Salisbury sentence examples

salisbury
  • provided him to a prebend at Lincoln, notwithstanding he already held prebends at Salisbury, Lichfield, St Martin's-le-Grand and Abergwyly, and the living of Brington.

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  • From 1448 to 1450 £3336 or some £i oo,000 of our money was spent on the church, of which Waynflete with the marquis of Suffolk and the bishop of Salisbury contributed £700 or £21,000.

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  • But no answer could be extracted from the king, and after some delay Lord Salisbury took the seals.

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  • in 1892, retired from his office in 1900, and died at Salisbury on the 13th of July 1904.

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  • He lived for some time with Sir Daniel Norton, one of his trustees, at Southwick, and upon his death in 1635 with Mr Tooker, an uncle by marriage, at Salisbury.

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  • The result was that Shaftesbury, Buckingham, Wharton and Salisbury were sent to the Tower.

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  • At the Council of Salisbury in 1116 the English king ordered Thurstan to submit, but instead he resigned his archbishopric, although this did not take effect.

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  • He then returned to Balliol as a Snell exhibitioner; became vicar of High Ercall, Shropshire, in 1750; canon of Windsor, 1762; bishop of Carlisle, 1787 (and also dean of Windsor, 1788); bishop of Salisbury, 1791.

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  • On the outbreak of the South African War in 1899 Grant was at first disposed to be hostile to the policy of Lord Salisbury and Mr Chamberlain; but his eyes were soon opened to the real nature of President Kruger's government, and he enthusiastically welcomed and supported the national feeling which sent men from the outlying portions of the Empire to assist in upholding British supremacy in South Africa.

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  • Some of these experiments were made on Salisbury Plain and others in the Bristol Channel between Lavernock and Flat Holm and Bream Down in 1897.

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  • 12039 of 1896) brought forward the idea of focusing a beam of electric radiation for telegraphic purposes on a distant station by means of parabolic mirrors, and tried this method successfully on Salisbury Plain up to a distance of about a couple of miles.

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  • Count Corti had no suspicion that France had adopted a less disinterested attitude towards similar suggestions from Bismarck and Lord Salisbury.

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  • Lord Salisbury and Waddington at the instance of Bismarck, that, when convenient, France should occupy Tunisia, an agreement afterwn.rds confirmed (with a reserve as to the eventual attitude of Italy) in despatches exchanged in July and August 1878 between the Quai dOrsay and Downing Street.

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  • The two other sealed copies belong to the cathedrals of Lincoln and of Salisbury.

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  • of Salisbury, i.

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  • Of these the earliest were Watson's Apology (1776), Salisbury's Strictures (1776) and Chelsum's (anonymous) Remarks (1776).

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  • Breaching the high ground of Salisbury Plain, it passes Amesbury, and following a very sinuous course reaches Salisbury.

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  • The length, excluding lesser sinuosities, is about 60 m., Salisbury being 35 m.

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  • The total fall is rather over 500 ft., and that from Salisbury about 140 ft.

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  • It was later granted to the earls of Salisbury, who seem to have allowed it to fall into disrepair, for in 1315 and in 1319 the abbot of Sherborne was appointed to inquire into its condition.

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  • At Lincoln, c. 1300, the candle was to weigh three stones of wax; at Salisbury in 1517 it was to be 36 ft.

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  • Until 1905 the only grounds for an absolute divorce were 1 Under the Constitution of 1776 senators were elected by counties, one for each county, and representatives also by counties, two for each county - in addition, the towns of Edenton, Newbern, Wilmington, Salisbury, Hillsboro and Halifax each elected one representative; and a property qualification - a freehold of 50 acres held for six months before an election - was imposed on electors of senators.

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  • via Raleigh, Greensboro and Salisbury, to Charlotte, was an extension of the Raleigh & Gaston, which had come into the hands of the state; it was chartered in 1849, the act being passed by the casting vote of the speaker, whose action was the cause of his failure to be re-elected to that, or to be elected to any other office afterwards, since the poverty of the state did not warrant such an expenditure.

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  • DANIEL WEBSTER (1782-1852), American statesman, was born in Salisbury (now Franklin), New Hampshire, on the 18th of January 1782.

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  • In answer to this he dedicated to the "most ingenious and excellent Mrs Katherine Phillips" his Discourse of the Nature, Offices and Measures of 1 See an angry letter by Brian Duppa, bishop of Salisbury, on the subject (Eden i.

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  • The famous meadows near Salisbury are mentioned, where, when cattle have fed their fill, hogs, it is said, " are made fat with the remnant - namely, with the knots and sappe of the grasse."

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  • Only two of the volumes are known to be in existence; one is a copy of John of Salisbury's works in the British Museum, and the other some theological treatises by Anselm and others in the Bodleian.

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  • In 1791 he was made prebendary of Salisbury, and in 1804 archdeacon of Wiltshire.

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  • He also edited Gay's Fables, and wrote a Life of John Gay (Salisbury, 1797), Anecdotes of G.

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  • SALISBURY, a township of Litchfield (disambiguation)|Litchfield county, in the northwestern corner of Connecticut, U.S.A. Pop. (1910) 3522.

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  • Salisbury is served by the Central New England, and the New York, New Haven, & Hartford railways.

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  • In the township are several villages, including Salisbury, Lakeville, Lime Rock, Chapinville and Ore Hill.

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  • In it are the Scoville Memorial Library (about 8000 volumes in 1910); the Hotchkiss preparatory school (opened in 1892, for boys); the Salisbury School (Protestant Episcopal, for boys), removed to Salisbury from Staten Island in 1901 and formerly St Austin's school; the Taconic School (1896, for girls); and the Connecticut School for Imbeciles (established as a private institution in 1858).

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  • Among the manufactures are charcoal, pig-iron, car wheels and general castings at Lime Rock, cutlery at Lakeville, and knife-handles and rubber brushes at Salisbury.

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  • Rudd, An Historical Sketch of Salisbury, Connecticut (New York, 1899); and Ellen S.

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  • Salisbury, England >>

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  • He had not those rights of sovereign which the Norman kings of England inherited from their AngloSaxon predecessors, or the Capetian kings of France from the Carolings; nor was he able therefore to come into direct touch with each of his subjects, which William I., in virtue of his sovereign rights, was able to attain by the Salisbury oath of 1086.

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  • The first really notable council at St Paul's was that of 1075 under the presidency of Lanfranc; it renewed ancient regulations, forbade simony and permitted three bishops to remove from country places to Salisbury, Chichester and Chester respectively.

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  • from Robert Cecil, first earl of Salisbury, in exchange for Hatfield House.

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  • Six additional base lines were measured up to 1849, including the Lough Foyle, in 1827-1828, and that on Salisbury Plain, in 1849.

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  • Of late years it has become a much frequented winter resort, and many handsome villas (among them that built by the 3rd marquess of Salisbury) have been constructed in the neighbourhood.

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  • But he showed admirable judgment in his choice of subordinates; Robert of Meulan, who died in 1118, and Roger of Salisbury, who survived his master, were statesmen of no common order; and Henry was free from the mania of attending in person to every detail, which was the besetting sin of medieval sovereigns.

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  • Some Churches, however, have adopted the colours of the use of Salisbury (Sarum).

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  • He married in 1870 Maria Catharine, daughter of the 5th earl de la Warr, and widow of the 2nd marquess of Salisbury.

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  • He was made dean of St Paul's in 1519, and was also dean of Exeter and dean of Salisbury.

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  • It is separated from the narrow valley, in which lie the Canongate and Holyrood Palace, by Salisbury Crags, named after Edward III.'s general William Montacute, 1 st earl of Salisbury (1 3 01 - 1 344).

