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sake

sake

sake Sentence Examples

  • For her sake, she hoped he would.

  • I mean, he's a twenty eight year old man, for heavens' sake.

  • I mean, we're siccing the police after someone Howie saw in... a vision, for God's sake!

  • And I'm pleased for Howie's sake.

  • That's not something I can ask my mother, for god's sake!

  • By mutual agreement with both Daniel Brennan and Merrill Cooms, our conversations are reduced to an occasional call, for security sake.

  • I volunteered to mind the store, so to speak, at least for appearance's sake though there was little to do.

  • Was the deceit worth it for their sake?

  • Someone broke into her place for god's sake!

  • Let's try and make the best of what we have, for Howie's sake.

  • She's only four months old, for God's sake!

  • I resolved to remain calm for her sake and talked of nothing but positive certainty of our escape.

  • I know how you don't want to do this but put your feelings aside, for Betsy's and Molly's sake.

  • For her sake, he made an effort to behave, but he truly loved the openings she gave him.

  • "Love," Claire said, "for old time's sake, please."

  • "It wasn't for my sake," she assured him.

  • "But not for my sake," she murmured.

  • For the sake of his soul, if nothing else?

  • For my sake, come in.

  • You're a doctor for god's sake!

  • For that sake, neither was he.

  • He'd almost died many times, and in many cases, for the sake of his brothers.

  • I need your help for the sake of humanity.

  • He's your brother, for God's sake.

  • She saw the glow of his eagerness and tried to be more upbeat than she felt, for his sake.

  • For your sake, not if I can help it.

  • For her sake, Katie tried not to look as pissed as she felt and trotted down the stairs to meet her sister.

  • For her sake, he had to find a way to live with Katie, or their differences would turn into a family feud.

  • Janet O'Brien had just told me my wife's mother had a heart attack, for God's sake!

  • She quickly added, Not for Claire's sake certainly, but for Annie Quincy.

  • Oh, for heaven's sake, Carmen, they're goats, not race horses.

  • Just for the sake of conversation, what kind of man would appeal to you?

  • Oh, for heaven's sake, Katie.

  • "For her sake, I hope so," Brady said.

  • They were like Barbie and Ken, for cripe's sake.

  • For God's sake, Vinnie.

  • Get me something to eat, for God's sake!

  • There's stuff I know...I don't want to be a squealer, but they got a contract on me, for God's sake!

  • We don't know, but for the sake of discussion, let's say it's the night the money turned up missing.

  • Let's do it right here on the desk—for old time's sake.

  • "And, for God's sake, be careful Fred!" he said.

  • He was trying to keep the situation under control – for her sake.

  • Not now, Alex — for heaven's sake.

  • For Carmen's sake, he hoped Lori would forget about the baby.

  • She should take more interest in it – if only for his sake.

  • Oh for heaven's sake, Dad.

  • For their sake, Xander subdued the lethal instinct that made him want to snatch Jessi, haul her away somewhere quiet and do whatever it took to pull the truth from her.

  • For her sake, Xander struggled to remain calm.

  • We have already mentioned the final conception in which Lotze's speculation culminates, that of a personal Deity, Himself the essence of all that merits existence for its own sake, who in the creation and government of a world has voluntarily chosen certain laws and forms through which His ends are to be realized.

  • It is hunted chiefly for the sake of the ivory of its immense tusks, of which it yields the principal source of supply to the European market, and the desire to obtain which is rapidly leading to the extermination of the species.

  • In her son's lifetime she had, for his sake, condoned the mesalliance, but it was impossible for the stately chatelaine and her low-born daughterin-law to live in peace under the same roof.

  • On St Wolstan's Day, the, 9th of January 44 8 - 1 449, Waynflete was enthroned in Winchester cathedral in the presence of the king; and, probably partly for his sake, parliament was held there in June and July 1449, when the king frequently attended the college chapel, Waynflete officiating (Win.

  • again tried to make his peace with the court in January 1792, but he was so insulted that he was not encouraged to sacrifice himself for the sake of the king and queen, who persisted in remembering all old enmities in their time of trouble.

  • Her children he adopted as his own; and it was chiefly for her sake that he desired the peerage which was twice held out to him.

  • The mind is not for the sake of knowledge, but knowledge for the sake of the mind.

  • Circles of these radii are usually marked around the jack for convenience' sake.

  • 3) we know that the Prytaneum was the official residence of the Archons, but, when the new Agora was constructed (by Peisistratus ?), they took their meals in the Thesmotheteum for the sake of convenience.

  • Robert Baillie, the patriot who was executed for conscience' sake (1684), belonged to Jerviswood, an estate on the Mouse.

  • The other three methods he devised for the sake of those who would prefer to work with natural numbers; and he mentions that the promptuary was his latest invention.

  • During the summer it is a place of considerable resort for the sake of its waters - saline, chalybeate and sulphur - and it possesses the usual accessories of pump-rooms, baths and a recreation ground.

