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salerno

salerno

salerno Sentence Examples

  • Rocca, he accompanied them to the castle of Vatolla, near Cilento, in the province of Salerno.

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  • Tajani, Le Istoria Albanesi (Salerno, 1886); G.

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  • The central mass of the mountains, however, throws out two outlying ranges, the one to the west, which separates the Bay of Naples from that of Salerno, and culminates in the Monte S.

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  • The Silarus or Sele enters the Gulf of Salerno a few miles below the ruins of Paestum.

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  • from the Gulf of Salerno, so that it is frequently (though erroneously) described as traversing the whole range of the Apennines.

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  • It predominates along the Ligurian Riviera from Bordighera to Spezia, and on the Adriatic, near San Benedetto del Tronto and Gargano, and, crossing the Italian shore of the Ioian Sea, prevails in some regions of Calabria, and terminates around the gulfs of Salerno, Sorrento and Naples.

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  • Reggio Calabria, Catanzaro, Cosenza, Lecce, Salerno, Naples and Caserta are the continental provinces which come next after Sicily.

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  • A similar method prevails in the Abruzzi, and in the provinces of Salerno, Benevento and Avellino.

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  • Paper-making is highly developed in the provinces of Novara, Caserta, Milan, Vicenza, Turin, Como, Lucca, Ancona, Genoa, Brescia, Cuneo, Macerata and Salerno.

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  • Salerno Acerno, Capaccio-Vallo, Diano, MarsicoNuovo and Potenza, Nocera dci Pagani, Nusco, Policastro.

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  • Gregory had passed before her from the scene of his contest, an exile at Salerno, whither Robert Guiscard carried him in 1084 from the anarchy of rebellious Rome.

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  • The two ambones in the cathedral of Salerno, which are different in design, are magnificent in effect and are enriched with sculpture as well as with mosaic. In the gospel ambo in the cathedral of Ravello (1272), and also in that of the convent of the Trinita della Cava near Salerno, the spiral columns inlaid with mosaic stand on the backs of lions.

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  • In the epistle ambo at Salerno and the gospel ambones at Cava and San Giovanni del Toro in Ravello, the columns support segmental arches carrying the ambones; the epistle ambo at Ravello and all those in Rome are raised on solid marble bases.

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  • ANTONIO GENOVESI (1712-1769), Italian writer on philosophy and political economy, was born at Castiglione, near Salerno, on the 1st of November 1712.

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  • He was educated for the church, and, after some hesitation, took orders in 1736 at Salerno, where he was appointed professor of eloquence at the theological seminary.

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  • SARNO (anc. Sarnus), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, 15 m.

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  • of Salerno, 5 m.

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  • Something was borrowed even from the school of Salerno, and thus the close of Byzantine medicine is brought into connexion with the dawn of science in modern Europe.

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  • The study of Hippocrates, Galen, and other classics was recommended by Cassiodorus (6th century), and in the original mother-abbey of Monte Cassino medicine was studied; but there was not there what could be called a medical school; nor had this foundation any connexion (as has been supposed) with the famous school of Salerno.

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  • It is known that Salerno, a Roman colony, in a situation noted in ancient times for its salubrity, was in the 6th century at least the seat of a bishopric, and at the end of the 7th century of a Benedictine monastery, and that some of the prelates and higher clergy were distinguished for learning, and even for medical acquirements.

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  • A little later we find great and royal personages resorting to Salerno for the restoration of their health, among whom was William of Normandy, afterwards the Conqueror.

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  • The general plan of treatment is dietetic rather than pharmaceutical, though the art of preparing drugs had reached a high degree of complexity at Salerno.

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  • Although it cannot be said that the science of medicine was advanced at Salerno, still its decline was arrested at a time when every other branch of learning was rapidly falling into decay; and there can be no doubt that the observation of patients in hospitals, and probably clinical instruction, were made use of in learning and teaching.

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  • The school of Salerno thus forms a bridge between the ancient and the modern medicine, more direct though less conspicuous than that circuitous route, through Byzantium, Bagdad and Cordova, by which Hippocrates and Galen, in Arabian dress, again entered the European world.

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  • Though the glory of Salerno had departed, the school actually existed till it was finally dissolved by an edict of the emperor Napoleon I.

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  • The influence of Arabian medicine soon began to be felt even in the Hippocratic city of Salerno, and in the r3th century is said to have held an even balance with the older medicine.

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  • Its rising prosperity coincided with the decline of the school of Salerno.

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  • AMALFI, a town and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, from the town of which name it is distant 12 m.

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  • coast of the Gulf of Salerno.

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  • On the restoration of Ferdinand Colletta was permitted to retain his rank in the army, and given command of the Salerno division.

