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saint-simon

saint-simon

saint-simon Sentence Examples

  • Cheruel, Saint-Simon et l'abbe Dubois; L.

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  • Amongst his works are - Doctrine de Saint-Simon (written in conjunction with several of his followers), published in 1830, and several times republished; Economie politique et politique Saint-Simonienne (1831); Correspondance politique (1835-1840); Corresp. philos.

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  • This train of thinking naturally drew him towards the socialist philosophers of the school of Saint-Simon, whom he joined.

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  • But before taking further steps he retired to Versailles, then a hunting lodge, and there, listening to two of Richelieu's friends, Claude de Saint-Simon, father of the memoir writer, and Cardinal La Valette, sent for Richelieu in the evening, and while the salons of the Luxembourg were full of expectant courtiers the king was reassuring the cardinal of his continued favour and support.

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  • Towards 1818 Comte became associated as friend and disciple with Saint-Simon, who was destined to exercise a very decisive influence upon the turn of his speculation.

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  • In after years he so far forgot himself as to write of Saint-Simon as a depraved quack, and to deplore his connexion with him as purely mischievous.

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  • Even at the very moment when Comte was congratulating himself on having thrown off the yoke, he honestly admits that Saint-Simon's influence has been of powerful service in his philosophic education.

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  • Even if there were no such unmistakable expressions as these, the most cursory glance into Saint-Simon's writings is enough to reveal the thread of connexion between the ingenious visionary and the systematic thinker.

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  • We see the debt, and we also see that when it is stated at the highest possible, nothing has really been taken either from Comte's claims as a powerful original thinker, or from his immeasurable pre-eminence over Saint-Simon in intellectual grasp and vigour and coherence.

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  • It is no detriment to Comte's fame that some of the ideas which he recombined and incorporated in a great philosophic structure had their origin in ideas that were produced almost at random in the incessant fermentation of Saint-Simon's brain.

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  • Comte is in no true sense a follower of Saint-Simon, but it was undoubtedly Saint-Simon who launched him, to take Comte's own word, by suggesting the two starting-points of what grew into the Comtist system - first, that political phenomena are as capable of being grouped under laws as other phenomena; and second, that the true destination of philosophy must be social, and the true object of the thinker must be the reorganization of the moral, religious and political systems. We can readily see what an impulse these far-reaching conceptions would give to Comte's meditations.

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  • There were conceptions of less importance than these, in which it is impossible not to feel that it was Saint-Simon's wrong or imperfect idea that put his young admirer on the track to a right and perfected idea.

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  • That Comte would have performed some great intellectual achievement, if Saint-Simon had never been born, is certain.

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  • It is hardly less certain that the great achievement which he did actually perform was originally set in motion by Saint-Simon's conversation, though it was afterwards directly filiated with the fertile speculations of A.

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  • Comte thought almost as meanly of Plato as he did of Saint-Simon, and he considered Aristotle the prince of all true thinkers; yet their vital difference about Ideas did not prevent Aristotle from calling Plato master.

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  • After six years the differences between the old and the young philosopher grew too marked for friendship. Comte began to fret under Saint-Simon's pretensions to be his director.

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  • The occasion of the breach between them (1824)was an attempt on Saint-Simon's part to print a production of Comte's as if itwereinsomesortconnected with Saint-Simon's schemes of social reorganization.

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  • The early church condemned specularii (mirror-gazers), and Aubrey and the Memoirs of Saint-Simon contain "scrying" anecdotes of the 17th and 18th centuries, while Sir Walter Scott's story, My Aunt Margaret's Mirror, is based on a tradition of about 1750 in a noble Scottish family.

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  • The chief are Madame de Motteville's memoirs for the period of the Fronde, and the letters of Madame de Sevigne and the memoirs of Saint-Simon for the later period.

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  • Her death occurred on the 7th of May 1718, and is said by Saint-Simon to have been that of a saint.

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  • Saint-Simon asserts that her family threw her in the way of Louis XIV.

