French having assisted the Aragonese to recover Saragossa.

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  • It is not even certain when the romance was first printed, for though the oldest known edition (a unique copy of which is in the British Museum) appeared at Saragossa in 1508, it is highly probable that Amadis was in print before this date: an edition is reported to have been issued at Seville in 1496.

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  • The kingdom was given over to confusion till in 1216 the Templars and some of the more loyal nobles brought the young king to Saragossa.

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  • of Seville; Alcala del Jucar (2968), on the Jucar, in Albacete; Alcala de la Selva (1490), on the southern slopes of the Sierra del Gudar, in Teruel; Alcala de la Vega (712), on the river Cabriel, in Cuenca; Alcala de Gurrea (632), on the river Seton, in Huesca; Alcala del Obispo (432), in the same province; Alcala de Ebro (388) and Alcala de Moncayo (367), both in Saragossa.

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  • by Saragossa and Huesca.

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  • Lerida is traversed by the main railway from Barcelona to Saragossa, and by a line from Tarragona to the city of Lerida.

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  • Under the Moors Lareda became one of the principal cities of the province of Saragossa; it became tributary to the Franks in 793, but was reconquered in 797.

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  • But all attempts to remove the accused from the civil prison in Saragossa to that of the Inquisition raised popular tumults, which in the end led to Perez's escape across the Pyrenees, but unfortunately also furnished Philip with a pretext for sending an army into Aragon and suppressing the ancient.

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  • There he lived two years until the successful revolution of 1868 allowed him to return and enter the Cortes for the first time - as deputy for Saragossa.

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  • Jeronimo ZURITA Y CASTRO (1512-1580), Spanish historian, was born at Saragossa, and studied at Alcal5.

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  • Zurita resigned these posts on the 21st of January 1571, obtained a sinecure at Saragossa, and dedicated himself wholly to the composition of his Anales de la corona de Aragon, the first part of which had appeared in 1562; he lived to see the last volume printed at Saragossa on the 22nd of April 1580, and died on the 3rd of November following.

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  • Alphonso the Battler won his great successes in the middle Ebro, where he expelled the Moors from Saragossa; in the great raid of 1125, when he carried away a large part of the subject Christians from Granada, and in the south-west of France, where he had rights as king of Navarre.

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  • To the 12th century belong the collection in the MS. of Saragossa (Caesaraugustana) to which attention was drawn by Antonio Agustin; that of Cardinal Gregory, called by him the Polycarpus, in 8 books (about 1115); and finally the Liber de misericordia et justitia of Algerus, 10 scholasticus of Liege, in 3 books, compiled at latest in 1123.

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  • Of the nine fundamental laws of that Priscillian, whose widespread heresy evoked from the synod of Saragossa (418) the canon, " No one shall fast on Sunday, nor may any one absent himself from church during Lent and hold a festival of his own," appears, on the question of fasting, not to have differed from the Encratites and various other sects of Manichean tendency (c. 406).

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  • Important lines radiate from the city of Barcelona north-east along the coast to Gerona and to Perpignan in France; south-west along the coast to Tarragona and Valencia; and west to Saragossa and Madrid.

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  • Among the more prominent of Priscillian's friends were two bishops, named Instantius and Salvianus, and Hyginus of Cordova also joined the party; but, through the exertions of Idacius of Emerita, the leading Priscillianists, who had failed to appear before the synod of Spanish and Aquitanian bishops to which they had been summoned, were excommunicated at Saragossa in October 380.

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  • of Saragossa, on the left bank of the river Aragon, and among the southern slopes of the Pyrenees, 2380 ft.

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  • The city derives some importance from its position on the ancient frontier road from Saragossa to Pau.

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  • Early in the 8th century Jaca fell into the possession of the Moors, by whose writers it is referred to under the name of Dyaka as one of the chief places in the province of Sarkosta (Saragossa).

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  • by Huesca and Saragossa, S.

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  • by Saragossa and Logrono and W.

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  • far as the Ebro, but was defeated before Saragossa; and in their retreat the Franks were attacked by Vascons, losing many men as they came through the passes.

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  • He was born at Saragossa, and died comparatively young at Fez in 1138.

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  • Not only is there a total lack of those passes, so common in the Alps, which lead across the great mountain chains at a far lower level than that of the neighbouring peaks, but between the two extremities of the range, where the principal highroads and the only railways run between France and Spain, there are only two passes practicable for carriages - the Col de la Perche, between the valley of the Tet and the valley of the Segre, and the Col de Somport or Pot de Canfranc, on the old Roman road from Saragossa to Oloron.

