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sappho

sappho

sappho Sentence Examples

  • Besides early work on Aristophanes, Pindar, and Sappho, whose character he vindicated, he edited Alcman (1815), Hipponax (1817), Theognis (1826) and the Theogony of Hesiod (1865), and published a Sylloge epigrammatum Graecorum (Bonn, 1828).

  • 12 to Dec. 10, 1888); and Sappho (Sept.

  • His most original contribution to the substance of Roman literature was that he first shaped into poetry the experience of his own heart, as it had been shaped by Alcaeus and Sappho in the early days of Greek poetry.

  • On the other hand, in Alcman nectar is the food, and in Sappho and Anaxandrides ambrosia the drink.

  • His increasing ill-health and a certain moral laxity (as shown in his judgment on Sappho) led to a quarrel with the consistory.

  • He brought out editions of various Greek and Latin authors - Longinus, Anacreon and Sappho, Virgil, Horace, Lucretius and many others.

  • He is acquainted with the poems of the epic cycle, the Cypria, the Epigoni, &c. He quotes or otherwise shows familiarity with the writings of Hesiod, Olen, Musaeus, Bacis, Lysistratus, Archilochus of Paros, Alcaeus, Sappho, Solon, Aesop, Aristeas of Proconnesus, Simonides of Ceos, Phrynichus, Aeschylus and Pindar.

  • Her earliest publications were Sappho and Hammerstein, two poems which appeared at Leipzig in 1880.

  • Lyric poets (9): Alcman, Alcaeus, Sappho, Stesichorus, Pindar, Bacchylides, Ibycus, Anacreon, Simonides of Ceos.

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  • At the annual festival of Apollo a criminal was obliged to plunge from the summit into the sea, where, however, an effort was made to pick him up; and it was by the same heroic leap that Sappho and Artemisia, daughter of Lygdamis, are said to have ended their lives.

  • Hardy in the "Sappho," an old cruiser of the same class as the "Sirius."

  • The sea was smooth, the night dark with wind from N.W., but hardly had the ships left Dunkirk when the "Sappho" blew out a manhole joint in her boiler and had to put back.

  • SAPPHO (7th-6th centuries B.C.), Greek poetess, was a native of Lesbos, contemporary with Alcaeus, Stesichorus and Pittacus, in fact, with the culminating period of Aeolic poetry.

  • Sappho wrote an ode, in which she severely satirized and rebuked him.

  • He addressed her in an ode of which a fragment is preserved: "Violetweaving (or dark-haired), pure, sweet-smiling Sappho, I wish to say somewhat, but shame hinders me"; and she answered in another ode: "Hadst thou had desire of aught good or fair, shame would not have touched thine eyes, but thou wouldst have spoken thereof openly."

  • Six comedies entitled Sappho and two Phaon, were produced by the Middle Comedy; but, when we consider, for example, the way in which Socrates was caricatured by Aristophanes, we are justified in putting no faith whatever in such authority.

  • We may conclude that Sappho was not utterly vicious, though by no means a paragon of virtue.

  • The fragments of Sappho have been preserved by other authors incidentally.

  • 2 (1907); the third, discovered in 1879, and attributed to Sappho by Blass, is re-edited in the Berlin.

  • See also P. Brandt, Sappho (Leipzig, 1905); B.

  • Steiner, Sappho (1907).

  • 35, 38), who compares her to Sappho, as a model of wifely devotion, and wrote a volume of poems, describing with considerable freedom of language the methods adopted to retain her husband Calenus's affection.

  • In his fondness for mythological subjects (Hercules, Theseus) and his introduction on the stage (by a bold anachronism) of the poets Archilochus and Hipponax as rivals of Sappho, he approximates to the spirit of the latter.

  • At the period in question an Aeolic literature, the lyrics of Sappho and Alcaeus, were in existence.

  • She was called " The Swedish Sappho," and scandal has been needlessly busy in giving point to the allusion.

  • afterwards superseded his own work by treating in the same way the three minor planets Victoria, Iris and Sappho - the last was observed by W.

  • Sir David Gill derived a highly satisfactory value of 8.78" for the long-sought constant from the opposition of Mars in 1877, and from combined heliometer observations at five observatories in 1888-1889 of the minor planets Iris, Victoria and Sappho, the apparently definitive value of 8.80" (equivalent distance, 92,874,000 m.).

  • Sappho was a much-admired Greek lyric poetess, who taught the arts on the Greek island of Lesbos.

  • Sapphire Sappho Name Origin: celebrated poetess of ancient Greece, whose odes have in part been preserved to us.

  • Besides early work on Aristophanes, Pindar, and Sappho, whose character he vindicated, he edited Alcman (1815), Hipponax (1817), Theognis (1826) and the Theogony of Hesiod (1865), and published a Sylloge epigrammatum Graecorum (Bonn, 1828).

  • 12 to Dec. 10, 1888); and Sappho (Sept.

