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sail

sail

sail Sentence Examples

  • Before he set sail for Egypt, the French had taken possession of Rome.

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  • Must of the merchandise and passengers bound for and hailing from foreign ports sail under foreign flags.

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  • The industries include shipbuilding, rope and sail making and iron founding.

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  • (8) The Panathenaea, at which the new robes for the image of the goddess were carried through the city, spread like a sail on a mast.

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  • set sail for the conquest of Ireland in 1172, and to this harbour he made his return journey.

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  • A great part of the land-forces had been already sent off under Craterus in the earlier summer to return west by Kandahar and Seistan; the fleet was to sail under the Greek Nearchus from the Indus mouth with the winter monsoon; Alexander himself with the rest of the land-forces set out in October to go by the 2 Beside V.

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  • In 1218 he set sail for Esthonia with one of the largest fleets ever seen in northern waters, including a Wendish contingent led by Prince Vitsla y.

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  • He thought how grand it would be to sail and sail on the wide blue sea.

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  • There were Genoese ships in St Simeon's harbour in the spring of 1098 and at Jaffa in 1099; in 1099 Dagobert, the archbishop of Pisa, led a fleet from his city to the Holy Land; and in i ioo there came to Jaffa a Venetian fleet of 200 sail, whose leaders promised Venetian assistance in return for freedom from tolls and a third of each town they helped to conquer.

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  • Ship and boat building, rope and sail making, and brewing are carried on.

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  • Ship and boat building, together with subsidiary industries, such as rope and sail making, appear less subject to periods of depression than other industries.

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  • I hope the great ocean will love the new Helen, and let her sail over its blue waves peacefully.

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  • The Toulon fleet set sail on the 19th of May; and when the other contingents from the ports of France and Italy joined the flag, the armada comprised thirteen sail of the line, fourteen frigates, many smaller warships and some three hundred transports.

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  • During the same year in which De Torres sailed through the strait destined to make him famous, a little Dutch vessel called the " Duyfken," or " Dove," set sail from Bantam, in Java, on a voyage of discovery.

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  • The man who ten years before and a year later was considered an outlawed brigand is sent to an island two days' sail from France, which for some reason is presented to him as his dominion, and guards are given to him and millions of money are paid him.

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  • He intended that Spain should very soon have ready twenty-eight sail of the line - "ce qui est certes bien peu de chose" - so as to drive away the British squadrons, and then he would strike "de grands coups" in the autumn.

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  • George's brothers knew the master of a trading ship who was getting ready to sail to England.

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  • The youth may build or plant or sail, only let him not be hindered from doing that which he tells me he would like to do.

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  • After spending a month in Paris, he walked on to Amsterdam, took sail to Hamburg, and so went back to Denmark in 1716.

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  • We also rode in the Ferris wheel, and on the ice-railway, and had a sail in the Whale-back....

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  • Theobald was followed (1240-1241) by Richard of Cornwall, the brother of Henry III., who, like his predecessor, had to sail in the teeth of papal prohibitions; but neither of the two achieved any permanent result, except the fortification of Ascalon.

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  • Pero Lopes de Sousa received the grant of a captaincy, and set sail from Portugal at the same time as his brother, the founder of Sao Vicente.

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  • At the last moment he hesitated, but Crispi succeeded in persuading him to sail from Genoa on the 5th of May 1860 with two vessels carrying a volunteer corps of 1070 strong.

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  • It was very pleasant, when I stayed late in town, to launch myself into the night, especially if it was dark and tempestuous, and set sail from some bright village parlor or lecture room, with a bag of rye or Indian meal upon my shoulder, for my snug harbor in the woods, having made all tight without and withdrawn under hatches with a merry crew of thoughts, leaving only my outer man at the helm, or even tying up the helm when it was plain sailing.

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  • On the 15th of December 1796 the expedition, consisting of forty-three sail and carrying about 15,000 men with a large supply of war material for distribution in Ireland, sailed from Brest.

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  • There was a ship just ready to sail for Corinth, and the captain agreed to take him as a passenger.

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  • Ibrahim, taking this as a breach of the convention, set sail from Navarino northwards, but was turned back by Sir Edward Codrington, the British admiral.

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  • When Theseus set out for Crete to deliver Athens from the tribute to the Minotaur he promised Aegeus that, if he were successful, he would change the black sail carried by his ship for a white one.

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  • By general agreement among the powers the command was entrusted to Codrington, and the allied force consisted of three British, four French and four Russian sail of the line, if the French admiral's flagship the "Sirene" (60), which was technically "a double banked frigate," be included.

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  • After Austerlitz the conqueror fulminated against them, and sent southwards a strong column which compelled an Anglo-Russian force to sail away and brought about the flight of the Bourbons to Sicily (February 1806).

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  • After Austerlitz the conqueror fulminated against them, and sent southwards a strong column which compelled an Anglo-Russian force to sail away and brought about the flight of the Bourbons to Sicily (February 1806).

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  • On the 13th of June 1801 Rear-admiral Linois left Toulon with three sail of the line, to join a Spanish squadron at Cadiz and go on to Egypt.

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  • In the neighbourhood granite of a fine quality is quarried, and the town possesses rope and sail works, breweries, distilleries, flour-mills and tanneries.

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  • In the neighbourhood granite of a fine quality is quarried, and the town possesses rope and sail works, breweries, distilleries, flour-mills and tanneries.

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  • He himself never felt at home at Brussels, and in August 1559 he set sail for Spain, never again to revisit the Netherlands.

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  • As some months must elapse before they could sail for Palestine, Ignatius determined that the time should be spent partly in hospital work at Venice and later in the journey to Rome.

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  • of Kirkwall; and steamers sail at regular intervals from the harbour to Wick, Aberdeen and Leith.

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  • A squadron of seven sail of the line, under Admiral Ganteaume, succeeded in slipping out of Brest, when a gale had driven the British blockading force off the coast.

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  • On the 11th of January 1805 Admiral Missiessy left Rochefort with 5 sail of the line, undetected by the British forces on the coast.

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  • Napoleon now modified the simple plan prepared for Latouche Treville, and began laying elaborate plans by which French vessels were to slip out and sail for distant seas, to draw the British fleet after them, and then return to concentrate in the Channel.

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  • Siqueira's expedition ended in failure, owing partly to the aggressive attitude of the Portuguese, partly to the very justifiable suspicions of the Malays, and he was presently forced to destroy one of his vessels, to leave a number of his men in captivity, and to sail direct for Portugal.

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  • Under the heading "Remarks" are noted (for vessels with sail power) making, shortening and trimming sails; and (for all ships) employment of crew, times of passing prominent landmarks, altering of course, and any subject of interest and FIG.

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  • In July 1804 he ordered his admiral commanding at Toulon, Latouche Treville, to seize an opportunity when Nelson, who was in command of the blockade, was driven off by a northerly gale, to put to sea, with 1 0 sail of the line, pick up the French ship in Cadiz, join Villeneuve who was in the Aix roads, and then effect a junction with Ganteaume and the 21 sail of the line at Brest.

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  • An action in the West Indies would have ruined the emperor's plan of concentration, and Villeneuve decided to sail at once for Ferrol.

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  • ..: the ships anchor at considerable risk in the roads, but the love of gain prevails: for the large number of lighters which receive the cargoes and reload them renders the time short before they can enter the river, and having lightened a part of their cargoes they sail in and ascend to Rome."

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  • Durban (Port Natal) is in regular communication with Europe via Cape Town and via Suez by several lines of steamers, the chief being the boats of the Union-Castle line, which sail from Southampton and follow the west coast route, those of the German East Africa line, which sail from Hamburg and go via the east coast route and those of the Austrian Lloyd from Trieste, also by the east coast route.

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  • and exercised all the real power from 919 to 944, was admiral of the Byzantine fleet on the Danube when, hearing of the defeat of the army at Achelous (917), he resolved to sail for Constantinople.

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  • The Scottish parliament agreed to the marriage of the young queen with the dauphin of France, and, on the plea of securing her safety from English designs, she set sail from Dumbarton in August 1548 to complete her education at the French court.

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  • The chief centre, however, of the fishery in the west of England is at Newlyn, near Penzance, where the small local sailing boats are outnumbered by hundreds of large boats, both sail and steam, which come chiefly from Lowestoft for the season.

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  • A Venetian fleet of 1 20 sail came in 1123, and after aiding in the repulse of an attack, which the Egyptians had taken advantage of Baldwin II.'s captivity to deliver, they helped the regent Eustace to capture Tyre (1124), in return for considerable privileges - freedom from toils throughout the kingdom, a quarter in Jerusalem, baths and ovens in Acre, and in Tyre onethird of the city and its suburbs, with their own court of justice and their own church.

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  • The chief centre, however, of the fishery in the west of England is at Newlyn, near Penzance, where the small local sailing boats are outnumbered by hundreds of large boats, both sail and steam, which come chiefly from Lowestoft for the season.

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  • He, ther,efore, pressed on the march of a corps of French and Swiss troops under Dupont towards Cadiz, in order to take possession of the French sail of the line, five in number, which had been in that harbour since Trafalgar.

