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sap

sap

sap Sentence Examples

  • Eventually it was found that the best plan was to sap through them.

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  • Sugar is also prepared from the sap in a similar manner to that obtained from the maple.

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  • The plant is propagated from suckers and requires very little attention after transplanting to the field where it is to remain, but it takes six to eight years to mature and then yields an average of ten gallons of sap during a period of four or five months, after which it dies.

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  • In his Statical Essays (1727) he gave an account of numerous experiments and observations which he had made on the nutrition of plants and the movement of sap in them.

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  • In his Statical Essays (1727) he gave an account of numerous experiments and observations which he had made on the nutrition of plants and the movement of sap in them.

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  • A tree may yield 3 gallons of juice a day and continue flowing for six weeks; but on an average only about 4 lb of sugar are obtained from each tree, 4 to 6 gallons of sap giving 1 lb of sugar.

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  • When two different generations are produced in one year on the same kind of tree it is clear the properties of the sap and tissues of the tree must be diverse so that the two generations are adapted to different conditions.

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  • The sap is purified and concentrated in a simple manner, the whole work being carried on by farmers, who themselves use much of the product for domestic and culinary purposes.

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  • That which comes into the European market as jaggery or khaur is obtained from the sap of several palms, the wild date (Phoenix sylvestris), the palmyra (Borassus flabellifer), the coco-nut (Cocos nucifera), the gomuti (Arenga saccharifera) and others.

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  • The willows are cut at the first indication of the sap rising and "couched" in rotten peelings and soil at a slight angle, the butts being on the ground, which should be strewn with damp straw from a manure heap. The tops are covered lightly with rotted peelings and by periodical application of water, fermentation is induced at the bottom, heat is engendered, the leaves force their way through the covering and peeling may begin.

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  • The sap which flows in the spring is drawn off and boiled down to an agreeable spirit, or fermented with a birch-wine of considerable alcoholic strength.

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  • The colors of flowers are due to coloring matters contained in the sap of which the chief is anthocyanin.

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  • The trees are ready to yield sap when five years old; at eight years they are mature, and continue to give an annual supply till they reach thirty years.

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  • This is derived from the sap of the rock or sugar maple (Ater saccharinum), a large tree growing in Canada and the United States.

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  • The caterpillars of the leopard moth (Zeuzera pyrina) and of the goat moth (Cossus ligniperda) sometimes bore their way into the trunks and destroy the sap channels.

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  • The sap is collected in spring, just before the foliage develops, and is procured by making a notch or boring a hole in the stem of the tree about 3 ft.

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  • According to Hinds they feed chiefly on the green tissues, which " are punctured by the piercing mouth-parts and the sap withdrawn by suction.

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  • of the sap is not suppressed, and this results in the production of branches of unequal vigour, which is very undesirable.

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  • The sap is drawn off from the upper growing portion of the stem, and altogether an average tree will run in a season 350 lb of toddy, from which about 35 lb of raw sugar - jaggery - is made by simple and rude processes.

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  • The sap is drawn off from the upper growing portion of the stem, and altogether an average tree will run in a season 350 lb of toddy, from which about 35 lb of raw sugar - jaggery - is made by simple and rude processes.

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  • A sugary sap is drawn from the trunk in the spring before the opening of the leaf-buds, and is fermented into a kind of beer and vinegar.

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  • A sugary sap is drawn from the trunk in the spring before the opening of the leaf-buds, and is fermented into a kind of beer and vinegar.

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  • The " cotton stainers," various species of Dysdercus, are widely distributed, occurring for example in America, the West Indies, Africa, India, &c. The larvae suck the sap from the young bolls and seeds, causing shrivelling and reduction in quantity of fibre.

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  • The presence of too much sugar in solution in the sap of the cell inhibits the activity of the chloroplasts; hence the necessity for its removal.

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  • The sap in these active tissues is alkaline, which has been interpreted as being in accordance with not appear to be concerned with digestion so directly as the others is pectase, which forms vegetable jelly from pectic substances occurring in the cell-wall.

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  • This may possibly be the cell sap in their interior, which must exercise a slightly different hydrostatic pressure on the basal and, the lateral walls of the cells.

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  • For instance, suppose the effect of a falling temperature is to so modify the metabolism of the cells that they fill up more and more with watery sap; as the freezing-point is reached this may result in destructive changes, and death from cold may result.

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  • Mr. Chamberlin initiated me into the mysteries of tree and wild-flower, until with the little ear of love I heard the flow of sap in the oak, and saw the sun glint from leaf to leaf.

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  • Political agitators, in order to sap the power of the Opportunist party, did not hesitate to drag in the mud one of the greatest citizens of France.

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  • The most valuable kind is that obtained from young trees of twenty to thirty years' growth, but the trunks and boughs of timber trees also furnish a large supply; it is separated from the tree most easily when the sap is rising in the spring.

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  • Aphides often ruin whole crops of fruit, corn, hops, &c., by sucking out the sap, and not only check growth, but may even entail the death of the plant.

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  • A peculiar and highly profitable branch of Mexican agriculture is the cultivation of the Agave for two widely different purposes - one for its fibre, which is exported, and the other for its sap, which is manufactured into intoxicating liquors called "pulque " and " mescal."

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  • Aphides often ruin whole crops of fruit, corn, hops, &c., by sucking out the sap, and not only check growth, but may even entail the death of the plant.

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  • until the sap rises and growth begins, when they are ready for the brake.

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  • until the sap rises and growth begins, when they are ready for the brake.

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  • The Hevea product is obtained annually by tapping the trees and coagulating the sap over a smoky fire, but the caucho is procured by felling the tree and collecting the sap in a hollow in the ground where it is coagulated by stirring in a mixture of soap and the juice of a plant called vetilla.

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  • Having been abruptly recalled into Anjou by a revolt of his barons, he returned to the charge in September 1136 with a strong army, including in its ranks William, duke of Aquitaine, Geoffrey, count of Vendome, and William Talvas, count of Ponthieu, but after a few successes was wounded in the foot at the siege of Le Sap (October 1) and had to fall back.