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  • He exercised a moderating influence on Louis XIV.'s zeal against the Jansenists, and Saint-Simon, who was opposed to him in most matters, does full justice to his humane and honourable character.

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  • Her moderation towards the Jacobites in Scotland, after the Pretender's expedition in 1708, was much praised by Saint Simon.

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  • In the words of Saint-Simon, the Huguenots were " a sect that had become a state within the state, dependent on the king no more than it chose, and ready on the slightest pretext to embroil the whole country by an appeal to arms."

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  • For the king's life generally see the memoirs of Saint-Simon, d'Argenson, Villars and Barbier, and for the details of his private life E.

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  • As a wife she was wholly admirable; she had to entertain a man who would not be amused, and had to submit to that terribly strict court etiquette of absolute obedience to the king's inclination, which Saint-Simon so vividly describes, and yet be always cheerful and never complain of weariness or ill-health.

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  • Such mistakes as, for instance, the replacing of Catinat by Villeroi may be attributed to her, but not whole policies - notably, according to Saint-Simon, not the policy with regard to the Spanish succession.

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  • Saint-Simon's fine but biased account of the court in her day and of her career is contained in the twelfth volume of Cheruel and Regnier's edition of his Memoires.

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  • Pilastre, Vie et caractere de Madame de Maintenon d'apres les oeuvres du duc de Saint-Simon et des documents anciens ou recents 0907); A.

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  • The character of this strange prince has been drawn once for all by Saint-Simon.

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  • Even Saint-Simon allows that his episcopal duties were perfectly performed.

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  • And Saint-Simon bears the same witness to his government of his palace.

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  • Still better is Saint-Simon's portrait of Fenelon as he appeared about the time of his appointment to Cambrai - tall, thin, well-built, exceedingly pale, with a great nose, eyes from which fire and genius poured in torrents, a face curious and unlike any other, yet so striking and attractive that, once seen, it could not be forgotten.

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  • CLAUDE HENRI DE ROUVROY SAINT-SIMON, COMTE DE (1760-1825), the founder of French socialism, was born in Paris on the 17th of October 1760.

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  • He belonged to a younger branch of the family of the duc de Saint-Simon (above).

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  • From his youth Saint-Simon felt the promptings of an eager ambition.

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  • For many years before his death in 1825 (at Paris on the Igth of May), Saint-Simon had been reduced to the greatest straits.

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  • As a thinker Saint-Simon was entirely deficient in system, clearness and consecutive strength.

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  • Apart from the details of his socialistic teaching, which are vague and unsystematic, we find that the ideas of Saint-Simon as to the reconstruction of society are very simple.

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  • What Saint-Simon desired, therefore, was an industrialist state directed by modern science in which universal association should suppress war.

    0
    0
  • The contrast between labour and capital so much emphasized by later socialism is not present to Saint-Simon, but it is assumed that the industrial chiefs, to whom the control of production is to be committed, shall rule in the interest of society.

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  • This principle became the watchword of the entire school of Saint-Simon.

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  • During his lifetime the views of Saint-Simon had very little influence; and he left only a few devoted disciples, who continued to advocate the doctrines of their master, whom they revered as a prophet.

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  • Of these the most important were Olinde Rodrigues, the favoured disciple of Saint-Simon, and Barthelemy Prosper Enfantin, who together had received Saint-Simon's last instructions.

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  • In the school of Saint-Simon we find a great advance on the vague and confused views of the master.

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  • The school of Saint-Simon insists strongly on the claims of merit; they advocate a social hierarchy in which each man shall be placed according to his capacity and rewarded according to his works.

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  • With regard to the family and the relation of the sexes the school of Saint-Simon advocated the complete emancipation of woman and her entire equality with man.

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  • It is a vague principle, of which the ethical character depends on the interpretation; and it was variously interpreted in the school of Saint-Simon.

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  • An excellent edition of the works of Saint-Simon and Enfantin was published by the survivors of the sect (47 vols., Paris, 1865-1878).