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  • Passenger steamers sail from the port of London to the principal ports of she British Isles and northern Europe, and to all parts of the world, but the most favoured passenger services to and from Europe and North America pass through other ports, to which the railways provide special services of trains from London.

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  • The Pisan fleet of three hundred sail, commanded by the archbishop Pietro Moriconi, attacked the Balearic Isles, where as many as 20,000 Christians were said to be held captive by the Moslems, and returned loaded with spoil and with a multitude of Christian and Moslem prisoners.

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  • On the loth, D'Estaing returned to the port with his fleet badly crippled, and only to announce that he should sail to Boston to refit.

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  • Passenger steamers sail from the port of London to the principal ports of she British Isles and northern Europe, and to all parts of the world, but the most favoured passenger services to and from Europe and North America pass through other ports, to which the railways provide special services of trains from London.

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  • People visit the lakes to swim, sail, or fish and to hike and explore in the rolling hills.

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  • But, on his return, he forgot to hoist the white sail, and his father, supposing that his son had lost his life, threw himself from a high rock on which he was keeping watch into the sea, which was afterwards called the Aegean.

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  • The 85,000 marks, the price of transport, were not forthcoming, and the Venetians declined to sail till they were paid.

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  • I don't know how to sail!

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  • black sail with which the fatal ship always put to sea should be exchanged for a white one.

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  • The Anasazi, "The Ancient Ones," as the pres­ent day Navajo call them, built cities and a society for 13 centuries before abandoning this high Sonoran desert, all before Columbus ever set sail.

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  • S, Sail.

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  • Herodotus (himself a notable traveller in the 5th century B.C.) relates that the Egyptian king Necho of the XXVIth Dynasty (c. 600 B.C.) built a fleet on the Red Sea, and confided it to Phoenician sailors with the orders to sail southward and return to Egypt by the Pillars of Hercules and the Mediterranean sea.

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  • In the Mandaean representation the sky is an ocean of water, pure and clear, but of more than adamantine solidity, upon which the stars and planets sail.

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  • The fleet then set sail.

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  • Nor can Idrisi's map of the world, were drawn at intervals of zams, supposed to be equal to three hours' sail.

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  • Aided by lucky changes of wind, he reached Cadiz, was joined by 1 French and 6 Spanish ships under Admiral Gravina, which, added to the 1 r he had with him, gave him a force of 18 sail.

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  • The crusaders set sail at last, and Zara, which the Venetians coveted, was taken without much trouble.

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  • 1 479, after his daring escape from Edinburgh Castle, the duke of Albany concealed himself within its walls, until he contrived to sail for France.

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  • The gradual supplanting of sail by steamships has made Malta a coaling station of primary importance.

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  • He determined the "elastic curve," which is formed by an elastic plate or rod fixed at one end and bent by a weight applied to the other, and which he showed to be the same as the curvature of an impervious sail filled with a liquid (lintearia).

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  • In May forty sail of their war-ships appeared off Dover under command of Martin Harpertzoon Tromp - then the best known of their admirals.

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  • In that month the duke of York was on the east coast of England with a fleet of 80 to 90 sail, composed, according to the custom of the time, of vessels of all sizes.

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  • But the pursuit of the English fleet was feeble, and the retreat of the Dutch was ably covered by Cornelius van Tromp, son of Martin Tromp. Much scandal was caused by the mysterious circumstances in which an order to shorten sail was given in the English flagship, and doubts were expressed of the courage of the duke of York.

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  • By May a Dutch fleet of some eighty sail was at sea, preparing to watch the English, and unite with the French.

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  • A fleet of 60 sail was with difficulty got together under the duke of York, who now went to sea for the second time.

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  • The Dutch, who had to contend with an overwhelming French invasion on shore, nevertheless fitted out a fleet of 70 to 80 sail of the line and the command was given to De Ruyter.

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  • Spain, unable to defend its possessions singlehanded, appealed to the Dutch for naval help. In September 1675 De Ruyter was sent into the Mediterranean with 18 sail of the line and four fire-ships.

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  • He cruised off Messina to intercept the supplies which were being brought to the French garrison by a fleet of 20 sail under the command of Abraham Duquesne.

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  • He himself did not get to Stockholm, as the Sailors' and Firemen's Union, whose distrust of Germany was based on practical knowledge of her crimes at sea, refused to permit him to sail.

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  • Satisfied that his usefulness in England was at an end, Franklin entrusted his agencies to the care of Arthur Lee, and on the 21st of March 1775 again set sail for Philadelphia.

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  • He collected all the money he could command, between £3000 and £4000, lent it to Congress before he set sail, and arrived at Paris on the 22nd of December.

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  • Thanks to the efforts of Daunou and others his name was removed from the list of emigres, and he set sail for Europe in November 1795.

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  • Merchant vessels were required for their protection to sail in convoy.

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  • The sangada, with its platform and sail, belonging to the Brazilian coast, is spoken of as a good seaworthy craft.

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  • These eremites also navigated the sea north of Iceland on their first arrival, and found it ice-free for one day's sail, after which they came to the ice-wall.

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  • On February 27, 1815, Napoleon set sail from Elba with his force of l,000 men and 4 guns, determined to reconquer the throne of France.

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  • When summoned to the war against Troy, he set sail at once with his Myrmidones in fifty ships.

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  • When Dion set sail from Zacynthus with the object of liberating Syracuse from the tyrannis, Philistus was entrusted with the command of the fleet, but he was defeated and put to death (356).

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  • Instead of showing the Romans the caravan route, he induced them to sail from Cleopatris to Leucocome, and then led them by a circuitous way through waterless regions, so that they reached South Arabia too much weakened to effect anything.

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  • But ' This was the 2nd Army, waiting in the port of Chinampo for the moment to sail for Pitszewo.

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  • From Europe Rozhestvenski's squadron was just setting sail for the Far East.

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  • On the 5th of December Ibrahim again set sail, and reached Suda without striking a blow.

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  • Engineering, oil-cake, tobacco, sail and rope works are the principal industries in the town.

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  • In July 1361 Valdemar set sail from Denmark at the head of a great fleet, defeated a peasant army before Visby, and a few days later the burgesses of Visby made a breach in their walls through which the Danish monarch passed in triumph.

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  • Tristan and Iseult set sail for Cornwall, Iseult accompanied by her waiting-woman, Brangaene (who, in some versions, is also a kinswoman), to whose care the queen, skilled in magic arts, confides a love-potion.

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  • Ultimately, while assisting his brother-in-law in an intrigue with the wife of a neighbouring knight, Tristan is wounded by a poisoned arrow; unable to find healing, and being near to death, he sends a messenger to bring Queen Iseult to his aid; if successful the ship which brings her is to have a white sail, if she refuses to come, a black.

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  • Iseult of the white hand overhears this, and when the ship returns, bringing Iseult to her lover's aid, either through jealousy or by pure inadvertence (both versions are given), she tells Tristan that the sail is black, whereon, despairing of seeing his love again, the hero turns his face to the wall and dies.

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  • A prayer was offered that "for us and all who sail thereon the sea may be calm and quiet," whereupon the doge and the others were solemnly aspersed with holy water, the rest of which was thrown into the sea while the priests chanted "Purge me with hyssop and I shall be clean."

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  • Returning to Rome, he held the dictatorship for eleven days, was elected consul for 48 B.C., and set sail for Epirus at Brundisium on the 4th of January.

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  • In November, however, he was obliged to sail for Spain, where the sons of Pompey still held out.

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  • On the 13th of April it despatched a squadron of twelve sail of the line and four frigates from Toulon to America under the command of the Count d'Estaing.

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  • The British government, having neglected to occupy the Straits of Gibraltar in time, despatched Admiral Byron from Plymouth on the 9th of June with thirteen sail of the line to join Admiral (Lord) Howe, Sir William's brother, in America, and collected a strong force at home, called the Western Squadron, under Viscount Keppel.

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  • In European waters the Channel had been invaded by a combined French and Spanish fleet of sixty-six sail of the line, Spain having now joined the coalition against Great Britain.

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  • Only thirty-five sail of the line could be collected against them under the command of Admiral Digby.

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  • In March 1898 the desired permission was granted, and the first party of Doukhobors, 1126 in number, were able in the summer of 1898 to sail from Batum for Cyprus, which was originally chosen for their settlement because at that time funds were not sufficient for transferring them to any other British territory.

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  • On the other hand, Haakon IV., king of Norway, at once to restrain the independence of his jarls and to keep in check the ambition of the Scottish kings, set sail in 1263 on a great expedition, which, however, ended disastrously at Largs.

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  • The twelve constellations of the zodiac form an ingenious machine, a great wheel with buckets, which pour into the sun and moon, those shining ships that sail continually through space, the portions of light set free from the world.

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  • For a year he relinquished himself to her endearments, and when he determined to leave, she instructed him how to sail to the land of shades which lay on the verge of the ocean stream, in order to learn his fate from the prophet Teiresias.

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  • high, which received its name from its resemblance to the square sail used on certain Portuguese craft.

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  • On his return to Peru, Mendana endeavoured to organize another expedition to colonize the islands, but it was not before June 1595 that he, with Pedro Quiros as second in command, was able to set sail for this purpose.