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  • The home for incurables is situated in Salisbury Place.

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  • Under the protection of the hill-fort, a native settlement was established on the ridge running down to the valley at the foot of Salisbury Crags, and another hamlet, according to William Maitland (1693-1757), the earliest historian of Edinburgh, was founded in the area at the northwestern base of the rock, a district that afterwards became the parish of St Cuthbert, the oldest in the city.

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  • The project fell through, but gave occasion for the famous moot at Salisbury in which William took an oath of direct allegiance from "all the land-sitting men that were in England" (1086).

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  • In the brig " Salisbury," commanded by James S.

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  • ohn of Salisbury, in his account of the controversies of these days (Metalogicus, ii.

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  • Bernard of Chartres, at the beginning of the 12th century, endeavoured, according to John of Salisbury, to reconcile Plato and Aristotle; but his doctrine is almost wholly derived from the former through St Augustine and the commentary of Chalcidius.

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  • And it is significant of this that the ablest and most cultured representative of the second half of the century was rather an of historian of opinion than himself a philosopher or a John Salisbury.

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  • John of Salisbury (Johannes Sarisberiensis) was educated in France in the years 1136-1148.

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  • It is not fitting to subtilize overmuch, and in the end John of Salisbury's solution is the practical one, his charitable spirit pointing him in particular to that love which is the fulfilling of the law.

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  • Of the cadet branches of the house, the oldest was that of Powyke and Alcester, which obtained a barony in 1447 and became extinct in 1496; from it sprang the Beauchamps, Lords St Amand from 1448, of whom was Richard, bishop of Salisbury, first chancellor of the order of the Garter, and who became extinct in 1508, being the last known male heirs of the race.

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  • These proposals were rejected by Lord Salisbury: there could be no end now but a complete destruction of the Boer power.

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  • of Delagoa Bay, in communication by railway with Cape Town via Umtali, Salisbury and Bulawayo.

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  • The completion in 1902 of the line connecting Salisbury with Cape Town adversely affected the port of Beira, the long railway route from the Cape being increasingly employed by travellers to and from Mashonaland.

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  • SALISBURY, a town and the county-seat of Wicomico county, Maryland, U.S.A., on the Wicomico river, about 23 m.

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  • deep; Salisbury is the head of navigation.

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  • Salisbury was founded in 1732, organized as a town in 1812, and incorporated in 1854 and again in 1888.

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  • Salisbury, North Carolina >>

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  • He was the son of George Moberly, bishop of Salisbury, and faithfully maintained the traditions of his father's teaching.

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  • After his return he became the first head of St Stephen's House, Oxford (1876-1878), and then, after presiding for two years over the Theological College at Salisbury, where he acted as his father's chaplain, he accepted the college living of Great Budworth in Cheshire in 1880, and the same year married Alice, the daughter of his father's predecessor, Walter Kerr Hamilton.

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  • In 1892 Lord Salisbury made him Regius Professor of Pastoral Theology of Oxford; and after a long period of delicate health he died at Christ Church on the 8th of June 1903.

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  • It was instituted in 1755 at the White Bear Inn (now St Bride's Tavern), Fleet Street, moved about 1850 to Discussion Hall, Shoe Lane, and in 1871 finally migrated to the Barley Mow Inn, Salisbury Square, E.C., its present quarters.

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  • But in 1878, at the Congress of Berlin, Lord Salisbury agreed to allow France a "free hand" in Tunisia in return for French acquiescence in the British lease of Cyprus.

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  • " At Eton," said Bishop Hamilton of Salisbury, " I was a thoroughly idle boy, but I was saved from some worse things by getting to know Gladstone."

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  • He was succeeded by Lord Salisbury.

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  • In spite of Gladstone's skilful appeal to the constituencies to sanction the principle of Home Rule, as distinct from the practical provisions of his late bill, the general election resulted in a majority of considerably over loo against his policy, and Lord Salisbury resumed office.

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  • As soon as the new parliament met a vote of want of confidence in Lord Salisbury's government was moved and carried.

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  • Lord Salisbury resigned, and on the 15th of August 1892 Gladstone kissed hands as first lord of the treasury.

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  • Kinglake, Lord Salisbury and W.

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  • the Bishop of Salisbury, and Wilson v.

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  • James, who had at first joined his army at Salisbury, fell back to London and tried to negotiate.

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  • After some slight successes as a writer, a Salisbury publisher commissioned him to compile an account of Wiltshire and, in conjunction with his friend Edward Wedlake Brayley, Britton produced The Beauties of Wiltshire (1801; 2 vols., a third added in 1825), the first of the series The Beauties of England and Wales, nine volumes of which Britton and his friend wrote.

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  • The castle, built under Henry I., by Roger, bishop of Salisbury, was held for Matilda against Stephen, and became a favourite residence of Henry II., Savernake being a royal deer-park.

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  • In 1336 it was besieged by the English under William, Lord Montacute, afterwards 1st earl of Salisbury, but was successfully defended by Black Agnes of Dunbar, countess of March, a member of the Murray family.

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  • of Salisbury, iii.

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  • The former cathedral church was mainly built 1069-1089, but was later gothicized; near the west end of the nave a plate in the floor marks the spot where Huss stood when condemned to death, while in the midst of the choir is the brass which covered the grave of Robert Hallam, bishop of Salisbury, who died here in 1417, during the council.

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  • In 1864 the bishop of Salisbury (W.

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  • Hamilton), whose examining chaplain he had been, appointed him prebendary of Salisbury cathedral.

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  • CALEB CUSHING (1800-1879), American political leader and lawyer, was born in Salisbury, Massachusetts, on the 17th of January 1800.

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  • of Salisbury, on the London & South-Western railway.

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  • It stands on a wooded upland, amid the chalk downs of Salisbury Plain.

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  • Pipeclay abounds in the neighbourhood, and in the 17th century Amesbury was famous for the best pipes in England, many of which are preserved in Salisbury museum.

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  • In 1630 Charles I., at the instance of the earl of Pembroke, whose kinsman Herbert was, presented him to the living of Fugglestone with Bemerton, near Salisbury, and he was ordained priest in September.

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  • the cathedral at Salisbury, and before returning home, would "sing and play his part" at a meeting of music lovers.

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  • m.), besides the small crater 1 In 1909 Albert Edward Nyanza was renamed by British geo lakes of Toro and Ankole (singularly beautiful), the lake-swamps Salisbury and Kirkpatrick in the Eastern province, Lakes Wamala in Buganda, and Kachera in Ankole.

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  • In 1598 he declined the two bishoprics of Ely and Salisbury, as the offers were coupled with a proposal to alienate part of the revenues of those sees.

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  • Its white stone houses form a long curve between the uplands of Salisbury Plain,which sweep away towards the north and east, and the tract of park and meadow land lying south and west.

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  • The meeting of roads from Bath, Frome, Shaftesbury and Salisbury made Warminster a busy coaching centre.

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  • In 1617 he became chaplain to the king, in 1619 dean of Salisbury, and in the following year dean of Westminster.

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  • At this point the oldest track went across Salisbury Plain towards Stonehenge and so on to Cornwall.

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  • It is in answer to A Defence of the Government established in the Church of Englande, by Dr. John Bridges, dean of Salisbury, itself a reply to earlier puritan works, and besides attacking the episcopal office in general assails certain prelates with much personal abuse.

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  • On the death of his adversary Freeman in 1892, he was appointed, on the recommendation of Lord Salisbury, to succeed him as regius professor of modern history at Oxford.

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  • Early in 1643 he was chosen chancellor of the cathedral of Salisbury, but of this preferment he was soon deprived as a "malignant."