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  • " Pulque "f is the fermented drink made from this sap: " mescal " is the distilled spirit made from the leaves and roots of the plant.

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  • The Hevea product is obtained annually by tapping the trees and coagulating the sap over a smoky fire, but the caucho is procured by felling the tree and collecting the sap in a hollow in the ground where it is coagulated by stirring in a mixture of soap and the juice of a plant called vetilla.

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  • Many aphides, &c., puncture the leaves, suck out the sap, and induce va:ious local deformations, arrest of growth, pustular swellings, &c., and if numerous all the evils of defoliation may follow.

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  • In other forms such as Elodea, Nitella, Chara, &c., where the cytoplasm is mainly restricted to the periphery of the sap vacuole and lining the cell wall, the streaming movement is exhibited in one direction only.

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  • The cell sap contains various substances in solution such as sugars, inulin, alkaloids, glucosides, organic acids and various inorganic salts.

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  • The sieve tubes contain a thin lining layer of protoplasm on their walls, but no nuclei, and the cell sap contains albuminous substances which are coagulable by heat.

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  • Their food consists mainly of the sap obtained from the leaves and blossom of plants, but some also live on the roots of plants (Phylloxera vastatrix and Schizoneura lanigera).

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  • In well-developed shoots the buds are generally double, or rather triple, a wood bud growing between two fruit buds; the shoot must be cut back to one of these, or else to a wood bud alone, so that a young shoot may be produced to draw up the sap beyond the fruit, this being generally desirable to secure its proper swelling.

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  • The latex is not to be confused with the sap of trees, on the circulation of which their nutrition depends.

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  • The largest of the Amazon forest trees are the massaranduba (Mimusops data), called the cow-tree because of its milky sap, the samadma (Eriodendron samauma) or silk-cotton tree, the pdu d'arco (Tecoma speciosa), pdu d'alho (Catraeva tapia), bacori (Symphonea coccinea), sapucaia (Lecythis ollaria), and castanheira or brazil-nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa).

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  • The fruit is edible and its juice is made into beer; the sap of the tree is made into wine, and its pith into bread; the leaves furnish an excellent thatch, and the fibre extracted from their midribs is used f or fish lines, cordage, hammocks, nets, &c.; and the wood is hard and makes good building' material.

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  • Among other forest trees of economic importance are the silk-cotton tree (Bombax ceiba), the Palo de vaca, or cow-tree (Brosimum galactodendron), whose sap resembles milk and is used for that purpose, the Inga saman, the Hevea guayanensis, celebrated in the production of rubber, and the Altalea speciosa, distinguished for the length of its leaves.

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  • The tissues of an animal or plant are all under a certain pressure, caused, in the one case, by the expulsive action of the heart and the restraint of the skin and other elastic tissues, and, in the other case, by the force of the rising sap and the restraint of the periderm or bark.

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  • The collection of the sap (toddy) begins about the end of October and continues, during the cool season, till the middle of February.

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  • 20, has an inaccurate notice from Nearchus of the Indian honey-bearing reed, and various classical writers of the first century of our era notice the sweet sap of the Indian reed or even the granulated saltlike product which was imported from India, or from Arabia and Opone (these being entrepots of Indian trade), 1 under the name of saccharum or aaKxape (from Skr.

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  • They feed entirely by suction, and the majority of the species pierce plant tissues and suck sap. The leaves of plants are for the most part the objects of attack, but many aphids and scale-insects pierce stems, and some go underground and feed on roots.

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  • The insect is fixed by this rostrum, which is inserted into the root of the vine for the purpose of sucking the sap. The abdomen consists of seven segments, and these as well as the anterior segments bear four rows of small tubercles on their dorsal surface.

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  • They fly about from July till October, living upon the sap of the vine, which is sucked up by the rostrum from the leaves or buds.

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  • Their food consists mainly of the sap obtained from the leaves and blossom of plants, but some also live on the roots of plants (Phylloxera vastatrix and Schizoneura lanigera).

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  • In well-developed shoots the buds are generally double, or rather triple, a wood bud growing between two fruit buds; the shoot must be cut back to one of these, or else to a wood bud alone, so that a young shoot may be produced to draw up the sap beyond the fruit, this being generally desirable to secure its proper swelling.

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  • The latex is not to be confused with the sap of trees, on the circulation of which their nutrition depends.

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  • He was also a diligent and skilful observer, and busied himself not only with astronomical subjects, such as the double stars, the satellites of Jupiter and the measurement of the polar and equatorial diameters of the sun, but also with biological studies of the circulation of the sap in plants, the fructification of plants, infusoria, &c.

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  • When these fires occur while the trees are full of sap, a curious mucilaginous matter is exuded from the half-burnt stems; when dry it is of pale reddish colour, like some of the coarser kinds of gum-arabic, and is soluble in water, the solution resembling gumwater, in place of which it is sometimes used; considerable quantities are collected and sold as " Orenburg gum "; in Siberia and Russia it is occasionally employed as a semi-medicinal food, being esteemed an antiscorbutic. For burning in close stoves and furnaces, larch makes tolerably good fuel, its value being estimated by Hartig as only one-fifth less than that of beech; the charcoal is compact, and is in demand for iron-smelting and other metallurgic uses in some parts of Europe.

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  • On the French Alps a sweet exudation is found on the small branchlets of young larches in June and July, resembling manna in taste and laxative properties, and known as Manna de Briancon or Manna Brigantina; it occurs in small whitish irregular granular masses, which are removed in the morning before they are too much dried by the sun; this manna seems to differ little in composition from the sap of the tree, which also contains mannite; its cathartic powers are weaker than those of the manna of the manna ash (Fraximus ornus), but it is employed in France for the same purposes.

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  • The best month for larch planting, whether for poles or timber, is November; larches are sometimes planted in the spring, but the practice cannot be commended, as the sap flows early, and, if a dry period follows, the growth is sure to be checked.