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  • Smith, writing in the Philosophical Transactions for 1683-1684, says of the Turks (p. 439), "They have no genius for Seavoyages, and consequently are very raw and unexperienced in the art of Navigation, scarce venturing to sail out of sight of land.

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  • and barges up to the Andes, and by sail to its middle course.

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  • There are iron foundries, breweries, distilleries, rope and sail works, coachbuilding yards, steam joinery works, and brick and tile works.

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  • When Troy was captured he set sail for Ithaca, but was carried by unfavourable winds to the coast of Africa.

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  • In 1548 the queen of six years old was betrothed to the dauphin Francis, and set sail for France, where she arrived on the 15th of August.

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  • At least as early as the 3rd century B.C. the custom was introduced of spreading the peplus like a sail on the mast of a ship, which was rolled on a machine in the procession.

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  • Transports containing 7000 troops, to be led by Marshal Saxe, accompanied by the young prince, were in readiness to set sail for England.

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  • Receiving, however, but a cool reception from Macdonald of Boisdale, he set sail again and arrived at the bay of Lochnanuagh on the west coast of Inverness-shire.

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  • It consisted of fifty-three sail in all, of which eighteen were of the line.

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  • The nominal strength of the Russian fleet was eighty-three sail of the line, of the Danish twenty-three, and of the Swedish eighteen.

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  • He therefore proposed that he should be detached with ten sail of the line, and the frigates and small craft, to pass between the Middle Ground and Saltholm Flat, and assail the Danish line at the southern end while the remainder of the fleet engaged the Trekroner battery from the north.

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  • He might have run past them by the use of sail and oar to escape, but with the true spirit of a Norse warrior he refused to flee, and turned to give battle with the eleven ships immediately about him.

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  • He attacked Bankipur and the garrison of only fourteen persons set sail for Europe.

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  • In the great gale of 1799 seventy sail, including the "York," 74 guns, were wrecked off the reef, and this disaster compelled the authorities to take steps to protect shipping.

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  • But in 1796, the Directory having offered to release his mother and his two brothers, who had been kept in prison since the Terror, on condition that he went to America, he set sail for the United States, and in October settled in Philadelphia, where in February 1 797 he was joined by his brothers the duc de Montpensier and the comte de Beaujolais.

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  • After finishing his studies in the Egyptian capital he set sail for Greece; but the ship was driven by contrary winds to Italy, and he seized the opportunity of paying a flying visit to Rome.

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  • Sea-going vessels sail up the Ems as far as Halte, and river craft as far as Greven, and the river is connected with a widely branching system of canals,, as the Ems-Jade and Dortmund-Ems canals.

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  • Relations between Spain and the United States became strained, and war seemed imminent; but on the 8th of December the Spanish government agreed to surrender the "Virginius" on the 16th, to deliver the survivors of the crew and passengers to an American war-ship at Santiago, and to salute the American flag at Santiago on the 25th if it should not be proved before that date that the "Virginius" was not entitled to sail under American colours.

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  • The expedition sailed on the 8th of October 1 202, three hundred sail in all, with the aged Dandolo himself in command.

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  • After wintering at Zara the fleet set sail on the 7th of April 1203, and on the 23rd of June anchored in the Bosporus.

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  • and Phormio with only 20 ships defeated the Corinthian fleet of 47 sail in the Gulf of Corinth.

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  • 405), Conon escaping with only 12 out of 180 sail to Cyprus.

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  • Belhiard, who had been left in charge at Cairo, was assailed on two sides by the British forces under General John Hely Hutchinson (afterwards 2nd earl of Donoughmore), and the Turkish under Ytisuf Pasha; after negotiations Belhiard agreed to evacuate Cairo and to sail with his 13,734 troops to France.

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  • Thus it was the desire to secure his Jutish kingdom which induced Harold Klak, in 826, to sail up the Rhine to Ingelheim, and there accept baptism, with his wife, his son Godfred and 400 of his suite, acknowledging the emperor as his overlord, and taking back with him to Denmark the missionary monk Ansgar.

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  • The Danes, finding their position on the continent becoming more and more precarious, crossed to England in two divisions, amounting in the aggregate to 330 sail, and entrenched themselves, the larger body at Appledore and the lesser under Haesten at Milton in Kent.

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  • The industries include rope and sail making, boat-building, brewing and fishing.

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  • But the town offered a vigorous resistance, and the Athenians were obliged to sail away after a siege of twenty-six days, during which they had laid the island waste.

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  • When Ignatius de Loyola (q.v..) set sail in 1523 from Venice to Palestine, only some thirteen souls could be mustered on the pilgrim-ship, while eight or nine others sailed with the Venetian state-vessel as far as Cyprus.

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  • 2 But he forgot his promise; and when Aegeus from the Acropolis at Athens descried the black sail out at sea, he flung himself from the rock and died.

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  • The ship that was to bring Iseult to the mortally wounded Tristram was to hoist a white sail if she was on board, a black sail if she was not.

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  • 2 " Sail " in every Teutonic language is practically the same word, and derived from the Latin sagulum.

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  • The viking ship had but one large and heavy square sail.

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  • They sail well and are weatherly craft.

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  • Besides the mail service and harbour trade, Dover has a trade in shipbuilding, timber, rope and sail making, and ships' stores.

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  • Congress twice offered him an appointment as one of the plenipotentiaries to negotiate peace with England, but, though he accepted the second offer, the business was so far advanced before he could sail that his appointment was recalled.

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  • From Patala the admiral Nearchos was to sail round the coast to the Euphrates, while Alexander himself marched through the wilds of Gedrosia, or modern Makran.

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  • In 1492 Christopher Columbus set sail under the Spanish flag to seek India beyond the Atlantic, bearing with him a letter to the great khan of Tartary.

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  • In 1505 a large fleet of twenty sail and fifteen hundred men was Decline of Mogul Empire.

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  • After some negotiation an armistice was concluded and a capitulation agreed upon, whereby the castles were to be evacuated, the hostages liberated and the garrisons free to remain in Naples unmolested or to sail for Toulon.

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  • They accordingly built a fleet at Naupactus, but before they set sail, Aristodemus was struck by lightning (or shot by Apollo) and the fleet destroyed, because one of the Heraclidae had slain an Acarnanian soothsayer.

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  • In 1529, by the treaty of Zaragosa, Spain relinquished to Portugal all claims to the Moluccas and agreed that no Spaniard should trade or sail west of a meridian drawn 297 leagues east of the Moluccas.

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  • embarked for the relief of Mans, and the crusading squadron set sail in 1190, while John landed here in 1214.

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  • In the spring of 55 2 Narses set sail from Salona on the Dalmatian coast with a large and well-appointed army.

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  • The Russian squadron was detained by contrary winds, and before it could sail peremptory orders arrived from the tsar for it to remain until Ibrahim should have repassed the Taurus mountains.

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  • 1618), Sir Thomas Gates and Sir George Somers, the new authorities, reached Jamestowri at last with 150 men, but finding things in such a deplorable state all agreed (June ro, 1610) to give up the effort to found a colony on the James and set sail for Newfoundland.

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  • The Catalogue of the Ships begins with Boeotia; the list of Boeotian towns is much the longest; and they sail, not from the bay of Argos, but from the Boeotian harbour of Aulis.

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  • Rule Vi.-Carrying Press Of Sail-Damage To Or Loss Of Sails Damage to or loss of sails and spars, or either of them, caused by forcing a ship off the ground or by driving her higher up the ground, for the common safety, shall be made good as G.A.; but where a ship is afloat, no loss or damage caused to the ship, cargo and freight, or any of them, by carrying a press of sail, shall be made good as G.A.

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  • Thence they sail up the Rhine by way of Cologne to Basel, at which place they make fast their vessels and proceed on foot to Rome.

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  • obliged all to sail for Sicily.

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  • Though superior in force, D'Estaing would not attack the English in the roadstead, but set sail to attack Savannah.

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  • In 1840 Millet went back to Greville, where he painted "Sailors Mending a Sail" and a few other pictures - reminiscences of Cherbourg life.

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  • As large vessels can sail up to the town, it is a trade centre for the products of the districts along the banks of the Barito and Martapura, such as benzoin, rattans, wax, gold, diamonds, iron and weapons.

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  • By prodigies of energy the Spanish commander held out till August 1791, when the Spanish government having made terms with the bey of Algiers, he was allowed to set sail for Spain with his guns and ammunition.

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  • Till the 18th century ships were not allowed to sail round Cape Horn, so that the Chileans had to trade indirectly through Peru and the Argentine.

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  • Merchant-ships were allowed to sail direct to Chile, trade with France was sometimes permitted, and a large batch of hardy emigrants was sent out from the Biscay provinces of Spain.

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  • Thus it was possible, as says the remnant of an hieroglyphic inscription there discovered, for ships to sail direct from the Nile to Persia, over Saba.

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  • At Bushire, on the 1st of December, the Persian governor of Fars, Ala ad-daula, committed a breach of diplomatic etiquette which induced Lord Curzon to sail away without landing.

