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sahara

sahara

sahara Sentence Examples

  • In the Tunisian Sahara rain is most uncertain.

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  • North of the Senegal the Sahara reaches the coast, and for over moo miles no river enters the ocean.

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  • EL WAD, a town in the Algerian Sahara, 125 m.

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  • In the extreme south, in the Sahara desert, the addax antelope is still found.

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  • An article on the Tunisian Sahara, the Tunisian Cave-Dwellers and Berber Languages, &c., by Sir H.

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  • An article on the Tunisian Sahara, the Tunisian Cave-Dwellers and Berber Languages, &c., by Sir H.

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  • The dry wind from the Sahara called harmattan, which carries great quantities of fine red sand, causes a fall of temperature in the (European) summer.

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  • The best hypothesis in the writer's opinion is that maintained by Charles Tissot, who sees in the word " Africa " the name of the great Berber tribe, the Aourigha (whose name would have been pronounced Afarika), the modern Aouraghen, now driven back into the Sahara, but in ancient times the principal indigenous element of the African empire of Carthage (Tissot, Geogr.

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  • The best hypothesis in the writer's opinion is that maintained by Charles Tissot, who sees in the word " Africa " the name of the great Berber tribe, the Aourigha (whose name would have been pronounced Afarika), the modern Aouraghen, now driven back into the Sahara, but in ancient times the principal indigenous element of the African empire of Carthage (Tissot, Geogr.

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  • north-west; 1 (2) ordinary Berbers, dolichocephalous, and of brown complexion, found over the greater part of Tunisia, especially in the east and south centre; (3) the short-headed Berbers, found in part of the Matmata country, part of the Sahara, the island of Jerba, the Cape Bon Peninsula, and the vicinity of Susa, Kairwan, and Sfax; (4) Berbers of a blond type, that is to say, with a tendency to brown or yellow moustaches, brown beard and head hair, and grey eyes.

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  • Allied species inhabit most parts of the world, excepting Africa south of the Sahara, New Zealand and Australia proper, and North America.

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  • Johnston, "A Journey through the Tunisian Sahara," Geog.

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  • A cushion plant (Anabasis aretioides) of the north-western Sahara, frequently shows dead leaves on the exposed side whilst the plant is in full vigour on the sheltered side.

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  • The association first employed John Ledyard (who had previously made an extraordinary journey into Siberia) to cross Africa from east to west on the parallel of the Niger, and William Lucas to cross the Sahara to Fezzan.

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  • Some deserts, like those of Central America, are specially characterized by succulents; in other deserts, such as the Sahara, succulents are not a prominent feature.

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  • Both of these families are distributed over the whole of the northern hemisphere, but whereas the Cervidae are absent from Africa south of the Sahara and well represented in South America, the Bovidae are unknown in the latter area, but are extraordinarily abundant in Africa.

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  • On the south the boundary of the Tunisian Sahara is undetermined, but it may be roughly placed at 31° N.

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  • See ” A Journey in the Tunisian Sahara,"by Sir H.

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  • It is within the Sahara, of which it forms one of the most fertile regions.

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  • - Geographically speaking, Tunisia is merely the eastern prolongation of the Mauretanian projection of northern Africa, of that strip of mountainous, fertile and fairly well-watered country north of the Sahara desert, which in its flora and its fauna, and to some extent in its human race, belongs rather to Europe than to Africa.

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  • Tsetse-flies are restricted to Africa, where they occur in suitable localities throughout the greater portion of the tropical region, although not found either in the Sahara or in the veld country of the extreme south.

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  • Captives were brought thence to the slave market of Kuka in Bornu, where, after being bought by dealers, they were, to the number of about 10,000 annually, marched across the Sahara to Murzuk in Fezzan, from which place they were distributed to the northern and eastern Mediterranean coasts.

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  • The retama shrub is met with in sandy districts, especially in the Sahara, but also right up to the north of Tunisia.

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  • Natives of Morocco and of the Sahara oases occasionally bring with them young baboons which they assert are obtained in various Sahara countries to the south and south-west of Tunisia.

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  • Far down in the Sahara, to the south of Tunisia, the Arabs report the existence of a wild ass, apparently identical with that of Nubia.

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  • Short vocabularies of the Berber spoken in the Tunisian Sahara have been published by Sir H.

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  • The retama shrub is met with in sandy districts, especially in the Sahara, but also right up to the north of Tunisia.

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  • The squirrels of the typical genus Sciurus are unknown in Africa south of the Sahara, but otherwise have a distribution co-extensive with the rest of the family.

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  • The sultan of Air is to a great extent dependent on the chiefs of the Tuareg tribes inhabiting a vast tract of the Sahara to the north-west.

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  • Richardson, Travels in the Great Desert of Sahara 1845-1846 ...

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  • In the Sahara and at Suakin there are Roman Catholic missions.

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  • The sultan of Air is to a great extent dependent on the chiefs of the Tuareg tribes inhabiting a vast tract of the Sahara to the north-west.

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  • He hoped, by organizing a fraternity of armed laymen as pioneers, to restore fertility to the Sahara; but this community did not succeed, and was dissolved before his death.

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  • above the sea in the borderland between the fertile and wooded regions of the Sudan on the south and the arid steppes which merge into the Sahara on the north.

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  • Another region so called is that part of the Sahara washed by the Atlantic. The name is also used to designate the territory under French jurisdiction west of Timbuktu and north of the Senegal.

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  • This is the case, for instance, in the Caspian sea, the Aral and Balkhash lakes, the Tarim basin, the Sahara, inner Australia, the great basin of the United States and the Titicaca basin.

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  • "The Country of the Filali," as its inhabitants are called, because descended from the Arabian tribe of Hilal, settled here in the ttth century), the most important oasis of the Moroccan Sahara, ten days' journey south of Fez, across the Atlas.

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  • by the Sahara and E.

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  • In the Sahara are Biskra (4218), El Wad (7586), Tuggurt (2073) and Wargla (3579).

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  • The Algerian Sahara was divided into four territories, officially named Tuggurt, Ghardaia, Ain Sefra and the Saharan Oases (Tuat, Gurara and Tidikelt).