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  • On the north-east, by far the most important communication with the Ebro valley is formed by the valley of the Jalon, which has thus always formed a military route of the highest consequence, and is now traversed by the railway from Madrid to Saragossa.

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  • Huesca rate of increase during this period of forty Saragossa years was less than 45%, or lower than that Teruel of any other European state, except France Navarre (Nav~ in the later years of the I9th century.

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  • There are ten archbishoprics (Toledo, Madrid, Burgos, Granada, Santiago, Saragossa, Seville, Tarragona, Valencia and Valladolid) and fortyfive bishoprics.

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  • Spain has nine universities: Madrid, the most numerotisly attended; Salamanca, the most ancient; Granada, Seville, Barcelona, Valencia, Santiago, Saragossa and Valladolid.

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  • In the north one great Visigoth family not only accepted Islam, but founded a dynasty, with its capital at Saragossa, which played a stirring part in the 8th and 9th centuries, the Beni-Casi, or Beni-Lope.

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  • It was at their hands that Charlemagne (q.v), while returning from his expedition to Saragossa, suffered that disaster to his rearguard at Roncesvalles which is more famous in poetry than important in history.

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  • The country was swarming underAbwith brigands, and the communications were so durrahman dangerous that seven years had been known to pass during which no caravan travelled from Cordova to Saragossa.

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  • In Aragon the successors of Ramiro Sanchez had begun to press close on Saragossa when the Almorvide invasion took place.

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  • In the meantime his quarrels with Urraca had not deterred Alphonso, who is surnamed the Battler in Aragonese history, from taking Saragossa in 1118, and from defeating the Almorvides at the decisive battle of Cutanda in 1120.

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  • When he won he took indeed a brutal vengeance on individuals, and he extorted the surrender of the charter and destroyed it with his dagger in the presence of the Cortes at Saragossa.

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  • The epidemic spread rapidly over the Peninsula, causing great havoc in important cities like Granada, Saragossa and Valencia.

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  • The industrial unrest, fomented by Socialist agitation, culminated in January 1902 ~fl Industrial serious riots at Barcelona and Saragossa, and on Unrest and the 16th of February in the proclamation of a general Socialist strike in the former city.

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  • He fought with the Carolingian counts of the marches, and in alliance with the Spanish Mahommedan Beni Casi of Saragossa.

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  • Saragossa Irom the Moors, and was married to Urraca, queen of Castile and Leon.

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  • It requires to be supplemented by Don Pascual de Gayongoss translation of Al Makkaris History of the Mahommedan Dynasties in Spais (1840-1843) and by Seor Francisco Coderas Decadencia y desaparinon de los Almoravides en Espana (Saragossa, 1899) and Estudio~ criticos de hist.

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  • Catalan, which by the reunion of Aragon and the countship of Barcelona in 1137 became the official language of the Aragonese monarchyalthough the kingdom of Aragon, consisting of the present provinces of Saragossa, Huesca and Teruel, has always been Castilian in speechestablished a footing in Italy also, in all parts where the domination of the kings of Aragon extended, viz, in Sicily, Naples, Corsica and Sardinia, but it has not maintained itself here except in a single district of the last-named island (Aighero); everywhere else in Italy, where it was not spoken except by the conquerors, nor written except in the royal chancery, it has disappeared without leaving a trace.

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  • Borao, Dicciogario de voces aragonesas (2nd ed., Saragossa, 1885); for Andalusian, the searching study of H.

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  • besiegew regiment formed part of the force which, under Marshal Lannes, was then besieging the Spanish town of Saragossa.

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  • Zurita, Anales de Aragon (Saragossa, 1610).

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  • At Saragossa Peter Arbue, a canon and an ardent inquisitor, was slain in 1485 whilst praying in a church; and the threats against the hated Torquemada made him go in fear of his life, and he never went abroad without an escort of forty familiars of the Holy Office on horseback and two hundred more on foot.

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  • His system was' adopted by Abu'l-walid ibn Jannah, of Saragossa (died early in the nth century), in his lexicon (Kitab al-usul, in Arabic) and other works.

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  • To this period belong Ilafz al-Quti (the Goth?) who made a version of the Psalms in Arabic rhyme, and Bahya (more correctly Behai) ibn Paquda, dayyan at Saragossa, whose Arabic ethical treatise has always had great popularity among the Jews in its Hebrew translation, .¥Iobhoth ha-lebhabhath.