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  • In 428 or 429 the whole nation set sail for Africa, upon an invitation received by their king from Bonifacius, count of Africa, who had fallen into disgrace with the court of Ravenna Gunderic was now dead, and supreme power was in the hands of his bastard brother, who is generally known in history as Genseric, though the more correct form of his name is Gaiseric. This man, short of stature and with limping gait, but with a great natural capacity for war and dominion, reckless of human life and unrestrained by conscience or pity, was for fifty years the hero of the Vandal race and the terror of Constantinople and Rome.

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  • After fully three months' imprisonment they were released on the demand of the dey of Algiers, and again set sail for Marseilles on the 28th of November, but when within sight of their port they were driven back by a northerly wind to Bougie on the coast of Africa.

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  • After six months' stay in Algiers he once again, on the 21st of June 1809, set sail for Marseilles, where he had to undergo a monotonous and inhospitable quarantine in the lazaretto, before his difficulties were over.

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  • He set sail from Shoreham on the 15th of October 1651, and landed at Fecamp in Normandy the next day.

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  • The birds flap their wings on rising from the ground, but after attaining a moderate elevation they seem to sail on the air, Charles Darwin having watched them for half an hour without once observing a flap of their wings.

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  • In 1415 a Portuguese fleet, commanded by the king and the three princes, set sail for Ceuta.

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  • Accordingly in June 1654 he set sail for Lisbon to plead the cause of the Indians, and in April 1655 he obtained from the king a series of decrees which placed the missions under the Company of Jesus, with himself as their superior, and prohibited the enslavement of the natives, except in certain specified cases.

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  • Refusing to remain with Dido, queen of Carthage, who in despair puts an end to her life, he sets sail from Africa, and after seven years' wandering lands at the mouth of the Tiber.

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  • They got together a band of about twenty men ready to sacrifice their lives for an idea, and set sail on their desperate venture on the 1 2th of June 1844.

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  • He calls it the most northerly of the British Isles and says that he reached it after six days' sail from Britain: it was inhabited, but produced little; corn grew there sparingly and ripened ill; in summer the nights were long and bright.

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  • Besides railway communication Michigan has a coast line of about 1600 m., along which vessels of 2000 tons can sail and find several good harbours, the water communication having been extended and improved by several canals, among which are the Sault Ste.

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  • At last it is determined that Pantagruel and his followers (Friar John has reappeared in the suite of the prince) shall set sail to consult the Oracle of the Dive Bouteille.

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  • After appointing a regency in Bar and Lorraine, he visited his provinces of Anjou and Provence, and in 1438 set sail for Naples, which had been held for him by the Duchess Isabel.

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  • There are also rope and sail works, iron-foundries, saw-mills, breweries and tanneries.

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  • When at last she was ready to sail she was delayed by contrary winds.

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  • for an opening through the ice, and on the 6th of July, "voide of hope of a north-east passage (except by the Waygats, for which I was not fitted to trie or prove)," he resolved to sail to the north-west, and if time and means permitted to run a hundred leagues up Lumley's Inlet (Frobisher Strait) or Davis's "overfall" (Hudson Strait).

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  • An allied force of 37 British sail of the line, under command of the earl of Torrington (Arthur Herbert), and of 2 2 Dutch under C. Evertsen, was at anchor under the headland, while a French fleet of over 70 sail, commanded by the comte de Tourville, was anchored some miles off to the south-west.

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  • As his fleet was only 57 sail in all he was not able to engage the enemy from end to end, but as the French were arranged in a line from east to west he could have fallen on the end nearest him, and could have guarded himself by telling off a part of his ships to watch the remainder.

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  • William Dampier (c. 1688) and others speak of the number of foreign merchants settled there - English, Dutch, Danes, Portuguese, Chinese, &c. Dampier says the anchorage was rarely without ten or fifteen sail of different nations, bringing vast quantities of rice, as well as silks, chintzes, muslins and opium.

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  • It consisted of 50o sail, of which 250 were galleys, and among these a hundred were greater than any then used in Europe.

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  • Borelli's artificial wing, it will be remembered, consists of a rigid rod in front and a flexible sail behind.

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  • In his theology of nature he describes a schematic wing as consisting of a rigid ribbing in front, and a flexible sail behind.

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  • It will suffice if such a sail elevates and lowers itself successively.

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  • He describes two artificial wings, the one composed of a rigid rod and sail - the rod representing the stiff anterior margin of the wing; the sail, which is made of paper bordered with cardboard, the flexible posterior margin.

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  • It lowers itself - the front part of the wing strongly resists, the sail which follows it being flexible yields.

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  • Carried by the ribbing (the anterior margin of the wing) which lowers itself, the sail or posterior margin of the wing being raised meanwhile by the air, which sets it straight again, the sail will take an intermediate position and incline itself about 45° plus or minus according to circumstances.

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  • Beneath the tail is a rudder for directing the course of the machine to the right or to the left; and to facilitate the steering a sail is stretched between two masts which rise from the car.

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  • A merchant vessel laden with Spanish wines was sent to Lough Swilly, and anchoring off Rathmullan, where the boy was residing in the castle of MacSweeny his foster parent, Hugh Roe with some youthful companions was enticed on board, when the ship immediately set sail and conveyed the party to Dublin.

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  • for passages on board a vessel which was about to sail for Shanghai (1863).

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  • long and 7 wide, and so deep that boats sail over the submerged tops of tall trees.

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  • From Cape Town mail steamers sail once a week, or oftener, to Port Elizabeth (436 m., two days) East London (543 m., three days) and Durban (823 m., four or five days); Mossel Bay being called at once a fortnight.

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  • The English andFrench were, however, not very friendly; and in 1629, after the retirement of several of the former to an adjoining island, the remaining colonists were surprised and partly dispersed by the arrival of a Spanish fleet of thirty-nine sail.

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  • The Pacific, hitherto free from their intrusion, showed many sail of merchant vessels, while on land opposition south of the Bay of Panama was of little avail, since few were acquainted with the use of fire-arms. Coxon and seventy men returned as they had gone, but the others, under Sawkins, Sharp and Watling, roamed north and south on islands and mainland, and remained for long ravaging the coast of Peru.

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  • In this same year a Spanish fleet of fourteen sail met, but did not engage, ten buccaneer vessels which were found in the Bay of Panama.

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  • Similar commercial considerations determined the Chians in their attitude towards the Persian conquerors: in 546 they submitted to Cyrus as eagerly as Phocaea resisted him; during the Ionian revolt their fleet of too sail joined the Milesians in offering a desperate opposition at Lade (494).

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  • As a member of the Delian League it had regained its prosperity, being able to equip a fleet of 50 or 60 sail.

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  • Before setting sail he preached in some of the principal London churches, and in order to hear him, crowds assembled at the church doors long before daybreak.

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  • William meanwhile had been unable to sail, because for many weeks the wind had been unfavourable.

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  • Yet so many of his subjects were discontented that he dared not trust himself to the chances of war, and, when the fleet of King Philip was ready to sail, he surprised the world by making a sudden and grovelling submission to the pope.

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  • He also stated that he had taken the cross as a crusader, but could not sail to Palestine as long as his subjects were putting him in restraint.

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  • Even then Norfolk and Hereford refused to sail; but the greater part of the minor magnates consented to serve as stipendiaries.

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  • They had planned to raise a rebellion in the name of the earl of March, in whose cause Wales and the North were to have been called to arms. But March himself refused to stir, and betrayed them to the king, who promptly beheaded them, and set sail five days later.

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  • 13 frigates and 15 ~tnal1er vessels set sail from Brest, ~ carrying an expeditionary force of some 13,000 men under General Hoche~ The British fleet, under Lord Bridport, was wintering at Spithead; and before it could put to sea the French had slipped past.

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  • In September 1679 Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle, and Henri de Tonty entered the mouth of the Fox river in the "Griffon," the first ship to sail the Great Lakes.

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  • He was then appointed to the command of the frigate "La Boudeuse" and the transport "L'Etoile," and set sail in December 1766 on a voyage of discovery round the world.

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  • Hence in part arose the maritime character of its inhabitants; and when they had once taken to the sea, the string of neighbouring islands, Ceos, Cythnos and others, some of which lay within sight of their coasts, and from one to another of which it was possible to sail without losing sight of land, served to tempt them on to further enterprises.

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  • Postal connexion is maintained with Denmark by steamers, which sail from Copenhagen and call at Leith.

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  • Accordingly, in 1427 he accepted an invitation from the republic of Venice, and set sail for Italy, intending to resume his professorial career.

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  • long, which are strongly lashed together to a width of some 24 ft., decked and fitted with two masts, each carrying a huge mat sail picturesquely fashioned.

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  • Almost everywhere they present to the sea perpendicular cliffs, broken into fantastic forms, affording at every turn, to those who sail along the coast, the most picturesque and varied scenery.

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  • Pisani had been reinforced early in the spring of 1378, but when he was sighted by the Genoese fleet of 25 sail off Pola in Istria on the 7th of May, he was slightly outnumbered, and his crews were still weak.

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  • 99) - the first three colours are those of The hypothesis of gradual and complete modernization is also opposed to the fact that the other romances used by Cairene storytellers (such as those of `Antar and of Sail.) retain their original local colour through all variations of language and style.