  • It was the chief town of the Samnites, who took refuge here after their defeat by the Romans in 314 B.C. It appears not to have fallen into the hands of the latter until Pyrrhus's absence in Sicily, but served them as a base of operations in the last campaign against him in 275 B.C. A Latin colony was planted there in 268 B.C., and it was then that the name was changed for the sake of the omen, and probably then that the Via Appia was extended from Capua to Beneventum.

  • A wife who for her lover's sake procured her husband's death was gibbeted.

  • These tongues are magnetized by the inducing action of a strong horse-shoe permanent magnet, S N, which is made in a curved shape for the sake of compactness.

  • of Spain (1527-1598) for the sake of its harbour.

  • Podebrad treated Matthias hospitably and affianced him with his daughter Catherine, but still detained him, for safety's sake, in Prague, even after a Magyar deputation had hastened thither to offer the youth the crown.

  • Of these the Dora (called for distinctions sake Dora Riparia), which unites with the greater river just below Turin, has its source in the Mont Genèvre, and flows past Susa at the foot of the Mont Cenis.

  • In all the upland valleys of the Abruzzi snow begins to fall early in November, and heavy storms occur often as late as May; whole communities are shut out for months from any intercourse with their neighbours, and some villages are so long buried in snow that regular passages are made between the different houses for the sake of communication among the inhabitants.

  • For the sake of clearness, we have anticipated the course of events by nearly a century.

  • Paley includes that too; virtue is " doing good to mankind," in obedience to God, for the sake of heaven.

  • We must conceive nature as overruled by God not so much Later for the sake of man's happiness as for the sake of his form; moral development.

  • From all centres the leading motives of exploration were probably the same - commercial intercourse, warlike operations, whether resulting in conquest or in flight, religious zeal expressed in pilgrimages or missionary journeys, or, from the other side, the avoidance of persecution, and, more particularly in later years, the advancement of knowledge for its own sake.

  • He went to Egypt and Syria, and for the sake of visiting the holy cities became a Mahommedan.

  • For a long time he had pondered over the confusion in which Spain was, which he attributed to the intimate relations allowed between Christians and infidels for the sake of commerce.

  • It is much visited for the sake of its mild climate, the grand cliffs, moors and hills of the neighbourhood, and the beach, admirably suited for bathing.

  • There had already been other schisms on such questions as the right way to swing a censer and the legality of self-immolation for the Lord's sake.

  • Such are the Philippovsti, founded by one Philip (who burned himself alive for Christ's sake in 1 743), who have exalted self-immolation into a principle; the Stranniki (pilgrims) and Byeguni (runners), who interpret Matt.

  • lengths, of a double-flanged section, and for the sake of strength they were " fish-bellied " or deeper in the middle than at the ends.

  • His defeat left the resources of his kingdom exhausted and its extent diminished; and so the Jews became important to his successors for the sake of their wealth and their position on the frontier.

  • The evil was wrought, not by the regular armies of the cross who were inspired by noble ideals, but by the undisciplined mobs which, for the sake of plunder, associated themselves with the genuine enthusiasts.

  • Love grows with the knowledge of its object, he proceeds, and at the highest stage self-love is so merged in love to God that we love ourselves only for God's sake or because God has loved us.

  • But the narrative loses its point unless David's kindness " for Jonathan's sake " comes at an early date soon after he became king, and although the youth is found at Lo-debar (east of the Jordan) under the protection of Machir, the independent fragment in ii.

  • From the lust of conquest for its own sake David appears to have been wholly free.

  • At the same time a class of men arose interested in these forms for their own sake, professional lawyers Bence, but also "poisons, nay destroys, the divinest feeling in man, the sense of truth," and the belief in sacraments such as the Lord's Supper, a piece of religious materialism of which "the necessary consequences are superstition and immorality."

  • Yet it would be treason to the majesty of man's incessant struggle towards an ideal good, if one were to deny that in and through the Crusades men strove for righteousness' sake to extend the kingdom of God upon earth.

  • The native archaeologists of the present day hold a recognized position in the scientific world; the patriotic sentiment of former times, which prompted their zeal but occasionally warped their judgment, has been merged in devotion to science for its own sake, and the supervision of excavations, as well as the control of the art-collections, is now in highly competent hands.

  • Siegfried's whole character and career is, indeed, annihilated in the clumsy progress towards this consummation; but Shakespeare might have condoned worse plots for the sake of so noble a result; and indeed Wagner's awkwardness arises mainly from fear of committing oversights.

  • Every decision made by three of these "deputations" - and in each of them the lower clergy formed the majority - was ratified for the sake of form in general congregation, and if necessary led to decrees promulgated in session.

  • - Fibre is obtained from the aloe plants, this industry being in the hands of women; ostriches are reared for the sake of their feathers, and large quantities of gum and resin are collected.

  • chi and the latter by a b d e f g, which groups for the sake of brevity we designate as a and 1 3.

  • This he modifies by explaining that self-interest is based on the relationships of life; a man needs money for the sake of his children, his friends and the state whose general prosperity depends on the wealth of its citizens.

  • Tobacco and vegetables are also produced in some quantity, and maize is grown largely for the sake of the husk, which is used for native cheroot-wrappers, under the name of yawpet.