  • His most original contribution to the substance of Roman literature was that he first shaped into poetry the experience of his own heart, as it had been shaped by Alcaeus and Sappho in the early days of Greek poetry.

  • His translation of Anacreon (1791) obtained him a post in the royal library in 1795, and in1796-1797he published paraphrases from Theocritus, Bion, Moschus, Sappho and Meleager.

  • On the other hand, in Alcman nectar is the food, and in Sappho and Anaxandrides ambrosia the drink.

  • His increasing ill-health and a certain moral laxity (as shown in his judgment on Sappho) led to a quarrel with the consistory.

  • He brought out editions of various Greek and Latin authors - Longinus, Anacreon and Sappho, Virgil, Horace, Lucretius and many others.

  • He is acquainted with the poems of the epic cycle, the Cypria, the Epigoni, &c. He quotes or otherwise shows familiarity with the writings of Hesiod, Olen, Musaeus, Bacis, Lysistratus, Archilochus of Paros, Alcaeus, Sappho, Solon, Aesop, Aristeas of Proconnesus, Simonides of Ceos, Phrynichus, Aeschylus and Pindar.

  • Her earliest publications were Sappho and Hammerstein, two poems which appeared at Leipzig in 1880.

  • Lyric poets (9): Alcman, Alcaeus, Sappho, Stesichorus, Pindar, Bacchylides, Ibycus, Anacreon, Simonides of Ceos.

  • At the annual festival of Apollo a criminal was obliged to plunge from the summit into the sea, where, however, an effort was made to pick him up; and it was by the same heroic leap that Sappho and Artemisia, daughter of Lygdamis, are said to have ended their lives.

  • Hardy in the "Sappho," an old cruiser of the same class as the "Sirius."

  • The sea was smooth, the night dark with wind from N.W., but hardly had the ships left Dunkirk when the "Sappho" blew out a manhole joint in her boiler and had to put back.

  • SAPPHO (7th-6th centuries B.C.), Greek poetess, was a native of Lesbos, contemporary with Alcaeus, Stesichorus and Pittacus, in fact, with the culminating period of Aeolic poetry.

  • Sappho wrote an ode, in which she severely satirized and rebuked him.

  • He addressed her in an ode of which a fragment is preserved: "Violetweaving (or dark-haired), pure, sweet-smiling Sappho, I wish to say somewhat, but shame hinders me"; and she answered in another ode: "Hadst thou had desire of aught good or fair, shame would not have touched thine eyes, but thou wouldst have spoken thereof openly."

  • Six comedies entitled Sappho and two Phaon, were produced by the Middle Comedy; but, when we consider, for example, the way in which Socrates was caricatured by Aristophanes, we are justified in putting no faith whatever in such authority.

  • We may conclude that Sappho was not utterly vicious, though by no means a paragon of virtue.

  • The fragments of Sappho have been preserved by other authors incidentally.

  • 2 (1907); the third, discovered in 1879, and attributed to Sappho by Blass, is re-edited in the Berlin.

  • See also P. Brandt, Sappho (Leipzig, 1905); B.

  • Steiner, Sappho (1907).

  • 35, 38), who compares her to Sappho, as a model of wifely devotion, and wrote a volume of poems, describing with considerable freedom of language the methods adopted to retain her husband Calenus's affection.

  • In his fondness for mythological subjects (Hercules, Theseus) and his introduction on the stage (by a bold anachronism) of the poets Archilochus and Hipponax as rivals of Sappho, he approximates to the spirit of the latter.

  • At the period in question an Aeolic literature, the lyrics of Sappho and Alcaeus, were in existence.

  • She was called " The Swedish Sappho," and scandal has been needlessly busy in giving point to the allusion.

  • afterwards superseded his own work by treating in the same way the three minor planets Victoria, Iris and Sappho - the last was observed by W.

  • Sir David Gill derived a highly satisfactory value of 8.78" for the long-sought constant from the opposition of Mars in 1877, and from combined heliometer observations at five observatories in 1888-1889 of the minor planets Iris, Victoria and Sappho, the apparently definitive value of 8.80" (equivalent distance, 92,874,000 m.).

  • Little is known of Sappho 's life, and her work survives only in fragments.

  • Agnew. Whites-Mrs John Clutton, Minnie, Madame Carvalho, Duchess of Connaught, and Sappho.

  • The word "lesbian" itself comes from the isle of Lesbos in Greece, where the poet Sappho created some of the earliest and most beautiful romantic writing.

  • Some historians believe that lesbian love poetry fragments written by Sappho, a Greek woman from the isle of Lesbos, are some of the oldest surviving examples of written literature.

  • However, that doesn't mean they were tolerated (even Sappho's poetry only partially survives) and so wearing the label of "lesbian lovers" gives women a way to establish and validate their relationships.

  • From the early poetry fragments of Sappho, an ancient poet from the isle of Lesbos, stories about love between lesbians has always been present somewhere, even if marginalized, disguised, or ignored.

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