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  • Having lost his wife Isabella on the 8th of May 1228, Frederick again set sail for Palestine, where he met with considerable success, the result of diplomatic rather than of military skill.

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  • On the 7th of June 1630 the Swedish fleet set sail, and two days after midsummer day, the whole army, 16,000 strong, was disembarked at Peenemiinde.

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  • The hemp fibre has always been valuable for the rope industry, and it was at one time very extensively used in the production of yarns for the manufacture of sail cloth, sheeting, covers, bagging, sacking, &c. Much of the finer quality is still made into cloth, but almost all the coarser quality finds its way into ropes and similar material.

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  • "I want to go sail boating," Darian said.

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  • I don't know how to sail!

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  • The Anasazi, "The Ancient Ones," as the pres­ent day Navajo call them, built cities and a society for 13 centuries before abandoning this high Sonoran desert, all before Columbus ever set sail.

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  • If he is under the influence of alcohol he will not be allowed to sail.

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  • He set sail from England in 1842 - it took him six months by sailing ship to reach the antipodes.

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  • A converted sail shed now houses a stylish tea room and Edwardian and Victorian antiques are to be found in the old engine house.

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  • Tells readers to: " take the wind out of the mission- Aries ' sail.

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  • This was the greatest armada to sail into battle in the history of the world.

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  • Yacht chartering either bareboat or skippered is the perfect solution for those who want to sail at their own pace.

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  • charter bareboat for total freedom to set sail on your own voyage of discovery.

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  • She is the light of birch bark, carved to sail on her soothing rivers.

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  • barter with any natives they might meet, and they set sail in 1603.

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  • We will make a large silk cloth billow to create the effect of a sail.

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  • birch bark, carved to sail on her soothing rivers.

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  • Possibly this would be used to sail the boat upstream.

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  • These were clinker built cutters with a large spread of sail and a very long bowsprit.

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  • You will find yourselves wondering how those brave men dare to sail those waters in such fragile caravels!

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  • catamaran trip and sail around the island.

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  • catenary cables just sail on past the ends of the bridge into the mountainside above.

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  • caulking iron jib A triangular sail, usually fitted at or near the bow of a vessel.

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  • I would rather fix a cleat down nearer to the deck so that I can drop the sail easier when coming ashore.

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  • Yellow buoys mark the area reserved for sail training to avoid conflict from other water users.

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  • Dave with blue 7 cruise day mexico sail from either quot costa maya.

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  • Pull on to you get a single crease across the foot of the sail.

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  • Rock the baby to sleep in its very own swinging crib, turn the arm and watch the balloon sail around the hill.

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  • Mae ymddiriedolaeth iechyd yn y Gogledd wedi dweud wrthyf ei bod yn sefydlu arferion da gydag awdurdodau lleol ac eraill ar y sail honno.

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  • These boat trips sail along east Devon 's oldest section of the coast.

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  • The Happy tugboat doorplate is waiting to sail you off to exciting lands.

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  • electrostatic charging of the sail must also be considered.

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  • My preference goes to sail ties permanently fitted to the sail at suitably reinforced eyelets.

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  • Ian, Isobel and I hire a felucca and go for a sail up the nile.

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  • After lunch, sail by traditional felucca around the islands in the Nile.

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  • felucca sail will be offered locally.

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  • From there we sail through Paradise Bay with its myriad icebergs and deep cut fjords, while having chances of seeing large whales.

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  • flotilla of yachts to sail around the Isle of Wight?

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  • flowing white robes of the United Arab Emirates (were they really going to sail in that gear?

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  • fore and aftapable of sail, with a fore-and-aft style hoy rig, William would have been more commonly rowed.

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  • furled sail at rest in a harbor.

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  • At first, just as sail had been used as an addition to oared galleys, steam was used as an adjunct to sail.

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  • genoa halyard, dumping the sail on the deck.

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  • Up the sail goes, colorless in the early half-light, a tan gunter lug, on a honey-coloured wooden spar.

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  • Like BP, it has suffered a broken genoa halyard, dumping the sail on the deck.

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  • If not within heaving range: - start the engine - lower or furl the headsail - sheet the main sail amidships.

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  • To understand the techniques it is necessary to know ho the sail fish or marlin takes its prey.

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  • hoist a rudimentary sail from the shower head?

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  • Light boats sail swift, tho greater hulks draw deep.

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  • In addition we also sail a Soling, which is a 28 ` Olympic class keelboat.

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  • The Bessie Ellen, a wonderful experience on Britain's last wooden coasting ketch still under sail.

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  • The three basic options are; not to do it at all, to use spiral lacing or to use sail ties.

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  • So far three sail, including the Lady Anne, and a replica enclosed lifeboat.

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  • Jamie, do you work at the sail loft?

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  • luff tube then hosing water through from the head of the sail will clear it.

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  • luff of the sail.

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  • Could hardly be sail from ceuta chip mahogany poker set armed with a. Pay particular attention center that combines.

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  • maiden voyage, just set sail from the shores of England.

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  • After a while the reefed mainsail was set, but adding that sail just made the motion more uncomfortable.

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  • Hi, I'm a novice sailor and have had difficulty raising the mainsail while underway on a solo sail.

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  • Simply must join quot period royal caribbean mariner of the sea their sail sign the national warehouse.

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  • Simply must join quot period royal caribbean mariner of the sea their sail sign the national warehouse.

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  • mariner of the sea their sail sign the national warehouse.

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  • Dave with blue 7 cruise day mexico sail from either quot costa Maya.

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  • Dave with blue 7 cruise day mexico sail from either quot costa Maya.

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  • Dave with blue 7 cruise day mexico sail from either quot costa Maya.

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  • Once completed young sailors will be able to sail a dinghy confidently in light winds and be aware of safety issues and basic meteorology.

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  • mizzen sail of the trawler.

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  • Day 13 We sail south, to the Antarctic, where the ship is again followed by a multitude of seabirds.

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  • Bristol merchants financed the Italian navigator Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot) to sail west from Bristol in 1497 in his ship the Matthew.

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  • Some of the ships were propelled by oars, others were under sail.

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  • oared galleys, steam was used as an adjunct to sail.

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  • sail onboard the youngest ship in our range the Dana Sirena.

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  • Now herons call And wrangle by their pool; and hooting owls Sail from the wood above pale stooks of oats.

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  • David Perry and Frank Gun set sail for some delicious double penetration with the lovely Eva.

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  • pilgrim fathers set sail from here in the 16th century.

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  • pleasure steamer gave way to sail during its trips through the racing area.

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  • New Skys Property Club partners Fairline Andalucia have luxury powerboats available for sale or charter now you can sail the Med in style!

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  • The captain said we ought to shorten sail anyway, out of common prudence.

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  • quandary created by the switch from sail to steam.

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  • rattless of sail boat masts and rigging all rattling in the wind.

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  • Effectively losing his discard, he would have to sail a near faultless regatta to regain his crown.

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  • Sail away to a romantic rendezvous for two or windsurf atop the waves like dolphin at play.

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  • With her fin keel, wheel steering and sloop rig she is an easy boat to sail.

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  • This is either the sail being shown or running rigging.

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  • rigid inflatable, so you can take pictures of the barge under sail.

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  • The ropewalk is unique in Britain, and maybe even the world, as the only working ropewalk from the age of sail.

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  • The intention was to sail a double round robin for each league which would give the competitors more balanced competition.

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  • Each will sail a single round robin with the top three from each advancing to the Quarterfinal Round.

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  • Quickly the crew furl the damaged sail and concentrate on getting us into the dinghy to start the Mull run.

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  • Designed to reflect a billowing sail, this spectacular hotel can only be described as an architectural marvel.

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  • A couple of months later we set sail for the Far East where the ship was to carry the flag of the fleet.

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  • It was assumed that this was a transitional survival between the ancient type and the more modern lateen sail.

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  • sail loft where in the 1790's a Polar Bear was kept.

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  • sail honno, yr ydym yn barod i ganiatáu i'r gyllideb gael ei derbyn.

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  • O weinyddiaeth sy'n honni ei bod yn gweithredu ar sail tystiolaeth, ni fu unrhyw dystiolaeth yn hynny o beth.

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  • sail on a voyage to access the Zero Point Field at the end of this world.

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  • sail across to the island of Symi and to the harbor of Gialos at its northern tip.

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  • The crew gets a schooner called the Hispaniola and set sail not knowing the problems they will face.

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  • Sinbad (voiced by Brad Pitt) is the most daring and notorious rogue ever to sail the seven seas.

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  • Sail among some of the other islands in the bay with a chance to see the rare white-tailed sea eagle.

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  • seaways sail into Newcastle (2 hours drive from Edinburgh) from Germany, Sweden and Holland.

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  • set sail on a voyage to access the Zero Point Field at the end of this world.

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  • Did American Clams Sail to Europe on viking ships?

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  • Well, HE'S dead now, he is--as dead as bilge; and who's to sail this ship, I don't see.

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  • Down at the waterfront, our qualified watersports instructors will help you windsurf, waterski or sail from the gently shelving shore.