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  • Solomon's pupil Bahya ben Asher, of Saragossa (d.

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  • Its long and noble resistance, told by the Roman historian Livy in no less noble language, ranks with the Spanish defence of Saragossa in the Peninsular War.

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  • at Abini near Teti; and Spain has yielded objects recognized as Aegean from tombs near Cadiz and from Saragossa.

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  • The city is connected with Barcelona and Valencia by the coast railway, and with Saragossa by the Ebro valley line; it is also the terminus of a railway to San Carlos de la Rapita on the Mediterranean.

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  • At the head of a band of 300 free lances he offered his services first to the count of Barcelona; then, failing him, to Moktadir, the Arab king of Saragossa, of the race of the Beni Houd.

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  • As early as 1450 a company of Jewish converts in Spain, at the head of which were Paul de Heredia, Vidal de Saragossa de Aragon, and Davila, published compilations of Kabbalistic treatises to prove from them the doctrines of Christianity.'

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  • This victory, together with the in- Baylen, July trepid defence of Saragossa by the Spanish general l9 ' 1808.

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  • Palafox (20,000) was near Saragossa and observing Sanguessa; Castanos with the victors of Baylen" In this account of the war the losses and numbers engaged in different battles are given approximately only; and the former include killed, wounded and missing.

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  • Of the Spaniards, Palafox, after his defeat at Tudela had most gallantly defended Saragossa a second time (Dec. 20, 1808-Feb.

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  • Pamplona has a station on the Ebro railway connecting Alsasua with Saragossa.

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  • It was captured by Euric the Goth in 466 and by the Franks under Childebert in 542; it was dismantled by Charlemagne in 778, but repulsed the emir of Saragossa in 907.

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  • When the French invasion took place in 1808 he enlisted at Saragossa.

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  • Pons Boigues was published at Saragossa (1900).

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  • IBN PAQUDA BAHYA, a Jewish ethical writer who flourished at Saragossa in the 11th century.

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  • He was born before the year 99 o, in Cordova, studied in Lucena, left his native city in 1012, and, after somewhat protracted wanderings, settled in Saragossa, where he died before 1050.

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  • He entered the church and was provided for by a prebend at Saragossa.

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  • Childebert also made a series of expeditions against the Visigoths of Spain; in 542 he took possession of Pampeluna with the help of his brother Clotaire and besieged Saragossa, but was forced to retreat.

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  • The chief cities on its banks are Logrono, Calahorra, Tudela, Saragossa and Caspe.

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  • below Saragossa; the irrigation canal of Tauste skirts the opposite bank for a shorter distance; and the San Carlos or New Canal affords direct communication between Amposta at the head of the delta and the harbour of Los Alfaques.

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  • Charlemagne's march on Saragossa, and the capture of Huesca, Barcelona and Girone, gave rise to La Prise de Pampelune (14th century, based on a lost chanson); and Gui de Bourgogne (12th century) tells how the children of the barons, after appointing Guy as king of France, set out to find and rescue their fathers, who are represented as having been fighting in Spain for twenty-seven years.

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  • He was born probably at Saragossa towards the close of the 11th century.

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  • Afterwards he went to Valencia, then to Saragossa.

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  • After the fall of Saragossa (1119) he went to Seville, then to Xativa, where he is said to have returned to Islam to save his life.

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  • Railways from Madrid to the French frontier, and from Saragossa to Bilbao, cross the province.

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  • Aragon was divided in 1833 into the provinces of Huesca, Teruel and Saragossa; an account of its modern condition is therefore given under these names, which have not, however, superseded the older designation in popular usage.

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  • The central pass over the Pyrenees is the Port de Canfranc, on the line between Saragossa and Pau.

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  • in 7 folio volumes (Saragossa, 1668-1671; 1st ed.

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  • de Asso y del Rio (Saragossa, 1798).

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  • Ribera Tarrago (Saragossa, 1897), and Instituciones y reyes de Aragon, by V.

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  • AURELIUS CLEMENS PRUDENTIUS (348-c. 410), the most remarkable of the earlier Christian poets in the West, was probably born at Tarraco, though Saragossa and Calagurris have also been claimed as his birthplace.

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  • In Spain he obtained the legion of honour and the rank of a French baron for his heroism at the battle of Epila and the storming of Saragossa, and in 1809 was promoted to be general of brigade.

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  • he Messianic claims of Abraham Abulafia of Saragossa (born 1240) had a cabalistic basis, and the same studies encouraged the wildest hopes at a later time.

