Salix sentence example

salix
  • There were oaks, beeches (scarcely distinguishable from existing species), birches, planes and willows (one closely related to the living Salix candida), laurels, represented by Sassafras and Cinnamomum, magnolias and tulip trees (Liriodendron), myrtles, Liquidambar, Diospyros and ivy.
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  • This was not confined to the north but may occur on the mountains of England and Wales: Salix herbacea, Silene acaulis and Dryas octopetala will serve as examples.
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  • At the close of the glacial period the alpine floras retreated to the mountains accompanied by an arctic contingent, though doubtless many species of the latter, such as Salix polaris, failed to establish themselves.
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  • The following species, none of which are found in European Russia, are characteristic of the tundras - arbutus (Arctostaphilus alpina), heaths or andomedas (Cassiope tetragona and C. hypnoides), Phyllodoce taxifolia, Loiseleuria procumbens, a species of Latifolium, a Polar azalea (Osmothamnus fragrans) and a Polar willow (Salix arctica).
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  • Mimosa and the wild wilge-boom (Salix capensis) are the common trees on the banks and rivers, while the weeping willow is frequent round the farmsteads.
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  • A great mass of pale-green foliage is usually composed of the algarrobo trees, while the course of the river is marked by lines or groups of palms, by fine old willows (Salix humboldtiana), fruit-gardens, and fields of cotton, Indian corn, sugar-cane and alfalfa (lucerne).
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  • Thus the galls of Cynips and its allies are inhabited by members of other cynipideous genera, as Synergus, Amblynotus and Synophrus; and the pine-cone-like gall of Salix strobiloides, as Walsh has shown, 2 is made by a large species of Cecidomyia, which inhabits the heart of the mass, the numerous smaller cecidomyidous larvae in its outer part being mere inquilines.
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  • With the melting of the great ice-sheet the climate became milder, and the southern part of Sweden was covered with shrubs and plants now found only in the northern and alpine parts of the country (Salix polaris, Dryas octopetala, Betula nana, &c.).
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  • Of Phanerogams, only the Dryas octopetala covers small areas of the debris, interspersed with isolated Cochlearia, &c., and, where a layer of thinner clay has been deposited in sheltered places, the surface is covered with saxifrages, &c.; and a carpet of mosses allows the arctic willow (Salix polaris) to develop. Where a thin sheet of humus, fertilized by lemmings, has accumulated, a few flowering plants appear, but even so their brilliant flowers spring direct from the soil, concealing the developed leaflets, while their horizontally spread roots grow out of proportion; only the Salix lanata rises to 7 or 8 in., sending out roots I in.
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  • Briancon manna is met with on the leaves of the common Larch, and bide-khecht on those of the willow, Salix fragilis; and a kind of manna was at one time obtained from the cedar.
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  • Willows are also pretty general, the highest in growth being Salix phyllicifolia, 7 to to ft.
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  • A beetle, Saperda populnea, creates a large gall in both willow (Salix spp.) and poplar twigs, including aspen.
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  • Pollarding willows osier cutting Osiers The osier willow, Salix viminalis, was important to both the riverside economy and the local wildlife.
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  • There are around 50 mature pollard White Willow Salix alba growing on Sheep's Green.
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  • The Salix alba (white willow, withe, withy) contains salicin, which is converted to salicylic acid in the body.
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  • The constituent willows of Sub-Arctic Salix spp. scrub also occur occasionally in a range of other habitats, including several Annex I types.
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  • It has the largest known population in the UK of wooly willow Salix lanata, the rarest of the sub-Arctic willows.
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  • While downy willow Salix lapponum is the most widespread willow species, whortle-leaved willow S. myrsinites is also present.
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  • In all three zones occur the chestnut, aspen, willow (especially Salix laurea), hornbeam, birch, alder, juniper and yew; while the mountain ash, hazel, wild plum, wild pear and other wild fruit trees are found at rarer intervals.
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  • The mere enumeration of the genera will indicate how close the flowering plants are to living forms. Newberry records Juglans, Myrica (7 species), Populus, Salix (5 species), Quercus, Planera, Ficus (3 species), Persoonia and another extinct Proteaceous genus named Proteoides, Magnolia (7 species), Liriodendron (4 species), Menispermites, Laurus and allied plants, Sassafras (3 species), Cinnamomum, Prunus, Hymenaea, Dalbergia, Bauhinia, Caesalpinia, Fontainea, Colutea and other Leguminosae, Ilex, Celastrus, Celastrophyllum (Io species), Acer, Rhamnites, Paliurus, Cissites, Tiliaephyllum, Passiflora, Eucalyptus (5 species), Hedera, Aralia (8 species), Cornophyllum, Andromeda (4 species), Myrsine, Sapotacites, Diospyros, Acerates, Viburnum and various genera of uncertain affinities.
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  • The genera best represented are Ficus (21 species), Quercus (16 species), Populus (ir species), Rhamnus (9 species), Platanus (8 species), Viburnum (7 species), Magnolia (6 species), Cornus (5 species), Cinnamomum (5 species), Juglans (4 species), Acer (4 species), Salix (4 species), Aralia (3 species), Rhus (3 species), Sequoia (3 species).
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  • Among the other noticeable plants may be mentioned Betula (3 species), Alnus (2 species), Carpinus, Fagus (4 species), Salix (4 species), Populus (2 species), Platanus, Liquidambar, Planera, Ulmus (2 species), Ficus (2 species), Persoonia, Laurus (5 species), Persea, Sassafras, Cinnamomum (5 species), Oreodaphne, Diospyros (2 species), Andromeda, Magnolia, Acer (3 species), Sapindus, Celastrus (2 species), Rex (4 species), Rhamnus (3 species), Juglans (5 species), Carya (2 species), Rhus, Myrtus, Crataegus, Prunus, Cassia (3 species).
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