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  • For a relatively small boat the Channel 245 has an immense living space, boat with full standing headroom and easy to sail short-handed.

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  • Straight away I got a ' sail away ' bite, which resulted in a small skimmer hooked through the top lip.

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  • Flying Fish trains and recruits yacht skippers and sail, dive, surf, windsurf, ski and snowboard instructors.

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  • sloop rig she is an easy boat to sail.

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  • How I long to sail " Said the tiny snail.

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  • The Giannis D set sail from Croatia with a cargo of sawn softwood destined for Jeddah.

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  • Setting sail in the evening, we pass by historic Frobisher Bay and head southeast through the narrows.

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  • spinnaker sail to assist us up the steep Down Uplands.

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  • Look no hands - Taking pictures from the top spreader of a racing yacht's mast while under sail!

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  • sprit pole holds sail out instead of a boom.

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  • In medieval time ships had one single square sail.

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  • Their ships were from 80-100 feet long and used a single square sail beside oars.

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  • A large French fleet set sail bound for London, a rebel stronghold, commanded by Eustace the Monk.

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  • stymied by a lack of spinnaker in conditions where large sail plans were fastest.

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  • stymied by a lack of spinnaker in conditions where large sail plans were fastest.

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  • sunbathefrom sunbathing on the shale beach, you are able to sail, water ski, surf, scuba dive or fish.

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  • But virgin swizzles usually set by set sail on the left.

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  • They were due to sail aboard an oil tanker to film for tonight's episode.

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  • Propulsion methods such as the ion thruster and solar sail are examples of alternative propulsion options for spacecraft.

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  • Some people working on sail training ships will not qualify for paid holiday.

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  • An International Fireball is a two person, three sail monohull sailing dinghy, with a single trapeze built in either wood or fiberglass.

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  • CL components BT thwart foresail A usually triangular sail, fitted at or near the bows of a vessel.

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  • He set sail to head into previously uncharted waters not knowing what he may find.

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  • unfurl the sail, you open it up.

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  • Weather was too unkind to do the trial sail but we did get to have a long talk with owner aboard the boat.

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  • It is however very handy when you sail on a venue that gets weedy in summer like mine.

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  • Find out more » Hove Lagoon Daily Have you ever fancied learning how to sail, windsurf or drive a powerboat?

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  • If you're ready to swim, windsurf or sail, you can rent gear from the club and head into the water.

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  • Ar sail y materion hynny y materion hynny y mae pobl yn pleidleisio.

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  • Ar sail y materion hynny y mae pobl yn pleidleisio.

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  • Mae ymddiriedolaeth iechyd yn y Gogledd wedi dweud wrthyf ei bod yn sefydlu arferion da gydag awdurdodau lleol ac eraill ar y sail honno.

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  • yacht skippers and sail, dive, surf, windsurf, ski and snowboard instructors.

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  • At the last moment he hesitated, but Crispi succeeded in persuading him to sail from Genoa on the 5th of May 1860 with two vessels carrying a volunteer corps of 1070 strong.

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  • Cavour, however, obliged the expedition to sail for Palermo.

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  • He set sail for Tuscany to cooperate with the emperor, but on the latter's death (1314) he returned to Sicily.

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  • The stock of the anchor rests on the cat-head when hung outside the ship. The name is also used of a type of a vessel, now obsolete, and formerly used in the coal and timber trade on the north-east coast of England; it had a deep waist and narrow stem; it is still applied to a small rig of sailing boats, with a single mast stepped far forward, with a fore and aft sail.

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  • ..: the ships anchor at considerable risk in the roads, but the love of gain prevails: for the large number of lighters which receive the cargoes and reload them renders the time short before they can enter the river, and having lightened a part of their cargoes they sail in and ascend to Rome."

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  • A great part of the land-forces had been already sent off under Craterus in the earlier summer to return west by Kandahar and Seistan; the fleet was to sail under the Greek Nearchus from the Indus mouth with the winter monsoon; Alexander himself with the rest of the land-forces set out in October to go by the 2 Beside V.

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  • Uluch Ali then retreated with sail and oar, bringing most of his division off in good order.

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  • During the same year in which De Torres sailed through the strait destined to make him famous, a little Dutch vessel called the " Duyfken," or " Dove," set sail from Bantam, in Java, on a voyage of discovery.

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  • This consists of passing a sail, attached to cords, and charged with oakum, wool, and other materials, under the vessel's keel, in such a manner that the suction of the leak may draw the canvas into the aperture, and thus partially stop the vent.

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  • He himself never felt at home at Brussels, and in August 1559 he set sail for Spain, never again to revisit the Netherlands.

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  • Meanwhile inter-Asiatic intercourse by means of sea-routes had been steadily on the increase since the discovery of the way to utilize the monsoons and to sail directly to and fro across the Indian Ocean (attributed to the Greek pilot Hippalus) had been made.

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  • Siqueira's expedition ended in failure, owing partly to the aggressive attitude of the Portuguese, partly to the very justifiable suspicions of the Malays, and he was presently forced to destroy one of his vessels, to leave a number of his men in captivity, and to sail direct for Portugal.

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  • On the 15th of December 1796 the expedition, consisting of forty-three sail and carrying about 15,000 men with a large supply of war material for distribution in Ireland, sailed from Brest.

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  • Must of the merchandise and passengers bound for and hailing from foreign ports sail under foreign flags.

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  • Before he set sail for Egypt, the French had taken possession of Rome.

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  • S, Sail.

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  • - Upper sur- sisting of a bract, siphon, tentacle and face of Velella, showing gonophore; when free it is known as pneumatophore and sail.

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  • Herodotus (himself a notable traveller in the 5th century B.C.) relates that the Egyptian king Necho of the XXVIth Dynasty (c. 600 B.C.) built a fleet on the Red Sea, and confided it to Phoenician sailors with the orders to sail southward and return to Egypt by the Pillars of Hercules and the Mediterranean sea.

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  • Under the heading "Remarks" are noted (for vessels with sail power) making, shortening and trimming sails; and (for all ships) employment of crew, times of passing prominent landmarks, altering of course, and any subject of interest and FIG.

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  • As some months must elapse before they could sail for Palestine, Ignatius determined that the time should be spent partly in hospital work at Venice and later in the journey to Rome.

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  • In 1218 he set sail for Esthonia with one of the largest fleets ever seen in northern waters, including a Wendish contingent led by Prince Vitsla y.

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  • set sail for the conquest of Ireland in 1172, and to this harbour he made his return journey.

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  • The Scottish parliament agreed to the marriage of the young queen with the dauphin of France, and, on the plea of securing her safety from English designs, she set sail from Dumbarton in August 1548 to complete her education at the French court.

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  • On the night of the 16th-17th December, Dugommier, Bonaparte, Victor and Muiron headed the storming column which forced its way into the chief battery thrown up by the besieged on the height behind l'Eguillette; and on the next day Hood and Langara set sail, leaving the royalists to the vengeance of the Jacobins.

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  • The conquest of north and central Italy also placed great naval resources at the disposal of France, Venice alone providing nine sail of the line and twelve frigates (see Bonaparte's letter of the 15th of November 1797), Genoa, Spezzia, Leghorn, Civita Vecchia and Ancona also supplied their quota in warships, transports, stores and sailors, with the result that the armada was ready for sea by the middle of May 1798.

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  • The Toulon fleet set sail on the 19th of May; and when the other contingents from the ports of France and Italy joined the flag, the armada comprised thirteen sail of the line, fourteen frigates, many smaller warships and some three hundred transports.

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  • Setting sail for Egypt on the 19th of June, he again had the good fortune to elude Nelson and arrived off Alexandria on the 2nd of July.

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  • He, ther,efore, pressed on the march of a corps of French and Swiss troops under Dupont towards Cadiz, in order to take possession of the French sail of the line, five in number, which had been in that harbour since Trafalgar.

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  • He intended that Spain should very soon have ready twenty-eight sail of the line - "ce qui est certes bien peu de chose" - so as to drive away the British squadrons, and then he would strike "de grands coups" in the autumn.

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  • In the Mandaean representation the sky is an ocean of water, pure and clear, but of more than adamantine solidity, upon which the stars and planets sail.

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  • The fleet then set sail.

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  • The 85,000 marks, the price of transport, were not forthcoming, and the Venetians declined to sail till they were paid.

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  • There were Genoese ships in St Simeon's harbour in the spring of 1098 and at Jaffa in 1099; in 1099 Dagobert, the archbishop of Pisa, led a fleet from his city to the Holy Land; and in i ioo there came to Jaffa a Venetian fleet of 200 sail, whose leaders promised Venetian assistance in return for freedom from tolls and a third of each town they helped to conquer.

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  • A Venetian fleet of 1 20 sail came in 1123, and after aiding in the repulse of an attack, which the Egyptians had taken advantage of Baldwin II.'s captivity to deliver, they helped the regent Eustace to capture Tyre (1124), in return for considerable privileges - freedom from toils throughout the kingdom, a quarter in Jerusalem, baths and ovens in Acre, and in Tyre onethird of the city and its suburbs, with their own court of justice and their own church.