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  • Reybaud, Etudes sur les reformateurs contemporains (7th edition, Paris, 1864); Paul Janet, Saint-Simon et le Saint-Simonisme (Paris, 1878);- A.

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  • Booth, Saint-Simon and Saint-Simonism (London, 1871); Georges Weill, Un Precurseur du socialisme, Saint-Simon et son oeuvre (Paris, 1894), and a history of the Ecole Saint-Simonienne, by the same author (1896); G.

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  • Levasseur's Etudes sociales sous la Restauration, contains a good section on Saint-Simon.

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  • Louis de Rouvroy Saint-Simon >>

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  • He strongly detested the prurient immorality of the schools of Saint-Simon and Fourier.

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  • This was the age of plebeians, to the great indignation of the duke and peer Saint Simon.

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  • He therefore reinstituted the parlement in its ancient right of remonstrance (suspended since the declarations of 1667 and 1673), and handed over ministerial power to the nobility, replacing the secretaries of state by six councils composed in part of great nobles, on the advice of the famous duc de Saint-Simon.

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  • The political crisis that had placed him in power had not put an end to the financial crisis, and this, it was hoped, might be effected by substituting partial and petty bankruptcies for the general bankruptcy cyI~ically advocated by Saint-Simon.

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  • Cheruel, Saint-Simon et l'abbe Dubois; L.

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  • In 1825 a new turn was given to his thoughts and his life by the friendship which he formed with Olinde Rodriguez, who introduced him to Saint-Simon.

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  • Amongst his works are - Doctrine de Saint-Simon (written in conjunction with several of his followers), published in 1830, and several times republished; Economie politique et politique Saint-Simonienne (1831); Correspondance politique (1835-1840); Corresp. philos.

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    0
  • This train of thinking naturally drew him towards the socialist philosophers of the school of Saint-Simon, whom he joined.

    0
    0
  • But before taking further steps he retired to Versailles, then a hunting lodge, and there, listening to two of Richelieu's friends, Claude de Saint-Simon, father of the memoir writer, and Cardinal La Valette, sent for Richelieu in the evening, and while the salons of the Luxembourg were full of expectant courtiers the king was reassuring the cardinal of his continued favour and support.

    0
    0
  • Towards 1818 Comte became associated as friend and disciple with Saint-Simon, who was destined to exercise a very decisive influence upon the turn of his speculation.

    0
    0
  • In after years he so far forgot himself as to write of Saint-Simon as a depraved quack, and to deplore his connexion with him as purely mischievous.

    0
    0
  • Even at the very moment when Comte was congratulating himself on having thrown off the yoke, he honestly admits that Saint-Simon's influence has been of powerful service in his philosophic education.

    0
    0
  • Even if there were no such unmistakable expressions as these, the most cursory glance into Saint-Simon's writings is enough to reveal the thread of connexion between the ingenious visionary and the systematic thinker.

    0
    0
  • We see the debt, and we also see that when it is stated at the highest possible, nothing has really been taken either from Comte's claims as a powerful original thinker, or from his immeasurable pre-eminence over Saint-Simon in intellectual grasp and vigour and coherence.

    0
    0
  • It is no detriment to Comte's fame that some of the ideas which he recombined and incorporated in a great philosophic structure had their origin in ideas that were produced almost at random in the incessant fermentation of Saint-Simon's brain.

    0
    0
  • Comte is in no true sense a follower of Saint-Simon, but it was undoubtedly Saint-Simon who launched him, to take Comte's own word, by suggesting the two starting-points of what grew into the Comtist system - first, that political phenomena are as capable of being grouped under laws as other phenomena; and second, that the true destination of philosophy must be social, and the true object of the thinker must be the reorganization of the moral, religious and political systems. We can readily see what an impulse these far-reaching conceptions would give to Comte's meditations.

    0
    0
  • There were conceptions of less importance than these, in which it is impossible not to feel that it was Saint-Simon's wrong or imperfect idea that put his young admirer on the track to a right and perfected idea.