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  • Henceforth matters remained quiet in the region of the Sahara, and Marshal Randon turned his efforts towards Kabylia.

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  • This being accomplished by March 1901, the conquest of the Algerine Sahara was from that time completed, and nothing any longer hindered the attempts to join Algeria and the Sudan across the Sahara.

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  • - Missions: Algeria, Sahara, Nyasa, Victoria.

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  • On the other hand, the Gaetulians to the south of the Atlas range, on the date-producing slopes towards the Sahara, seem to have owned a precarious subjection to the kings of Mauretania, as afterwards to the Roman government.

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  • Henceforth matters remained quiet in the region of the Sahara, and Marshal Randon turned his efforts towards Kabylia.

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  • Communication between Algeria and Lake Chad by way of the Sahara was opened, after repeated failures, by the French explorer F.

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  • One of the ancient trade routes across the Sahara - that from Tripoli to Kuka in Bornu - strikes the lake at its northwest corner, but this has lost much of its former importance.

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  • (For the climate of the Saharan region see Sahara.) Throughout Algeria, especially in the summer, there is a great difference between day and night temperature, notably in the inland districts.

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  • of Constantine by the railway to Biskra, commands the passage of the Aures mountains by which the nomads of the Sahara were wont to enter the Tell.

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  • Thus we have in the northern hemisphere the Sahara desert, the deserts of Arabia, Iran, Turan, Takla Makan and Gobi, and the desert regions of the Great Basin in North America; and in the southern hemisphere the Kalahari desert in Africa, the desert of Australia, and the desert of Atacama in South America.

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  • He subsequently encouraged Major Roudaire, who wished to transform the Sahara desert into an inland sea.

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  • The works of Canon Tristram on the Sahara describe southern Tunisia in the 'sixties of the 19th century.

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  • ALMORAVIDES (properly Murabtis, the name being corrupted through the Spanish), a Berber horde from the Sahara which, in the 11th century, founded the fourth dynasty in Morocco.

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  • The attempts at penetration into the extreme south, abandoned after the massacre by Tuareg of a mission sent in 1881, under Colonel Paul Flatters, to study the question of railway communication with Senegal, were begun again in 1890, in which year the British government recognized the western Sahara as within the French sphere.

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  • Although in late Tertiary times widely spread over southern Europe and India, giraffes are now confined to Africa south of the Sahara.

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  • The dust is chiefly of local origin, but partly comes from the Sahara.

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  • Sahara >>

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  • The conquest of the central Sudan states by France - completed in 1910 by the subjugation of Wadai - has practically ended the caravan trade in slaves across the Sahara.

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  • - This section of the Atlas, known to the inhabitants of Morocco by its Berber name, Idraren Draren or the " Mountains of Mountains," consists of five distinct ranges, varying in length and height, but disposed more or less parallel to one another in a general direction from south-west to north-east, with a slight curvature towards the Sahara.

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  • The southern flanks, being exposed to the hot dry winds of the Sahara,.

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  • Both in the east (at Batna) and the west (at Ain Sefra) the mountains are traversed by railways, which, starting from Mediterranean seaports, take the traveller into the Sahara.

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  • of Gabes, for the sea end of the channel (see Sahara).

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  • by the Sahara.

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  • The Tunisian Sahara.

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  • At Tunis the temperature rarely exceeds 90°, except with a wind from the Sahara.

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  • Berber dialects are still spoken in Tunisia in the island of Jerba, in the Matmata country, and in the Tunisian Sahara.

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  • African Sahara.

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  • Hitherto marine conditions were confined to the littoral; in Middle Miocene times (Helvetian) the sea broke in and spread in a south-east direction in the form of long ramified fjords but did not extend as far as the Sahara.

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  • The flora of Algeria consists of about 3000 species, of which some 450 are indigenous to the country, ioo being peculiar to the Sahara.

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  • (6) A few Tuareg, another division of the Berbers, are among the nomads found in the Algerian Sahara.

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  • It has a good harbour, is the outlet for the produce of several fertile valleys, and the starting-point of a railway which penetrates into the Sahara.

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  • Its market is attended by Kabyles, Arabs of the plateaus and people from the Sahara.

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  • enters the Sahara.

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  • The few genera and species of this family are restricted to Africa, south of the Sahara.

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  • The group is represented in Madagascar, as well as in Africa south of the Sahara.

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  • But unmistakable traces of much more ancient bored springs appear in Lombardy, in Asia Minor, in Persia, in China, in Egypt, in Algeria, and even in the great desert of Sahara.

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  • It is clothed largely with thin forest, but becomes more open to the north until, near the French frontier, the arid steppes bordering the Sahara are reached.

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  • Then the " hamattan," or hot, dry wind from the Sahara, begins and brings with it clouds of impalpable dust.

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  • The camel is found in the northern regions bordering the Sahara.

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  • Good roads connect some of the great Hausa cities, and Kano and Kuka are starting-points for caravans across the Sahara to the Mediterranean.

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  • Salt and " potash " are imported from Absen in the Sahara; and ivory, ostrich feathers and leather goods are exported to Tripoli.

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  • by Tripoli and the Sahara.

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  • But for the river there would be nothing to differentiate the country from other parts of the Sahara.

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  • The western region has no natural barrier for many hqndreds of miles; it is part of the vast Sahara.

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  • 181 seq.) makes it plain that this was mainly a salt-road, and to the present day the caravan trade of the Sahara is largely a trade in salt.

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  • This family contains numerous species, having a wide geographical distribution, ranging in the New World from the Arctic circle as far south as Patagonia, and in the Old World throughout the whole of Europe and Asia, but absent in Africa south of the Sahara, and, of course, Australasia.

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  • the western Sahara.

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  • There is also an ancient caravan route which runs through Kanem and across the Sahara to Tripoli.

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  • Nachtigal, Sahara and Sudan (Berlin, 1879-1889); E.

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  • Since the dawn of history the Berbers have occupied the tract between the Mediterranean and the Sahara from Egypt to the Atlantic. The origin of the name is doubtful.