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  • Theobald was followed (1240-1241) by Richard of Cornwall, the brother of Henry III., who, like his predecessor, had to sail in the teeth of papal prohibitions; but neither of the two achieved any permanent result, except the fortification of Ascalon.

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  • Out of a citizen body of over 50,000 freemen, reinforced by mercenaries and slaves, a superb fleet exceeding 300 sail and an army of 30,000 drilled soldiers could be mustered.

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  • When Theseus set out for Crete to deliver Athens from the tribute to the Minotaur he promised Aegeus that, if he were successful, he would change the black sail carried by his ship for a white one.

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  • But, on his return, he forgot to hoist the white sail, and his father, supposing that his son had lost his life, threw himself from a high rock on which he was keeping watch into the sea, which was afterwards called the Aegean.

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  • Nor can Idrisi's map of the world, were drawn at intervals of zams, supposed to be equal to three hours' sail.

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  • of quaint shapes, suggesting a ship in full sail, a ruin, a cowled monk and so forth.

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  • In June 1572 a fresh Ottoman fleet of 250 sail took the sea; and the jealousy of the allies and the incompetence of their commanders made any repetition of their former victory impossible.

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  • Ibrahim, taking this as a breach of the convention, set sail from Navarino northwards, but was turned back by Sir Edward Codrington, the British admiral.

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  • A squadron of seven sail of the line, under Admiral Ganteaume, succeeded in slipping out of Brest, when a gale had driven the British blockading force off the coast.

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  • On the 13th of June 1801 Rear-admiral Linois left Toulon with three sail of the line, to join a Spanish squadron at Cadiz and go on to Egypt.

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  • In July 1804 he ordered his admiral commanding at Toulon, Latouche Treville, to seize an opportunity when Nelson, who was in command of the blockade, was driven off by a northerly gale, to put to sea, with 1 0 sail of the line, pick up the French ship in Cadiz, join Villeneuve who was in the Aix roads, and then effect a junction with Ganteaume and the 21 sail of the line at Brest.

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  • Napoleon now modified the simple plan prepared for Latouche Treville, and began laying elaborate plans by which French vessels were to slip out and sail for distant seas, to draw the British fleet after them, and then return to concentrate in the Channel.

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  • On the 11th of January 1805 Admiral Missiessy left Rochefort with 5 sail of the line, undetected by the British forces on the coast.

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  • Aided by lucky changes of wind, he reached Cadiz, was joined by 1 French and 6 Spanish ships under Admiral Gravina, which, added to the 1 r he had with him, gave him a force of 18 sail.

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  • An action in the West Indies would have ruined the emperor's plan of concentration, and Villeneuve decided to sail at once for Ferrol.

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  • By general agreement among the powers the command was entrusted to Codrington, and the allied force consisted of three British, four French and four Russian sail of the line, if the French admiral's flagship the "Sirene" (60), which was technically "a double banked frigate," be included.

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  • (8) The Panathenaea, at which the new robes for the image of the goddess were carried through the city, spread like a sail on a mast.

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  • Ship and boat building, rope and sail making, and brewing are carried on.

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  • Pero Lopes de Sousa received the grant of a captaincy, and set sail from Portugal at the same time as his brother, the founder of Sao Vicente.

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  • After spending a month in Paris, he walked on to Amsterdam, took sail to Hamburg, and so went back to Denmark in 1716.

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  • Durban (Port Natal) is in regular communication with Europe via Cape Town and via Suez by several lines of steamers, the chief being the boats of the Union-Castle line, which sail from Southampton and follow the west coast route, those of the German East Africa line, which sail from Hamburg and go via the east coast route and those of the Austrian Lloyd from Trieste, also by the east coast route.

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  • In the rainy season boats of considerable size sail about 60 m.

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  • - By the use of the complex variable and its conjugate functions, an attempt can be made to give a mathematical interpretation of problems such as the efflux of water in a jet or of smoke from a chimney, the discharge through a weir, the flow of water through the piers of a bridge, or past the side of a ship, the wind blowing on a sail or aeroplane, or against a wall, or impinging jets of gas or water; cases where a surface of discontinuity is observable, more or less distinct, which separates the running stream from the dead water or air.

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  • of Kirkwall; and steamers sail at regular intervals from the harbour to Wick, Aberdeen and Leith.

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  • and exercised all the real power from 919 to 944, was admiral of the Byzantine fleet on the Danube when, hearing of the defeat of the army at Achelous (917), he resolved to sail for Constantinople.

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  • The Pisan fleet of three hundred sail, commanded by the archbishop Pietro Moriconi, attacked the Balearic Isles, where as many as 20,000 Christians were said to be held captive by the Moslems, and returned loaded with spoil and with a multitude of Christian and Moslem prisoners.

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  • The industries include shipbuilding, rope and sail making and iron founding.

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  • Ship and boat building, together with subsidiary industries, such as rope and sail making, appear less subject to periods of depression than other industries.

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  • On the loth, D'Estaing returned to the port with his fleet badly crippled, and only to announce that he should sail to Boston to refit.

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  • The crusaders set sail at last, and Zara, which the Venetians coveted, was taken without much trouble.

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  • 1 479, after his daring escape from Edinburgh Castle, the duke of Albany concealed himself within its walls, until he contrived to sail for France.

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  • The gradual supplanting of sail by steamships has made Malta a coaling station of primary importance.

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  • He determined the "elastic curve," which is formed by an elastic plate or rod fixed at one end and bent by a weight applied to the other, and which he showed to be the same as the curvature of an impervious sail filled with a liquid (lintearia).

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  • In May forty sail of their war-ships appeared off Dover under command of Martin Harpertzoon Tromp - then the best known of their admirals.

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  • In that month the duke of York was on the east coast of England with a fleet of 80 to 90 sail, composed, according to the custom of the time, of vessels of all sizes.

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  • But the pursuit of the English fleet was feeble, and the retreat of the Dutch was ably covered by Cornelius van Tromp, son of Martin Tromp. Much scandal was caused by the mysterious circumstances in which an order to shorten sail was given in the English flagship, and doubts were expressed of the courage of the duke of York.

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  • By May a Dutch fleet of some eighty sail was at sea, preparing to watch the English, and unite with the French.

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  • A fleet of 60 sail was with difficulty got together under the duke of York, who now went to sea for the second time.

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  • The Dutch, who had to contend with an overwhelming French invasion on shore, nevertheless fitted out a fleet of 70 to 80 sail of the line and the command was given to De Ruyter.

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  • Spain, unable to defend its possessions singlehanded, appealed to the Dutch for naval help. In September 1675 De Ruyter was sent into the Mediterranean with 18 sail of the line and four fire-ships.

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  • He cruised off Messina to intercept the supplies which were being brought to the French garrison by a fleet of 20 sail under the command of Abraham Duquesne.

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  • He himself did not get to Stockholm, as the Sailors' and Firemen's Union, whose distrust of Germany was based on practical knowledge of her crimes at sea, refused to permit him to sail.

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  • Satisfied that his usefulness in England was at an end, Franklin entrusted his agencies to the care of Arthur Lee, and on the 21st of March 1775 again set sail for Philadelphia.

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  • He collected all the money he could command, between £3000 and £4000, lent it to Congress before he set sail, and arrived at Paris on the 22nd of December.

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  • Thanks to the efforts of Daunou and others his name was removed from the list of emigres, and he set sail for Europe in November 1795.

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  • Merchant vessels were required for their protection to sail in convoy.

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  • The sangada, with its platform and sail, belonging to the Brazilian coast, is spoken of as a good seaworthy craft.

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  • These eremites also navigated the sea north of Iceland on their first arrival, and found it ice-free for one day's sail, after which they came to the ice-wall.

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  • On February 27, 1815, Napoleon set sail from Elba with his force of l,000 men and 4 guns, determined to reconquer the throne of France.

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  • When summoned to the war against Troy, he set sail at once with his Myrmidones in fifty ships.

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  • When Dion set sail from Zacynthus with the object of liberating Syracuse from the tyrannis, Philistus was entrusted with the command of the fleet, but he was defeated and put to death (356).

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  • Instead of showing the Romans the caravan route, he induced them to sail from Cleopatris to Leucocome, and then led them by a circuitous way through waterless regions, so that they reached South Arabia too much weakened to effect anything.

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  • But ' This was the 2nd Army, waiting in the port of Chinampo for the moment to sail for Pitszewo.

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  • From Europe Rozhestvenski's squadron was just setting sail for the Far East.

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  • On the 5th of December Ibrahim again set sail, and reached Suda without striking a blow.

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  • Engineering, oil-cake, tobacco, sail and rope works are the principal industries in the town.

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  • In July 1361 Valdemar set sail from Denmark at the head of a great fleet, defeated a peasant army before Visby, and a few days later the burgesses of Visby made a breach in their walls through which the Danish monarch passed in triumph.

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  • Tristan and Iseult set sail for Cornwall, Iseult accompanied by her waiting-woman, Brangaene (who, in some versions, is also a kinswoman), to whose care the queen, skilled in magic arts, confides a love-potion.