  • The reports of the earlier wise men, men of practical sagacity in political and social affairs, have come to us from unfriendly sources; it is quite possible that among them were some who took interest in life for its own sake, and reflected on its human moral basis.

  • Nor do the sages go beyond the old position in their ethical theory: they have no philosophical discussion of the basis of the moral life; their standard of good conduct is existing law and custom; their motive for right-doing is individual eudaemonistic, not the good of society, or loyalty to an ideal of righteousness for its own sake, but advantage for one's self.

  • It is thought better here, for the sake of clearness, to reserve observations on revenues specially assigned to the international administration of the Ottoman Public Debt, and on the expenditure of that administration, and to deal with that subject separately, while, however, including the total figures of both in the general figures in order to reproduce exactly the totals shown in the budget of the empire.

  • There were further handed over, under the Muharrem decree, to the public debt council, the tribute of Bulgaria, the amount of which has never even been fixed, but as compensation for which the tobacco tithe up to a yearly amount of £Tioo,000 was ceded to the council in the same conditions as the " six indirect contributions "; the proportional shares (generally known as the " contributive 1 For simplicity's sake, the lottery bonds having a special treatment different from that of the rest of the loans, these groups, when the new bonds of the reduced debt were exchanged against the old bonds of the original loans, became " series " thus: Series A, group i.; series B, group ii.;.

  • This distinguished mastery of style, and love of it for its own sake within the bounds of good sense and literary decorum, gave him a pre-eminence among the story-tellers of his time.

  • "on the complaint of two parishioners" (too often qualified ad hoc by a temporary residence) followed; and since the act had provided no penalty save imprisonment for contempt of court, there followed the scandal of zealous clergymen being lodged in gaol indefinitely "for conscience' sake."

  • While determining its atomic weight, he thought it desirable, for the sake of accuracy, to weigh it in a vacuum, and even in these circumstances he found that the balance behaved in an anomalous manner, the metal appearing to be heavier when cold than when hot.

  • the sale of tithes, the taking of a fee for confession, absolution, marriage or burial, the concealment of one in mortal sin or the reconcilement of an impenitent for the sake of gain, and the doing homage for spiritualities.

  • In Nevada and Colorado the ore is worked chiefly for the sake of the silver.

  • To get drunk for the sake of the drink was the mark of a beast; but wine was a powerful stimulant to the brain, and to fuddle oneself in order to think great thoughts was worthy of a sage.

  • Casuistry might insist that it only proposed to fix the minimum of a minimum, and beg them for their soul's sake to aim a little higher.

  • The sample under test is prepared in the form of a ring A, upon which are wound the induction and the magnetizing coils; the latter should be wound evenly over the whole ring, though for the sake of clearness only part of the winding is indicated in the diagram.

  • For the sake of increasing his capital, he divided his grant with Fernao, Alvares de Andrade and Aires da Cunha.

  • The nation at large was resolutely pagan, and Geza, for his own sake, was obliged to act warily.

  • He aspired to the role of a politician, and has left a memorable example of genius degraded to servility for the sake of a riband and a title.

  • When a, b, X are regarded as constant, the first factor may be omitted, - as indeed should be done for consistency's sake, inasmuch as other factors of the same nature have been omitted already.

  • This necessitated their constantly moving in search of fresh pasture, spending the spring and autumn upon the open steppe, the winter and summer by the rivers for the sake of moisture and shelter.

  • 22: " Yea, for thy sake are we killed all the day long," &c. On the other hand, not only is the atmosphere of the second collection of psalms as a whole the atmosphere of godly Judaism in the 2nd century B.C., but it may fairly be claimed that this collection contains many psalms which may naturally be interpreted in the light of the history of that period, of which no satisfactory explanation (in their details) can be given if they are assigned to any other time.

  • xliv., with its description of the sufferings of the righteous for God's sake, would be perfectly appropriate in the mouth of one of the " godly " (Hasidim) about 167 B.C. Ps.

  • He abandoned the attack on Rhodes at the first check, made concessions, for the sake of peace, to Venice and reduced the tribute due from Ragusa.

  • While pointing out that history has a utility as a mental discipline and a part of a liberal education, he recommended its study chiefly for its own sake, for the truth's sake and for the pleasure which it brings.

  • When, however, he returned to the West Indies he was for a time in independent command owing to Rodney's absence !in England for the sake of his health.

  • tagged on to the treatment of human disease, but unworthy of being studied for its own sake as a branch of knowledge.

  • The movement of reform started, of necessity, with scholars rather than practising physicians - more precisely with a group of learned men, whom we may be permitted, for the sake of a name, to call the medical humanists, equally enthusiastic in the cause of letters and of medicine.

  • Frederick, though his love of teasing for teasing's sake has been exaggerated by Macaulay, was a martinet of the first water, had a sharp though one-sided idea of justice, and had not the slightest intention of allowing Voltaire to insult or to tyrannize over his other guests and servants.

  • The former, visits paid in accordance with a vow, were very frequent in the middle ages, and were under the special protection of the pope, who put the ban upon any who should molest pilgrims "who go to Rome for God's sake."

