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sam

sam

sam Sentence Examples

  • They enjoyed lunch with Sam doing most of the talking.

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  • Sam stood and smiled.

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  • About time she was thinking Sam might be the one she wanted to hire, Sam threw a kink into the process.

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  • About time she was thinking Sam might be the one she wanted to hire, Sam threw a kink into the process.

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  • As bad as old Sam Hutchins?

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  • Sam pulled away to look at him.

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  • They sat at a table in the bar, and after a few minutes Sam complained, "What do we have to do to get a drink around here?"

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  • They sat at a table in the bar, and after a few minutes Sam complained, "What do we have to do to get a drink around here?"

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  • They left Felipa with the children and Carmen drove Sam to the stables.

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  • Sam is well thought of amongst the pack, and I'm sure she will help.

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  • By the time they left for Bourbon Street, Sam was a little tipsy.

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  • Gee, maybe you should have taken Sam up on her offer.

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  • Like Sam said, we will have to wait and see what transpires.

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  • "This is Sam," a distinctively feminine voice replied.

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  • Felipa watched the children while Carmen took Sam to the office.

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  • Sam was an interesting person.

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  • Like Sam said, we will have to wait and see what transpires.

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  • Sam whistled and spoke softly.

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  • I never heard anyone who bettered Sam at poker.

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  • Sam, please focus There are some weird things going on with us and I'm hoping you can help make some sense of them.

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  • They barely reached the porch when the door flew open and Sam burst through, arms open wide screeching.

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  • Sam took it and moved in close.

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  • Sam put tea on and said, "Let's sit and see if we can get to the bottom of what is going on with you two."

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  • Even drunk, Sam was sure footed on the dance floor.

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  • Sam the Sham is one thing, but I wouldn't disrespect Frank that way.

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  • Sam went quiet for a moment.

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  • Sam succeeded in convincing Miriam to meet with Jackson.

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  • Sam was a tall redhead with large blue eyes and a sprinkle of freckles over an upturned nose.

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  • Watching Sam drool over him – especially during a job interview – left Carmen feeling uncertain about the girl.

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  • Sam glanced up in surprise and blushed.

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  • Maybe Sam was merely being spontaneous or maybe her intent was flattery.

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  • Sam asked which horse Carmen wanted and then began saddling it.

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  • Sam put tea on and said, "Let's sit and see if we can get to the bottom of what is going on with you two."

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  • Sam succeeded in convincing Miriam to meet with Jackson.

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  • I had a couple of Sam Adams and a roast beef sandwich and arrived at the 30th Street station in Philadelphia just before four o'clock.

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  • He told Sam about the dream and how it had changed.

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  • Sam finally spoke, "Well that settles that."

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  • Elisabeth asked Sam, "What kind of higher purpose are you talking about?"

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  • Sam could see her blunder.

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  • In this case it was irrelevant, but Sam wouldn't have any way of knowing that.

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  • Sam eyed her with a fair amount of discomfort, which wasn't surprising because Carmen was close to tears.

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  • She told Sam what happened, including the part where she disobeyed Alex and rode up into the hills alone.

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  • Alex leaned sideways and stretched a hand out to Sam, It's nice to meet you, Sam.

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  • She was considering getting one of the men to carry it to the barn when Gerald and Sam arrived on horseback.

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  • Sam offered to help but Gerald declined, saying it wasn't that heavy.

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  • Alex leaned sideways and stretched a hand out to Sam, It's nice to meet you, Sam.

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  • The hunter who told me this could remember one Sam Nutting, who used to hunt bears on Fair Haven Ledges, and exchange their skins for rum in Concord village; who told him, even, that he had seen a moose there.

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  • Carmen nodded, thinking Sam was going to comment on his past.

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  • Felipa, Aaron and Rob had gone to town with Sam and the three youngest children were asleep.

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  • Felipa, Aaron and Rob had gone to town with Sam and the three youngest children were asleep.

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  • It would be nice to see Uncle Sam's grasping dogs coaxed to bay at the wrong tree as well.

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  • "Well, I'll be damned," mused Sam.

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  • He brought his attention to Sam.

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  • Carmen shut the door and crossed the room, sitting at the desk and indicating a chair for Sam.

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  • "If you don't mind my asking," Sam began cautiously, "How did you hurt your arm?"

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  • Sam glanced at her.

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  • "I didn't mean to pry," Sam said.

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  • If Sam was going to take care of the horses, it was important that she know which ones to be cautious with.

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  • At that point Sam got an amused look in her eyes and looked away.

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  • Like Sam, he had no part in it, yet she had drug him into it with a phone call.

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  • It was totally unprofessional – as it was right now discussing their problems with Sam.

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  • Sam helped her into the saddle and then mounted her horse.

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  • Sam was an excellent horseman - possibly as good as Alex.

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  • This is Sam Collins.

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  • Sam accepted his hand and laughed.

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  • Sam is studying to be a veterinarian.