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  • After his return to Rome he held (29th April 1050) another Easter synod, which was occupied largely with the controversy about the teachings of Berengarius of Tours; in the same year he presided over provincial synods at Salerno, Siponto and Vercelli, and in September revisited Germany, returning to Rome in time for a third Easter synod, at which the question of the reordination of those who had been ordained by simonists was considered.

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  • It thus comprised almost all the modern province of the Basilicata, with the greater part of the province of Salerno and a portion of that of Cosenza.

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  • In 1732 he founded the "Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer" at Scala, near Salerno; the headquarters of the Order were afterwards transferred to Nocera dei Pagani.

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  • SALERNO (anc. Salernum), a seaport and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Salerno, on the west coast, 33 m.

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  • The chief buildings are the theatre, the prefecture, and the cathedral of St Matthew (whose bones were brought from Paestum to Salerno in 954), begun in 1076 by Robert Guiscard and consecrated in 1084 by Gregory VII.

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  • Domenico near it has Norman cloisters, and several of the other churches contain paintings by Andrea Sabbatini da Salerno, one of the best of Raphael's scholars.

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  • The Lombard princes, who had frequently defended their city against the Saracens, succumbed before Robert Guiscard, who took the castle after an eight months' siege and made Salerno the capital of his new territory.

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  • Salerno university, founded in 1150, and long one of the great seats of learning in Italy, was closed in 1817.

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  • Of prose writers we have Geoffrey Malaterra, Alexander abbot of Telesia, Romuald archbishop of Salerno, Falco of Benevento, and above all Hugo Falcandus, one of the very foremost of medieval writers.

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  • EBOLI (anc. Eburum), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, from which it is 16 m.

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  • The baronial resistance, which was backed by Naples, Bari, Salerno and other cities, whose aim was civic freedom, also gave way, and at Melfi (Sept.

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  • " He had," says Romnald of Salerno, " a lion face, and spoke with a harsh voice."

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  • Contemporary authors are: Falco of Benevento, Alexander of Telese, Romuald of Salerno and Hugo Falcandus, all in the Scrittori e cronisti napoletani, ed.

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  • Other important examples exist at Ravello (1197), Salerno (1099), Amalfi (1062), Atrani (1087); and doors at Monreale in Sicily and at Trani, signed by an artist named Barisanos (end of the 12th century); the reliefs on these last are remarkable for expression and dignity, in spite of their early rudeness of modelling and ignorance of the human figure.

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  • only), and by the provinces of Salerno and Avellino.

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  • The Latin Breviary also affirms that his body was afterwards translated to Salerno, where it is said to lie in the church built by Robert Guiscard.

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  • The universities of Bologna, Padua and Salerno had been famous through the middle ages for the study of law, physics and medicine; and during the 15th and 16th centuries the first two still enjoyed celebrity in these faculties.

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  • AGOSTINO MAGLIANI (1824-1891), Italian financier, was a native of Lanzino, near Salerno.

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  • JULIUS POMPONIUS LAETUS [Giulio Pomponio Leto], (1425-1498), Italian humanist, was born at Salerno.

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  • RAVELLO, a village of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, about 3 m.

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  • west, divides the Bay of Naples from the bay of Salerno (Sinus Paestanus), and ends in the bold promontory of the Punta della Campanella (Promontorium Minervae), which is separated by a strait of 4 m.

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  • The territory of Salerno was already Robert's; in December 1076 he took the city, expelling its Lombard prince Gisulf, whose sister Sikelgaita he had married.

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  • The Norman attacks on Benevento, a papal fief, alarmed and angered Gregory VII., but pressed hard by the emperor, Henry IV., he turned again to the Normans, and at Ceprano (June r080) reinvested Robert, securing him also in the southern Abruzzi, but reserving Salerno.

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  • At his death Robert was duke of Apulia and Calabria, prince of Salerno and suzerain of Sicily.

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  • to Rome, and marched into southern Italy, where he invested the Norman Rainulf with the county of Aversa, and gave the principality of Capua to Waimar IV., prince of Salerno.

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  • In 1224 he founded the university of Naples, and he was a liberal patron of the medical school at Salerno.

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  • Rocca, he accompanied them to the castle of Vatolla, near Cilento, in the province of Salerno.

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  • Tajani, Le Istoria Albanesi (Salerno, 1886); G.

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  • The central mass of the mountains, however, throws out two outlying ranges, the one to the west, which separates the Bay of Naples from that of Salerno, and culminates in the Monte S.

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  • The Silarus or Sele enters the Gulf of Salerno a few miles below the ruins of Paestum.

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  • from the Gulf of Salerno, so that it is frequently (though erroneously) described as traversing the whole range of the Apennines.