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  • To speak of more modern times there can be enumerated the Zouaoua and Jebalia (Tripoli and Tunisia); the Chauwia, Kabyles and Beni-Mzab (Algeria); the Shluh (Chlouah), Amazigh and Berbers (Morocco); the Tuareg, Amoshagh, Sorgu, &c. (Sahara).

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  • Whatever these dialects be called, the Kabyle, the Shilha, the Zenati, the Tuareg or Tamashek, the Berber language is still essentially one, and the similarity between the forms current in Morocco, Algeria, the Sahara and the far-distant oasis of Siwa is much more marked than between the Norse and English in the sub-Aryan Teutonic group. The Berbers have, moreover, a writing of their own, peculiar and little used or known, the antiquity of which is proved by monuments and inscriptions ranging over the whole of North Africa.

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  • As might be expected the Berber tongue is most common in Morocco and the western Sahara - the regions where Arab dominion was least exercised.

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  • Sergi, The Mediterranean Race (London, 1901), and Africa, Antropologia della Stirpe Comitica (Turin, 1897); Henri Duveyrier, Exploration du Sahara (1864), Les Progres de la geographie en Algerie (1867-1871), Bull.

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  • Johnston, " A Journey through the Tunisian Sahara," Geog.

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  • JERBOA, properly the name of an Arabian and North African jumping rodent mammal, Jaculus aegyptius (also known as Jaculus, or Dipus, jaculus) typifying the family Jaculidae (or Dipodidae), but in a wider sense applied to most of the representatives of that family, which are widely distributed over the desert and semi-desert tracts of the Old World, although unknown in Africa south of the Sahara.

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  • Adrar Temur, the country usually referred to when Adrar is spoken of, is in the western Sahara, 300 m.

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  • Adrar or Adgar is also the name sometimes given to the chief settlement in the oasis of Tuat in the Algerian Sahara.

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  • WARGLA, a town in the Algerian Sahara, 175 m.

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  • of Biskra on the caravan route to the Niger countries, and a starting point for the exploration of the southern part of the Sahara.

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  • It claims to be the oldest town in the Sahara, and was for a long time self-governing, but eventually placed itself under the protection of the sultan of Morocco.

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  • In 1352 the restless man started for Central Africa, passing by the oases of the Sahara (where the houses were built of rock-salt, as Herodotus tells, and roofed with camel skins) to Timbuktu and Gogo on the Niger, a river which he calls the Nile, believing it to flow down into Egypt, an opinion maintained by some up to the date of Lander's discovery.

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  • Beyond this outer range and along the shore of the sea the flora is that of the Sahara region, which extends eastwards to Sind.

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  • During the dry season, when the climate is very much like that of the West Indies, there occur terrible tornadoes and long periods of the harmattan - a north-east wind, dry and desiccating, and carrying with it from the Sahara clouds of fine dust, which sailors designate "smokes."

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  • by the Sahara and N.

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  • Strawberries and Sahara dates; alfalfa, wheat, barley, corn and sorghum; oranges, lemons, wine grapes, limes, olives, figs, dates, peanuts and sweet potatoes; yams and sugar beets, show the range of agricultural products.

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  • It lies in the Sahara 360 ft.

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  • The Cervidae are distributed all over Europe, Asia, Northern Africa and America, but are unknown in Africa south of the Sahara.

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  • It owed its early prosperity to its easy access to the sea, and to the fact that natural conditions in Cyrenaica and the Sahara behind it, tend to divert trade to the west of the district - a fact which is exemplified by the final survival of Berenice (mod.

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  • A common type of mirage is the appearance of an isolated lake frequently seen in hot sandy deserts, as in the Sahara, Turkestan, &c. The explanation is as follows: The sand, being abnormally heated by the solar rays, causes the neighbouring air to expand, consequently its density, and therefore its refractive index, is diminished, and attains a minimum value in the lowest layers.

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  • BILMA, or Kawar, an oasis in the heart of the Sahara desert, some 60 m.

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  • In 1907 the oasis and surrounding district was created a circle of the Military Territory of the Niger (see Sahara).

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  • As regards the deer-family (Cervidae), which is unknown in Africa south of the Sahara, it is quite evident that it originated in the northern half of the Old World, whence it reached North America by the Bering Sea route, and eventually travelled into South America.

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  • and 89° 42' E.), the climate is fairly typical of Central Asia, the mean for the year being 55.5 for January 16.7° and for July 89.6°; in other words, while the summer is as hot as in the Sahara, the winter is as cold as at St Petersburg.

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  • During this latter year also John Fernandez spent seven months among the natives of the Arguim coast, and brought back the first trustworthy first-hand European account of the Sahara hinterland.

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  • TUGGURT, a town in the Wadi Ghir, Algerian Sahara, 127 m.

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  • Throughout the greater part of Africa south of the Sahara galagos are widely distributed in the wooded districts, from Senegambia in the west to Abyssinia in the east, and as far south as Natal.

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  • (2) The Atlas range, which, orographically, is distinct from the rest of the continent, being unconnected with any other area of high ground, and separated from the rest of the continent on the south by a depressed and desert area (the Sahara), in places below sea-level.

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  • This division includes the great desert of the Sahara.

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  • The arid region, the Sahara - the largest desert in the world, covering 3,500,000 sq.

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  • From the inner slopes of the plateau numerous wadis take a direction towards the Sahara.

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  • (The rarity of the air and the great radiation during the night cause the temperature in the Sahara to fall occasionally to freezing point.) Farther south, the heat is to some extent modified by the moisture brought from the ocean, and by the greater elevation of a large part of the surface, especially in East Africa, where the range of temperature is wider than in the Congo basin or on the Guinea coast.

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  • The wide heated plains of the Sahara, and in a lesser degree the corresponding zone of the Kalahari in the south, have an exceedingly scanty rainfall, the winds which blow over them from the ocean losing part of their moisture as they pass over the outer highlands, and becoming constantly drier owing to the heating effects of the burning soil of the interior; while the scarcity of mountain ranges in the more central parts likewise tends to prevent condensation.

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  • The countries bordering the Sahara are much exposed to a very dry wind, full of fine particles of sand, blowing from the desert towards the sea.