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  • He studied at the university of Saragossa, arid, having been ordained priest, became vicar-general to the bishop of Calahorra in 1782.

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  • and 2° 11' E., on the Mediterranean Sea, and at the head of railways from Madrid, Saragossa, and Perpignan in France.

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  • The early part of his troublous life was spent at Saragossa, but few personal details of it are recorded.

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  • - The lives of all the early kings of Spain will be found in the general histories (see the article SPAIN: Authorities), of which the most trustworthy is the Anales de la Corona de Aragon, by Geronimo Zurita (Saragossa, 1610).

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  • of Morocco, Madrid, Lisbon and Oporto were added, and Spain was again invaded in 1119 and 1121, but the tide had turned, the French having assisted the Aragonese to recover Saragossa.

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  • It is not even certain when the romance was first printed, for though the oldest known edition (a unique copy of which is in the British Museum) appeared at Saragossa in 1508, it is highly probable that Amadis was in print before this date: an edition is reported to have been issued at Seville in 1496.

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  • The kingdom was given over to confusion till in 1216 the Templars and some of the more loyal nobles brought the young king to Saragossa.

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  • of Seville; Alcala del Jucar (2968), on the Jucar, in Albacete; Alcala de la Selva (1490), on the southern slopes of the Sierra del Gudar, in Teruel; Alcala de la Vega (712), on the river Cabriel, in Cuenca; Alcala de Gurrea (632), on the river Seton, in Huesca; Alcala del Obispo (432), in the same province; Alcala de Ebro (388) and Alcala de Moncayo (367), both in Saragossa.

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  • by Saragossa and Huesca.

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  • Lerida is traversed by the main railway from Barcelona to Saragossa, and by a line from Tarragona to the city of Lerida.

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  • Under the Moors Lareda became one of the principal cities of the province of Saragossa; it became tributary to the Franks in 793, but was reconquered in 797.

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  • But all attempts to remove the accused from the civil prison in Saragossa to that of the Inquisition raised popular tumults, which in the end led to Perez's escape across the Pyrenees, but unfortunately also furnished Philip with a pretext for sending an army into Aragon and suppressing the ancient.

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  • There he lived two years until the successful revolution of 1868 allowed him to return and enter the Cortes for the first time - as deputy for Saragossa.

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  • Jeronimo ZURITA Y CASTRO (1512-1580), Spanish historian, was born at Saragossa, and studied at Alcal5.

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  • Zurita resigned these posts on the 21st of January 1571, obtained a sinecure at Saragossa, and dedicated himself wholly to the composition of his Anales de la corona de Aragon, the first part of which had appeared in 1562; he lived to see the last volume printed at Saragossa on the 22nd of April 1580, and died on the 3rd of November following.

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  • Alphonso the Battler won his great successes in the middle Ebro, where he expelled the Moors from Saragossa; in the great raid of 1125, when he carried away a large part of the subject Christians from Granada, and in the south-west of France, where he had rights as king of Navarre.

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  • A canon of a council at Saragossa in 380, forbidding the faithful to be absent from church during the three weeks from the 17th of December to the Epiphany, is thought to be an early reference to Advent.

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  • To the 12th century belong the collection in the MS. of Saragossa (Caesaraugustana) to which attention was drawn by Antonio Agustin; that of Cardinal Gregory, called by him the Polycarpus, in 8 books (about 1115); and finally the Liber de misericordia et justitia of Algerus, 10 scholasticus of Liege, in 3 books, compiled at latest in 1123.

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  • Of the nine fundamental laws of that Priscillian, whose widespread heresy evoked from the synod of Saragossa (418) the canon, " No one shall fast on Sunday, nor may any one absent himself from church during Lent and hold a festival of his own," appears, on the question of fasting, not to have differed from the Encratites and various other sects of Manichean tendency (c. 406).

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  • Important lines radiate from the city of Barcelona north-east along the coast to Gerona and to Perpignan in France; south-west along the coast to Tarragona and Valencia; and west to Saragossa and Madrid.

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  • Among the more prominent of Priscillian's friends were two bishops, named Instantius and Salvianus, and Hyginus of Cordova also joined the party; but, through the exertions of Idacius of Emerita, the leading Priscillianists, who had failed to appear before the synod of Spanish and Aquitanian bishops to which they had been summoned, were excommunicated at Saragossa in October 380.

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  • of Saragossa, on the left bank of the river Aragon, and among the southern slopes of the Pyrenees, 2380 ft.

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  • The city derives some importance from its position on the ancient frontier road from Saragossa to Pau.