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  • In November 1662 he was consecrated bishop of Worcester, and was translated, ten months later, to the see of Salisbury, where he conciliated the nonconformists.

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  • HUMPHRY DITTON (1675-1715), English mathematician, was born at Salisbury on the 29th of May 1675.

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  • After that date two more became known; the whole was familiar to John of Salisbury in 1159; while the Physics and Metaphysics came into notice about 1200.

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  • John of Salisbury attended Abelard's lectures in 1136, and, after spending two years in the study of logic in Paris, passed three more in the scholarly study of Latin literature at Chartres, where a sound and healthy tradition, originally due to Bernard of Chartres (fl.

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  • John of Salisbury (d.

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  • Wordsworth (bishop of Salisbury) and H.

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  • As a politician he ended his career with his submission to Henry, who found in Roger of Salisbury a financier not less able and infinitely more acceptable to the nation.

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  • Queen Catherine Parr introduced some humanity into Henry's household, and Edward and Elizabeth were well and happily educated together, principally at old Hatfield House, which is now the marquess of Salisbury's stables.

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  • of England which culminated in the treaty of Salisbury in 1289, and the treaty of Brigham in 1290.

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  • Earl Hodgson (1893); also The Episcopate of Charles Wordsworth, by his nephew John, bishop of Salisbury (1899).

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  • C. 16; (4) Lambeth 48; (5) Arundel 60; (6) Salisbury Cath.

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  • To counteract and supersede all these unauthorized editions, Tyndale himself brought out his own revision of the New Testament with translations added of all the Epistles of the Old Testament after the use of Salisbury.

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  • Ellicott, bishop of Gloucester and Bristol; and George Moberly, bishop of Salisbury; Dr Edward Bickersteth (1814-1892), prolocutor of the lower house of convocation; Henry Alford, dean of Canterbury, and Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, dean of Westminster; Joseph Williams Blakesley (1808-1885), canon of Canterbury, and (1872) dean of Lincoln.

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  • 2; and the life by John of Salisbury in Monumenta Germaniae historica.

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  • After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880); but before taking this office was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft on the 10th of June 1900.

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  • (4) It has indeed been contended (by Bishop Wordsworth of Salisbury) that reservation was not actually, though tacitly, continued under the second Prayer-Book of Edward VI., since that book orders that the curate shall " minister," and not " celebrate," the communion in the sick person's house.

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  • Wordsworth, Further Considerations on Public Worship (Salisbury, 1901).

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  • After Mr Gladstone's brief Home Rule Ministry in 1886 he entered Lord Salisbury's next Cabinet again as Irish secretary, making way for Lord Randolph Churchill as leader of the House; but troubles with his eyesight compelled him to resign in 1887, and meanwhile Mr Goschen replaced Lord Randolph as chancellor of the exchequer.

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  • On Lord Salisbury's retirement in 1902 Sir Michael Hicks Beach also left the government.

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  • In August 1890 Lord Salisbury proposed that the question at issue should be submitted to arbitration.

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  • Hoadly, being not unskilled in the art of flattery, was translated in 1721 to the see of Hereford, in 1723 to Salisbury and in 1734 to Winchester.

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  • In early life the archbishop was very intimate with Gilbert Burnet, then bishop of Salisbury, and in later life he was a prominent figure in Irish politics.

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  • JOHN OF SALISBURY (c. 1115-1180), English author, diplomatist and bishop, was born at Salisbury between the years 1115 and 1120.

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  • Bernard's teaching was distinguished partly by its pronounced Platonic tendency, partly by the stress laid upon literary study of the greater Latin writers; and the influence of the latter feature is noticeable in all John of Salisbury's works.

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  • The most complete study of John of Salisbury is the monograph by C. Schaarschmidt, Johannes Sarisberiensis nach Leben and Studien, Schriften and Philosophie, 1862, which is a model of accurate and complete workmanship. See also the article in the Dict.

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  • Lord Salisbury informed Mr Choate that H.M.

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  • It says: " And whereas heretofore there hath been great diversity in saying and singing in Churches within this Realm; some following Salisbury Use, some Hereford Use, and some the Use of Bangor, some of York, some of Lincoln; now from henceforth all the whole Realm shall have but one Use."

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  • JOHN JEWEL (1522-1571), bishop of Salisbury, son of John Jewel of Buden, Devonshire, was born on the 2 4 th of May 1522, and educated under his uncle John Bellamy, rector of Hampton, and other private tutors until his matriculation at Merton college, Oxford, in July 1535.

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  • His conge d'elire as bishop of Salisbury had been made out on the 27th of July, but he was not consecrated until the 21st of January 1560.

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  • He died on the 23rd of September 1571, and was buried in Salisbury Cathedral, where he had built a library.

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  • gave him the rich see of Salisbury, and the pope the archbishopric of Bologna.

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  • He was deprived by Henry of the English protectorate; and when sentence was finally given against the divorce, Campeggio was deprived of the see of Salisbury as a non-resident alien, by act of parliament (11th of March 1535); but his rich benefices in the Spanish dominions made ample amends.

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  • ARTHUR JAMES BALFOUR (1848-), British statesman, eldest son of James Maitland Balfour of Whittingehame, Haddingtonshire, and of Lady Blanche Gascoyne Cecil, a sister of the third marquess of Salisbury, was born on the 25th of July 1848.

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  • When, in the spring of 1878, Lord Salisbury became foreign minister on theresignation of the fifteenth Lord Derby, Mr Balfourbecamehis private secretary.

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  • That these views were not shared by Lord Salisbury was sufficiently shown by the fact that in his first administration (June 1885-January 1886) he made Mr Balfour president of the Local Government Board, and in forming his second administration (July 1886) secretary for Scotland with a seat in the cabinet.

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  • The accidents of political life suddenly opened out to him a career which made him, next to Lord Salisbury, the most prominent, the most admired and the most attacked Conservative politician of the day.

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  • Sir Michael Hicks-Beach, who was chief secretary for Ireland, suffered from an affection of the eyes and found it desirable to resign, and Lord Salisbury appointed his nephew in his stead.

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  • During the illness of Lord Salisbury in 1898, and again in Lord Salisbury's absence abroad, he was in charge of the foreign office, and it fell to his lot to conduct the very critical negotiations with Russia on the question of railways in North China.

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  • On Lord Salisbury's resignation on the 11th of July 1902, Mr Balfour succeeded him as prime minister, with the cordial approval of all sections of the Unionist party.

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  • Lord Londonderry now became president of the council, Lord Lansdowne leader of the House of Lords, and Lord Salisbury, son of the late premier, who as Lord Cranborne had for three years been under-secretary for foreign affairs, was included in the cabinet as lord privy seal.

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  • against the of g appeals to Rome, while others complained of the exactions of the legates, or, like John of Salisbury, animadverted upon the excessive powers of the bureaucracy at the Lateran.

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  • Letters to Henderson of Edinburgh and John Douglas, bishop of Salisbury, are in the British Museum.

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  • He had also three illegitimate sons: Geoffrey, archbishop of York; Morgan; and William Longsword, earl of Salisbury.

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  • The works of John of Salisbury (ed.

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  • The " vulgar and more general story," as Ashmole calls it, is that of the countess of Salisbury's garter.

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  • The prelate has always been the bishop of Winchester; the chancellor was formerly the bishop of Salisbury, but is now the bishop of Oxford; the registrarship and the deanery of Windsor have been united since the reign of Charles I.; the king of arms, whose duties were in the beginning discharged by Windsor herald, is Garter Principal King of Arms; and the usher is the gentleman usher of the Black Rod.