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  • Alex had turned his attention to Carmen when she spoke, but her words sent it scurrying back to Sam.

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  • With all that in mind, she was shocked when Alex expressed his impression after Sam left.

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  • Sam is qualified to take care of the horses, but she isn't able to take care of you.

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  • And yes, you could find a man who felt the same way Sam does, but around here it's unlikely.

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  • Either way, I'm sure Sam would be the better choice.

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  • When Sam arrived, Felipa invited her to ride with the guests.

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  • Sam looked to Carmen for guidance.

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  • Gerald and Sam watched as Carmen opened the box and started putting it together.

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  • She glanced at Gerald, who was looking uncomfortable, and then Sam, who appeared more amused than concerned.

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  • She glanced back at Gerald and Sam before she stepped through the door.

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  • Gerald looked worried and Sam was shaking her head.

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  • Fortunately, Gerald and Sam had escaped.

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  • As far as she knew, Felipa said nothing to anyone, but Gerald and Sam probably suspected.

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  • Sam, Felipa and I have been running the safari business.

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  • He and Sam were standing there when Alex blew up at me.

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  • Sam had the day off, so Carmen fed the horses and watered them.

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  • Sam was keeping them in excellent condition.

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  • Leaving the children with Carmen, Felipa joined Sam and the men on the last ride.

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  • I warned Felipa and Sam.

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  • The next morning, Sam caught Carmen up with the safari events.

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  • "I have something for you," Sam said.

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  • Sam opened her truck door and made a kissing sound.

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  • "I'm sure it was difficult for both of you," Sam said.

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  • Sam climbed into her truck.

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  • Of course, to be fair, Sam was an employee and Alex would have to live with the results of whatever she did … like killing his horse.

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  • Carmen watched Sam's truck disappear behind the brush that lined the road.

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  • Us. Sam brought her by this morning.

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  • As she suspected he would, Alex presented her with a fluffy white kitten with bright green eyes less than two weeks after Sam gave her the puppy.

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  • Alex leaned on the shovel and watched as Sam rode up the hill toward them.

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  • As she pointed out, Sam would eventually be leaving for a better job anyway.

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  • He hadn't said anything to Sam about it yet.

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  • Sam halted Red and dismounted gracefully.

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  • One thing about Sam, she never forgot who she was working for.

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  • Sam silently followed him with the wheelbarrow.

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  • Sam started to grab one and Alex stopped her.

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  • Sam pulled gloves from her waistline and put them on.

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  • He stepped between Sam and the animal.

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  • It was no wonder that Sam held her in such high regard.

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  • "I'll be glad to help," Sam interjected.

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  • She didn't appear to have any reservations about Sam, but he wasn't taking any chances.

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  • He nodded to Sam.

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  • Sam shifted a startled gaze to Carmen.

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  • Carmen smiled at him and then turned to Sam.

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  • She glanced at Sam and then nodded.

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  • Sam started helping Carmen place rocks.

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  • Dingley, Touchers and Rubs (Glasgow, 1893); Sam Aylwin, The Gentle Art of Bowling, with 26 diagrams (London, 1904); James A.

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  • 26; 2 Sam.

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  • The apparently theophorous name Obed-Edom (2 Sam.

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  • Saul, whose chief herdsman, Doeg, was an Edomite (I Sam.

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  • 7), fought successfully against them (I Sam.

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  • I I, 13), occupied Edom for six months and devastated it; it was garrisoned and permanently held by David (2 Sam.

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  • I), and that the unHebraic Araunah of 2 Sam.

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  • I; see 2 Sam.

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  • r Sam.

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  • 30); that of Shiloh claimed an equally high ancestry (r Sam.

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  • 5 The second element of the name Abiathar is connected with Jether or Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, and even Ichabod (1 Sam.

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  • Shiloh's priestly gild is condemned for its iniquity (I Sam.

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  • But there seems to be in I Sam.

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  • 21) must have remained; but that it was small is shown by the fact that it was deemed a suitable place for David's ambassadors to retire to after the indignities put upon them by Hanun (2 Sam.

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  • I Sam.

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  • The priesthoods of Shiloh and Dan could boast of an illustrious origin (I Sam.

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  • the law of booty, I Sam.

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  • ix., x.); where the champions of David fought those of Ish-bosheth (2 Sam.

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  • 2 Sam.

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  • Sam.

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  • (2) The eldest son of Saul, who, together with his father, freed Israel from the crushing oppression of the Philistines (I Sam.

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  • Both are lauded in an elegy quoted from the Book of Jashar (2 Sam.

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  • between him and David (I Sam.

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  • behind him a young child (I Sam.

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  • xxxi.; 2 Sam.

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  • of the youth and gave him a place at his court (2 Sam.

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  • 26 fol.; I Sam.

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  • 24 to the Moabite Chemosh (Kemosh); in 1 Sam.

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  • 426; and 1 Sam.

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  • We have examples (r Sam.

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  • That the Teraphim, which we know to have resembled the human form (1 Sam.