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  • While the climate of the north and south, especially the south, is eminently healthy, and even the intensely heated Sahara is salubrious by reason of its dryness, the tropical zone as a whole is, for European races, the most unhealthy portion of the world.

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  • Characteristic of the Sahara is the date-palm, which flourishes where other vegetation can scarcely maintain existence, while in the semi-desert regions the acacia (whence is obtained gum-arabic) is abundant.

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  • Rocks of Archean age cover wide areas in the interior, in West and East Africa and across the Sahara.

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  • The effect of the Glacial epoch in Europe is shown in northern Africa by the moraines of the higher Atlas, and the wider extension of the glaciers on Kilimanjaro, Kenya and Ruwenzori, and by the extensive accumulations of gravel over the Sahara.

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  • Below Timbuktu for a considerable distance the Niger receives no tributaries; from the north none until the region of the Sahara is passed.

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  • Chudeau, summing up the evidence available in 1909, set forth the hypothesis that the existing upper Niger and the existing lower Niger were distinct streams. According to this theory the upper Niger, somewhat above where Timbuktu now stands, went north and north-west and emptied into the Juf, which in the beginning of the quaternary age was a salt-water lake, the remnant of an arm of the sea which in the tertiary age covered the northern Sudan and southern Sahara as far east as Bilma.

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  • When the upper Niger had this direction, the Wadi Taffassassent, now a dried-up river of the central Sahara, which rose in the Ahaggar mountains, is believed to have formed the upper course of the existing lower Niger.

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  • Chudeau, Sahara soudanais, Paris, 1909).

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  • The united river ran north, disappeared underground in the Sahara and reached the Mediterranean at "the quicksands of the gulph of Sidra."

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  • SUDAN (Arabic Bilad-es-Sudan, country of the blacks), that region of Africa which stretches, south of the Sahara and Egypt, from Cape Verde on the Atlantic to Massawa on the Red Sea.

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  • For the central Sudan the most important work is that of Gustav Nachtigal, Sahara and Sudan (3 vols., Berlin 1879-1889).

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  • Bordering north on the Sahara, it contains much arid land, but south-west the land is very fertile.

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  • Under the influence of Berber and Arab tribes, who embraced Mahommedanism, the Hausa advanced in civilization; founded large cities, and developed a considerable trade, not only with the neighbouring countries, but, via the Sahara, with the Barbary states.

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  • We should have four great realms:-(1) Europe and Northern and Temperate Asia, Africa north of the Sahara (palaearctic region) and North and Central America (nearctic region); (2) Africa and South-Eastern Asia (Ethiopian and Indian region); (3) South America (neotropical region); and (4) Australia (Australian region).

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  • If my husband moved to the Sahara desert, I would go with him.

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  • amblee you ever tried ' ambling about ' in the Sahara or Himalaya regions.

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  • In 1997, he was the first leg amputee to complete the 250km Great Sahara Run.

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  • berth caravan is an Atlas Sahara Super.

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  • bosom of those fabled sand seas so emblematic of the Sahara.

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  • censors all political websites advocating Western Sahara's independence.

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  • continent on earth with an absolute humidity lower than that of the Sahara Desert.

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  • News Westward swirling clouds of dust from the Sahara Desert might be putting a damper on Atlantic Ocean.. .

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  • accelerating desertification is largely responsible for the fact that many countries in Africa south of the Sahara are losing the capacity to feed themselves.

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  • Review of Sahara (2005) by Andy.mack Advantages: Good action, special effects and soundtrack disadvantages: Penelope Cruz...of those actors.

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  • soon our little convoy was enveloped in the bosom of those fabled sand seas so emblematic of the Sahara.

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  • Beyond it, steadily encroaching onto the dusty, poverty-ridden streets of the town lies the western margin of the great Sahara desert.

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  • landlocked country, two thirds of Mali extends into the Sahara desert.

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  • The conversation eventually came around to the possibility of trying the marathon des Sables, an ultra distance marathon across the Sahara desert.

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  • plonked in the middle of the Sahara.

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  • The economic powerhouse of Africa south of the Sahara Desert is South Africa.

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  • They live in the zone where the Sahara desert meets with the large African savannas.

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  • Although in late Tertiary times widely spread over southern Europe and India, giraffes are now confined to Africa south of the Sahara.

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  • Except where exterminated by human agency (and this has been accomplished to a deplorable extent), the African elephant is a native of the wooded districts of the whole of Africa south of the Sahara.

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  • North of the Senegal the Sahara reaches the coast, and for over moo miles no river enters the ocean.

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  • The dust is chiefly of local origin, but partly comes from the Sahara.

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  • above the sea in the borderland between the fertile and wooded regions of the Sudan on the south and the arid steppes which merge into the Sahara on the north.

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  • Communication between Algeria and Lake Chad by way of the Sahara was opened, after repeated failures, by the French explorer F.

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  • One of the ancient trade routes across the Sahara - that from Tripoli to Kuka in Bornu - strikes the lake at its northwest corner, but this has lost much of its former importance.

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  • Kwang-Chow-Wan however, is bound to providefor destitute children (see FOUNDLING HOSPITALS) Total in As and pauper lunatics (both these being under the care of the department), aged In Africa and the mdi Algeria and infirm people without resources and Algerian Sahara victims of incurable illness, and to furnish Tunisia medical assistance gratuitously to those West Africa without resources who are afflicted with Senegal..

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  • The funds for these Upper Senegal andr Sahara)

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  • He subsequently encouraged Major Roudaire, who wished to transform the Sahara desert into an inland sea.

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  • The dry wind from the Sahara called harmattan, which carries great quantities of fine red sand, causes a fall of temperature in the (European) summer.

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  • Some deserts, like those of Central America, are specially characterized by succulents; in other deserts, such as the Sahara, succulents are not a prominent feature.

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  • A cushion plant (Anabasis aretioides) of the north-western Sahara, frequently shows dead leaves on the exposed side whilst the plant is in full vigour on the sheltered side.

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  • It includes the Azores and Canaries, the Mediterranean basin, northern Africa as far as the Atlas and Sahara, Asia Minor, Persia and the countries eastward as far as Sind, being bounded to the north by the mountains which run from the Caucasus to the Hindu-Kush.