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  • After his release in October he commanded cavalry in East Tennessee, making successful raids into Virginia and North Carolina, and on the 12th of April 1865 defeated a Confederate force near Salisbury, North Carolina, and captured a large number of prisoners.

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  • Upon quitting his professorship Barrow was only a fellow of Trinity College; but his uncle gave him a small sinecure in Wtles, and Dr Seth Ward, bishop of Salisbury, conferred upon him a prebend in that church.

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  • Salisbury, Geology, vol.

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  • Their name is preserved, but since the seat of this industry was removed to Wilton near Salisbury, the inhabitants of Axminster have found employment in brush factories, corn mills, timber yards and an iron foundry.

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  • Salisbury in the Journal of the American Oriental Society, viii.

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  • Salisbury in the Journal of the Amer.

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  • Cynric defeated the Britons at Salisbury in 552 and again in conjunction with his son Ceawlin at Beranburh, probably Barbury Hill, in 55 6.

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  • When the League had become a success, it was joined by Lord Salisbury and Sir Stafford Northcote, who were elected Grand Masters.

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  • SALISBURY, a city and the county-seat of Rowan county, North Carolina, U.S.A., about 120 m.

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  • Salisbury is served by the Southern railway, which has repair shops here.

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  • It is the seat of Livingstone College (African Methodist Episcopal, removed from Concord to Salisbury in 1882, chartered 1885).

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  • Salisbury was founded about 1753, was first incorporated as a town in 1755 and first chartered as a city in 1770.

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  • On the 12th of April 1865 the main body of General George Stoneman's cavalry encountered near Salisbury a force of about 3000 Confederates under General William M.

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  • In 1854 he declined the see of Salisbury, and he died on the 18th of June 1855.

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  • Stephen owed his crown to Henry (1135), but they quarrelled when Stephen refused to give Henry the primacy; and the bishop took up the cause of Roger of Salisbury (1139).

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  • appointed him bishop of Salisbury, and by Richard's command he went with the third crusade to the Holy Land.

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  • OLIVER PERRY MORTON (1823-1877), American political leader, "war governor" of Indiana, was born in Salisbury, Wayne county, Indiana, on the 4th of August 1823.

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  • The 3rd marquess of Salisbury said of him, and it sums up his character as a public man: "He was the greatest master of English oratory that this generation - I may say several generations - has seen..

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  • By an agreement signed by Lord Salisbury and the French ambassador on the 21st of March 1899, and appended to Art.

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  • In the meanwhile the French feudatories on the left wing had thoroughly defeated the imperialists opposed to them, and William Longsword, earl of Salisbury, the leader of this corps, was unhorsed and taken prisoner by the warlike bishop of Beauvais.

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  • He became known in the House of Commons principally for his candid criticism of the measures introduced by his nominal leaders, and he was rather to be ranked among the Opposition than as a Ministerialist; and when the crisis with the Transvaal came in 1899, Mr Courtney's views, which remained substantially what they were when he supported the settlement after Majuba in 1881, had plainly become incompatible with his position even as a nominal follower of Lord Salisbury and Mr Chamberlain.

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  • Mr Gladstone was attracted by his vigorous ability as a speaker, and his evidence of sound political judgment; and in August 1892, though comparatively unknown to the general public, he was selected to move the vote of want of confidence which overthrew Lord Salisbury's government, and was made home secretary in the new Liberal ministry.

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  • In 1423 he joined the earl of Salisbury in Champagne, and shared his victory at Crevant.

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  • He fought under John, duke of Bedford, at Verneuil on the 17th of August 1424, and throughout the next four years was Salisbury's chief lieutenant in the direction of the war.

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  • When Salisbury was killed before Orleans on the 3rd of November 1428, Suffolk succeeded to the command.

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  • Suffolk's wife, Alice, was widow of Thomas, earl of Salisbury, and granddaughter of Geoffrey Chaucer.

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  • In June 1885 the Liberal administration broke up, but Lord Salisbury's ministry, which succeeded, was beaten early in February 1886, and when Mr Gladstone adopted Home Rule, Lord Rosebery threw in his lot with the old leader, and was made secretary of state for foreign affairs during the brief Liberal ministry which followed.

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  • The general election which followed after Lord Salisbury had formed his new ministry was remarkable for the undisciplined state of the Liberal party.

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  • In the autumn of 1898 he gave valuable support to the attitude taken up by Lord Salisbury upon the Fashoda question.

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  • Nevertheless, in a letter to Captain Lambton, an unsuccessful Liberal candidate for Newcastle, in September 1900, he condemned the general conduct of affairs by Lord Salisbury's government, while in several speeches in the House of Lords he strongly urged the necessity of army reform.

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  • The house of Tarrant was founded by Ralph de Kahaines, and greatly enriched about 1230 by Richard Poor, bishop successively of Chichester, Salisbury and Durham, who was born at Tarrant and died there in 1237.

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  • The cession of Cyprus to Great Britain was at first denounced by the French newspapers as a great blow to his diplomacy, but he obtained, in a conversation with Lord Salisbury, a promise that Great Britain in return would allow France a free hand in Tunis.

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  • It lies in the valley of the Calne, and is surrounded by the high table-land of Salisbury Plain and the Marlborough Downs.

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  • In 1303 Lodovicus de Bello Monte, prebendary of Salisbury, obtained a grant of a Saturday market at the manor of Caine, and a three days' fair at the feast of St Mary Magdalene; the latter was only abandoned in the 19th century.

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  • At this date he had close relations, personal and by correspondence, with Mai, Bunsen, Burgess (bishop of Salisbury), Tholuck and Kluge.

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  • In 1782 he was translated to Salisbury and in 1791 to Durham.

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  • John of Salisbury (111o-1180) continually quotes from rhetorical and philosophical writings, but only once from the speeches.

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  • The earl of Salisbury, who was in Paris on the occasion of the marriage of Richard II.

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  • 1384), and reared him as his own; the boy, after Salisbury's death (1400), being received by Philip of Burgundy, at whose desire Christine wrote Le Livre des faitz et bonnes mceurs du sayge roy Charles (1405), valuable as a first-hand picture of Charles V.

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  • He studied law at Salisbury, North Carolina, was admitted to the bar there in 1787, and began to practise at McLeansville, Guilford county, North Carolina, where for a time he was a constable and deputy-sheriff.

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  • James Edward Hubert Gascoyne-Cecil Salisbury >>

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  • Salisbury's Geology, vol.

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  • By his marriage in 1438 to Cicely, sister of the earl of Salisbury, he allied himself to the rising family of the Nevilles.

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  • Hence the phenomena came to be collectively called electrical, a term first used by William Barlowe, archdeacon of Salisbury, in 1618, and the study of them, electrical science.

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  • Prerogative, despite Bacon's advice and efforts, clashed more than once with liberty; Salisbury's bold schemes for relieving the embarrassment caused by the reckless extravagance of the king proved abortive, and the House was dissolved in February 1611.

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  • The death of Salisbury, occuring soon after, opened a position in which Bacon thought his great political skill and sagacity might be made more immediately available for the king's service.

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  • About the same time he made two ineffectual applications for the mastership of the wards; the first, on Salisbury's death, when it was given to Sir George Carey; the second, on the death of Carey.

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  • REGINALD POLE (1500-1558), English cardinal and archbishop of Canterbury, born at Stourton Castle, Staffordshire, was the third son of Sir Richard Pole, Knight of the Garter, and Margaret, countess of Salisbury, a daughter of George, duke of Clarence, and therefore niece of Edward IV.

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  • appointed his young kinsman to a prebend in Salisbury, and soon afterwards to the deaneries of Wimborne and Exeter.