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  • Ultimately, while assisting his brother-in-law in an intrigue with the wife of a neighbouring knight, Tristan is wounded by a poisoned arrow; unable to find healing, and being near to death, he sends a messenger to bring Queen Iseult to his aid; if successful the ship which brings her is to have a white sail, if she refuses to come, a black.

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  • Iseult of the white hand overhears this, and when the ship returns, bringing Iseult to her lover's aid, either through jealousy or by pure inadvertence (both versions are given), she tells Tristan that the sail is black, whereon, despairing of seeing his love again, the hero turns his face to the wall and dies.

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  • The fisheries of the town are important, including extensive mussel-fisheries under the jurisdiction of the corporation, and there are also breweries, corn-mills, iron and brass foundries, agricultural implement manufactories, ship-building yards, rope and sail works.

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  • A prayer was offered that "for us and all who sail thereon the sea may be calm and quiet," whereupon the doge and the others were solemnly aspersed with holy water, the rest of which was thrown into the sea while the priests chanted "Purge me with hyssop and I shall be clean."

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  • Returning to Rome, he held the dictatorship for eleven days, was elected consul for 48 B.C., and set sail for Epirus at Brundisium on the 4th of January.

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  • In November, however, he was obliged to sail for Spain, where the sons of Pompey still held out.

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  • Two days' sail farther southward brought them to a thickly-wooded land they called Markland (i.e.

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  • On the 13th of April it despatched a squadron of twelve sail of the line and four frigates from Toulon to America under the command of the Count d'Estaing.

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  • The British government, having neglected to occupy the Straits of Gibraltar in time, despatched Admiral Byron from Plymouth on the 9th of June with thirteen sail of the line to join Admiral (Lord) Howe, Sir William's brother, in America, and collected a strong force at home, called the Western Squadron, under Viscount Keppel.

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  • In European waters the Channel had been invaded by a combined French and Spanish fleet of sixty-six sail of the line, Spain having now joined the coalition against Great Britain.

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  • Only thirty-five sail of the line could be collected against them under the command of Admiral Digby.

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  • In March 1898 the desired permission was granted, and the first party of Doukhobors, 1126 in number, were able in the summer of 1898 to sail from Batum for Cyprus, which was originally chosen for their settlement because at that time funds were not sufficient for transferring them to any other British territory.

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  • On the other hand, Haakon IV., king of Norway, at once to restrain the independence of his jarls and to keep in check the ambition of the Scottish kings, set sail in 1263 on a great expedition, which, however, ended disastrously at Largs.

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  • The twelve constellations of the zodiac form an ingenious machine, a great wheel with buckets, which pour into the sun and moon, those shining ships that sail continually through space, the portions of light set free from the world.

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  • For a year he relinquished himself to her endearments, and when he determined to leave, she instructed him how to sail to the land of shades which lay on the verge of the ocean stream, in order to learn his fate from the prophet Teiresias.

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  • high, which received its name from its resemblance to the square sail used on certain Portuguese craft.

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  • On his return to Peru, Mendana endeavoured to organize another expedition to colonize the islands, but it was not before June 1595 that he, with Pedro Quiros as second in command, was able to set sail for this purpose.

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  • Smith, writing in the Philosophical Transactions for 1683-1684, says of the Turks (p. 439), "They have no genius for Seavoyages, and consequently are very raw and unexperienced in the art of Navigation, scarce venturing to sail out of sight of land.

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  • Cardinal Jacques de Vitry, bishop of Acon in Palestine, in his History (cap. 89), written about the year 1218, speaks of the magnetic needle as "most necessary for such as sail the sea"; 1 and another French crusader, his contemporary, Vincent de Beauvais, states that the adamant (lodestone) is found in Arabia, and mentions a method of using a needle magnetized by it which is similar to that described by Kibdjaki.

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  • and barges up to the Andes, and by sail to its middle course.

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  • Among the fancy cloths made in cotton may be mentioned: matting, which includes various kinds with some similarity in appearance to a matting texture; matelasse, which is in some degree an imitation of French dress goods of that name; pique, also of French origin, woven in stripes in relief, which cross the width of the piece, and usually finished stiff; Bedford cord, a cheaper variety of pique in which the stripes run the length of the piece; oatmeal cloth, which has an irregular surface suggesting the grain of oatmeal, commonly dyed cream colour; crimp cloth, in which a puckered effect is obtained by uneven shrinkage; grenadine, said to be derived from Granada, a light dress material originally made of silk or silk and wool; brilliant, a dress material, usually with a small raised pattern; leno, possibly a corrupt form of the French linon or lawn, a kind of fancy gauze used for veils, curtains, &c.; lappet, a light material with a figure or pattern as lawn, batiste, serge, huckaback, galloon, and a large number of names are of obvious derivation and use, such as umbrella cloth, apron cloth, sail cloth, book-binding cloth, shroud cloth, 1 Including Federated Malay States.

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  • There are iron foundries, breweries, distilleries, rope and sail works, coachbuilding yards, steam joinery works, and brick and tile works.

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  • When Troy was captured he set sail for Ithaca, but was carried by unfavourable winds to the coast of Africa.

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  • In 1548 the queen of six years old was betrothed to the dauphin Francis, and set sail for France, where she arrived on the 15th of August.

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  • At least as early as the 3rd century B.C. the custom was introduced of spreading the peplus like a sail on the mast of a ship, which was rolled on a machine in the procession.

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  • Transports containing 7000 troops, to be led by Marshal Saxe, accompanied by the young prince, were in readiness to set sail for England.

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  • Receiving, however, but a cool reception from Macdonald of Boisdale, he set sail again and arrived at the bay of Lochnanuagh on the west coast of Inverness-shire.

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  • It consisted of fifty-three sail in all, of which eighteen were of the line.

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  • The nominal strength of the Russian fleet was eighty-three sail of the line, of the Danish twenty-three, and of the Swedish eighteen.

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  • He therefore proposed that he should be detached with ten sail of the line, and the frigates and small craft, to pass between the Middle Ground and Saltholm Flat, and assail the Danish line at the southern end while the remainder of the fleet engaged the Trekroner battery from the north.

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  • This retort caused Nelson annoyance which he did not attempt to conceal, but he justly concluded that he had nothing further to do at Reval, and therefore returned down the Baltic. Nelson remained with the fleet till he was relieved at his own request, and was able to sail for England on the 18th of June.

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  • He might have run past them by the use of sail and oar to escape, but with the true spirit of a Norse warrior he refused to flee, and turned to give battle with the eleven ships immediately about him.

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  • He attacked Bankipur and the garrison of only fourteen persons set sail for Europe.

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  • In the great gale of 1799 seventy sail, including the "York," 74 guns, were wrecked off the reef, and this disaster compelled the authorities to take steps to protect shipping.

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  • But in 1796, the Directory having offered to release his mother and his two brothers, who had been kept in prison since the Terror, on condition that he went to America, he set sail for the United States, and in October settled in Philadelphia, where in February 1 797 he was joined by his brothers the duc de Montpensier and the comte de Beaujolais.

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  • After finishing his studies in the Egyptian capital he set sail for Greece; but the ship was driven by contrary winds to Italy, and he seized the opportunity of paying a flying visit to Rome.

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  • Sea-going vessels sail up the Ems as far as Halte, and river craft as far as Greven, and the river is connected with a widely branching system of canals,, as the Ems-Jade and Dortmund-Ems canals.

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  • Relations between Spain and the United States became strained, and war seemed imminent; but on the 8th of December the Spanish government agreed to surrender the "Virginius" on the 16th, to deliver the survivors of the crew and passengers to an American war-ship at Santiago, and to salute the American flag at Santiago on the 25th if it should not be proved before that date that the "Virginius" was not entitled to sail under American colours.

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  • The expedition sailed on the 8th of October 1 202, three hundred sail in all, with the aged Dandolo himself in command.

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  • After wintering at Zara the fleet set sail on the 7th of April 1203, and on the 23rd of June anchored in the Bosporus.

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  • and Phormio with only 20 ships defeated the Corinthian fleet of 47 sail in the Gulf of Corinth.

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  • 405), Conon escaping with only 12 out of 180 sail to Cyprus.

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  • Belhiard, who had been left in charge at Cairo, was assailed on two sides by the British forces under General John Hely Hutchinson (afterwards 2nd earl of Donoughmore), and the Turkish under Ytisuf Pasha; after negotiations Belhiard agreed to evacuate Cairo and to sail with his 13,734 troops to France.

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  • Thus it was the desire to secure his Jutish kingdom which induced Harold Klak, in 826, to sail up the Rhine to Ingelheim, and there accept baptism, with his wife, his son Godfred and 400 of his suite, acknowledging the emperor as his overlord, and taking back with him to Denmark the missionary monk Ansgar.

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  • The Danes, finding their position on the continent becoming more and more precarious, crossed to England in two divisions, amounting in the aggregate to 330 sail, and entrenched themselves, the larger body at Appledore and the lesser under Haesten at Milton in Kent.

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  • The industries include rope and sail making, boat-building, brewing and fishing.

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  • But the town offered a vigorous resistance, and the Athenians were obliged to sail away after a siege of twenty-six days, during which they had laid the island waste.

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