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  • Cream-coloured flowers are regarded as white because cream is due to yellow plastids and not to sap colour.

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  • Sap. Conviv.

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  • As to season, it is now admitted with respect to deciduous trees and shrubs that the earlier in autumn planting is performed the better; although some extend it from the period when the leaves fall to the first part of spring, before the sap begins to move.

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  • Winter pruning is effected when the tree is comparatively at rest, and is therefore less liable to " bleeding " or outpouring of sap. Summer pruning or pinching off the tips of such of the younger shoots as are not required for the extension of the tree, when not carried to too great an extent, is preferable to the coarser more reckless style of pruning.

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  • Some plants root so freely that they need only pegging down; but in most cases the arrest of the returning sap to form a callus, and ultimately young roots, must be brought about artificially, either by twisting the branch, by splitting it, by girding FIG.

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  • The best seasons for these operations are early spring and midsummer, that is, before the sap begins to flow, and after the first flush of growth has passed off.

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  • The best season for grafting apples and similar hardy subjects in the open air is in March and April; but it may be commenced as soon as the sap in the stock is fairly in motion.

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  • In the propagating house budding may be done at any season when the sap is in motion; but for fruit trees, roses, &c., in the open air, it is usually done in July or August, when the buds destined for the following year are completely formed in the axils of the leaves, and when the bark separates freely from the wood it covers.

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  • The union is effected as in grafting, by means of the organizable sap or cambium, and the less this is disturbed until the inner bark of the shield is pressed and fixed against it the better.

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  • Cuttings of growing plants are prepared by removing with a sharp knife, and moderately close, the few leaves which would otherwise be buried in the soil; they are then cut clean across just below a joint; the fewer the leaves thus removed, however, the better, as if kept from being exhausted they help to supply the elaborated sap out of which the roots are formed.

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  • The effect of root-pruning in the first case is to reduce the supply of crude sap to the branches, and consequently to cause a check in their development.

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  • The advantage depends on the obstruction given to the descent of the sap. The ring should be cut out in spring, and be of such a width that the bark may remain separated for the season.

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  • What is called training is the guiding of the branches of a tree or plant in certain positions which they would not naturally assume, the object being partly to secure their full exposure to light, and partly to regulate the flow and distribution of the sap. To secure the former object, the branches must be so fixed as to shade each other as little as possible; and to realize the second, the branches must have given to them an upward or downward direction, as they may require to be encouraged or repressed.

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  • vigour which is given to a plant or tree by hard pruning is afforded by training in an upward direction so as to promote the flow of the sap; while the repression effected by summer pruning is supplemented by downward training, which acts as a check.

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  • The Half fan mode of training, which is intermediate between horizontal and fan training, is most nearly allied to the former, but the branches leave the stem at an acute angle, a disposition supposed to favour the more equal distribution of the sap. Sometimes, as in fig.

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  • Sometimes fatty oil or watery sap is found in swollen hyphal ends, or such tubes contain coloured sap. Cystidia and paraphyses may be also classed here.

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  • Car tot lo mon sap, quel papa no es negun et que el fa tot go ques vol del papa et de la esglea."

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  • In the spring the making of syrup and sugar from the sap of the sugar-maple is a typical industry.

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  • In 1667 Ray was elected a fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1669 he published in conjunction with Willughby his first paper in the Philosophical Transactions on "Experiments concerning the Motion of Sap in Trees."

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  • They demonstrated the ascent of the sap through the wood of the tree, and supposed the sap to "precipitate a kind of white coagulum or jelly, which may be well conceived to be the part which every year between bark and tree turns to wood and of which the leaves and fruits are made."

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  • The best time of the year for felling timber is in midsummer or midwinter, when the sap of the tree is at rest; it is not desirable to cut timber in the spring or autumn.

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  • To fit timber for use in building construction the superfluous sap and.

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  • The water enters the pores of the wood (which should be placed with the butt end pointing up stream) and dissolves and forces out the sap. After about two weeks in this position it is taken out and stacked in open sheds to be dried in the natural way, or treated by warm air in special chambers.

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  • It is supposed to be caused in severe weather by the freezing of the ascending sap. "Heart shake" is often found in old trees and extends from the pith or heart of the tree towards the circumference.

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  • The primary causes of decay in timber are the presence of sap, exposure to conditions alternately wet and dry, and want of efficient ventilation, especially if accompanied by a Timber.

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  • Boucherie, a Frenchman, originated a system in which the sap is expelled from the timber under pressure, and a strong solution of copper sulphate is then injected at the end of the wood.

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  • The heat and pressure together exert a chemical action upon the sap, which becomes insoluble and itself preserves the wood from decay.

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  • During the development of the inflorescence there is a rush of sap to the base of the young flowerstalk.

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  • americana and other species this is used by the Mexicans to make their national beverage, pulque; the flower shoot is cut out and the sap collected and subsequently fermented.

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  • In earlier times the coquito palm (Jubaea spectabilis) was to be found throughout this part of Chile, but it has been almost completely destroyed for its saccharine sap, from which a treacle was made.

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  • Sugar has been obtained from the sap of this as from other species, the most being one ounce from a quart of sap. The latter has also been made into wine in the Highlands of Scotland.

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  • Sugar has been made from the sap in Norway and Sweden.

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  • Sugar is principally extracted from this species, the sap being boiled and the syrup when reduced to a proper consistence runs into moulds to form cakes.

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  • Trees growing in low and moist situations afford the most sap but least sugar.

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  • A thawing night is said to promote the flow, and it ceases during a south-west wind and at the approach of a storm; and so sensitive are the trees to aspect and climatic variations that the flow of sap on the south and east side has been noticed to be earlier than on the north and west side of the same tree.

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  • The average quantity of sap per tree is from 12 to 24 gallons in a season.

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  • Sugar was made from the sap by the French Canadians, but the production is only half as great as that from the sugar maple.