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  • In 1483 he was chosen bishop of St Davids; in 1485 he was made bishop of Salisbury and provost of Queen's College, Oxford, and he became bishop of Winchester in 1493.

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  • In 1382 the archbishop's visitation led to disputes with the bishops of Exeter and Salisbury, and Courtenay was only partially able to enforce the payment of a special tax to meet his expenses on this occasion.

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  • The Sarum or Salisbury Breviary itself was very widely used.

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  • The socalled "Salisbury" cure consists of living entirely upon minced beef and hot water.

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  • Soon after his uncle Roger of Salisbury secured him the bishopric of Ely, much to the disgust of the monks.

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  • Nigel was at first retained in Stephen's service; but, like his uncle and his brothers, incurred the suspicion of leaning towards the Angevin interest, when Roger of Salisbury and Alexander of Lincoln were arrested by Stephen (January 1139).

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  • Salisbury and Buluwayo are the chief towns in Southern Rhodesia.

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  • There was also a labyrinth at Theobald's Park, near Cheshunt, when this place passed from the earl of Salisbury into the possession of James I.

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  • But he made a close friend in one of the resident fellows, Edward Talbot, son of William Talbot, then bishop of Oxford, and afterwards of Salisbury and Durham.

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  • In 1721 he had been given a prebend at Salisbury by Bishop Talbot, who on his translation to Durham gave Butler the living of Houghton-le-Skerne in that county, and in 1725 presented him to the wealthy rectory of Stanhope.

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  • GEORGE NEVILLE (c. 1432-1476), archbishop of York and chancellor of England, was the youngest son of Richard Neville, earl of Salisbury, and brother of Richard Neville, earl of Warwick, known as the "Kingmaker."

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  • The Salisbury records show him also admitted to a prebend there on the r 6th of August, which he exchanged for other prebends on the 9th and 15th of October.

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  • Robert Abbot, bishop of Salisbury.

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  • Stanhengist, hanging stones), a circular group of huge standing stones (see Stone Monuments), situated on Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire, England, about 7 m.

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  • of Salisbury.

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  • This was regafded as a miraculous feat brought about by the incantations of the magician Merlin, who caused a great stone circle in Ireland (said to have been previously carried thither out of Africa by giants) to be transported to Salisbury Plain, where, at Merlin's "word of power," all the stones moved into their proper places.

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  • Geoffrey of Monmouth, in recording the death of Constantine, which took place about the middle of the 6th century (Historic britonum), states that he was buried "close by Uther Pendragon, within the structure of stones which was set up with wonderful art not far from Salisbury, and called in the English tongue, Stonehenge."

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  • The acquisition of Salisbury Plain by the war office for military purposes seemed likely, again, to add to the risk of harm from thoughtless visitors.

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  • That its analogues were chiefly used as sepulchres has been fully established, and this is presumptive evidence that the sepulchral element was, at least, one of the objects for which Stonehenge was constructed: and it was probably for this reason that it was erected on Salisbury Plain, where there already existed an extensive necropolis of the Bronze Age.

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  • on Salisbury Pond, given to the city by Stephen Salisbury; Dodge Park (13 acres, N.); Burncoat Park (42 acres, N.E.); Chandler Hill Park (80 acres, E.); Hadwen (50 acres), University (14 acres) and Crompton Park (15.25 acres) in the S.W.

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  • The old Salisbury mansion, dating back to Colonial days, stands in this square.

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  • At Salisbury Street and Park Avenue are the library and museum (1910) of the American Antiquarian Society, established in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, with a collection of interesting portraits, a library of 99,000 vols.

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  • The Art Museum was erected and endowed (1899-1903) by Stephen Salisbury, and contains a fine collection of casts, many valuable paintings, and the Bancroft Collection of Japanese art.

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  • William also formed an acquaintance with Bishop Roger of Salisbury, who had a castle at Malmesbury.

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  • Accordingly, when Lord Salisbury proposed energetic action to protect the Armenians, the cabinet of St Petersburg suddenly assumed the role of protector of the sultan and vetoed the proposal.

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  • Monteagle at once started for Whitehall, found Salisbury and other ministers about to sit down to supper, and showed the letter, whereupon it was decided to search the cellar under the House of Lords before the meeting of parliament, but not too soon, so that the plot might be ripe and be fully disclosed.

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  • The opinion that the whole plot was the work of Salisbury, that he acted as an agent provocateur and lured on his victims to destruction, repeated by some contemporary and later writers and recently formulated and urged with great ability, has no solid foundation.

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  • The steps taken by Salisbury after the discovery of the gunpowder do not show the possession of any information of the plot or of the persons who were its chief agents outside Fawkes's first statement, and his knowledge is seen to develop according to the successive disclosures and confessions of the latter.

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  • The inquiry was not conducted by Salisbury alone, but by several commissioners, some of whom were Roman Catholics, and many rivals and secret enemies.

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  • Again, the plan agreed upon for disclosing the plot was especially designed to allow the conspirators to escape, and therefore scarcely a method which would have been arranged with Salisbury.

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  • Not one of the conspirators, even when all hope of saving life was gone, made any accusation against Salisbury or the government and all died expressing contrition for their crime.

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  • Lastly Salisbury had no conceivable motive in concocting a plot of this description.

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  • He was now at the height of his influence, having been created Viscount Cranborne in August 1604 and earl of Salisbury in May 1605; and James had already, more than 16 months before the discovery of the plot, consented to return to the repressive measures against the Romanists.

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  • between London and his mother's house at Ashby St Legers in eight hours, informed his friends in Warwickshire, who had been awaiting the issue of the plot, of its failure, but succeeded in persuading Sir Everard Digby, by an unscrupulous falsehood, to further implicate himself in his hopeless cause by assuring him that both James and Salisbury were dead; and, according to Father Garnet, this was not the first time that Catesby had been guilty of lies in order to draw men into the plot.

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  • The document was deposited by the 3rd Marquess of Salisbury for inspection at the Record Office, and was pronounced by two experts, one from the British Museum and another from the Record Office, to be undoubtedly genuine.

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  • He held, however, the prebend of Shipton in Salisbury cathedral, and is said to have been for a short time rector of Cripplegate.

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  • near Salisbury.

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  • Amesbury is served by two divisions of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected by electric line with Haverhill and Newburyport, Mass., and with Hampton Beach, New Hampshire, and Salisbury Beach, Mass., two summer resorts.

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  • Amesbury was settled about 1644 as a separate part of Salisbury, and in 1654, by mutual agreement of the old and new "towns," became practically independent, although not legally a township until 1666 (named Amesbury, from the English town in Wilts, in 1667).

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  • In 1876 Merrimac township was created out of the territory of Amesbury; in 1886 the west part of the old township of Salisbury was united to Amesbury.

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  • In the north of Hampshire along its boundary with Surrey and Berkshire, in the southern half of Wiltshire (where rises the upland of Salisbury Plain), in Dorsetshire, and the south of Somersetshire, the hills may be said to run in a series of connected groups.

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  • Thus the Chalk appears to run in four diverging fingers from the centre or palm on Salisbury Plain, other formations lying wedge-like between them.

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  • From the upland of Salisbury Plain, which corresponds to the axis of the anticline marking the centre of the double fold into which the strata of the south of England have been thrown, the great Chalk escarpment runs north-eastward; fingers of Chalk run eastward one each side of the Weald, forming the North and South Downs, while the southern edge of the Chalk sheet appears from beneath the Tertiary strata at several places on the south coast, and especially in the Isle of Wight.