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  • iv), as well as the " bread of the Presence " (lehem happanim), I Sam.

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  • Whether the primitive rite of water-offerings (I Sam.

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  • 6; 2 Sam.

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  • 10, I I; I Sam.

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  • 10-12) or by a thunderstorm (I Sam.

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  • See i Sam.

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  • and 2 Sam.

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  • The true character of Urim (as expressing " aye ") and Thummim (as expressing " nay ") is shown by the reconstructed text of 1 Sam.

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  • i Sam.

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  • 27; 1 Sam.

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  • - The rise of the order of prophets, who gradually emerged out of and became distinct from the old Hebrew " seer " or augur (r Sam.

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  • 1 Sam.

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  • Thus 1 Sam.

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  • But both in 2 Sam.

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  • 1-15 as well as in 2 Sam.

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  • At all events the first of a series of annalistic notices of the kings of Israel ascribes to Saul conquests over the surrounding peoples to an extent which implies that the district of Judah formed part of his kingdom (I Sam.

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  • His might is attested also by the fine elegy (2 Sam.

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  • In circumstances which are not detailed, the kingdom seems to have regained its strength, and Ishbaal is credited with a reign of two years over Israel and Gilead (2 Sam.

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  • David and his followers are found in the south of Hebron, and as they advanced northwards they encountered wondrous heroes between Gath and Jerusalem (2 Sam.

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  • Israelite tradition had ascribed the conquest of Jerusalem, Hebron and other cities of Judah to the Ephraimite Joshua; Judaean tradition, on the other hand, relates the capture of the sacred city from a strange and hostile people (2 Sam.

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  • Jehu's son Jehoahaz saw his army made " like the dust in threshing," and the desperate condition of the country recalls the straits in the time of Saul (I Sam.

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  • generally, 1 Sam.

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  • iv., xxxi.; 2 Sam.

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  • The books of Samuel (strictly, I Sam.

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  • south of Jerusalem; the polite deprecation in I Sam.

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  • 2; 2 Sam.

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  • There, too, he acquired that skill in music which led to his first introduction to Saul (I Sam.

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  • In I Sam.

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  • A further difficulty is caused by 2 Sam.

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  • 10-15, xxix., and on this and other grounds the simpler tradition in 2 Sam.

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  • According to the Hebrew text of I Sam.

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  • Since Merab and Michal are confounded in 2 Sam.

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  • He became chief of the bodyguard, as Ewald rightly interprets I Sam.

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  • The older history repeatedly indicates that David's kingship was predicted by a divine oracle, but would hardly lead us to place the prediction so early (I Sam.

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  • 30; 2 Sam.

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  • The narrative of i Sam.

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  • The noble elegy on the death of Saul and Jonathan, quoted from the Book of Jashar (2 Sam.

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  • - is consistent with his generous treatment of his late adversary in his outlaw life, and with this agrees his embassy of thanks to the men of Jabesh-Gilead for their chivalrous rescue of the bodies of the fallen heroes (2 Sam.

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  • (SeeABSALOM.) He was at the head of a small colony (i Sam.

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  • If Jerusalem and its immediate neighbourhood were first conquered by David (2 Sam.

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  • v.), it is probable that Beeroth and Gibeon (2 Sam.

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  • Since the early historical narrative (i Sam.

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  • Once indeed we find him in the wilderness of Paran 1 (Sam.

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  • David owed his success to his troop of freebooters (i Sam.

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  • The names of the most honoured are Captur e ofJe preserved, and we have some interesting accounts of their exploits in the days of the giants (2 Sam.

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  • The narrative (2 Sam.

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  • It was under the care of the king of Moab that David placed his parents when he fled from Saul (i Sam.

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  • 2 A deadly conflict with the Ammonites was provoked by a gross insult to friendly ambassadors of Israel; 3 and this war, of which we have pretty full details in 2 Sam.

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  • The glory of this victory was increased by the complete subjugation of Edom in a war conducted by Joab with characteristic severity (2 Sam.

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  • 6-32, or, preferably, in the description of the boundaries (2 Sam.

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  • 2 David destroyed two-thirds of the Moabites - presumably of their fighting men (2 Sam.

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  • 4 On the questions raised see the commentaries upon 2 Sam.

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  • The harem, an indispensable part of Eastern state, was responsible for many fatal disorders, although it is clear from 2 Sam.

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  • the present position of 2 Sam.

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  • 2, I Sam.

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  • David's hurried flight, attended only by his bodyguard, indicates that his position was not a very strong one, and it is difficult to connect this with the fact that he had already waged the wars mentioned in 2 Sam.

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  • The events of the remaining years after 2 Sam.

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  • are left untold, but the Chronicler omits the revolt of Absalom and 1 If Ewald's brilliant interpretation of an obscure word in 2 Sam.

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  • Israelite " (2 Sam.

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  • But it is clear from 2 Sam.

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  • Again (b) the primitive stories of conflicts with " Philistine " giants between Hebron and Jerusalem (2 Sam.