  • Its habits much resemble those of the rest of the group to which it belongs; and, like the leopard, when it happens to come within reach of an abundant and easy prey, as the sheep or calves of an outlying farming station, it kills far more than it can eat, either for the sake of the blood only or to gratify its propensity for destruction.

  • The hlaford and his hiredmen are an institution not only of private patronage, but also of police supervision for the sake of laying hands on malefactors and suspected persons.

  • The most important of them are Termessus, near the frontier of Lycia, a strong fortress in a position of great natural strength and commanding one of the principal passes into Pamphylia; Cremna, another mountain fortress, north of the preceding, impending over the valley of the Cestrus; Sagalassus, a little farther north, a large town in a strong position, the ruins of which are among the most remarkable in Asia Minor; Selge, on the right bank of the Eurymedon, surrounded by rugged mountains, notwithstanding which it was in Strabo's time a large and opulent city; and Antioch, known for distinction's sake as Antioch of Pisidia, and celebrated for the visit of St Paul.

  • At the present day the tree is largely cultivated in most temperate countries for the sake of its timber or for its edible nuts.

  • We use the term "feudal system" for convenience sake, but with a degree of impropriety if it conveys the meaning "systematic."

  • After the military defeat of France by Germany in 1870, he formed the idea of acquiring a great colonial empire, not to colonize it, but for the sake of economic exploitation.

  • - As supplemental to the account of poetry may be mentioned here some of the chief collections of ancient verse, sometimes made for the sake of the poems themselves, sometimes to give a locus classicus for usages of grammar or lexicography, sometimes to illustrate ancient manners and customs. The earliest of these is the Mo'allakat.

  • The phrase, "devil's advocate," has by an easy transference come to be used of any one who puts himself up, or is put up, for the sake of promoting debate, to argue a case in which he does not necessarily believe.

  • The lower forms of life prefigure man in unequal degrees of imperfection; they exist for his sake, but they are not regarded as representing necessary antecedent conditions of human existence.

  • When parliament met they executed, for form's sake, some confused manoeuvres, and then they were beaten on an amendment to the address in favour of Municipal Allotments.

  • Both are highly valued for the sake of the shell, which has always been a favorite material for ladies combs and hairpins.

  • It was mainly for the sake of their patina that value attached to the remarkable alloys shakudo (3 parts of gold to 97 of a Ba.

  • Joun has produced, and is thorou~hly capable of producing, bronzes at least equal to the best of Seimin s masterpieces, yet he has often been induced to put Seimins name on objects for the sake of attracting buyers who attach more value to cachet than to quality.

  • The intolerable meanness advocated for the sake of the paltriest gains, the entire ignoring of any pursuit in life except money-getting, and the representation of the whole duty of man as consisting first in the attainment of a competent fortune, and next, when that fortune has been attained, in spending not more than half of it, are certainly repulsive enough.

  • After travelling with his charge, he settled with his family in Holland, first at the Hague, then, for economy's sake, at Wesel, in 1707, where he began his great work, L'Histoire d'Angleterre.

  • The latter invited him to accompany him to Switzerland and Italy, a proposal which he eagerly accepted (1794) for the sake of the opportunity of furthering his studies in the fine arts.

  • These two alone move men to aim at perfect harmony for its own sake in the man and in the universe.

  • The most celebrated were Jacques (James), Jean (John) and Daniel, the first, second and fourth as dealt with below; but, for the sake of perspicuity they may be considered as nearly as possible in the order of family succession.

  • Thus, wasps catch flies; worker ants make raids and carry off weak insects of many kinds; bees gather nectar from flowers and transform it into honey within their stomachs - largely for the sake of feeding the larvae in the nest.

  • He earnestly admonished Leo, for his own sake and for Florence, to found a permanent and free state system for the republic, reminding him in terms of noble eloquence how splendid is the glory of the man who shall confer such benefits upon a people.

  • It became then desirable to make the head of steel for sake of uniformity of material, and the advantages of steel in lightness and rigidity for the tube then became evident.

  • For the sake of uniformity it is to be hoped that the system of nomenclature recommended by the International Geographical Congress will ultimately be adopted.

  • This hypothesis is introduced for the sake of simplicity, but is known to be unjustifiable in fact.

  • as, Why does not the pope empty purgatory forthwith for charity's sake, instead of cautiously for money ?

  • Permanency of occupation, however, dates from the voyage of the " Mayflower," which brought about a hundred men, women and children who had mostly belonged to an English sect of Separatists, originating in Yorkshire, but who had passed a period of exile for religion's sake in Holland.

  • The American species is also greatly diminished in numbers from incessant pursuit for the sake of its valuable fur.

  • Mineral, vegetable and animal substances, by means of tools and apparatus of stone, wood and bone - tools for cutting, or edged tools; tools for abrading and smoothing the surfaces of substances, like planes, rasps and sandpaper; tools for striking, that is, pounding for the sake of pounding, or for crushing and fracturing violently; perforating tools; devices for grasping and holding firmly.