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  • This phenomenon follows injury to the phloem in the lower parts of the stem, preventing the downward flow of elaborated sap. The injury may be due to gnawing insects, and particularly to the fungus Corticium vagum, var.

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  • The causes which, in the middle of the 19th century, were thus tending to sap the long-tried fidelity of the sepoy army were partly military and partly racial.

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  • On the eastern plains are to be found the "miriti" (Mauritia flexuosa) and the "pirijao" or peach palm (Guilielma speciosa), called the "pupunha" on the Amazon, whose fruit, fibre, leaf, sap, pith and wood meet so large a part of the primary needs of the aborigines.

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  • The chief solid residue, coke, is not absolutely pure carbon, as it contains the mineral non-volatile constituents which remain behind as ash when the original coal is burnt, and which, to a Solid great extent, existed in the sap that filled the cells of the plant from which the coal was formed.

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  • It is situated in 103° 6' E., 13° 6' N., in the midst of a fertile plain and on the river Sang Ke, which flows eastwards and falls into the Tonle or Tale Sap, the great lake of Cambodia.

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  • The acacias and the Rosaceae yield their gums most abundantly when sickly and in an abnormal state, caused by a fulness of sap in the young tissues, whereby the new cells are softened and finally disorganized; the cavities thus formed fill with liquid, which exudes, dries and constitutes the gum.

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  • Bitter aloes are made from the dried, purified sap obtained from the latex - the thin layer of tissue directly beneath the skin.

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  • The village is one of several settlements around Tonle Sap whose inhabitants lead an entirely aquatic existence.

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  • come autumn, green fades, emptying of sap.

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  • A brown dye is obtained from the inner bark A glue is made from the sap.

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  • The transformed rice was resistant to sap sucking insects and to bacterial blight [17] .

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  • There was much of sap and siege at Pembroke castle in time of civil broil, and forces must often of come by sea.

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  • The dark spots on the scar, mark where the vascular bundles which carried the sap passed through from the twig into the leaf.

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  • Apparently I then cooed at her and held her and generally acted like a complete sap.

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  • SAP, Europe's leading software company, said that sales in the fourth quarter had exceeded analysts ' expectations.

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  • mastic gum, a resin, comes from the sap of the mastic tree in the Mediterranean.

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  • gummy sap was made into poultices and soothing ointment.

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  • Quarry sap - the moisture found in most newly quarried stone which quickly dries out forming the case hardening.

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  • He has used only the heartwood of the oak trunk for this sculpture, the sap wood having been cut away.

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  • Sap of symptomatic plants was used for mechanical inoculation of test plants.

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  • The problem actually stemmed from an infestation of scale, a sap sucking insect that attacks the plant.

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  • Beware of plants which have leaves / sap that contain strong irritants.

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  • A single sugar maple tree can produce up to 12 gallons of sap a year.

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  • mastic gum, a resin, comes from the sap of the mastic tree in the Mediterranean.

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  • The most species-rich microhabitats were found in association with fallen trees and branches: decaying sap under bark and decaying sapwood.

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  • milky sap or the juice of crushed seeds.

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  • It may be just in bits and pieces, a squeeze of the railroad which will sap morale and destroy its potential.

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  • The plant is entirely parasitic on Nettles and feeds on their sap using especially adapted ' suckers ' .

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  • pollinated by bees, who come to collect a sweet juicy sap stored round the base of the ovary.

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  • Some plants can cause skin rashes either by contact with the outer cells or the sap.

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  • resinous, acrid sap which blackens on exposure to the air.

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  • sap the morale of the country.

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  • sap sucking insects that can reduce the vigor of plants.

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  • sap the will of programmers considering the unified model of service delivery.

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  • sap the strength of a poem.

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  • Incorrect pruning during late March, April and May can induce ' bleeding ' where the rising sap weeps from the tree.

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  • If leaves contain acidic sap, the anthocyanins will appear red and if the sap is less acidic, they will go purple.

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  • The active agents in all of these are either contained within the milky sap or the juice of crushed seeds.

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  • Seen under the microscope these stipules have small droplet of what I assume to be sugary sap in the hollow underneath.

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  • The poor, naïve sap thought he would actually pick up a pencil.

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  • Time of year In the wetter months, the off-road sections can get extremely claggy which can really sap your energy.

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  • The film paves a little too much sap with sobbing tragic love.

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  • sap also damage your cars paintwork and need removing on a regular basis, if not as soon as possible.

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  • Is it mostly dry but with wet slippy bits under the trees where the tree sap has fallen?

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  • sap rising around us.

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  • sap of pine trees.

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  • sap of the plant to be less concentrated.

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  • sap from plants.

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  • sap downward from the leaves into the roots.

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  • The most species-rich microhabitats were found in association with fallen trees and branches: decaying sap under bark and decaying sapwood.

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  • Oh wait a sec, didn't I fight 3 months to move the SAP authentication to LDAP?

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  • The grain may be enhanced by dark speckles of sap.

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  • sugary sap in the hollow underneath.

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  • thrips feed on cell sap by piercing the leaf or flower bud with their mouthparts.

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  • The solvent we use is pure gum turpentine, a natural product itself - being distilled pine sap.

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  • The dull black colored adults feed on sap from oak twigs.

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  • The base of each hair is thin walled and swollen with cell sap.

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  • According to Hinds they feed chiefly on the green tissues, which " are punctured by the piercing mouth-parts and the sap withdrawn by suction.

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  • It has been stated that when present in blossoms they feed on nectar, but it is more probable that there--as on the green parts - they suck sap. In any case, their presence in apple blossoms has been known to prevent the formation of fruit through injury to the essential organs of the flower, and some species do considerable damage to ears of corn.

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  • Political agitators, in order to sap the power of the Opportunist party, did not hesitate to drag in the mud one of the greatest citizens of France.