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  • "God sows"), the capital of the Israelite monarchy under Ahab, and the scene of stirring Biblical events (1 Sam.

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  • The fountain mentioned in 1 Sam.

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  • This was the native place of David's wife Abinoam (1 Sam.

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  • She had temples at Sidon and at Tyre (whence her worship was transplanted to Carthage), and the Philistines probably venerated her at Ascalon (I Sam.

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  • The last name appears in 2 Sam.

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  • An attempt on the part of Saul to exterminate the clan is mentioned in 2 Sam.

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  • The place is also associated with the murders of Asahel (2 Sam.

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  • 12), Amasa (2 Sam.

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  • 21), which we may identify with the memorable victory of David over the Philistines recorded in 2 Sam.

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  • The same sentiment recurs in Yahweh's command to Saul to destroy Amalek utterly for its hostility to Israel (1 Sam.

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  • Saul himself, according to one tradition, was slain by an Amalekite (2 Sam.

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  • i., contrast 1 Sam.

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  • 7; 1 Sam.

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  • 3), and their king Agag, slain by Samuel as a sacrificial offering (I Sam.

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  • I, 3), and would naturally increase the weight of the ark, which, according to 2 Sam.

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  • It is met with again at Shiloh, where it is under the care of Eli and his sons, descendants of an ancient family of priests (I Sam.

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  • Again a disaster happened through some obscure cause, and seventy of the sons of Jeconiah were smitten (I Sam.

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  • Thence it was removed to the house of Abinadab of Kirjath-jearim, who consecrated his son to its service (r Sam.

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  • After a remarkable period of obscurity, the ark enters suddenly into the history of David (2 Sam.

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  • stand on a plane by themselves, and the gap between them and 2 Sam.

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  • But it is not certain that the two belong to the same cycle of tradition; Kirjath-jearim and Baal-Judah are identified only in later writings, and the behaviour of Saul's daughter (2 Sam.

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  • It is of course possible that the ark was originally the sacred shrine of the clans which came direct to Judah, and that the traditions in 1 Sam.

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  • He who leaves his land to enter another, leaves his god and is influenced by the religion of his new home (1 Sam.

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  • 7.4),whose name was changed into Philadelphia by Ptolemy Philadelphus, a large and strong city with an acropolis, was situated on both sides of a branch of the Jabbok, bearing at the present day the name of Nahr 'Amman, the river of Ammon, whence the designation "city of waters" (2 Sam.

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  • The few Ammonite names that have been preserved (Nahash, Hanun, and those mentioned above, Zelek in Sam.

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  • The calling up of the spirit of Samuel by the Witch at Endor when consulted by Saul is the classical example (I Sam.

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  • 20), Sir Noel Paton's " Quarrel " and " Reconciliation of Oberon and Titania," several works by William Etty, Robert Scott Lauder and Sam Bough, Sir Edwin Landseer's " Rent Day in the Wilderness," and the diploma pictures of the academicians, besides many specimens of the modern Scottish school.

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  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.

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  • i sqq., Judges v., i Sam.

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  • xviii., for example, but there is no evidence that in early times David was regarded as the author of any of the psalms. Even the Chronicler, though he regarded David as the great founder of the Temple music, does not quote any psalm as composed by him, and the Chronicler's omission of 2 Sam.

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  • 3; 2 Sam.

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  • 63, 76), and metal armour, though known farther west, scarcely appear in old oriental costume, and the passage which attributes bronze helmets and coats of mail to the Philistine Goliath and the Israelite il Saul cannot be held (on other grounds) to be necessarily reliable for the middle or close of the Iith century (1 Sam.

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  • the Ammonite god, 2 Sam.

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  • 3; 1 Sam.

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  • If the emendation of 2 Sam.

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  • By a pure error, or perhaps through a confusion in the traditions, Achish the Philistine (of Gath, I Sam.

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  • To avoid the disgrace of perishing by a woman's hand, he begged his armour-bearer to run him through the body, but his memory was not saved from the ignominy he dreaded (2 Sam.

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  • 3-10), and near the Philistine border (2 Sam.

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  • It was in the stronghold ("cave" is a scribal error) of this town that David took refuge on two occasions (I Sam.

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  • 1; 2 Sam.

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  • Lag., p. 280), the scene of one of the most striking episodes in Old Testament history (1 Sam.

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  • "Heard of God," based on I Sam.

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  • are slain, and the ark is captured (I Sam.

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  • That he was an Ephrathite and lived at Ramah may only be due to the incorporation of one cycle of specifically local tradition; the name of his grandfather Jeroham (or Jerahmeel, so Septuagint) suggests a southern origin, and one may compare the relation between Saul and the Kenites (I Sam.

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  • But, although his great victory in I Sam.

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  • While the figure of Samuel grows in grandeur, the disastrous fate of Saul invited explanation, which is found in his previous acts of disobedience (I Sam.