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  • Another region so called is that part of the Sahara washed by the Atlantic. The name is also used to designate the territory under French jurisdiction west of Timbuktu and north of the Senegal.

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  • The association first employed John Ledyard (who had previously made an extraordinary journey into Siberia) to cross Africa from east to west on the parallel of the Niger, and William Lucas to cross the Sahara to Fezzan.

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  • This is the case, for instance, in the Caspian sea, the Aral and Balkhash lakes, the Tarim basin, the Sahara, inner Australia, the great basin of the United States and the Titicaca basin.

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  • They are six in number: (1) Palaearctic, including Europe, Asia north of the Himalaya, and Africa north of the Sahara; (2) Ethiopian, consisting of Africa south of the Atlas range, and Madagascar; (3) Oriental, including India, Indo-China and the Malay Archipelago north of Wallace's line, which runs between Bali and Lombok; (4) Australian, including Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea and Pol y nesia; (5) Nearctic or North America, north of Mexico; and (6) Neotropical or South America.

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  • Captives were brought thence to the slave market of Kuka in Bornu, where, after being bought by dealers, they were, to the number of about 10,000 annually, marched across the Sahara to Murzuk in Fezzan, from which place they were distributed to the northern and eastern Mediterranean coasts.

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  • The conquest of the central Sudan states by France - completed in 1910 by the subjugation of Wadai - has practically ended the caravan trade in slaves across the Sahara.

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  • - This section of the Atlas, known to the inhabitants of Morocco by its Berber name, Idraren Draren or the " Mountains of Mountains," consists of five distinct ranges, varying in length and height, but disposed more or less parallel to one another in a general direction from south-west to north-east, with a slight curvature towards the Sahara.

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  • The southern flanks, being exposed to the hot dry winds of the Sahara,.

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  • With the exception of the Dra'a, the streams rising on the side of the range facing the Sahara do not reach the sea, but form marshes or lagoons at one season, and at another are lost in the dry soil of the desert.

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  • Both in the east (at Batna) and the west (at Ain Sefra) the mountains are traversed by railways, which, starting from Mediterranean seaports, take the traveller into the Sahara.

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  • Dr Oskar Lenz in 1879-1880 surveyed a part of the Great Atlas north of Tarudant, determined a pass south of Iligh in the Anti-Atlas, and penetrated thence across the Sahara to Timbuktu.

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  • (See also Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Sahara.) Authorities.

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  • In the oases of Sahara, and in other parts of Northern Africa, dates are pounded and pressed into a cake for food.

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  • In 1874 he founded the Sahara and Sudan mission, and sent missionaries to Tunis, Tripoli, East Africa and the Congo.

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  • He hoped, by organizing a fraternity of armed laymen as pioneers, to restore fertility to the Sahara; but this community did not succeed, and was dissolved before his death.

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  • EL WAD, a town in the Algerian Sahara, 125 m.

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  • Both of these families are distributed over the whole of the northern hemisphere, but whereas the Cervidae are absent from Africa south of the Sahara and well represented in South America, the Bovidae are unknown in the latter area, but are extraordinarily abundant in Africa.

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  • Allied species inhabit most parts of the world, excepting Africa south of the Sahara, New Zealand and Australia proper, and North America.

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  • of Gabes, for the sea end of the channel (see Sahara).

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  • by the Sahara.

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  • On the south the boundary of the Tunisian Sahara is undetermined, but it may be roughly placed at 31° N.

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  • - Geographically speaking, Tunisia is merely the eastern prolongation of the Mauretanian projection of northern Africa, of that strip of mountainous, fertile and fairly well-watered country north of the Sahara desert, which in its flora and its fauna, and to some extent in its human race, belongs rather to Europe than to Africa.

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  • The Tunisian Sahara.

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  • At Tunis the temperature rarely exceeds 90°, except with a wind from the Sahara.

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  • In the Tunisian Sahara rain is most uncertain.

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  • Johnston, "A Journey through the Tunisian Sahara," Geog.

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  • Natives of Morocco and of the Sahara oases occasionally bring with them young baboons which they assert are obtained in various Sahara countries to the south and south-west of Tunisia.

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  • In the extreme south, in the Sahara desert, the addax antelope is still found.

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  • Far down in the Sahara, to the south of Tunisia, the Arabs report the existence of a wild ass, apparently identical with that of Nubia.

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  • north-west; 1 (2) ordinary Berbers, dolichocephalous, and of brown complexion, found over the greater part of Tunisia, especially in the east and south centre; (3) the short-headed Berbers, found in part of the Matmata country, part of the Sahara, the island of Jerba, the Cape Bon Peninsula, and the vicinity of Susa, Kairwan, and Sfax; (4) Berbers of a blond type, that is to say, with a tendency to brown or yellow moustaches, brown beard and head hair, and grey eyes.

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  • Berber dialects are still spoken in Tunisia in the island of Jerba, in the Matmata country, and in the Tunisian Sahara.

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  • Short vocabularies of the Berber spoken in the Tunisian Sahara have been published by Sir H.

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  • It is considered that these nomads will be gently pushed back towards the Sahara, leaving cultivable Tunisia to the settled Berber stock, a stock fundamentally one with the peoples of Mediterranean Europe.

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  • See ” A Journey in the Tunisian Sahara,"by Sir H.

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  • The telegraph system penetrates to the farthest French post in the Sahara, is connected with the Turkish system on the Tripolitan frontier and with Algeria, and by cable with Sicily, Malta, Sardinia and Marseilles.

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  • It may be added that down to the early years of the 19th century it was alleged that some of the Tuareg tribes in the Sahara professed Christianity (see e.g.

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  • The works of Canon Tristram on the Sahara describe southern Tunisia in the 'sixties of the 19th century.

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  • African Sahara.

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  • Tsetse-flies are restricted to Africa, where they occur in suitable localities throughout the greater portion of the tropical region, although not found either in the Sahara or in the veld country of the extreme south.