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  • The most valuable kind is that obtained from young trees of twenty to thirty years' growth, but the trunks and boughs of timber trees also furnish a large supply; it is separated from the tree most easily when the sap is rising in the spring.

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  • In these we have (1) the evaporation from the damp delicate cell-walls into the intercellular spaces; (2) the imbibition by the cell-wall of water from the vacuole; (3) osmotic action, consequent upon the subsequent increased concentration of the cell sap, drawing water from the wood cells or vessels which abut upon the leaf parenchyma.

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  • The presence of too much sugar in solution in the sap of the cell inhibits the activity of the chloroplasts; hence the necessity for its removal.

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  • The sap in these active tissues is alkaline, which has been interpreted as being in accordance with not appear to be concerned with digestion so directly as the others is pectase, which forms vegetable jelly from pectic substances occurring in the cell-wall.

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  • Eventually the protoplasm usually forms only a lining to the cell wall, and a large vacuole filled with cell sap occupies the centre.

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  • This may possibly be the cell sap in their interior, which must exercise a slightly different hydrostatic pressure on the basal and, the lateral walls of the cells.

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  • Many aphides, &c., puncture the leaves, suck out the sap, and induce va:ious local deformations, arrest of growth, pustular swellings, &c., and if numerous all the evils of defoliation may follow.

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  • For instance, suppose the effect of a falling temperature is to so modify the metabolism of the cells that they fill up more and more with watery sap; as the freezing-point is reached this may result in destructive changes, and death from cold may result.

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  • At certain seasons the wound bleeds, and the organismssome of which, by the bye, are remarkable and interesting formsmultiply in the nutritious sap and ferment it.

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  • In other forms such as Elodea, Nitella, Chara, &c., where the cytoplasm is mainly restricted to the periphery of the sap vacuole and lining the cell wall, the streaming movement is exhibited in one direction only.

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  • The cell sap contains various substances in solution such as sugars, inulin, alkaloids, glucosides, organic acids and various inorganic salts.

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  • The colors of flowers are due to coloring matters contained in the sap of which the chief is anthocyanin.

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  • The sieve tubes contain a thin lining layer of protoplasm on their walls, but no nuclei, and the cell sap contains albuminous substances which are coagulable by heat.

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  • The caterpillars of the leopard moth (Zeuzera pyrina) and of the goat moth (Cossus ligniperda) sometimes bore their way into the trunks and destroy the sap channels.

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  • The " cotton stainers," various species of Dysdercus, are widely distributed, occurring for example in America, the West Indies, Africa, India, &c. The larvae suck the sap from the young bolls and seeds, causing shrivelling and reduction in quantity of fibre.

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  • The point of this leading shoot is subsequently pinched off, that it may not draw away too much of the sap. If the fruit sets too abundantly, it must be thinned, first when as large as peas, reducing the clusters, and then when as large as nuts to distribute the crop equally; the extent of the thinning must depend on the vigour of the tree, but one or two fruits ultimately left to each square foot of wall is a full average crop. The final thinning should take place after stoning.

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  • The principal feature is the suppression of the direct channel of the sap, and the substitution of four, or more commonly two, mother branches, so laid to the wall that the central angle contains about 90°.

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  • of the sap is not suppressed, and this results in the production of branches of unequal vigour, which is very undesirable.

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  • Date sugar is a valuable commercial product of the East Indies, obtained from the sap or toddy of Phoenix sylvestris, the toddy palm, a tree so closely allied to the date palm that it has been supposed to be the parent stock of all the cultivated varieties.

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  • The largest of the Amazon forest trees are the massaranduba (Mimusops data), called the cow-tree because of its milky sap, the samadma (Eriodendron samauma) or silk-cotton tree, the pdu d'arco (Tecoma speciosa), pdu d'alho (Catraeva tapia), bacori (Symphonea coccinea), sapucaia (Lecythis ollaria), and castanheira or brazil-nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa).

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  • The fruit is edible and its juice is made into beer; the sap of the tree is made into wine, and its pith into bread; the leaves furnish an excellent thatch, and the fibre extracted from their midribs is used f or fish lines, cordage, hammocks, nets, &c.; and the wood is hard and makes good building' material.

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  • Among other forest trees of economic importance are the silk-cotton tree (Bombax ceiba), the Palo de vaca, or cow-tree (Brosimum galactodendron), whose sap resembles milk and is used for that purpose, the Inga saman, the Hevea guayanensis, celebrated in the production of rubber, and the Altalea speciosa, distinguished for the length of its leaves.

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  • The tissues of an animal or plant are all under a certain pressure, caused, in the one case, by the expulsive action of the heart and the restraint of the skin and other elastic tissues, and, in the other case, by the force of the rising sap and the restraint of the periderm or bark.

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  • This is derived from the sap of the rock or sugar maple (Ater saccharinum), a large tree growing in Canada and the United States.

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  • The sap is collected in spring, just before the foliage develops, and is procured by making a notch or boring a hole in the stem of the tree about 3 ft.

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  • A tree may yield 3 gallons of juice a day and continue flowing for six weeks; but on an average only about 4 lb of sugar are obtained from each tree, 4 to 6 gallons of sap giving 1 lb of sugar.

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  • The sap is purified and concentrated in a simple manner, the whole work being carried on by farmers, who themselves use much of the product for domestic and culinary purposes.

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  • That which comes into the European market as jaggery or khaur is obtained from the sap of several palms, the wild date (Phoenix sylvestris), the palmyra (Borassus flabellifer), the coco-nut (Cocos nucifera), the gomuti (Arenga saccharifera) and others.

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  • The trees are ready to yield sap when five years old; at eight years they are mature, and continue to give an annual supply till they reach thirty years.

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  • The collection of the sap (toddy) begins about the end of October and continues, during the cool season, till the middle of February.

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  • 20, has an inaccurate notice from Nearchus of the Indian honey-bearing reed, and various classical writers of the first century of our era notice the sweet sap of the Indian reed or even the granulated saltlike product which was imported from India, or from Arabia and Opone (these being entrepots of Indian trade), 1 under the name of saccharum or aaKxape (from Skr.