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  • Abishai on one occasion saved the king's life from a Philistine giant (2 Sam.

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  • 4-9); with Abishai and Ittai of Gath heed a small army against the Israelites who had rebelled under Absalom (2 Sam.

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  • 2); and he superintended the campaign against Ammon and Edom (2 Sam.

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  • He showed his sturdy character by urging the king after the death of Absalom to place his duty to his people before his grief for the loss of his favourite son (2 Sam.

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  • Abishai proposed to kill Saul when David surprised him asleep (i Sam.

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  • 8), and was anxious to slay Shimei when he cursed the king (2 Sam.

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  • But when Joab himself killed Abner David's imprecation against him and his brother Abishai showed that he dissociated himself from the act of vengeance, although it brought him nearer to the throne of all Israel (2 Sam.

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  • Fear of a possible rival may have influenced Joab, and this at all events led him to slay Amasa of Judah (2 Sam.

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  • It is singular that Joab is not blamed for killing Absalom, but it would indeed be strange if the man who helped to reconcile father and son (2 Sam.

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  • 22 f.), the stories of David and Amnon (2 Sam.

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  • the story of Hannah, 1 Sam.

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  • 22; 2 Sam.

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  • His chief work appeared in 1713, under the title Clavis Universalis, or a New Inquiry after Truth, being a Demonstration of the NonExistence or Impossibility of an External World 1 (printed privately, Edinburgh, 1836, and reprinted in Metaphysical Tracts, 1837, edited by Sam.

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  • 1853) as lieutenant-governor, Sam Houston as major-general of the armies of Texas; and Austin, Wharton and Branch T.

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  • In the crisis of 1860-61 Texas sided with the other Southern States in spite of the strong Unionist influence exerted by the German settlers and by Governor Sam Houston.

    0
    0
  • On this account Saul spared them when bidden by Yahweh to destroy Amalek; David, too, whilst living in Judah, appears to have been on friendly terms with them (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 38) was in the mountains (compare i Sam.

    0
    0
  • As one of the five chief cities of the Philistines and the seat of the worship of Dagon (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • to Samuel (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 47), and David (2(2 Sam, viii.

    0
    0
  • Samuel's great defeat of the Philistines leads to " peace between Israel and the Amorites " (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 7, 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 2), and his strange adversaries find a close parallel in the semi-mythical sons of Anak (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Biblical history has presented its own views of the Israelite and Judaean monarchies; Israel has its enemies who come pouring forth from the south (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • In the stories of Samson and Samuel, the Philistines are located in the maritime plain, whereas, in the oldest traceable account of Saul's rise (apparently shortly before 1000 B.C.) they hold Israel (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Upon the (incomplete) external evidence and upon a careful criticism of the biblical history of this period, and not upon any promiscuous combination of the two sources, must depend the value of the plausible though broad reconstructions which have been proposed.4 Considerable stress is often laid upon Goliath's armour of bronze and his iron weapon, but even David himself has helmet, sword and coat-of-mail at his disposal (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Only at Gezer - perhaps Philistine, 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The Cherethites, associated with the Philistine district (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 5 seq.), are sometimes recognized by the Septuagint as Cretans, and, with the Pelethites (often taken to be a rhyming form of Philistines), they form part of the royal body-guard of Judaean kings (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 38, 44; in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • A gag, in verse 7, can hardly be the Amalekite king of i Sam.

    0
    0
  • The Septuagint and other Greek Versions and Sam.

    0
    0
  • 5-8) and has statements which directly conflict with 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 28-30; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • to (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 18 (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 5, 25 (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • David's first-born, Amnon, perished at the hands of the third son, Absalom, who lost his life in his revolt (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The acute observation that 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 3 sqq., where reference is made to David's incessant wars (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • That 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • We learn, also, that Hadad, a young Edomite prince, had escaped the sanguinary campaign in the reign of David (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • of Hadadezer, king of Zobah, to the north of Palestine (see David's war, 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 4 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 7 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Examples are: Rao (We) dekchai (boy) sam (three) kon (persons) cha (will) pai (go) chap (catch) pla (fish) samrap (for) hai (give) paw (father) kin (eat).

    0
    0
  • b) set up under the open heaven, and here the blood of the victim is poured out as an offering to God (see especially I Sam.

    0
    0
  • The priest has no place in this ritual; he is not the minister of an altar,' but the guardian of a temple, such as was already found here and there in the land for the custody of sacred images and palladia or other consecrated things (the ark at Shiloh, I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 5.; Goliath's sword lying behind the "ephod " or plated image at Nob, I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Such treasures required a guardian; but, above all, wherever there was a temple there was an oracle, a kind of sacred lot, just as in Arabia (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 41, Sept.), which could only be drawn where there was an " ephod " and a priest (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 7 seq.), of which Moses was the priest and Joshua the aedituus, and ever since that time the judgment of God through the priest at the sanctuary had a greater weight than the word of a seer, and was the ultimate solution of every controversy and claim (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 2 It is not clear from I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, though priesthood was not yet tied to one family, so that Micah's son, or Eleazar of Kirjath-jearim (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • r), or David's sons (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The greater priestly offices were therefore in every respect very important places, and the priests of the royal sanctuaries were among the grandees of the realm (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • He was born to Haggith at Hebron (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 5; i Sam.