    0
    0
  • It predominates along the Ligurian Riviera from Bordighera to Spezia, and on the Adriatic, near San Benedetto del Tronto and Gargano, and, crossing the Italian shore of the Ioian Sea, prevails in some regions of Calabria, and terminates around the gulfs of Salerno, Sorrento and Naples.

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  • Reggio Calabria, Catanzaro, Cosenza, Lecce, Salerno, Naples and Caserta are the continental provinces which come next after Sicily.

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  • A similar method prevails in the Abruzzi, and in the provinces of Salerno, Benevento and Avellino.

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  • Paper-making is highly developed in the provinces of Novara, Caserta, Milan, Vicenza, Turin, Como, Lucca, Ancona, Genoa, Brescia, Cuneo, Macerata and Salerno.

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  • Salerno Acerno, Capaccio-Vallo, Diano, MarsicoNuovo and Potenza, Nocera dci Pagani, Nusco, Policastro.

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  • Gregory had passed before her from the scene of his contest, an exile at Salerno, whither Robert Guiscard carried him in 1084 from the anarchy of rebellious Rome.

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  • The two ambones in the cathedral of Salerno, which are different in design, are magnificent in effect and are enriched with sculpture as well as with mosaic. In the gospel ambo in the cathedral of Ravello (1272), and also in that of the convent of the Trinita della Cava near Salerno, the spiral columns inlaid with mosaic stand on the backs of lions.

    0
    0
  • In the epistle ambo at Salerno and the gospel ambones at Cava and San Giovanni del Toro in Ravello, the columns support segmental arches carrying the ambones; the epistle ambo at Ravello and all those in Rome are raised on solid marble bases.

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  • ANTONIO GENOVESI (1712-1769), Italian writer on philosophy and political economy, was born at Castiglione, near Salerno, on the 1st of November 1712.

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    0
  • He was educated for the church, and, after some hesitation, took orders in 1736 at Salerno, where he was appointed professor of eloquence at the theological seminary.

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    0
  • SARNO (anc. Sarnus), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, 15 m.

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  • of Salerno, 5 m.

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    0
  • Something was borrowed even from the school of Salerno, and thus the close of Byzantine medicine is brought into connexion with the dawn of science in modern Europe.

    0
    0
  • The study of Hippocrates, Galen, and other classics was recommended by Cassiodorus (6th century), and in the original mother-abbey of Monte Cassino medicine was studied; but there was not there what could be called a medical school; nor had this foundation any connexion (as has been supposed) with the famous school of Salerno.

    0
    0
  • It is known that Salerno, a Roman colony, in a situation noted in ancient times for its salubrity, was in the 6th century at least the seat of a bishopric, and at the end of the 7th century of a Benedictine monastery, and that some of the prelates and higher clergy were distinguished for learning, and even for medical acquirements.

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    0
  • A little later we find great and royal personages resorting to Salerno for the restoration of their health, among whom was William of Normandy, afterwards the Conqueror.

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  • An equally popular writer was Gilles de Corbeil (Aegidius Corboliensis), at one time a teacher at Salerno, afterwards court physician to Philip Augustus of France, who composed several poems in Latin hexameters on medical subjects.

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  • The general plan of treatment is dietetic rather than pharmaceutical, though the art of preparing drugs had reached a high degree of complexity at Salerno.

    0
    0
  • Although it cannot be said that the science of medicine was advanced at Salerno, still its decline was arrested at a time when every other branch of learning was rapidly falling into decay; and there can be no doubt that the observation of patients in hospitals, and probably clinical instruction, were made use of in learning and teaching.

    0
    0
  • The school of Salerno thus forms a bridge between the ancient and the modern medicine, more direct though less conspicuous than that circuitous route, through Byzantium, Bagdad and Cordova, by which Hippocrates and Galen, in Arabian dress, again entered the European world.

    0
    0
  • Though the glory of Salerno had departed, the school actually existed till it was finally dissolved by an edict of the emperor Napoleon I.

    0
    0
  • The influence of Arabian medicine soon began to be felt even in the Hippocratic city of Salerno, and in the r3th century is said to have held an even balance with the older medicine.

    0
    0
  • Its rising prosperity coincided with the decline of the school of Salerno.

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    0
  • AMALFI, a town and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, from the town of which name it is distant 12 m.

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  • coast of the Gulf of Salerno.

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  • On the restoration of Ferdinand Colletta was permitted to retain his rank in the army, and given command of the Salerno division.

    0
    0
  • After his return to Rome he held (29th April 1050) another Easter synod, which was occupied largely with the controversy about the teachings of Berengarius of Tours; in the same year he presided over provincial synods at Salerno, Siponto and Vercelli, and in September revisited Germany, returning to Rome in time for a third Easter synod, at which the question of the reordination of those who had been ordained by simonists was considered.