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  • Of the few towns in the Chalk country, the interest of which is largely historical or scholastic, Salisbury, Winchester, Marlborough and Cambridge are the most distinguished.

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  • The Hampshire Basin forms a triangle with Dorchester, Salisbury and Worthing near the angles, and the rim of Chalk to the south appears in broken fragments in the Isle of Purbeck, the Isle of Wight, and to the east of Bognor.

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  • Downs, the Dorsetshire heights and Salisbury Plain.

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  • Main line - Woking, Basingstoke, Salisbury, Yeovil, Exeter, Plymouth; Woking, Guildford and Portsmouth,.

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  • N., and about ten companions went thither from Cape Town in the brig " Salisbury," from which circumstance the island in the bay gets its name.

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  • His urbanity and perfect ' On this head see the 3rd marquess of Salisbury's Political Essays, reprinted from the Quarterly Review.

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  • The Indian states are sometimes described as " Feudatory States," sometimes " Independent and Protected States " (Twiss), sometimes " Mediatized States " (Chesney), sometimes " Half-Sovereign," sometimes as in a position of " subordinate alliance " (Lord Salisbury, Parliamentary Papers, 1897 [c. 87001.

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  • After the Yorkist failure at Ludlow field in October 1459, Edward fled with the earls of Salisbury and Warwick, his uncle and cousin, to Calais.

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  • He not long after was seen once more upon the field of his early triumphs lecturing on Mount St Genevieve in 1136 (when he was heard by John of Salisbury), but it was only for a brief space: no new triumph, but a last great trial, awaited him in the few years to come of his chequered life.

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  • The manor belonged to the see of Salisbury in the middle ages, but reverted to the crown in the time of Henry VIII.

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  • The bishop of Salisbury in 1300 received the grant of a weekly market to be held on Mondays: the day was altered to Wednesday by Elizabeth's charter.

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  • Here he remained some time in concealment in company with another priest, Oldcorne alias Hall, but at last on the 30th of January 1606, unable to bear the close confinement any longer, they surrendered and were taken up to London, being well treated during the journey by Salisbury's express orders.

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  • He made her countess of Salisbury, reversed her brother's attainder, created her eldest son, Henry, Lord Montague, and caused one of her younger sons, Reginald, who displayed much taste for learning, to be carefully educated.

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  • But this only made matters worse for his family at home: his brother, Lord Montague, and even his mother, the aged countess of Salisbury, were beheaded as traitors because they had continued to correspond with him.

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  • "He carrieth himself," writes Salisbury to Sir Charles Cornwallis, ambassador at Madrid, "without any feare or perturbation ...; under all this action he is noe more dismayed, nay scarce any more troubled than if he was taken for a poor robbery upon the highway," declaring "that he is ready to die, and rather wisheth 10,000 deaths, than willingly to accuse his master or any other."

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  • When, however, in September the English (under the earl of Salisbury) invested Orleans, the key to the south of France, she renewed her efforts with Baudricourt, her mission being to relieve Orleans and crown the dauphin at Reims. By persistent importunity, the effect of which was increased by the simplicity of her demeanour and her calm assurance of success, she at last prevailed on the governor to grant her request; and in February 1429, accompanied by six men-at-arms, she set out on her perilous journey to the court of the dauphin at Chinon.

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  • to Mafeking (870 m.), Bulawayo (1360m.), the Victoria Falls on the Zambezi (1623 m.) and the Belgian Congo frontier, whilst a branch from Bulawayo runs via Salisbury to Beira,- 2037 m.

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  • On the 21st of December 1671 he was proposed as a candidate for admission into the Royal Society by Dr Seth Ward, bishop of Salisbury, and on the 11th of January 1672 he was elected a fellow of the Society.

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  • The manor, part of that of Canford, belonged in 1086 to Edward of Salisbury, and passed by marriage to William Longespee, earl of Salisbury, thence to Edmund de Lacy, earl of Lincoln, and with his heiress to Thomas, earl of Lancaster, and so to the Crown.

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  • Entries in the Patent Rolls show that Poole had considerable trade before William de Longespee, earl of Salisbury, granted the burgesses a charter about 1248 assuring to them all liberties and free customs within his borough.

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  • to 60, and enormous fines imposed on the trespassers, - Lord Salisbury being assessed in £20,000, Lord Westmoreland in £19,000, Sir Christopher Hatton in £12,000 (Hallam's Constitutional History of England, c. viii.).

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  • He and his brother, Waleran, were the chief advisers of Stephen, and helped this king to seize the bishops of Salisbury and Lincoln in '139; later, however, Robert made his peace with Henry II., and became chief justiciar of England.

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  • It is to Henry, aided by his great justiciar, Roger, bishop of Salisbury, that England owed the institution of the machinery of government by which it was to be ruled during the Constftu- earlier middle ages.

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  • At Winchester he was acknowledged as king by the bishop, his own brother Henry of Blois, and by the great justiciar, Roger, bishop of Salisbury, and the archbishop, William of Corbeil.

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  • In 1139 Stephen had wrought himself fatal damage by quarrelling with the ecclesiastical bureaucrats, the kinsmen and allies of Roger of Salisbury, who had been among his earliest adherents.

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  • He handed over the exchequer to Nigel, bishop of Ely, the nephew of the old justiciar Roger of Salisbury, and the heir of his traditions.

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  • He induced the archbishop of York, assisted by the bishops of London and Salisbury, to perform the ceremony.

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  • He had wholly misjudged the situation; Becket made neither promises nor threats, but three weeks after he reached Canterbury publicly excommunicated the bishops of London and Salisbury for the part that they had taken in the coronation of the young king, and suspended from their functions the other prelates who had been present at the ceremony.

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  • Johns safety, however, was secured in a more practical way when his bastard brother, William, Longsword, earl of Salisbury, made a descent on the port of Damme and burnt or sunk a whole squadron of the French transports.

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  • He sent the earl of Salisbury with some of his mercenaries to join the confederates in Flanders, while he sailed with the main body of them to La Rochelle, whence he marched northwardr devastating the land before him.

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  • that some of the most splendid of the English cathedrals, Salisbury (1220-1258) and Wells (1230-1239), were built.

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  • Kent and Salisbury were slain at Cirencester, the others captured and executed with many of their followers.

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  • It would be going too far to seek the origin of the Yorkist partyas some have donein the old enmity of the houses of March, Norfolk and Salisbury against Henry IV.

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  • They were headed by the two most capable politicians and soldiers then alive in England, the two Richards, father and son, who held the earidoms of Salisbury and Warwick, and were respectively brother-in-law and nephew to York.

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  • But it was not his Richard death that was the main misfortune, but the fact slain, that in the battle the Lancastrians gave no quarter to small or great, and that after it they put to death Yorks brother-in-law Salisbury and other prisoners.

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  • Through the insistence of Russia an armistice was agreed upon; and Lord Beaconsfieldfor Disraeli had now been raised to the peerageendeavoured to utilize the breathing space by organizing a conference of the great powers at Constantinople, which was attended on behalf of Great Britain by Lord Salisbury.

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  • Lord Derby,1 who was at the foreign office, thereupon retired from the ministry, and was succeeded by Lord Salisbury.

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  • At Prince Bismarcks suggestion Russia coiisented to refer the treaty which she had concluded at San Stefano to a congress of the great powers; and the congress, at which Great Britain was represented by Lord Beaconsfield and Lord Salisbury, B nil succeeded in substituting for the treaty of San Stefano t,aty~.

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  • On Lord Beaconsfields return, however, he claimed for Lord Salisbury and himself that they had brought back peace with honor, and the country accepted with wild delight the phrase, without taking much trouble to analyse its justice.