    0
    0
  • i i, and perhaps i Sam.

    0
    0
  • We also find (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 4; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 12, 13 (" Sun, stand thou still upon Gibeon," &c.); in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • I-11, 15, xiii.-xiv., xxv.- xxxi.; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • In!i Sam.

    0
    0
  • the substitution of bosheth (= shame) for ba'al in Ishbosheth (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 8) and Mephibosheth (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 3); and the insertion of " the enemies of " in 1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 22, 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • - xxxix; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • It is also to be noted that in the Samaritan text of the Pentateuch, and in the LXX., the figures, especially in the period from the Creation to the birth of Abraham, differ considerably from those given in the Hebrew, yielding in Sam.

    0
    0
  • makes it in several cases as much as loo years higher, the general result of these differences being that the total in the Sam.

    0
    0
  • The variations are analogous to those under (1), except that here the birth-years of the patriarchs in both Sam.

    0
    0
  • does this, the figures in Sam.

    0
    0
  • The majority of scholars hold the same view in regard also to (I); but Dillmann gives here the preference to the figures of the Sam.

    0
    0
  • 1); and for this reason, no doubt, the Sam.

    0
    0
  • 20) years' judgeship of Eli (i Sam.

    0
    0
  • 18), the 20 or more years of Samuel (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 2, 15), the y years of Saul (the two years of 1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 31), 20 years; Eli (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • For Saul, see I Sam.

    0
    0
  • It is evidently regarded as the one which had been in Nob (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • to), and henceforth he regularly inquires of Yahweh in his movements (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 2, 4; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 6), and this fluctuation is noteworthy by reason of the present confusion in the text of I Sam.

    0
    0
  • On one view, the ark in Kirjath-jearim was in non-Israelite hands (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • z The ordinary interpretation "linen ephod" (i Sam.

    0
    0
  • 18; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • For the form of the earlier ephod the classic passage is 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The favourite view that the ephod was also an image rests partly upon 1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 4) is noteworthy, since the fact that the latter were images (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 27), or that as a wrapping it formed the sole covering of the officiating agent (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 2085, middle), 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 4-8, where the teaching of Jesus on the law of the Sabbath rests upon 1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • - The author of I Sam.

    0
    0
  • The narrative of I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Samuel in his later days appears presiding over the exercises of a group of nebhiim at Ramah, where they seem to have had a sort of coenobium (Naioth), but he was not himself a nabhia - that name is never applied to him except in I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Processions with pipe and hand-drum, such as that described in I Sam.

    0
    0
  • in I Sam.

    0
    0
  • It is certainly probable that the nabhi a emerged by a process of continued development, of which the intermediate stages are lost, from the older roeh, as the explanatory gloss in i Sam.

    0
    0
  • The peculiar methods of the prophetic exercises described in i Sam.

    0
    0
  • The great prophecy of Nathan (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • vii.) is of too disputed a date to be cited in evidence,' but already in David's time we find that Gad the nabhia is also the king's seer (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 4).2 1 Budde (Bucher Samuelis, p. 233) assigns Nathan's speech (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 4 Those who consulted the old seers' were expected to make a present, I Sam.

    0
    0
  • But the Maccabean use of 218 may have been a reversion to the older shekel; and this is strongly shown by the fraction 1/4 shekel (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • in height: Mount Adams, 5805 ft.; Mount Jefferson, 5725 ft.; Mount Sam Adams, 5585 ft.; Mount Clay, 5554 ft.; Boot Spur, 5520 ft.; Mount Monroe, 5390 ft.; J.

    0
    0
  • I; I Sam.

    0
    0
  • It was the early home of David and of Joab (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The king was thereby rendered sacrosanct (i Sam.

    0
    0
  • 6 sqq.; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Thus whosoever curses the king is stoned as though God Himself had been cursed (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • In the Psalms corresponding phrases (My, Thy, His anointed) occur nine times, to which may be added the lyrical passages I Sam.

    0
    0
  • The religious view of the kingship is still essentially the same as in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • There are other parts of the Old Testament - notably I Sam.

    0
    0
  • of the city on Government Hill is Fort Sam Houston (established in 1865), headquarters of the Department of Texas, with an army hospital (1885) and a tower 88 ft.

    0
    0
  • His sister Tamar having been violated by David's eldest son Amnon, Absalom, after waiting two years, caused his servants to murder Amnon at a feast to which he had invited all the king's sons (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • A great heap of stones was erected where he fell, whilst another monument near Jerusalem (not the modern "Absalom's Tomb," which is of later origin) he himself had erected in his lifetime to perpetuate his name (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • On the narratives in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Thus in I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Under the influence of General Sam Houston the capital was for a time in 1842-1845 removed from Austin to Houston, but in 1845 an ordinance was passed making Austin the capital, and it remained the state capital after Texas entered the Union, although Huntsville and Tehuacana Springs in 1850 and Houston in 1872 attempted in popular elections to be chosen in its place.