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  • Early in the 8th century Jaca fell into the possession of the Moors, by whose writers it is referred to under the name of Dyaka as one of the chief places in the province of Sarkosta (Saragossa).

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  • by Huesca and Saragossa, S.

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  • by Saragossa and Logrono and W.

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  • far as the Ebro, but was defeated before Saragossa; and in their retreat the Franks were attacked by Vascons, losing many men as they came through the passes.

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  • He was born at Saragossa, and died comparatively young at Fez in 1138.

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  • Not only is there a total lack of those passes, so common in the Alps, which lead across the great mountain chains at a far lower level than that of the neighbouring peaks, but between the two extremities of the range, where the principal highroads and the only railways run between France and Spain, there are only two passes practicable for carriages - the Col de la Perche, between the valley of the Tet and the valley of the Segre, and the Col de Somport or Pot de Canfranc, on the old Roman road from Saragossa to Oloron.

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  • On the north-east, by far the most important communication with the Ebro valley is formed by the valley of the Jalon, which has thus always formed a military route of the highest consequence, and is now traversed by the railway from Madrid to Saragossa.

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  • Huesca rate of increase during this period of forty Saragossa years was less than 45%, or lower than that Teruel of any other European state, except France Navarre (Nav~ in the later years of the I9th century.

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  • There are ten archbishoprics (Toledo, Madrid, Burgos, Granada, Santiago, Saragossa, Seville, Tarragona, Valencia and Valladolid) and fortyfive bishoprics.

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  • Spain has nine universities: Madrid, the most numerotisly attended; Salamanca, the most ancient; Granada, Seville, Barcelona, Valencia, Santiago, Saragossa and Valladolid.

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  • In the north one great Visigoth family not only accepted Islam, but founded a dynasty, with its capital at Saragossa, which played a stirring part in the 8th and 9th centuries, the Beni-Casi, or Beni-Lope.

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  • It was at their hands that Charlemagne (q.v), while returning from his expedition to Saragossa, suffered that disaster to his rearguard at Roncesvalles which is more famous in poetry than important in history.

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  • The country was swarming underAbwith brigands, and the communications were so durrahman dangerous that seven years had been known to pass during which no caravan travelled from Cordova to Saragossa.

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  • In Aragon the successors of Ramiro Sanchez had begun to press close on Saragossa when the Almorvide invasion took place.

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  • In the meantime his quarrels with Urraca had not deterred Alphonso, who is surnamed the Battler in Aragonese history, from taking Saragossa in 1118, and from defeating the Almorvides at the decisive battle of Cutanda in 1120.

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  • When he won he took indeed a brutal vengeance on individuals, and he extorted the surrender of the charter and destroyed it with his dagger in the presence of the Cortes at Saragossa.

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  • The epidemic spread rapidly over the Peninsula, causing great havoc in important cities like Granada, Saragossa and Valencia.

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  • The industrial unrest, fomented by Socialist agitation, culminated in January 1902 ~fl Industrial serious riots at Barcelona and Saragossa, and on Unrest and the 16th of February in the proclamation of a general Socialist strike in the former city.

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  • He fought with the Carolingian counts of the marches, and in alliance with the Spanish Mahommedan Beni Casi of Saragossa.

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  • Saragossa Irom the Moors, and was married to Urraca, queen of Castile and Leon.

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  • It requires to be supplemented by Don Pascual de Gayongoss translation of Al Makkaris History of the Mahommedan Dynasties in Spais (1840-1843) and by Seor Francisco Coderas Decadencia y desaparinon de los Almoravides en Espana (Saragossa, 1899) and Estudio~ criticos de hist.

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  • Catalan, which by the reunion of Aragon and the countship of Barcelona in 1137 became the official language of the Aragonese monarchyalthough the kingdom of Aragon, consisting of the present provinces of Saragossa, Huesca and Teruel, has always been Castilian in speechestablished a footing in Italy also, in all parts where the domination of the kings of Aragon extended, viz, in Sicily, Naples, Corsica and Sardinia, but it has not maintained itself here except in a single district of the last-named island (Aighero); everywhere else in Italy, where it was not spoken except by the conquerors, nor written except in the royal chancery, it has disappeared without leaving a trace.

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  • Borao, Dicciogario de voces aragonesas (2nd ed., Saragossa, 1885); for Andalusian, the searching study of H.

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  • (This Frenchman and one of the German princes serving with the Russian army were discussing the siege of Saragossa and considering the possibility of defending Moscow in a similar manner.)

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