    0
    0
  • That Comte would have performed some great intellectual achievement, if Saint-Simon had never been born, is certain.

    0
    0
  • It is hardly less certain that the great achievement which he did actually perform was originally set in motion by Saint-Simon's conversation, though it was afterwards directly filiated with the fertile speculations of A.

    0
    0
  • Comte thought almost as meanly of Plato as he did of Saint-Simon, and he considered Aristotle the prince of all true thinkers; yet their vital difference about Ideas did not prevent Aristotle from calling Plato master.

    0
    0
  • After six years the differences between the old and the young philosopher grew too marked for friendship. Comte began to fret under Saint-Simon's pretensions to be his director.

    0
    0
  • The occasion of the breach between them (1824)was an attempt on Saint-Simon's part to print a production of Comte's as if itwereinsomesortconnected with Saint-Simon's schemes of social reorganization.

    0
    0
  • The early church condemned specularii (mirror-gazers), and Aubrey and the Memoirs of Saint-Simon contain "scrying" anecdotes of the 17th and 18th centuries, while Sir Walter Scott's story, My Aunt Margaret's Mirror, is based on a tradition of about 1750 in a noble Scottish family.

    0
    0
  • The chief are Madame de Motteville's memoirs for the period of the Fronde, and the letters of Madame de Sevigne and the memoirs of Saint-Simon for the later period.

    0
    0
  • Her death occurred on the 7th of May 1718, and is said by Saint-Simon to have been that of a saint.

    0
    0
  • Saint-Simon asserts that her family threw her in the way of Louis XIV.

    0
    0
  • He exercised a moderating influence on Louis XIV.'s zeal against the Jansenists, and Saint-Simon, who was opposed to him in most matters, does full justice to his humane and honourable character.

    0
    0
  • Her moderation towards the Jacobites in Scotland, after the Pretender's expedition in 1708, was much praised by Saint Simon.

    0
    0
  • In the words of Saint-Simon, the Huguenots were " a sect that had become a state within the state, dependent on the king no more than it chose, and ready on the slightest pretext to embroil the whole country by an appeal to arms."

    0
    0
  • For the king's life generally see the memoirs of Saint-Simon, d'Argenson, Villars and Barbier, and for the details of his private life E.

    0
    0
  • As a wife she was wholly admirable; she had to entertain a man who would not be amused, and had to submit to that terribly strict court etiquette of absolute obedience to the king's inclination, which Saint-Simon so vividly describes, and yet be always cheerful and never complain of weariness or ill-health.

    0
    0
  • Such mistakes as, for instance, the replacing of Catinat by Villeroi may be attributed to her, but not whole policies - notably, according to Saint-Simon, not the policy with regard to the Spanish succession.

    0
    0
  • Saint-Simon's fine but biased account of the court in her day and of her career is contained in the twelfth volume of Cheruel and Regnier's edition of his Memoires.

    0
    0
  • Pilastre, Vie et caractere de Madame de Maintenon d'apres les oeuvres du duc de Saint-Simon et des documents anciens ou recents 0907); A.

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    0
  • The character of this strange prince has been drawn once for all by Saint-Simon.

    0
    0
  • Even Saint-Simon allows that his episcopal duties were perfectly performed.

    0
    0
  • And Saint-Simon bears the same witness to his government of his palace.

    0
    0
  • Still better is Saint-Simon's portrait of Fenelon as he appeared about the time of his appointment to Cambrai - tall, thin, well-built, exceedingly pale, with a great nose, eyes from which fire and genius poured in torrents, a face curious and unlike any other, yet so striking and attractive that, once seen, it could not be forgotten.

    0
    0
  • CLAUDE HENRI DE ROUVROY SAINT-SIMON, COMTE DE (1760-1825), the founder of French socialism, was born in Paris on the 17th of October 1760.

    0
    0
  • He belonged to a younger branch of the family of the duc de Saint-Simon (above).