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  • "The Country of the Filali," as its inhabitants are called, because descended from the Arabian tribe of Hilal, settled here in the ttth century), the most important oasis of the Moroccan Sahara, ten days' journey south of Fez, across the Atlas.

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  • The squirrels of the typical genus Sciurus are unknown in Africa south of the Sahara, but otherwise have a distribution co-extensive with the rest of the family.

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  • It is within the Sahara, of which it forms one of the most fertile regions.

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  • GHADAMES, GADAMES or Rhadames, a town in an oasis of the same name, in that part of the Sahara which forms part of the Turkish vilayet of Tripoli.

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  • Richardson, Travels in the Great Desert of Sahara 1845-1846 ...

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  • by the Sahara and E.

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  • (see Sahara, Tuat, &C.).

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  • To the south this region is divided by the Great Atlas from the deserts of the Sahara, with its oases, in which the boundary of Algeria is lost.

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  • The Dahra range (see Mostaganem) overlooks the sea, and is separated from the Warsenis by the valley of the Shelif (see Atlas Mountains, Sahara and Tuat).

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  • Hitherto marine conditions were confined to the littoral; in Middle Miocene times (Helvetian) the sea broke in and spread in a south-east direction in the form of long ramified fjords but did not extend as far as the Sahara.

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  • (For the climate of the Saharan region see Sahara.) Throughout Algeria, especially in the summer, there is a great difference between day and night temperature, notably in the inland districts.

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  • The flora of Algeria consists of about 3000 species, of which some 450 are indigenous to the country, ioo being peculiar to the Sahara.

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  • (6) A few Tuareg, another division of the Berbers, are among the nomads found in the Algerian Sahara.

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  • In the Sahara are Biskra (4218), El Wad (7586), Tuggurt (2073) and Wargla (3579).

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  • It has a good harbour, is the outlet for the produce of several fertile valleys, and the starting-point of a railway which penetrates into the Sahara.

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  • Its market is attended by Kabyles, Arabs of the plateaus and people from the Sahara.

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  • of Constantine by the railway to Biskra, commands the passage of the Aures mountains by which the nomads of the Sahara were wont to enter the Tell.

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  • enters the Sahara.

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  • The Algerian Sahara was divided into four territories, officially named Tuggurt, Ghardaia, Ain Sefra and the Saharan Oases (Tuat, Gurara and Tidikelt).

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  • The attempts at penetration into the extreme south, abandoned after the massacre by Tuareg of a mission sent in 1881, under Colonel Paul Flatters, to study the question of railway communication with Senegal, were begun again in 1890, in which year the British government recognized the western Sahara as within the French sphere.

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  • This being accomplished by March 1901, the conquest of the Algerine Sahara was from that time completed, and nothing any longer hindered the attempts to join Algeria and the Sudan across the Sahara.

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  • The few genera and species of this family are restricted to Africa, south of the Sahara.

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  • The group is represented in Madagascar, as well as in Africa south of the Sahara.

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  • Projecting like a bastion into the Mediterranean at a very central point, Cyrenaica seems intended to play a commercial part; but it does not do so to any extent because of (1) lack of natural harbours, Bengazi and Derna having only open and dangerous roads (this is partly due to coastal subsidence; ancient ports have sunk); (2) the difficulty of the desert routes behind it, wells beings singularly deficient in this part of the Sahara.

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  • - Missions: Algeria, Sahara, Nyasa, Victoria.

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  • In the Sahara and at Suakin there are Roman Catholic missions.

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  • Thus we have in the northern hemisphere the Sahara desert, the deserts of Arabia, Iran, Turan, Takla Makan and Gobi, and the desert regions of the Great Basin in North America; and in the southern hemisphere the Kalahari desert in Africa, the desert of Australia, and the desert of Atacama in South America.

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  • But unmistakable traces of much more ancient bored springs appear in Lombardy, in Asia Minor, in Persia, in China, in Egypt, in Algeria, and even in the great desert of Sahara.

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  • On the other hand, the Gaetulians to the south of the Atlas range, on the date-producing slopes towards the Sahara, seem to have owned a precarious subjection to the kings of Mauretania, as afterwards to the Roman government.

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  • ALMORAVIDES (properly Murabtis, the name being corrupted through the Spanish), a Berber horde from the Sahara which, in the 11th century, founded the fourth dynasty in Morocco.

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  • It is clothed largely with thin forest, but becomes more open to the north until, near the French frontier, the arid steppes bordering the Sahara are reached.

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  • Then the " hamattan," or hot, dry wind from the Sahara, begins and brings with it clouds of impalpable dust.

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  • The camel is found in the northern regions bordering the Sahara.

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  • Good roads connect some of the great Hausa cities, and Kano and Kuka are starting-points for caravans across the Sahara to the Mediterranean.

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  • Salt and " potash " are imported from Absen in the Sahara; and ivory, ostrich feathers and leather goods are exported to Tripoli.

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  • by Tripoli and the Sahara.

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  • But for the river there would be nothing to differentiate the country from other parts of the Sahara.

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  • The western region has no natural barrier for many hqndreds of miles; it is part of the vast Sahara.

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  • 181 seq.) makes it plain that this was mainly a salt-road, and to the present day the caravan trade of the Sahara is largely a trade in salt.

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  • This family contains numerous species, having a wide geographical distribution, ranging in the New World from the Arctic circle as far south as Patagonia, and in the Old World throughout the whole of Europe and Asia, but absent in Africa south of the Sahara, and, of course, Australasia.

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  • the western Sahara.

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  • There is also an ancient caravan route which runs through Kanem and across the Sahara to Tripoli.

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  • Nachtigal, Sahara and Sudan (Berlin, 1879-1889); E.

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  • Since the dawn of history the Berbers have occupied the tract between the Mediterranean and the Sahara from Egypt to the Atlantic. The origin of the name is doubtful.

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  • To speak of more modern times there can be enumerated the Zouaoua and Jebalia (Tripoli and Tunisia); the Chauwia, Kabyles and Beni-Mzab (Algeria); the Shluh (Chlouah), Amazigh and Berbers (Morocco); the Tuareg, Amoshagh, Sorgu, &c. (Sahara).