  • In some cases the operation of filtration is performed for the sake of removing impurities from the filtrate or liquid filtered, as in the purification of water for drinking purposes; in others the aim is to recover and collect the solid matter, as when the chemist filters off a precipitate from the liquid in which it is suspended.

  • buds and leaves, and are hunted by the natives of the lands in which they live for the sake of their hides and flesh.

  • For the sake of comparison it may be stated that the per capita cost of the English census of 1901 was 2.24 cents, or little more than one-tenth that of the American census.

  • Whatever may be thought of their application of these principles, there is no mistaking the deeply religious aim of these separatists for conscience' sake, viz.

  • A voice answers, " I have glorified it and will glorify it again ": some think that an angel spoke; but Jesus explains that this voice was not for His sake but for theirs.

  • For the sake of systematic completeness the book begins with.

  • In subsequent diagrams the two reaction lines will, for the sake of clearness, be drawn as if slightly inclined to the vertical.

  • de Gournay (1712-1759), who was also an earnest inquirer in the economic field; and round these two distinguished men was gradually formed the philosophic sect of the Economistes, or, as for distinction's sake they were afterwards called, the Physiocrates.

  • Thus the latter seemed to them simply to bring forgiveness of past sins for Christ's sake, and then an enhanced moral responsibility to the New Law revealed in Him.

  • He had the double dignity of having refused the highest prize in his profession for conscience' sake, and of having accepted that dignity without loss of consistency; in his life he acquired a high reputation and the sincere admiration of his fellowmen, as well as an abundant fortune and ample titular distinctions.

  • 18 In John, Christ is a " propitiation " (tXaa l uos) provided by the love of God that man may be cleansed from sin; He is also their advocate (HapetOsi ros) with God that they may be forgiven, for His name's sake.

  • He loved stories for their own sake, and found fault with Wace for questioning the miraculous elements in the legend of Arthur.

  • He did not make a study apart of antiquity for its own sake, but used it as an instrument of culture.

  • His delight is in war and bloodshed; he loves fighting for fighting's sake, and takes the side of the one or the other combatant indifferently, regardless of the justice of the cause.

  • It was founded and controlled by God, and even the world was created for its sake (cf.

  • "One would gladly have seen a single king in Denmark if only for peace sake," says the contemporary Lubeck chronicle, "for peace was not to be had either at sea or on land."

  • Milton, in his Tractate on Education (1644), advances further on Bacon's lines, protesting against the length of time spent on instruction in language, denouncing merely verbal knowledge, and recommending the study of a large number of classical authors for the sake of their subject appointed to consider the studies and examinations of the university, their report of November 1904 on the Previous Examination was fully discussed, and the speeches published in the Reporter for December 17, 1904.

  • A modern education is also the aim of the general introduction to the nova methodus of Leibnitz, where the study of Greek is recommended solely for the sake of the Greek Testament (1666).

  • He was thus led both to clear up for himself and to state for the sake of others his whole conception of soteriology - his answer to the question how was man to be set right before God.

  • The value of the book lay not in history for its own sake, but in its direct application to present needs.

  • Elizabeth could hardly be expected to go out of her way and ask parliament to repeal its own acts for Mary's sake; probably it would have refused.

  • Religion was not really the cause of her external dangers, for the time had passed for crusades, and no foreign power seriously contemplated an armed invasion of England for religion's sake.

  • But till this was realized Isaiah was right in teaching that the law of continuity demanded that the nation within which Yahweh had made Himself known to His spiritual prophets must be maintained as a nation for the sake of the glory of God and the preservation of the "remnant."

  • They in turn are much hunted for the sake of their delicate flesh.

  • The kat was regularly divided into 10; but another division, for the sake of interrelation with another system, was in 1/3 and 1/4, scarcely found except in the eastern Delta, where it is common (29); and it is known from a papyrus (38) to be a Syrian weight.

  • A new world was discovered, for the sake of which everything else was abandoned; to make sure of that world insight and intelligence were freely sacrificed; and, in the light that streamed from beyond, the absurdities of the present became wisdom, and its wisdom became foolishness.

  • Logarithms were originally invented for the sake of abbreviating arithmetical calculations, as by their means the operations of multiplication and division may be replaced by those of addition and subtraction, and the operations of raising to powers and extraction of roots by those of multiplication and division.

  • It should be mentioned that in most tables of trigonometrical functions, the number io is added to all the logarithms in the table in order to avoid the use of negative characteristics, so that the characteristic 9 denotes in reality 1, 8 denotes a, io denotes o, &c. Logarithms thus increased are frequently referred to for the sake of distinction as tabular logarithms, so that the tabular logarithm =the true logarithm -IIo.

  • For the sake of comparison the following extracts from St Matthew are given, according to the edition of 1539.

  • Lelewel, a man of austere character, simple tastes and the loftiest conception of honour, was a lover of learning for its own sake.

  • It is a full vestment of the type of the Western bell chasuble; but, instead of being cut away at the sides, it is for convenience' sake either gathered up or cut short in front.

  • By way of enforcing this point Paul repeats the tradition he had received direct from the Lord, and already handed on to the Corinthians, of how " the Lord Jesus on the night in which he was betrayed " (not necessarily the night of Passover) " took bread and having given thanks brake it and said, This is my body, which is for your sake; this do in remembrance of me.