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  • Sugar is also prepared from the sap in a similar manner to that obtained from the maple.

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  • They feed entirely by suction, and the majority of the species pierce plant tissues and suck sap. The leaves of plants are for the most part the objects of attack, but many aphids and scale-insects pierce stems, and some go underground and feed on roots.

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  • The insect is fixed by this rostrum, which is inserted into the root of the vine for the purpose of sucking the sap. The abdomen consists of seven segments, and these as well as the anterior segments bear four rows of small tubercles on their dorsal surface.

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  • They fly about from July till October, living upon the sap of the vine, which is sucked up by the rostrum from the leaves or buds.

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  • Having been abruptly recalled into Anjou by a revolt of his barons, he returned to the charge in September 1136 with a strong army, including in its ranks William, duke of Aquitaine, Geoffrey, count of Vendome, and William Talvas, count of Ponthieu, but after a few successes was wounded in the foot at the siege of Le Sap (October 1) and had to fall back.

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  • Eventually it was found that the best plan was to sap through them.

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  • When two different generations are produced in one year on the same kind of tree it is clear the properties of the sap and tissues of the tree must be diverse so that the two generations are adapted to different conditions.

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  • A peculiar and highly profitable branch of Mexican agriculture is the cultivation of the Agave for two widely different purposes - one for its fibre, which is exported, and the other for its sap, which is manufactured into intoxicating liquors called "pulque " and " mescal."

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  • The plant is propagated from suckers and requires very little attention after transplanting to the field where it is to remain, but it takes six to eight years to mature and then yields an average of ten gallons of sap during a period of four or five months, after which it dies.

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  • " Pulque "f is the fermented drink made from this sap: " mescal " is the distilled spirit made from the leaves and roots of the plant.

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  • The willows are cut at the first indication of the sap rising and "couched" in rotten peelings and soil at a slight angle, the butts being on the ground, which should be strewn with damp straw from a manure heap. The tops are covered lightly with rotted peelings and by periodical application of water, fermentation is induced at the bottom, heat is engendered, the leaves force their way through the covering and peeling may begin.

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  • The sap which flows in the spring is drawn off and boiled down to an agreeable spirit, or fermented with a birch-wine of considerable alcoholic strength.

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  • He was also a diligent and skilful observer, and busied himself not only with astronomical subjects, such as the double stars, the satellites of Jupiter and the measurement of the polar and equatorial diameters of the sun, but also with biological studies of the circulation of the sap in plants, the fructification of plants, infusoria, &c.

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  • When these fires occur while the trees are full of sap, a curious mucilaginous matter is exuded from the half-burnt stems; when dry it is of pale reddish colour, like some of the coarser kinds of gum-arabic, and is soluble in water, the solution resembling gumwater, in place of which it is sometimes used; considerable quantities are collected and sold as " Orenburg gum "; in Siberia and Russia it is occasionally employed as a semi-medicinal food, being esteemed an antiscorbutic. For burning in close stoves and furnaces, larch makes tolerably good fuel, its value being estimated by Hartig as only one-fifth less than that of beech; the charcoal is compact, and is in demand for iron-smelting and other metallurgic uses in some parts of Europe.

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  • On the French Alps a sweet exudation is found on the small branchlets of young larches in June and July, resembling manna in taste and laxative properties, and known as Manna de Briancon or Manna Brigantina; it occurs in small whitish irregular granular masses, which are removed in the morning before they are too much dried by the sun; this manna seems to differ little in composition from the sap of the tree, which also contains mannite; its cathartic powers are weaker than those of the manna of the manna ash (Fraximus ornus), but it is employed in France for the same purposes.

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  • The best month for larch planting, whether for poles or timber, is November; larches are sometimes planted in the spring, but the practice cannot be commended, as the sap flows early, and, if a dry period follows, the growth is sure to be checked.

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  • Cream-coloured flowers are regarded as white because cream is due to yellow plastids and not to sap colour.

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  • Sap. Conviv.

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  • As to season, it is now admitted with respect to deciduous trees and shrubs that the earlier in autumn planting is performed the better; although some extend it from the period when the leaves fall to the first part of spring, before the sap begins to move.

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  • It has been supposed that because the surface of the young leaves is small transpiration is correspondingly feeble; but it must be remembered, not only that their newlyformed tissue is unable without an abundant supply of sap from the roots to resist the excessive drying action of the atmosphere, but that, in spring, the lowness of the temperature at that season in Great Britain prevents the free circulation of the sap. The comparative dryness of the atmosphere in spring also causes a greater amount of transpiration then than in autumn and winter.

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  • Winter pruning is effected when the tree is comparatively at rest, and is therefore less liable to " bleeding " or outpouring of sap. Summer pruning or pinching off the tips of such of the younger shoots as are not required for the extension of the tree, when not carried to too great an extent, is preferable to the coarser more reckless style of pruning.

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  • Some plants root so freely that they need only pegging down; but in most cases the arrest of the returning sap to form a callus, and ultimately young roots, must be brought about artificially, either by twisting the branch, by splitting it, by girding FIG.

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  • The best seasons for these operations are early spring and midsummer, that is, before the sap begins to flow, and after the first flush of growth has passed off.

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  • The best season for grafting apples and similar hardy subjects in the open air is in March and April; but it may be commenced as soon as the sap in the stock is fairly in motion.

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  • In the propagating house budding may be done at any season when the sap is in motion; but for fruit trees, roses, &c., in the open air, it is usually done in July or August, when the buds destined for the following year are completely formed in the axils of the leaves, and when the bark separates freely from the wood it covers.

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  • The union is effected as in grafting, by means of the organizable sap or cambium, and the less this is disturbed until the inner bark of the shield is pressed and fixed against it the better.