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    0
  • It thus comprised almost all the modern province of the Basilicata, with the greater part of the province of Salerno and a portion of that of Cosenza.

    0
    0
  • In 1732 he founded the "Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer" at Scala, near Salerno; the headquarters of the Order were afterwards transferred to Nocera dei Pagani.

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    0
  • SALERNO (anc. Salernum), a seaport and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Salerno, on the west coast, 33 m.

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    0
  • The chief buildings are the theatre, the prefecture, and the cathedral of St Matthew (whose bones were brought from Paestum to Salerno in 954), begun in 1076 by Robert Guiscard and consecrated in 1084 by Gregory VII.

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    0
  • Domenico near it has Norman cloisters, and several of the other churches contain paintings by Andrea Sabbatini da Salerno, one of the best of Raphael's scholars.

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    0
  • The Lombard princes, who had frequently defended their city against the Saracens, succumbed before Robert Guiscard, who took the castle after an eight months' siege and made Salerno the capital of his new territory.

    0
    0
  • Salerno university, founded in 1150, and long one of the great seats of learning in Italy, was closed in 1817.

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    0
  • Of prose writers we have Geoffrey Malaterra, Alexander abbot of Telesia, Romuald archbishop of Salerno, Falco of Benevento, and above all Hugo Falcandus, one of the very foremost of medieval writers.

    0
    0
  • EBOLI (anc. Eburum), a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, from which it is 16 m.

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  • The baronial resistance, which was backed by Naples, Bari, Salerno and other cities, whose aim was civic freedom, also gave way, and at Melfi (Sept.

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  • " He had," says Romnald of Salerno, " a lion face, and spoke with a harsh voice."

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    0
  • Contemporary authors are: Falco of Benevento, Alexander of Telese, Romuald of Salerno and Hugo Falcandus, all in the Scrittori e cronisti napoletani, ed.

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    0
  • Other important examples exist at Ravello (1197), Salerno (1099), Amalfi (1062), Atrani (1087); and doors at Monreale in Sicily and at Trani, signed by an artist named Barisanos (end of the 12th century); the reliefs on these last are remarkable for expression and dignity, in spite of their early rudeness of modelling and ignorance of the human figure.

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  • Bianco,, La Sicilia durante l'occupazione Inglese (Palermo, 1902); and for: 40,000 Bourbon troops between Salerno and Avellino fell back panic-stricken, and on the 7th Garibaldi entered Naples alone, although the city was still full of soldiers, and was received with delirious enthusiasm.

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  • only), and by the provinces of Salerno and Avellino.

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  • The Latin Breviary also affirms that his body was afterwards translated to Salerno, where it is said to lie in the church built by Robert Guiscard.

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  • The universities of Bologna, Padua and Salerno had been famous through the middle ages for the study of law, physics and medicine; and during the 15th and 16th centuries the first two still enjoyed celebrity in these faculties.

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  • AGOSTINO MAGLIANI (1824-1891), Italian financier, was a native of Lanzino, near Salerno.

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    0
  • JULIUS POMPONIUS LAETUS [Giulio Pomponio Leto], (1425-1498), Italian humanist, was born at Salerno.

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  • RAVELLO, a village of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, about 3 m.

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  • west, divides the Bay of Naples from the bay of Salerno (Sinus Paestanus), and ends in the bold promontory of the Punta della Campanella (Promontorium Minervae), which is separated by a strait of 4 m.

    0
    0
  • The territory of Salerno was already Robert's; in December 1076 he took the city, expelling its Lombard prince Gisulf, whose sister Sikelgaita he had married.

    0
    0
  • The Norman attacks on Benevento, a papal fief, alarmed and angered Gregory VII., but pressed hard by the emperor, Henry IV., he turned again to the Normans, and at Ceprano (June r080) reinvested Robert, securing him also in the southern Abruzzi, but reserving Salerno.

    0
    0
  • At his death Robert was duke of Apulia and Calabria, prince of Salerno and suzerain of Sicily.

    0
    0
  • to Rome, and marched into southern Italy, where he invested the Norman Rainulf with the county of Aversa, and gave the principality of Capua to Waimar IV., prince of Salerno.

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    0
  • In 1224 he founded the university of Naples, and he was a liberal patron of the medical school at Salerno.

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  • The easiest way to see if a grocery store can answer the question, "Where can I buy Archway Christmas cookies" is to scout the cookie aisle and find the Salerno cookies.

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  • That's because Archway Bakery also distributes the Salerno brand cookies.

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  • If there are Archway and Salerno cookies stocked there, the chances are good that that store will carry Archway Christmas cookies.

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