    0
    0
  • The only one of the priests to escape from Saul's massacre, he fled to David at Keilah, taking with him the ephod (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • He was of great service to David, especially at the time of the rebellion of Absalom (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • In 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The immediate pursuit of David was then suggested; the advice was accepted, and the sequence of events shows that the king, being warned of this, fled across the Jordan (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The hill behind is terraced, and luxuriant vineyards and fruit plantations surround the place, which is well watered on the north by three principal springs, including the Well Sirah, now `Ain Sara (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Z In 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • David's last words (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • ABNER (Hebrew for "father of [or is a] light"), in the Bible, first cousin of Saul and commander-in-chief of his army (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • He is only referred to incidentally in Saul's history (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • The only engagement between the rival factions which is told at length is noteworthy, inasmuch as it was preceded by an encounter at Gibeon between twelve chosen men from each side, in which the whole twenty-four seem to have perished (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • At length Ishbaal lost the main prop of his tottering cause by remonstrating with Abner for marrying Rizpah, one of Saul's concubines, an alliance which, according to Oriental notions, implied pretensions to the throne (cp. 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The conduct of David after the event was such as to show that he had no complicity in the act, though he could not venture to punish its perpetrators (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • (2) The second son of Samuel (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Their misconduct was made by the elders of Israel a pretext for demanding a king (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 17, 18-22) was of greater interest than that of Saul, which is given in I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 22 (where the Targum and late rabbinical exegesis discover references to the story of Ruth), and is more explicitly suggested by the isolated I Sam.

    0
    0
  • of Hebron as in Judges i., I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Among the early Hebrews the king could exact a tithe from cornfields, vineyards and flocks (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • with, Sam.

    0
    0
  • (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 17 seq.; 1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 27), and the idea of the king as the embodiment of his people's safety (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • v., 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • As it stands, it has literary connexions with the late narrative in I Sam.

    0
    0
  • into German from the Arabic version of Sam.

    0
    0
  • Abigayil, perhaps "father is joy"), or ABIGAL (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 3), in the Bible, the wife of Nabal the Carmelite, on whose death she became the wife of David (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • By her David had a son, whose name appears in the Hebrew of 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The name Abigail was also borne by a sister of David (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • From the former (self-styled "handmaid" I Sam.

    0
    0
  • A complete edition of his works was published at Leiden, under the title of Sam.

    0
    0
  • (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Sam, a causeway, generally descriptive of the old Roman paved roads - Talsarn, Sarnau, Sarn Badrig.

    0
    0
  • from Deva (Chester) by way of Uriconium (Wroxeter) and Gobannium (Abergavenny) to Isca Silurum (Caerleon-on-Usk) and Venta Silurum (Caerwent); another from Deva to Conovium (Conway), whence a road, the Sam Helen, extended due S.

    0
    0
  • I) was riot the shrine where Samuel made his headquarters (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • (5) MIZPEH OF MOAB, where David interviewed the king of Moab and found an asylum for his parents (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Saul, the first king of Israel, conquered Edom (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 47).3 Of the conquest of Edom by David, the first king of the united Judah and Israel, several details are given (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The account of the ferocious slaughter of the priests of Nob at Saul's command by Doeg the Edomite is a secondary tradition and probably of late origin (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 29; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • David's (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • " (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Sam Mirza was seventeen years of age when the nobles, in fulfilment of the charge c mmitted to them, proclaimed him Shah ~ king under the title of Shah ~ufi.

    0
    0
  • As in the Greek usage and in the Benedictine, certain canticles like the Song of Moses (Exodus xv.), the Song of Hannah (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Pauline particles like apa, Sc6, Sam, E7recra, Iise and Moo 1 When the literary integrity of the epistle is maintained this allusion naturally drops to the ground, since the use of the epistle by Polycarp rules the earlier conjectures of Baur and others (who made the pastorals anti-Marcionite) out of court; besides, passages like i.

    0
    0
  • 13 and 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Since it contained the lament of David (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • I, p. 476; Travels of Fah-hian and Sung- Yan, Buddhist Pilgrims, &c., by Sam.

    0
    0
  • The age is noted for its chronicles, beginning with the anonymous life of the Portuguese Cid, the Holy Constable Nuno Alvares Pereira, told in charming infantile prose, the translated Chronica da fundirao do moesteyro de Sam Vicente, and the Vida Fernao Lopes (q.v.), the father of Portuguese history and author of chronicles of King Pedro, King Ferdinand and King John I., has been called by Southey the best chronicler of any age or nation.

    0
    0
  • with 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 10; 1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • him the sobriquet of "Soapy Sam."