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  • Whatever these dialects be called, the Kabyle, the Shilha, the Zenati, the Tuareg or Tamashek, the Berber language is still essentially one, and the similarity between the forms current in Morocco, Algeria, the Sahara and the far-distant oasis of Siwa is much more marked than between the Norse and English in the sub-Aryan Teutonic group. The Berbers have, moreover, a writing of their own, peculiar and little used or known, the antiquity of which is proved by monuments and inscriptions ranging over the whole of North Africa.

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  • As might be expected the Berber tongue is most common in Morocco and the western Sahara - the regions where Arab dominion was least exercised.

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  • Sergi, The Mediterranean Race (London, 1901), and Africa, Antropologia della Stirpe Comitica (Turin, 1897); Henri Duveyrier, Exploration du Sahara (1864), Les Progres de la geographie en Algerie (1867-1871), Bull.

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  • Johnston, " A Journey through the Tunisian Sahara," Geog.

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  • JERBOA, properly the name of an Arabian and North African jumping rodent mammal, Jaculus aegyptius (also known as Jaculus, or Dipus, jaculus) typifying the family Jaculidae (or Dipodidae), but in a wider sense applied to most of the representatives of that family, which are widely distributed over the desert and semi-desert tracts of the Old World, although unknown in Africa south of the Sahara.

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  • It is the headquarters of the Awellimiden Tuareg (see Tuareg and Sahara).

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  • Adrar Temur, the country usually referred to when Adrar is spoken of, is in the western Sahara, 300 m.

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  • Adrar or Adgar is also the name sometimes given to the chief settlement in the oasis of Tuat in the Algerian Sahara.

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  • WARGLA, a town in the Algerian Sahara, 175 m.

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  • of Biskra on the caravan route to the Niger countries, and a starting point for the exploration of the southern part of the Sahara.

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  • It claims to be the oldest town in the Sahara, and was for a long time self-governing, but eventually placed itself under the protection of the sultan of Morocco.

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  • In 1352 the restless man started for Central Africa, passing by the oases of the Sahara (where the houses were built of rock-salt, as Herodotus tells, and roofed with camel skins) to Timbuktu and Gogo on the Niger, a river which he calls the Nile, believing it to flow down into Egypt, an opinion maintained by some up to the date of Lander's discovery.

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  • Beyond this outer range and along the shore of the sea the flora is that of the Sahara region, which extends eastwards to Sind.

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  • During the dry season, when the climate is very much like that of the West Indies, there occur terrible tornadoes and long periods of the harmattan - a north-east wind, dry and desiccating, and carrying with it from the Sahara clouds of fine dust, which sailors designate "smokes."

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  • by the Sahara and N.

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  • Strawberries and Sahara dates; alfalfa, wheat, barley, corn and sorghum; oranges, lemons, wine grapes, limes, olives, figs, dates, peanuts and sweet potatoes; yams and sugar beets, show the range of agricultural products.

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  • It lies in the Sahara 360 ft.

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  • The Cervidae are distributed all over Europe, Asia, Northern Africa and America, but are unknown in Africa south of the Sahara.

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  • It owed its early prosperity to its easy access to the sea, and to the fact that natural conditions in Cyrenaica and the Sahara behind it, tend to divert trade to the west of the district - a fact which is exemplified by the final survival of Berenice (mod.

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  • A common type of mirage is the appearance of an isolated lake frequently seen in hot sandy deserts, as in the Sahara, Turkestan, &c. The explanation is as follows: The sand, being abnormally heated by the solar rays, causes the neighbouring air to expand, consequently its density, and therefore its refractive index, is diminished, and attains a minimum value in the lowest layers.

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  • BILMA, or Kawar, an oasis in the heart of the Sahara desert, some 60 m.

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  • In 1907 the oasis and surrounding district was created a circle of the Military Territory of the Niger (see Sahara).

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  • As regards the deer-family (Cervidae), which is unknown in Africa south of the Sahara, it is quite evident that it originated in the northern half of the Old World, whence it reached North America by the Bering Sea route, and eventually travelled into South America.

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  • and 89° 42' E.), the climate is fairly typical of Central Asia, the mean for the year being 55.5 for January 16.7° and for July 89.6°; in other words, while the summer is as hot as in the Sahara, the winter is as cold as at St Petersburg.

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  • During this latter year also John Fernandez spent seven months among the natives of the Arguim coast, and brought back the first trustworthy first-hand European account of the Sahara hinterland.

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  • TUGGURT, a town in the Wadi Ghir, Algerian Sahara, 127 m.

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  • Throughout the greater part of Africa south of the Sahara galagos are widely distributed in the wooded districts, from Senegambia in the west to Abyssinia in the east, and as far south as Natal.

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  • (2) The Atlas range, which, orographically, is distinct from the rest of the continent, being unconnected with any other area of high ground, and separated from the rest of the continent on the south by a depressed and desert area (the Sahara), in places below sea-level.

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  • This division includes the great desert of the Sahara.

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  • The arid region, the Sahara - the largest desert in the world, covering 3,500,000 sq.

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  • From the inner slopes of the plateau numerous wadis take a direction towards the Sahara.

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  • (The rarity of the air and the great radiation during the night cause the temperature in the Sahara to fall occasionally to freezing point.) Farther south, the heat is to some extent modified by the moisture brought from the ocean, and by the greater elevation of a large part of the surface, especially in East Africa, where the range of temperature is wider than in the Congo basin or on the Guinea coast.

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  • The wide heated plains of the Sahara, and in a lesser degree the corresponding zone of the Kalahari in the south, have an exceedingly scanty rainfall, the winds which blow over them from the ocean losing part of their moisture as they pass over the outer highlands, and becoming constantly drier owing to the heating effects of the burning soil of the interior; while the scarcity of mountain ranges in the more central parts likewise tends to prevent condensation.

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  • The countries bordering the Sahara are much exposed to a very dry wind, full of fine particles of sand, blowing from the desert towards the sea.

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  • While the climate of the north and south, especially the south, is eminently healthy, and even the intensely heated Sahara is salubrious by reason of its dryness, the tropical zone as a whole is, for European races, the most unhealthy portion of the world.