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  • Cuttings of growing plants are prepared by removing with a sharp knife, and moderately close, the few leaves which would otherwise be buried in the soil; they are then cut clean across just below a joint; the fewer the leaves thus removed, however, the better, as if kept from being exhausted they help to supply the elaborated sap out of which the roots are formed.

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  • The effect of root-pruning in the first case is to reduce the supply of crude sap to the branches, and consequently to cause a check in their development.

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  • The advantage depends on the obstruction given to the descent of the sap. The ring should be cut out in spring, and be of such a width that the bark may remain separated for the season.

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  • What is called training is the guiding of the branches of a tree or plant in certain positions which they would not naturally assume, the object being partly to secure their full exposure to light, and partly to regulate the flow and distribution of the sap. To secure the former object, the branches must be so fixed as to shade each other as little as possible; and to realize the second, the branches must have given to them an upward or downward direction, as they may require to be encouraged or repressed.

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  • vigour which is given to a plant or tree by hard pruning is afforded by training in an upward direction so as to promote the flow of the sap; while the repression effected by summer pruning is supplemented by downward training, which acts as a check.

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  • The Half fan mode of training, which is intermediate between horizontal and fan training, is most nearly allied to the former, but the branches leave the stem at an acute angle, a disposition supposed to favour the more equal distribution of the sap. Sometimes, as in fig.

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  • Sometimes fatty oil or watery sap is found in swollen hyphal ends, or such tubes contain coloured sap. Cystidia and paraphyses may be also classed here.

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  • Passing over the locomotor activity of zoospores (Pythium, Peronospora, Saprolegnia) we often find spores held under tension in sporangia (Pilobolus) or in asci (Peziza) until ripe, and then forcibly shot out by the sudden rupture of the sporangial wall under the pressure of liquid behind - mechanism comparable to that of a pop-gun, if we suppose air replaced by watery sap. Even a single conidium, held tense to the last moment by the elastic cell-wall, may be thus shot forward by a spurt of liquid under pressure in the hypha abstricting it (e.g.

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  • Car tot lo mon sap, quel papa no es negun et que el fa tot go ques vol del papa et de la esglea."

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  • In the spring the making of syrup and sugar from the sap of the sugar-maple is a typical industry.

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  • In 1667 Ray was elected a fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1669 he published in conjunction with Willughby his first paper in the Philosophical Transactions on "Experiments concerning the Motion of Sap in Trees."

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  • They demonstrated the ascent of the sap through the wood of the tree, and supposed the sap to "precipitate a kind of white coagulum or jelly, which may be well conceived to be the part which every year between bark and tree turns to wood and of which the leaves and fruits are made."

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  • The best time of the year for felling timber is in midsummer or midwinter, when the sap of the tree is at rest; it is not desirable to cut timber in the spring or autumn.

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  • To fit timber for use in building construction the superfluous sap and.

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  • The water enters the pores of the wood (which should be placed with the butt end pointing up stream) and dissolves and forces out the sap. After about two weeks in this position it is taken out and stacked in open sheds to be dried in the natural way, or treated by warm air in special chambers.

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  • It is supposed to be caused in severe weather by the freezing of the ascending sap. "Heart shake" is often found in old trees and extends from the pith or heart of the tree towards the circumference.

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  • The primary causes of decay in timber are the presence of sap, exposure to conditions alternately wet and dry, and want of efficient ventilation, especially if accompanied by a Timber.

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  • Boucherie, a Frenchman, originated a system in which the sap is expelled from the timber under pressure, and a strong solution of copper sulphate is then injected at the end of the wood.

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  • The heat and pressure together exert a chemical action upon the sap, which becomes insoluble and itself preserves the wood from decay.

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  • During the development of the inflorescence there is a rush of sap to the base of the young flowerstalk.

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  • americana and other species this is used by the Mexicans to make their national beverage, pulque; the flower shoot is cut out and the sap collected and subsequently fermented.

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  • In earlier times the coquito palm (Jubaea spectabilis) was to be found throughout this part of Chile, but it has been almost completely destroyed for its saccharine sap, from which a treacle was made.

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  • Sugar has been obtained from the sap of this as from other species, the most being one ounce from a quart of sap. The latter has also been made into wine in the Highlands of Scotland.

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  • Sugar has been made from the sap in Norway and Sweden.

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  • Sugar is principally extracted from this species, the sap being boiled and the syrup when reduced to a proper consistence runs into moulds to form cakes.

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  • Trees growing in low and moist situations afford the most sap but least sugar.

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  • A thawing night is said to promote the flow, and it ceases during a south-west wind and at the approach of a storm; and so sensitive are the trees to aspect and climatic variations that the flow of sap on the south and east side has been noticed to be earlier than on the north and west side of the same tree.

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  • The average quantity of sap per tree is from 12 to 24 gallons in a season.

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  • Sugar was made from the sap by the French Canadians, but the production is only half as great as that from the sugar maple.

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  • This phenomenon follows injury to the phloem in the lower parts of the stem, preventing the downward flow of elaborated sap. The injury may be due to gnawing insects, and particularly to the fungus Corticium vagum, var.

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  • The causes which, in the middle of the 19th century, were thus tending to sap the long-tried fidelity of the sepoy army were partly military and partly racial.

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  • On the eastern plains are to be found the "miriti" (Mauritia flexuosa) and the "pirijao" or peach palm (Guilielma speciosa), called the "pupunha" on the Amazon, whose fruit, fibre, leaf, sap, pith and wood meet so large a part of the primary needs of the aborigines.

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  • The chief solid residue, coke, is not absolutely pure carbon, as it contains the mineral non-volatile constituents which remain behind as ash when the original coal is burnt, and which, to a Solid great extent, existed in the sap that filled the cells of the plant from which the coal was formed.

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  • It is situated in 103° 6' E., 13° 6' N., in the midst of a fertile plain and on the river Sang Ke, which flows eastwards and falls into the Tonle or Tale Sap, the great lake of Cambodia.