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  • Gladstone resigned office, and Lord Salisbury, who, after Lord Beaconsfields death, had succeeded to the lead of the Conservative party, was instructed to form a new administration.

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  • It was generally understood that H Lord Carnarvon, who had been made viceroy of ome Ireland, had been in communication with Parnell; that Lord Salisbury was aware of the interviews which had taken place; and it was whispered that Lord Carnarvon was in favor of granting some sort of administrative autonomy to Ireland.

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  • Lord Salisbury resigned, and Gladstone restimed power.

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  • Gladstone, bowing at once to the verdict of the people, resigned office, and Lord Salisbury returned to power.

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  • ~ t The secessionists from the Liberal partythe Liberal non Unionists, as they were calledheld aloof from it; and Lord Salisbury was forced to form his cabinet out of his immediate followers.

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  • But before many months were over, Lord Randolphunable to secure acceptance of a policy of financial retrenchmentresigned office, and Lord Salisbury was forced to reconstruct his ministry.

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  • Smith moved from the war office to the treasury, and became leader of the House of Commons; while Lord Salisbury himself returned to the foreign office, which the dramatically sudden death of Lord Iddesleigh, better known as Sir Stafford Northcote, vacated.

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  • Lord Rosebery resigned office, and Lord Salisbury for the third time became prime minister, the duke of Devonshire.

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  • The political history of his reign, which ended with his death in May 1910, is dealt with in detail in separate biographical and other articles in this work (see especially those on Lord Salisbury, Mr A.

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  • Wright), treatises like those of John of Salisbury, Gerald of Wales, and, later, Wycliffes works, Netters Fasciculi Zizaniorum, Gascoignes Loci e libro veritatum, Pecocks Repressor, and the literary writings of Chaucer, Langland, Gower, Richard Rolle and others.

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  • Here, in what was then a part of the town of Salisbury, Daniel Webster was born, and on the Webster farm is the New Hampshire orphans' home, established in 1871.

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  • The town of Franklin was formed in 1828 by the union of portions of Salisbury, Sanbornton, Andover and Northfield.

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  • The earliest settlement within its limits was made in 1748 in the portion taken from Salisbury.

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  • Many of the nobles, like Lords Montacute and Salisbury, supported the poor preachers, took them as private chaplains, and protected them against clerical interference.

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  • BERNARD OF CHARTRES (1080 ?-1167), surnamed Sylvestris, scholastic philosopher, described by John of Salisbury as perfectissimus inter Platonicos nostri saeculi.

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  • John of Salisbury (Metalogicus, iv.

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  • the lordship was acquired by the Hungerford family, and in 1427 Sir Walter Hungerford granted the reversion of the manor to the dean and chapter of Salisbury cathedral to aid towards the repair of their belfry.

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  • He was consecrated to the see of Salisbury on the 31st of March 1689 by a commission of bishops to whom Archbishop Sancroft had delegated his authority, declining personally to perform the office.

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  • He discouraged plurality of livings, and consequent non-residence, established a school of divinity at Salisbury, and spent much time himself in preparing candidates for confirmation, and in the examination of those who wished to enter the priesthood.

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  • 1726) became prebendary of Salisbury in 1715, and chaplain to George I.

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  • See also A Life of Gilbert Burnet, Bishop of Salisbury (1907), by T.

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  • According to the Metalogus of John of Salisbury, who in 1155 went on a mission from King Henry II.

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  • Lord Salisbury came into office, with Lord Carnarvon as lord-lieutenant and Sir W.

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  • Gladstone resigned, and Lord Salisbury became prime minister, with Lord Londonderry as lord-lieutenant and Sir M.

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  • Lord Salisbury resigned in August, and was succeeded by Gladstone, with Lord Houghton (afterwards earl of Crewe) as lord-lieutenant and Mr John Morley as chief secretary.

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  • Next day the visitors were entertained by Lord Salisbury at Hatfield, the duke of Devonshire, Mr Balfour, Mr Goschen and Mr Chamberlain being present.

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  • The landlords of Ireland, who had made so many sacrifices and worked so hard to return Lord Salisbury to power, felt that [From Anglo-Norman Invasion] the measure was hardly what they had a right to expect from a Unionist administration.

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  • career in India (1865-1901) Sir Antony had never concealed his Nationalist proclivities, but his appointment, about the form of which there was nothing peculiar, was favoured by Lord Lansdowne and Lord George Hamilton, and ultimately sanctioned by Mr Balfour, who had been prime minister since Lord Salisbury's resignation in July.

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  • The latter is one of the chief examples of the period, to which must be added the cathedral of Salisbury (except the tower); the Galilee at Ely; nave and transept of Wells (1225-1240); nave of Lincoln; west front of Peterborough; and the minster at Beverley.

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  • Provision was moreover made by an ordinance of 1906 for the extinction of slavery itself throughout the protectorate, it being enacted that 1 Extract from a despatch of Lord Salisbury to the British ambassador to France, dated 30th of March 1892.

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  • Lancaster, who had just obtained the earldoms of Lincoln and Salisbury on the death of his father-in-law in 1311, drove the king and his favourite from Newcastle to Scarborough, and was present at the execution of Gaveston in June 1312.

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  • The king, melancholy spectacle as he was, seemed indeed to suit that tragic hour when Orleans, the last bulwark of the south, was besieged by the earl of Salisbury, now roused from inactivity (1428).

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  • Nihilists and naturalists, who deified logic and science at the expense of faith, were not unknown at Paris in the days of John of Salisbury.

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  • For their success against the earls of Kent and Salisbury Henry IV.

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  • Before 1892 Mr Chamberlain had the satisfaction of seeing Lord Salisbury's ministry pass such important acts, from a progressive point of view, as those dealing with Coal Mines Regulation, Allotments, County Councils, Housing of the Working Classes, Free Education and Agricultural Holdings, besides Irish legislation like the Ashbourne Act, the Land Act of 1891, and the Light Railways and Congested Districts Acts.

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  • In August Lord Salisbury's ministry was defeated; and on the 13th of February 1893 Mr Gladstone introduced his second Home Rule Bill, which was eventually read a third time on the 1st of September.

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  • In that year, on the defeat of Lord Rosebery, the union of the Unionists was sealed by the inclusion of the Liberal Unionist leaders in Lord Salisbury's ministry; and Mr Chamberlain became secretary of state for the colonies.

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  • When Mr Arthur Balfour succeeded Lord Salisbury as prime minister in July 1902, Mr Chamberlain agreed to serve loyally under him, and the friendship between the two leaders was indeed one of the most marked features of the political situation.

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  • Meanwhile, the death of Lord Salisbury (August 22) removed a weighty figure from the councils of the Unionist party.

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  • In May 1659 he brought a command from Charles in Brussels, directing the bishop of Salisbury to summon all those bishops, who were then alive, to consecrate clergymen to various sees "to secure a continuation of the order in the Church of England," then in danger of becoming extinct.'

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  • In 1502 he became prebendary of Salisbury, in 1505 prebendary of St Paul's, and immediately afterwards dean of the same cathedral, having previously taken the degree of doctor of divinity.

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  • In 1663 he was prebendary of Ripon, in 1667 prebendary of Salisbury, in 1668 archdeacon of Merioneth, in 1672 dean of Bangor and prebendary of St Paul's, London, in 1680 bishop of St Asaph, in 1689 lord-almoner, in 1692 bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, and in 1699 bishop of Worcester.

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  • At this moment, 21st of June 1895, Lord Rosebery's cabinet resigned, and when Lord Salisbury's government resumed the negotiations in August, the sultan appealed to France and Russia against England.

