Samnites sentence example

samnites
  • Fabricius afterwards gained a series of victories over the Samnites, the Lucanians and the Bruttians, and on his return to Rome received the honour of a triumph.
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  • Fabius; the Samnites captured it again in 311, but it must have been retaken at an unknown date.
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  • This phenomenon of what might have been taken for a piece of Umbrian text appearing in a district remote from Umbria and hemmed in by Latins on the north and Oscan-speaking Samnites on the south is a most curious feature in the geographical distribution of the Italic dialects, and is clearly the result of some complex historical movements.
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  • C.; and many of whom were conquered by the Samnites about a century or more earlier.
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  • It was the chief town of the Samnites, who took refuge here after their defeat by the Romans in 314 B.C. It appears not to have fallen into the hands of the latter until Pyrrhus's absence in Sicily, but served them as a base of operations in the last campaign against him in 275 B.C. A Latin colony was planted there in 268 B.C., and it was then that the name was changed for the sake of the omen, and probably then that the Via Appia was extended from Capua to Beneventum.
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  • The fourth region comprised all the Samnites (except the Hirpini), together with the Sabines and the cognate tribes of the Frentani, Marrucini, Marsi, Peligni, Vestini and Aequiculi.
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  • Only the Samnites, who were as yet without the Roman franchise, remained his enemies, and it seemed as if the old war between Rome and Samnium had to be fought once again.
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  • These last were chosen from the most warlike races - as the Samnites, Gauls and Thracians.
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  • The last-named were certainly in Nola about 500 B.C. At the time when it sent assistance to Neapolis against the Roman invasion (328 B.e.) it was probably occupied by Oscans in alliance with the Samnites.
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  • In the Second Punic War it thrice bade defiance to Hannibal; but in the Social War it was betrayed into the hands of the Samnites, who kept possession till Marius, with whom they had sided, was defeated by Sulla, who in 80 B.C. subjected it with the rest of Samnium.
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  • In his various campaigns he defeated successively the Gauls, the Volscians, the Samnites, the Etruscans and the Marsians.
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  • His most important victory (343) was over the Samnites at Mount Gaurus.
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  • It maintained its allegiance to Rome till 309 B.C. when it joined the revolted Samnites.
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  • The country never recovered from these disasters, and under the Roman government fell into decay, to which the Social War, in which the Lucanians took part with the Samnites against Rome (90-88 B.C.) gave the finishing stroke.
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  • It was captured by the Samnites in the Social War.
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  • Samnites >>
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  • Gauls, Samnites, Tyrrhenians, fought for him, while mercenary Greeks and Syracusan exiles fought for Carthage.
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  • These terms, which are said by Appian (De Rebus Samniticis, 10, II) to have included the freedom of the Greeks in Italy and the restoration to the Bruttians, Apulians and Samnites of all that had been taken from them, were rejected chiefly through the vehement and patriotic speech of the aged Appius Claudius Caecus the censor.
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  • It was devastated by the Samnites, was one of the 12 Latin colonies that refused in 209 B.C. to provide more soldiers, and was in 186 used as a state prison, like Alba and Setia.
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  • Except that he was tribune of the people, nothing certain is known of him until his first consulship in 290 B.C. when, in conjunction with his colleague P. Cornelius Rufinus, he gained a decisive victory over the Samnites, which put an end to a war that had lasted fifty years.
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  • According to the well-known anecdote, when the Samnites sent ambassadors with costly presents to induce him to exercise his influence on their behalf in the senate, they found A n FIG.
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  • In 332 he crossed over to Italy to assist the Tarentines against the Lucanians, Bruttians and Samnites.
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  • He gained considerable successes and made an arrangement with the Romans for a joint attack upon the Samnites; but the Tarentines, suspecting him of the design of founding an independent kingdom, turned against him.
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  • As a protection against the Samnites Arpi became an ally of Rome, and remained faithful until after the battle of Cannae, but Fabius captured it in 213 B.C., and it never recovered its former importance.
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  • In 309, when the Samnites again rose, Cursor was appointed dictator for the second time, and gained a decisive victory at Longula, in honour of which he celebrated a magnificent triumph.
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  • The confusion does not end there other evidence clearly show the retiarius fighting samnites.
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  • If the conclusions suggested under Sabini may be accepted as sound we should expect to find the Volsci speaking a language similar to that of the Ligures, whose fondness for the suffix -sco- we have noticed (see Ligures), and identical with that spoken by the plebeians of Rome, and that this branch of Indo-European was among those which preserved the original Indo-European Velars from the labialization which befell them in the speech of the Samnites.
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  • This presents a strong contrast to the evidence of tradition, which asserts very strongly (I) the identity of the Sabines and Samnites; (2) the conquest of an earlier population by this tribe; and which affords (ci) clear evidence of the identity of the Sabines with the ruling class, i.e.
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  • Of the Italian peoples Rome's old foes the Samnites were the most formidable; these Sulla vanquished, and took their chief town, Bovianum.
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  • The conclusion, therefore, to which the evidence appears to lead us is that in, say, the 7th century, B.C., the Safines spoke a language not differing in any important particulars from that of the Samnites, generally known as Oscan; and that when this warlike tribe combined with the people of the Latian plain to found or fortify or enlarge the city of Rome, and at the end of the 6th century to drive out from it the Etruscans, who had in that century become its masters, they imposed upon the new community many of their own usages, especially within the sphere of politics, but in the end adopted the language of Latium henceforth known as lingua Latina, just as the Normans adopted the language of the conquered English.
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  • Dentatus was consul for the third time in 274, when he finally crushed the Lucanians and Samnites, and censor in 272: In the latter capacity he began to build an aqueduct to carry the waters of the Anio into the city, but died (270) before its completion.
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