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  • Characteristic of the Sahara is the date-palm, which flourishes where other vegetation can scarcely maintain existence, while in the semi-desert regions the acacia (whence is obtained gum-arabic) is abundant.

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  • Rocks of Archean age cover wide areas in the interior, in West and East Africa and across the Sahara.

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  • The effect of the Glacial epoch in Europe is shown in northern Africa by the moraines of the higher Atlas, and the wider extension of the glaciers on Kilimanjaro, Kenya and Ruwenzori, and by the extensive accumulations of gravel over the Sahara.

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  • North of the Sahara in Algeria and Morocco are the Libyans (Berbers, q.v.), a distinctively white people, who have in certain respects (e.g.

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  • Below Timbuktu for a considerable distance the Niger receives no tributaries; from the north none until the region of the Sahara is passed.

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  • Chudeau, summing up the evidence available in 1909, set forth the hypothesis that the existing upper Niger and the existing lower Niger were distinct streams. According to this theory the upper Niger, somewhat above where Timbuktu now stands, went north and north-west and emptied into the Juf, which in the beginning of the quaternary age was a salt-water lake, the remnant of an arm of the sea which in the tertiary age covered the northern Sudan and southern Sahara as far east as Bilma.

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  • When the upper Niger had this direction, the Wadi Taffassassent, now a dried-up river of the central Sahara, which rose in the Ahaggar mountains, is believed to have formed the upper course of the existing lower Niger.

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  • Chudeau, Sahara soudanais, Paris, 1909).

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  • The united river ran north, disappeared underground in the Sahara and reached the Mediterranean at "the quicksands of the gulph of Sidra."

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  • SUDAN (Arabic Bilad-es-Sudan, country of the blacks), that region of Africa which stretches, south of the Sahara and Egypt, from Cape Verde on the Atlantic to Massawa on the Red Sea.

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  • For the central Sudan the most important work is that of Gustav Nachtigal, Sahara and Sudan (3 vols., Berlin 1879-1889).

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  • Bordering north on the Sahara, it contains much arid land, but south-west the land is very fertile.

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  • Under the influence of Berber and Arab tribes, who embraced Mahommedanism, the Hausa advanced in civilization; founded large cities, and developed a considerable trade, not only with the neighbouring countries, but, via the Sahara, with the Barbary states.

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  • We should have four great realms:-(1) Europe and Northern and Temperate Asia, Africa north of the Sahara (palaearctic region) and North and Central America (nearctic region); (2) Africa and South-Eastern Asia (Ethiopian and Indian region); (3) South America (neotropical region); and (4) Australia (Australian region).

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  • They live in the zone where the Sahara desert meets with the large African savannas.

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  • Breccia Oniciata, or Sahara Gold on the floor with a richly colored wall paper on the walls will set off the copper sink perfectly.

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  • Egyptian-themed proms have become more popular with ideas like "Arabian Nights," "Desert Dreams," and "Sahara Nights."

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  • He earned a reported $8,000,000 for his role of Dirk Pitt in the action/adventure film Sahara.

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  • Take the "Great Egypt" tour that features Cairo and a Sahara safari tour in Sinai.

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  • The tours may include visiting monuments and wild Sahara safari tours.

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  • Bring some old world charm to your kitchen by selecting a richly colored marble, such as Giallo Sahara in a 4-inch square tile and running it in an offset pattern throughout the kitchen.

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  • However, if you happen to be an archeologist digging in the sands of the Sahara, even this look wouldn't appear wrong.

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  • Sahara: This one is a traditional aviator style, a flattering style on most face shapes.

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  • Give the Turban to Sahara when she stops by and she'll give you the Massage Chair or a Red Vase.

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  • When you're a model, you're willing to go where the jobs are, and sometimes that means being willing to model bikinis in Siberia or fur coats in the Sahara.

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  • The Sahara swimsuit featured sophisticated print and a plunging neckline, while the line's Tie Dye swimsuit, while a one-piece, was barely there at all with its revealing cut.

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  • If you live in a humid part of the country, or you have a problem with dampness in your basement, garage or another part of your home, a Sahara dehumidifier may prove to be just the thing you need to keep your home comfortable and dry.

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  • This dehumidifier is no longer sold under the name "Sahara," but rather, it is now called the Santa Fe dehumidifier.

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  • The Santa Fe dehumidifier is the exact same unit as the Sahara dehumidifier, with only the name change signifying the difference.

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  • The Sahara (Santa Fe) dehumidifier is an industrial-strength dehumidifier that's powered by a standard 120-volt outlet and draws less than seven amps.

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  • The Sahara, or Santa Fe dehumidifier comes with a one-year warranty on parts and labor with a five-year warranty on sealed system parts.

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  • Sahara Sands - With a roped look, this piece is lovely for any pillar candle.

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  • It is part of the Sahara Sands Collection.

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  • These challenges included extreme kayaking, flying over the Sahara, and free diving.

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  • With the exception of the Dra'a, the streams rising on the side of the range facing the Sahara do not reach the sea, but form marshes or lagoons at one season, and at another are lost in the dry soil of the desert.

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    2
  • Dr Oskar Lenz in 1879-1880 surveyed a part of the Great Atlas north of Tarudant, determined a pass south of Iligh in the Anti-Atlas, and penetrated thence across the Sahara to Timbuktu.

    0
    2
  • In the oases of Sahara, and in other parts of Northern Africa, dates are pounded and pressed into a cake for food.

    0
    2
  • In 1874 he founded the Sahara and Sudan mission, and sent missionaries to Tunis, Tripoli, East Africa and the Congo.

    0
    2
  • It is considered that these nomads will be gently pushed back towards the Sahara, leaving cultivable Tunisia to the settled Berber stock, a stock fundamentally one with the peoples of Mediterranean Europe.

    0
    2
  • GHADAMES, GADAMES or Rhadames, a town in an oasis of the same name, in that part of the Sahara which forms part of the Turkish vilayet of Tripoli.

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    2
  • To the south this region is divided by the Great Atlas from the deserts of the Sahara, with its oases, in which the boundary of Algeria is lost.

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