  • Thou Almighty Sovereign,didst create all things for thy name's sake, and food and drink thou didst give to men for enjoyment, that they should give thanks unto thee; but to us thou didst of thy grace give spiritual food and drink and life eternal through thy servant.

  • For as Jesus Christ our Saviour was made flesh by Word of God and possessed flesh and blood for our sake; so we have been taught that the food blessed (lit.

  • There is also a spiritual chewing of the body of Christ, not such that by it we understand the very food to be changed into spirit, but such that, the body and blood of the Lord abiding in their essence and peculiarity, they are spiritually communicated to us, not in any corporeal way, but in a spiritual, through the Holy Spirit which applies and bestows on us those things which were prepared through the flesh and blood of the Lord betrayed for our sake to death, to wit, remission of sins, liberation and life eternal, so that Christ lives in us and we in him...

  • He endeavoured to explain away certain of the contradictions which are found in Kant's system by saying that much of the language is used in a popular sense for the sake of intelligibility, e.g.

  • Its relief is seldom more than 200 or 300 ft., and is commonly of small measure, but its continuity and its contrast with the associated lowlands worn on the underlying and overlying weak strata suffice to sake it a feature of importance.

  • Those Who Read Haliburton'S Books Only For The Sake Of The Humour Will Miss Much Of Their Value.

  • Papineau, The Most Insistent Demagogue Of 1837, Must Certainly Be Named Among The Founders, For The Sake Of Speeches Which Came Before Written Works Both In Point Of Time And Popular Esteem.

  • The forests are extensive and fine, and are now superintended by government officials, called 8avod, XaKEs, in spite or with the connivance of whom the timber is being rapidly destroyed - partly from the merciless way in which it is cut by the proprietors, partly from its being burnt by the shepherds, for the sake of the rich grass that springs up after such conflagrations, and partly owing to the goats, whose bite kills all the young growths.

  • Gentlemanliness it regards as perfect virtue, containing all particular virtues, and all goods for the sake of the honourable.

  • Secondly, he made no division of logic. In the Categories he distinguished names and propositions for the sake of the classification of names; in the De Interpretatione he distinguished nouns and verbs from sentences with a view to the enunciative sentence: in the Analytics he analysed the syllogism into premisses and premisses into terms and copula, for the purpose of syllogism.

  • Hence, the citizen of the best state is he who has the power and the purpose to be governed and govern for the sake of the life according to virtue.

  • In the present article, for the sake of convenience, all the insects which have been regarded by Linnaeus and others as "Neuroptera " are included, but they are distributed into the orders agreed upon by the majority of modern observers, and short characters of these orders and their principal families are given.

  • These parcels, he said, "contained quicklime, for the purpose of absorbing any moisture and keeping the boxes quite dry, the lime being packed in paper for the sake of cleanliness.

  • For The Sake Of Greater Generality, The Days Of The Week Are Denoted By The First Seven Letters Of The Alphabet, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, Which Are Placed In The Calendar Beside The Days Of The Year, So That A Stands Opposite The First Day Of January, B Opposite The Second, And So On To G, Which Stands Opposite The Seventh; After Which A Returns To The Eighth, And So On Through The 365 Days Of The Year.

  • It resembles the sperm-whale in possessing a large store of oil in the upper part of the head, which yields spermaceti when refined; on this account, and also for the sake of the blubber, which supplies an oil almost indistinguishable from sperm-oil, this whale became the object of a regular chase in the latter half of the 19th century.

  • In 1751 his eldest son died, and in 1752 he removed with his family to Oxford for the sake of his son George, who was studying there.

  • In the Hasmonaean sovereignty these ideas took a political form, and the result was the secularization of the kingdom of God for the sake of a harsh and rapacious aristocracy.

  • Rice is also -the source of a drinking spirit in India, known as arrack, and the national beverage of Japan - sake - is prepared from the grain by means of an organic ferment.

  • War for fighting's sake, although in the popular mind there may be, during most wars, only the excitement and the emotion of a great gamble, has no conscious place among the motives of those who determine the destinies of peoples.

  • The lines of the trunk series are double but for the sake of shortness the least refrangible component is here omitted.

  • It was, however, the disreputable Lefort who, for the sake of his own interests, diverted the young tsar from mere pleasure to serious enterprises, by persuading him first to undertake the Azov expedition, and then to go abroad to complete his education.

  • But for the sake of the independence of the Russian nation he resisted the temptation of taking this inviting but perilous short-cut to greatness.

  • Some years ago, when for instance the Ohio and Indiana elections were held a few weeks before the general election, each party strained every nerve to carry them, for the sake of prestige and the influence on other states.

  • In Wedderburn's character ambition banished all rectitude of principle, but the love of money for money's sake was not among his faults.

  • Aristotle thought that God is only prime mover, and that too only as the good for the sake of which Nature moves; so that God moves as motive.

  • In the western half of the empire Arianism found no foothold, and even the despotic will of Constantius, sole emperor after 351, succeeded only for the moment in subduing the bishops exiled for the sake of their belief.