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  • Salisbury (1899); Die Schweiz unter den Romern (anonymous) published by the Historischer Verein of St Gall (Scheitlin and Zollikofer, St Gall, 1862); and G.

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  • of England; and the fables, her Ysopet, were written according to the Epilogus for a Count William, generally recognized to be William Longsword, earl of Salisbury.

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  • continuation of the Green and the Housatonic mountain ranges of Vermont and Massachusetts, the highest among them being: Bear Mountain (Salisbury) 2355 ft.; Gridley Mountain (Salisbury), 2200 ft.; Mt.

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  • Riga (Salisbury), 2000 ft.; Mt.

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  • Ball (Norfolk) and Lion's Head (Salisbury), each 1760 ft.; Canaan Mountain (North Canaan), 1680 ft.; and Ivy Mountain (Goshen), 1640 ft.

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  • About 1730 the production of iron became an important industry in the vicinity of Salisbury, and from Connecticut iron many of the American military supplies in the War of Independence were manufactured.

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  • Her first shed allocation was Salisbury, where she worked the south western main line.

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  • Accordingly he invited the chieftains to a banquet to be held near Stonehenge, or the Hanging Stones, on Salisbury Plains.

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  • histology sections at Salisbury District general Hospital.

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  • This was during my first year as official jester to the City of Salisbury.

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  • Salisbury looks to be a very attractive option to the South.

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  • Finally, perhaps I may take up the points made by the right reverend prelate the Bishop of Salisbury.

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  • reverend prelate the Bishop of Salisbury.

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  • Here also, at Salisbury Plain, is a huge rookery of magnificent king penguins.

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  • We'll hope to get ashore at Salisbury Plain, home to perhaps the largest king penguin rookery in the world.

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  • shed allocation was Salisbury, where she worked the south western main line.

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  • The Amesbury area exists in close symbiosis with Salisbury to the south.

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  • Vintage: 2003 Price: £ 14.00 Shiraz (Australia) Salisbury Ripe, plummy fruit on the nose with cedary oak undertones.

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  • In 1397 he was made archdeacon of Dorset by Richard Mitford, bishop of Salisbury, but litigation was still going on about it in the papal court till the 27th of June 1399, when the pope extinguished the suit, imposing perpetual silence on Nicholas Bubwith, master of the rolls, his opponent.

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  • Chicheley was parson of Sherston, Wiltshire, and prebendary of Nantgwyly in the college of Abergwilly, North Wales; on the 23rd of February 1401/2, now called doctor of laws, he was pardoned for bringing in, and allowed to use, a bull of the pope " providing " him to the chancellorship of Salisbury cathedral, and canenries in the nuns' churches of Shaftesbury and Wilton in that diocese; and on the 9th of January 1402/3 he was archdeacon of Salisbury.

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  • In January 1409 Chicheley was named with Bishop Hallum of Salisbury and the prior of Canterbury to represent the Southern Convocation at the council, which opened on the 25th of March 1409, arriving on the 24th of April.

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  • As, however, he had obtained a bull (August 20, 1409) enabling him to appoint his successors to the vacated preferments, including his nephew William, though still an undergraduate and not in orders, to the chancellorship of Salisbury, and a prebend at Lichfield, he did not go empty away.

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  • Contemporary Puritan writers in the Marprelate tracts allude to Dr John Bridges, dean of Salisbury, author of A Defence of the Government of the Church of England, as the reputed author of Gammer Gurton's Needle, but he obviously could not be properly described as "Mr S."

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  • Bartlett, "Salisbury," in The Connecticut Quarterly, vol.

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  • In 1896 Lord Salisbury induced the other powers to unite in urging the execution of the reforms, but no agreement could be come to for the use of coercion, and Europe could but look on and protest.

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  • The account which John of Salisbury gives of it in the first half of the r 2th century, under the presidency of Theodoric and Bernard, affords a very pleasant glimpse into the history of the middle ages.

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  • Prantl distinguishes from the system of indifference the " status " doctrine attributed by John of Salisbury to Walter of Mortagne (d.

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  • On the death of Anne, his only child, in 1449, his vast inheritance passed to Anne, his sister of the whole blood, wife of Richard Neville, earl of Salisbury ("the Kingmaker"), who thereupon became earl of Warwick.

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  • But Lord Salisbury's retirement, Unionist divisions, the staleness of the ministry, and the accumulating opposition in the country to the Education Act of 1 9 02 and to the continued weight of taxation, together with the growth of the Labour movement, and the antagonism to the introduction of Chinese coolies (1904) into South Africa under conditions represented by Radical spokesmen as those of "slavery," made the political pendulum swing back.

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  • Her extravagant expenditure, returned by Salisbury in 1605 at more than L50,000 and by Chamberlain at her death at more than 84,000, was unfavourably contrasted with the economy of Queen Elizabeth; in spite of large allowances and grants of estates which included Oatlands, Greenwich House and Nonsuch, it greatly exceeded her income, her debts in 1616 being reckoned at nearly fio,000, while her jewelry and her plate were valued at her death at nearly half a million.

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  • At his death she paid an exceptional tribute to his" dear and honoured memory "from his" grateful and affectionate sovereign and friend."To something like this position Lord Salisbury after 1886 succeeded.

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  • A more formidable antagonist than Cole now entered the lists in the person of Thomas Harding, an Oxford contemporary whom Jewel had deprived of his prebend in Salisbury Cathedral for recusancy.

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  • But commentators are not at one as to which countess of Salisbury was the heroine of the adventure, whether she was Katherine Montacute or Joan the Fair Maid of Kent, while Heylyn rejects the legend as " a vain and idle romance derogatory both to the founder and the order, first published by Polydor Vergil, a stranger to the affairs of England, and by him taken upon no better ground than fama vulgi, the tradition of the common people, too trifling a foundation for so great a building."

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  • He became specially prominent in the controversy with Great Britain concerning the boundary dispute between the British and Venezuelan governments (see Venezuela), and in his correspondence with Lord Salisbury gave an extended interpretation to the Monroe Doctrine which went considerably beyond previous statements on the subject.

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  • With so powerful a press behind it, it is no wonder that Welsh political dissent was largely responsible for the changed attitude of the Imperial government in its treatment of the Principality - as evinced in the Sunday Closing Act of 1881, a measure which was very dear to the strong temperance party in Wales, and in the Welsh Intermediate Education Act, granted by Lord Salisbury's government in 1889.

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  • Difficulties with the Portuguese followed, but the Salisbury administration firmly upheld British claims, with the result that the British sphere of influence was extended not only to the Zambezi but beyond to the shores of Lake Tanganyika (see Africa: § 5).

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  • The author embarks on special pleading in favour of Earl Robert and Bishop Roger of Salisbury, but shows a certain liking for the personal character of Stephen, whose case he states with studious fairness.

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  • The success with which the conspirators concealed their plot from Salisbury's spies is indeed astonishing, but is probably explained by its very audacity and by the absence of incriminating correspondence, the medium through which the minister chiefly obtained his knowledge of the plans of his enemies.

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  • Devizes (Divisis, la Devise, De Vies) does not appear in any historical document prior to the reign of Henry I., when the construction of a castle of exceptional magnificence by Roger, bishop of Salisbury, at once constituted the town an important political centre, and led to its speedy development.

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  • In December it was stated that Mr Gladstone intended to propose Home Rule for Ireland, and in January Lord Salisbury's ministry was defeated on the Address, on an amendment moved by Mr Chamberlain's Birmingham henchman, Mr Jesse Collings (b.

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  • More of Salisbury Plain 's fascinating history was revealed in an excavation by Channel 4's Time Team, see page 58.

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