    0
    0
  • 1 Generally identified with Ramathaim-Zophim, the city of Elkanah in the hilly district of Ephraim (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • vi.), the procession of David with the ark (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Primarily the clan Caleb was settled in the south of Judah but formed an independent unit (i Sam.

    0
    0
  • It was no doubt the northernmost province of the Shan kingdom, founded at Mogaung by Sam Lang-hpa, the brother of the ruler of Kambawsa, when that empire had reached its greatest extension.

    0
    0
  • He visited Constantinople, Egypt, Assyria and 1 Jerusalem and its district was Jebusite until its capture by David (so 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • v.); for Beeroth and Gibeon, see 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 26; i Sam.

    0
    0
  • 6, 9; and 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • But it is as a brilliant humourist and satirist that he is remembered, in connexion with his fictitious character "Sam Slick."

    0
    0
  • The Attaché, or Sam Slick in England (1843-1844), was the result of a visit there in 1841.

    0
    0
  • such place names as Baal Hazor (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 21; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The story of the covenant conflicts with the notice that Gibeon was still an independent Canaanite city in David's time (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • seq., and Samuel's last address in I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 20); Jerusalem was taken by David from the Jebusites (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • That some method of casting lots is denoted by the terms is evident from 1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • A further inference (c) from a comparison of I Sam.

    0
    0
  • The covenant with Abimelech may be compared with the friendship between David and Achish (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • (see 1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The cave of Machpelah became the grave of Isaac, Rebekah and Leah (but not Rachel); and though Jacob ' In 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • sqq., 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • DAGON, a god of the Philistines who had temples at Ashdod (i Sam.

    0
    0
  • In 1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Certain "marmora" in the temple, which might not be approached, especially by women, may perhaps be connected with the threshold which the priests of Dagon would not touch with their feet (1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Berytus, whether it is to be identified with Hebrew Berothai or not (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • An "evil spirit" possesses Saul (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • But generally evil, whether as misfortune or as sin, is assigned to divine causality (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 10; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • While, according to 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The book of Samuel completes the history of the " judges " of Israel, (11th century B.C.), and begins by relating the events which led to the institution of the monarchy under Saul, the part played by Samuel being especially prominent (r Sam.

    0
    0
  • As Saul loses the divine favour, David's position advances until, after the death of Saul and the overthrow of Israel, he gains the allegiance of a disorganized people (r Sam.

    0
    0
  • xv.-2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 47-51 compared with xv., 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • compared with x.; in the double lists in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 23-26, &c. The religious views are so varied that a single writer or even a single age cannot be postulated; note especially I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 13, and the different conceptions of Yahweh (r Sam.

    0
    0
  • Thus, I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 26 seq.); or 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 9), or 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • (i Sam.

    0
    0
  • The formula is parallel to that in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • This summary gives a picture of Saul's ability and position which differs so markedly from the subsequent more extensive narratives of David's history that its genuineness has sometimes been questioned; nevertheless it is substantiated by the old poem quoted from the Book of Jashar in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Similarly in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 8-ioa, in common with i Sam.

    0
    0
  • also the introduction in i Sam.

    0
    0
  • 35-43) has been adapted to the life of David, and the Amalekite war (r Sam.

    0
    0
  • are ignored in the narratives of the relations between David and Saul, of whose first meeting two 1 Characteristic expressions of Deuteronomic writers are found in r Sam.

    0
    0
  • ro) is incompatible with the simpler notice in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Apart from the more detailed and continuous history, there are miscellaneous passages in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • were likewise wanting (Sam.

    0
    0
  • p. xi.) is also valuable, since (a) 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • (also Deuteronomic) explicitly points back to the summary of the wars in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • It is commonly recognized that the compiler of 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 10-12; 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The fragments preserved in 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • II, 20) find no place by the side of the more detailed records of David's sojourn under the protection of a king of Gath, one of a confederation of Philistine cities (i Sam.

    0
    0
  • Jerusalem " in I Sam.

    0
    0
  • But it is clear that Nob (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • x., and for Saul, i Sam.

    0
    0
  • 7-12 (south Judacan clans under Israelite suzerainty) and 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • But 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 16 contrast 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • It is important to notice that, as in the account of the temple in the history of Solomon, the introduction to it in these chapters (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • On their prelude in I Sam.

    0
    0
  • David's history is handled independently of Saul in I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 44, see 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The geographical data are confused by the stories of David (see 1 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 6 seq.), and it is for David to save the people of Israel out of their hands (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 3 The sequel to the joint history has another version of Saul's death (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • So also, David's wars (2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • viii.) bear a certain resemblance to those of Saul (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Although the contents of 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, Samuel's farewell address (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • Perplexity is caused, also, in the oldest account of Saul's rise (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • 2-viii., or even with I Sam.

    0
    0
  • The literary processes thus involved find an analogy in the original connexion between 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • The section I Sam.

    0
    0
  • The author of 2 Sam.

    0
    0
  • 25 sq.) can scarcely have known I Sam.

    0
    0
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