  • It was this sermon that determined his friend Thomas Bilney to go to Latimer's study, and ask him " for God's sake to hear his confession," the result being that " from that time forward he began to smell the word of God, and forsook the school doctors and such fooleries."

  • In the pursuit of pure science for its own sake, undisturbed by sordid considerations, he shone as a beacon light to younger men - an exemplar of simple tastes, robust nature and lofty aspirations.

  • The ruins suffered greatly from vandalism during the early period of French rule, many portable objects being removed to museums in Paris or Algiers, and most of the monuments destroyed for the sake of their stone.

  • 10, 1707) was broken alive on the wheel, Charles rejecting an appeal for mercy from his sister, the princess Ulrica, on the ground that Patkul, as a traitor, could not be pardoned for example's sake.

  • In one experiment, specially undertaken for the sake of measurement, the total air employed was 9250 c.c., and the oxygen consumed, manipulated with the aid of partially deaerated water, amounted to 10,820 c.c. The oxygen contained in the air would be 1942 c.c.; so that the quantities of atmospheric nitrogen and of total oxygen which enter into combination would be 7308 c.c. and 12,762 c.c. respectively.

  • Favoured for the sake of Period, 538their fleet, and having common interests against 333 B.

  • He declared that the cenobitical life is superior to the eremitical; that fasting and austerities should not interfere with prayer or work; that work should form an integral part of the monastic life, not merely as an occupation, but for its own sake and in order to do good to others; and therefore that monasteries should be near towns.

  • Grotius read the classics as a humanist, for the sake of their contents, not as a professional scholar.

  • The ill-success of the old king in this war aggravated the disease from which he was suffering; and his heart was broken by the discovery that John, for whose sake he had alienated Richard, was in secret league with the victorious allies.

  • Chivalry again in its military aspect not only encourages the love of war for its own sake without regard to the cause for which war is waged, it encourages also an extravagant regard for a fantastic show of personal daring which cannot in any way advance the objects of the siege or campaign which is going on.

  • When at the beginning of 1823, as a result of the congress of Verona, the French invaded Spain,' "invoking the God of St Louis, for the sake of preserving the throne of Spain to a descendant of Henry IV., and of reconciling that fine kingdom with Europe," and in May the revolutionary party carried Ferdinand to Cadiz, he continued to make promises of amendment till he was free.

  • Naming the new metal in anticipation of its actual birth, he called it alumium; but for the sake of analogy he was soon persuaded to change the word to aluminum, in which form, alternately with aluminium, it occurs in chemical literature for some thirty years.

  • His first step was to recover control of the mint, and place it in the hands of capable middle-class merchants and bankers, like Caspar Beer, Jan Thurzo, Jan Boner, the Betmans, exiles for conscience' sake from Alsace, who had sought refuge in Poland under Casimir IV., Justus Decyusz, subsequently the king's secretary and historian, and their fellows, all practical economists of high integrity who reformed the currency and opened out new ways for trade and commerce.

  • She summoned him to declare his reasons for it in presence of the French ambassador and an assembly of the nobles; she besought him for God's sake to speak out, and not spare her; and at last he left her presence with an avowal that he had nothing to allege.

  • But for the sake of practical convenience it has long been usual to select certain of the best marked of these passes to serve as limits within the range, whether to distinguish several great divisions from each other, or to further break up each of these great divisions into smaller groups.

  • Flowers, whether for their own sake or as the necessary precursors of the fruit and seed, are objects of the greatest concern to the gardener.

  • Each sort of fruit should be planted by itself, for the sake of orderly arrangement, and in order to facilitate protection when necessary by a covering of nets.

  • Pyrites is largely worked for sake of the sulphur which it contains, and in many cases it has displaced brimstone in the manufacture of sulphuric acid.

  • Impoldering for its own sake or on a large scale was impossible as long as the means of drainage were restricted.

  • Under the close oligarchical rule of the patrician families, who filled all offices in the town councils, the States of Holland, in which the influence of Amsterdam was dominant, and which in their turn exercised predominance in the States-General, became more and more an assembly of " shopkeepers " whose policy was to maintain peace for the sake of the commerce on which they thrived.

  • Vocalic harmony is the internal bringing together of vowels of the same class for the sake of greater euphony, while vocalic dissimilation is the deliberate insertion of another class of vowels, in order to prevent the disagreeable monotony arising from too prolonged a vowel harmony.

  • The essential difference between monks and regular canons may be explained as follows: monks, whether hermits or cenobites, are men who live a certain kind of life for its own sake, for the purpose of leading a Christian life according to the Gospel's counsel and thus serving God and saving their own souls; external works, either temporal or spiritual, are accidental; clericature or ordination is an addition, an accession, and no part of their object, and, as a matter of fact, till well on in the middle ages it was not usual for monks to be priests; in a word, the life they lead is their object, and they do not adopt it in order the better to compass some other end.

  • The work was an integral part of the life, and was undertaken for its own sake and not merely for an occupation, as among the Antonian monks.