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  • The acacias and the Rosaceae yield their gums most abundantly when sickly and in an abnormal state, caused by a fulness of sap in the young tissues, whereby the new cells are softened and finally disorganized; the cavities thus formed fill with liquid, which exudes, dries and constitutes the gum.

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  • Some plants can cause skin rashes either by contact with the outer cells or the sap.

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  • The bark of the tree contains a thick, resinous, acrid sap which blackens on exposure to the air.

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  • In addition, its sap was used for medicinal purposes like rubbing the body to cure rheumatic pain.

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  • The enemy advanced of the sap, blowing up a sandbag barricade leaving just one foot of its standing.

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  • The cathedral must be saved, he said damage to the fabric would sap the morale of the country.

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  • Red spider mites are sap sucking insects that can reduce the vigor of plants.

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  • There are many things that can support or sap the will of programmers considering the unified model of service delivery.

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  • These can easily sap the strength of a poem.

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  • Incorrect pruning during late March, April and May can induce ' bleeding ' where the rising sap weeps from the tree.

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  • If leaves contain acidic sap, the anthocyanins will appear red and if the sap is less acidic, they will go purple.

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  • Seen under the microscope these stipules have small droplet of what I assume to be sugary sap in the hollow underneath.

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  • The poor, naïve sap thought he would actually pick up a pencil.

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  • Time of year In the wetter months, the off-road sections can get extremely claggy which can really sap your energy.

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  • The film paves a little too much sap with sobbing tragic love.

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  • Bird droppings and tree sap also damage your cars paintwork and need removing on a regular basis, if not as soon as possible.

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  • Is it mostly dry but with wet slippy bits under the trees where the tree sap has fallen?

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  • And as the grinding gears of the plot push us ever further into a corner, we can feel the sap rising around us.

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  • Many people are allergic to the sap of pine trees.

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  • Insufficient supply causes the sap of the plant to be less concentrated.

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  • Aphids Small insects that feed by sucking the sap from plants.

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  • The bast is a thin layer formed of tiny channels which carry sugar sap downward from the leaves into the roots.

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  • Oh wait a sec, did n't I fight 3 months to move the SAP authentication to LDAP?

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  • The grain may be enhanced by dark speckles of sap.

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  • Thrips feed on cell sap by piercing the leaf or flower bud with their mouthparts.

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  • The solvent we use is pure gum turpentine, a natural product itself - being distilled pine sap.

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  • The dull black colored adults feed on sap from oak twigs.

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  • But the SAP is being driven to disintegration by the vacillating, indecisive policies of Seydewitz, and of Walcher as well.

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  • The base of each hair is thin walled and swollen with cell sap.

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  • Agave nectar comes from the sap of the agave cactus.

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  • The leaves and strings make thread and needles and the sap actually lathers with water to form a crude type of soap.

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  • The early Spaniard colonists tried fermenting agave sap and created a new beverage, tequila, when they couldn't import European liquor fast enough to meet demand.

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  • It is named milk thistle due to the white spots on the leaves and the whitish sap the leaves produce.

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  • Aphids often excrete a sweet, sticky substance as they suck sap from your plants.Aphids may be found feeding on your vegetables, shrubs, flowers and trees.

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  • If you don't pull weeds growing among the asparagus, they can either take over the bed and dominate the asparagus or sap vital nutrients from the plants.

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  • They don't stay in tune very well, and they sap your guitar of its vitality and life.

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  • Whether you like the acoustic touches of Sap or Jar of Flies or the heavy metal touches of Facelift, there are some great Alice in Chains bass tabs available free of charge for bassists to get their hands on.

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  • It can be used as a sweetener in many recipes.It takes about 50 gallons of maple sap to make one gallon of maple syrup.

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  • Of course, additional cleanings may be required if your RV is not parked in a covered area and it is exposed to unusually heavy amounts of tree sap and other substances that may result in particularly difficult outdoor cleaning challenges.

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  • Opium latex-The milky juice or sap of the opium poppy, used to produce morphine.

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  • The sap of the jewelweed plant (Impatiens capensis) is thought to be helpful in binding to and removing urushiol from skin.

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  • In addition, a few people are sensitive to the milky sap and will get irritated skin from handling it.

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  • This natural product is made from the hardened sap of two species of the acacia tree.

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  • Gum tragacanth is made from the dried sap of several species of Middle Eastern legumes.

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  • Words like "sensitive" and "intuitive" give the impression that Cancer is something of a sap, but that is not the case.

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  • Did an emergency repair or medical situation sap the savings account?

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  • Its sap is hot molded to form an almost indestructible sole.

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  • Don't let this type of carelessness sap the persuasive nature of your business memo.

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  • You will need to remove the sap before treatment but use caution.

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  • Bath soaps, even strong scrubs, may do little other than spread the sap around and enlarge the infected area.

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  • Remove the sap with a gel cleanser and avoid rubbing the area in a wide circular manner.

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  • Toss out any cloths you use to remove the sap.

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  • Snip a leaf from a backyard aloe vera plant and squeeze the sap from it.

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  • You should apply the sap on the rash using gloved fingers.

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  • At certain seasons the wound bleeds, and the organismssome of which, by the bye, are remarkable and interesting formsmultiply in the nutritious sap and ferment it.

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  • The point of this leading shoot is subsequently pinched off, that it may not draw away too much of the sap. If the fruit sets too abundantly, it must be thinned, first when as large as peas, reducing the clusters, and then when as large as nuts to distribute the crop equally; the extent of the thinning must depend on the vigour of the tree, but one or two fruits ultimately left to each square foot of wall is a full average crop. The final thinning should take place after stoning.

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  • The principal feature is the suppression of the direct channel of the sap, and the substitution of four, or more commonly two, mother branches, so laid to the wall that the central angle contains about 90°.

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    2
  • Date sugar is a valuable commercial product of the East Indies, obtained from the sap or toddy of Phoenix sylvestris, the toddy palm, a tree so closely allied to the date palm that it has been supposed to be the parent stock of all the cultivated varieties.

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    2
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