    0
    0
  • From his youth Saint-Simon felt the promptings of an eager ambition.

    0
    0
  • For many years before his death in 1825 (at Paris on the Igth of May), Saint-Simon had been reduced to the greatest straits.

    0
    0
  • As a thinker Saint-Simon was entirely deficient in system, clearness and consecutive strength.

    0
    0
  • Apart from the details of his socialistic teaching, which are vague and unsystematic, we find that the ideas of Saint-Simon as to the reconstruction of society are very simple.

    0
    0
  • What Saint-Simon desired, therefore, was an industrialist state directed by modern science in which universal association should suppress war.

    0
    0
  • The contrast between labour and capital so much emphasized by later socialism is not present to Saint-Simon, but it is assumed that the industrial chiefs, to whom the control of production is to be committed, shall rule in the interest of society.

    0
    0
  • Previous to the publication of the Nouveau Christianisme, Saint-Simon had not concerned himself with theology.

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  • This principle became the watchword of the entire school of Saint-Simon.

    0
    0
  • During his lifetime the views of Saint-Simon had very little influence; and he left only a few devoted disciples, who continued to advocate the doctrines of their master, whom they revered as a prophet.

    0
    0
  • Of these the most important were Olinde Rodrigues, the favoured disciple of Saint-Simon, and Barthelemy Prosper Enfantin, who together had received Saint-Simon's last instructions.

    0
    0
  • In the school of Saint-Simon we find a great advance on the vague and confused views of the master.

    0
    0
  • The school of Saint-Simon insists strongly on the claims of merit; they advocate a social hierarchy in which each man shall be placed according to his capacity and rewarded according to his works.

    0
    0
  • This is, indeed, a most special and pronounced feature of the Saint-Simon socialism, whose theory of government is a kind of spiritual or scientific autocracy, degenerating into the fantastic sacerdotalism of Enfantin.

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  • With regard to the family and the relation of the sexes the school of Saint-Simon advocated the complete emancipation of woman and her entire equality with man.

    0
    0
  • It is a vague principle, of which the ethical character depends on the interpretation; and it was variously interpreted in the school of Saint-Simon.

    0
    0
  • An excellent edition of the works of Saint-Simon and Enfantin was published by the survivors of the sect (47 vols., Paris, 1865-1878).

    0
    0
  • Reybaud, Etudes sur les reformateurs contemporains (7th edition, Paris, 1864); Paul Janet, Saint-Simon et le Saint-Simonisme (Paris, 1878);- A.

    0
    0
  • Booth, Saint-Simon and Saint-Simonism (London, 1871); Georges Weill, Un Precurseur du socialisme, Saint-Simon et son oeuvre (Paris, 1894), and a history of the Ecole Saint-Simonienne, by the same author (1896); G.

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    0
  • Levasseur's Etudes sociales sous la Restauration, contains a good section on Saint-Simon.

    0
    0
  • Louis de Rouvroy Saint-Simon >>

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    0
  • He strongly detested the prurient immorality of the schools of Saint-Simon and Fourier.

    0
    0
  • This was the age of plebeians, to the great indignation of the duke and peer Saint Simon.

    0
    0
  • The court, whose sentimental history has been related by Madame de Ia Fayette, its official splendours by Loret, and its intrigues by the duc de Saint-Simon, now resembled an infirmary of morose invalid~, presided over by Louis XIV.s elderly wife, Madame de Maintenon, under the domination of the Jesuit le Tellier.

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  • He therefore reinstituted the parlement in its ancient right of remonstrance (suspended since the declarations of 1667 and 1673), and handed over ministerial power to the nobility, replacing the secretaries of state by six councils composed in part of great nobles, on the advice of the famous duc de Saint-Simon.

    0
    0
  • The political crisis that had placed him in power had not put an end to the financial crisis, and this, it was hoped, might be effected by substituting partial and petty bankruptcies for the general bankruptcy cyI~ically advocated by Saint-Simon.

    0
    0
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