  • With the exception of occasional changes of residence in England, generally for the sake of his wife's health, one or two short holiday trips abroad, a tour in the West Indies, and another in America to visit his eldest son settled there as an engineer, his life was spent in the peaceful, if active, occupations of a clergyman who did his duty earnestly, and of a vigorous and prolific writer.

  • In Macmillan's Magazine for January 1864 he asserted that truth for its own sake was not obligatory with the Roman Catholic clergy, quoting as his authority John Henry Newman.

  • In 1842 he removed to Paris for the sake of its wider clinical opportunities, and there he worked until his death over thirty years later.

  • Taking up his abode in Fetter Lane, London, on his return, and continuing to reside there for the sake of intellectual society, even after renewing his old ties with the earl of Devonshire, who lived in the country till the Restoration,4 he worked so steadily as to be printing the De corpore in the year 1654.

  • "In the Circuits, then, they adapted the whole to their own views, representing Peter falsely in many ways, as that he was daily baptized for the sake of purification, as these also do; and they say that he likewise abstained from animal food and meat, as they themselves also do."

  • During a temporary flight from Warsaw the child was lost, and eventually discovered in a stable; on another occasion she was for safety's sake hidden in an oven.

  • Since both held the same views regarding the slavery of marriage, and since they only married at all for the sake of possible offspring, the marriage was concealed for some time, and the happiness of the avowed married life was very brief; his wife's death on the 10th of September left Godwin prostrated by affliction, and with a charge for which he was wholly unfit - his infant daughter Mary, and her stepsister, Fanny Imlay, who from that time bore the name of Godwin.

  • In placing the account of the origin and development of the Habsburg monarchy under this heading, it is merely for the sake of convenience.

  • This arrangement, which for the sake of brevity will henceforth be referred to as the Szell-Kdrber Compact, was destined to play an important part in the history of the next few years, though it was never fully ratified by either parliament and was ultimately discarded.

  • "As to the governments of this world," he said, "whatever their titles or forms we shall endeavour to prove that in their essential elements, as at present administered, they are all anti-Christ; that they can never by human wisdom be brought into conformity with the will of God; that they cannot be maintained except by naval and military power to carry them into effect; that all their penal enactments, being a dead letter without any army to carry them into effect, are virtually written in human blood; and that the followers of Jesus should instinctively shun their stations of honor, power: and emolument - at the same time ` submitting to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake' and offering no physical resistance to any of their mandates, however unjust or tyrannical."

  • They are ready for Christ's sake to give up their own lives; for His commandments they securely keep, living holily and righteously, according as the Lord their God hath commanded them, giving thanks to Him at all hours, over all their food and drink, and the rest of their good things."

  • Science.The Egyptians sought little after knowledge for its own sake: they might indulge in religious speculation, but their science was no more than the knowledge of practical methods.

  • 2t), a design for its own sake without the tie of symbolism or history.

  • It sported with a seductive Syrian type of face, especially under Amenophis (Amenhotep) III.; but we find the anatomy giving way to mere smoothness of surface, for the sake of contrast with the masses of detail.

  • For policys sake, however, Aibek nominally associated with himself on the throne a scion of the Ayyubite house, Malik al-Ashraf Musa, who died in prison (1252 or 1254).

  • Of Christianity he always spoke in the mocking tone of the "enlightened" philosophers, regarding it as the invention of priests; but it is noteworthy that after the Seven Years' War, the trials of which steadied his character, he sought to strengthen the church for the sake of its elevating moral influence.

  • The Stassfurt deposits are of special importance for the sake of the associated salts of potassium and magnesium, such as carnallite and kainite.

  • He took a leading part in safeguarding the results of the Reformation and was indefatigable in his endeavours to unite the different sections of Protestantism for the sake of effective resistance against the Catholic reaction.

  • The source of the traditions to her discredit is to be found in a letter written a few years after Darer's death by his life-long intimate, Willibald Pirkheimer, who accuses her of having plagued her husband to death by her meanness, made him overwork himself for money's sake, and given his latter days no peace.

  • The disinterested pursuit of learning, study for study's sake, is commended in many of Hillel's sayings as being what is best in life: "He who wishes to make a name for himself loses his name; he who does not increase [his knowledge] decreases it; he who does not learn is worthy of death; he who works for the sake of a crown is lost" (Aboth, i.

  • He came into collision with philanthropists, and was supposed to approve of despotism for its own sake.

  • " The first duty of a modern theologian " he held to be " to study the Bible, not for the sake of making or defending systems out of it, but for the sake of discovering what it actually contains."

  • He died on the 14th of July 1904 at Clarens, near Vevey, on the shores of the Lake of Geneva, whither he had gone for the sake of his health.

  • In 1484 he was in Paris, whether merely for the sake of learning or because he had rendered himself obnoxious to Richard III.

  • Martin Luther and thousands of children like him were trained at home to know the creed, the ten commandments, the Lord's prayer, and such simple hymns as Ein Kindelein so lobelich, Nun bitten wir den Heiligen Geist and Crist ist erstanden; and they were taught to believe that God for Christ's sake freely pardons sin.

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