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saffron

saffron

saffron Sentence Examples

  • The Blackwater in Essex, which rises near Saffron Walden, has a course of about 40 m.

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  • The country around is flat and fertile, producing much wine, dates, oranges, oil, saffron and aniseed.

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  • shelheleth), the celebrated odoriferous shell of the ancients, the operculum or "nail" of a species of Strombus or "wing shell," formerly well known in Europe under the name of Blatta byzantina; it is still imported into Bombay to burn with frankincense and other incense to bring out their odours more strongly; saffron (Heb.

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  • German residents are found mainly in the western and west central districts; French mainly in the City of Westminster (especially the district of Soho), St Pancras and St Marylebone; Italians in Holborn (Saffron Hill), Soho and Finsbury; and Russians and Poles in Stepney and Bethnal Green.

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  • A similar notoriety attached to Saffron Hill on the eastern confines of the borough.

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  • Good saffron has a deep orange-red colour; if it is light yellow or blackish, it is bad or too old.

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  • SAFFRON (Arab.

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  • Saffron is grown and exported.

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  • The crops principally raised are wheat and maize, though here, as well as in other parts of the government, barley, flax, tobacco, water-melons, gourds, fruit, wine, saffron and madder are grown.

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  • SIR THOMAS SMITH (1513-1577), English scholar and diplomatist, was born at Saffron Walden in Essex on the 23rd of December 1513.

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  • Caravans from Sus laden with copper-ware, olive oil, butter, saffron, wax, skins, dates, dried roses, &c., are sent to Marrakesh, four days' journey from Tarudant.

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  • Saffron was used as an ingredient in many of the complicated medicines of early times.

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  • Tofieldia, an arctic and alpine genus of small herbs with a slender scape springing from a tuft of narrow ensiform leaves and bearing a raceme of small green flowers; Narthecium (bog-asphodel), herbs with a habit similar to Tofieldia, but with larger golden-yellow flowers; and Colchicum, a genus with about 30 species including b the meadow saffron or autumn crocus (C. autumnale).

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  • It is surrounded by a fertile plain, and has considerable trade in saffron and agricultural produce.

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  • Falafel, and the saffron rice are favorites among regulars.

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  • COLCHICUM, the Meadow Saffron, or Autumn Crocus (Colchicum autumnale), a perennial plant of the natural order Liliaceae, found wild in rich moist meadow-land in England and Ireland, in middle and southern Europe, and in the Swiss Alps.

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  • Among other important productions of the Ottoman Empire are sesame, coleseed, castor oil, flax, hemp, aniseed, mohair, saffron, olive oil, gums, scammony and liquorice.

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  • The most important vegetable productions are - cereals, cotton, gum tragacanth, liquorice, olive oil, opium, rice, saffron, salep, tobacco and yellow berries.

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  • Saffron was used as an ingredient in many of the complicated medicines of early times.

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  • Then, too, there are various dyewoods; rosewood, logwood (or campeachy wood), indigo, manaju (Garcinia Morella), Brazil-wood and saffron.

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  • Thus in Nuremberg a regular saffron inspection was held, and in the 15th century we read of men being burned in the market-place along with their adulterated saffron, while on another occasion three persons convicted of the same crime were buried alive.

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  • Grease and butter are still very frequently mixed with the cake, and shreds of beef dipped in saffron water are also used.

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  • Aquila has some trade in lace and saffron, and possesses other smaller industries.

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  • Manzanares has manufactures of soap, bricks and pottery, and an active trade in wheat, wine, spirits, aniseed and saffron.

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  • Wheat, maize, rice, oil, flax and hemp, of fine quality, are grown in considerable quantities; as well as saffron, madder, liquorice, sumach, and a variety of fruits.

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  • HAVERHILL, a market town of England, in the Sudbury parliamentary division of Suffolk, and the Saffron Walden division of Essex.

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  • Wheat and other cereals are cultivated, with fruits of many kinds, olives, and vines which yield a wine of fair quality; while saffron is largely produced, and some attention is given to the keeping of bees and silkworms. Stock-farming, for which the wide plains afford excellent opportunities, employs many of the peasantry; the bulls of Albacete are in demand for bull-fighting, and the horses for mounting the Spanish cavalry.

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  • From Mongolia come leather, saddlery, sheep and horses, with coral, amber and small diamonds from European sources; from Kham perfumes, fruits, furs and inlaid metal saddlery; from Sikkim and Bhutan rice, musk, sugar-balls and tobacco; from Nepal broadcloth, indigo, brasswork, coral, pearls, sugar, spices, drugs and Indian manufactures; from Ladak saffron, dried fruits and articles from India.

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  • Usually they are of a different colour, and may be black, brown, yellowish, or also less frequently rose-coloured, rusty-red, orange-reddish, saffron, or of various intermediate shades.

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  • He resigned the great seal on the 21st of April 1544, and died on the 30th, being buried at Saffron Walden, where he had prepared for himself a splendid tomb.

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  • Eschscholtzia californica: hardy, II ft., yellow with saffron eye.

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  • Of plants used for dyeing, the principal are bastard saffron, madder, woad and the indigo plant.

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  • SAFFRON WALDEN, a market-town and municipal borough in the Saffron Walden parliamentary division of Essex, England, beautifully situated near the Cam in a valley surrounded by hills, on a branch of the Great Eastern railway, 431 m.

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  • The culture of saffron was the most characteristic industry at Walden from the reign of Edward III.

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  • The trade is mainly in these products and in wine and saffron.

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  • The environs are occupied by vineyards, gardens and orchards, in which madder, saffron and tobacco, as well as figs, peaches, pears and other fruits, are cultivated.

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  • Among the vegetable products not yet mentioned the most important are the mulberry, grown in almost all provinces, but principally in those bordering on the Mediterranean, and above all in Valencia, the chief seat of the Spanish silk production and manufacture; tobacco, which is also imported, hemp and flax, grown chiefly in Galicia and other northern provinces; among dye-plants, madder, saffron, woad (Isatis tinctoria), and wild woad or dyers weed (Reseda luteola); ground-nuts (Arachis hypogaea), grown for their oil, for the preparation of which the nuts are exported in considerable quantity to France; liquorice, cummin, colocynth, &c. Esparto, chiefly from the arid lands of the south-east, is largely exported to Great Britain.

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  • The hill-sides were clothed with vine and fir, and the rich broad plain of Hermus produced large quantities of corn and saffron.

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  • My own face might have been pretty cheery with the splendid sea bass, fennel and cherry tomatoes served with saffron aioli £ 10.90.

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  • Sautéed langoustine with Chardonnay reduction, grilled asparagus with saffron aioli or grilled salmon with Thai curry sauce and basmati rice.

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  • You may add cardamom, saffron or rose essence if you prefer a classic Indian flavor.

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  • The food is top notch, with exquisite treats like Bayonne ham and figs or poached cod with saffron and chili.

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  • The food is top notch, with exquisite treats like Bayonne ham and figs or poached cod with saffron and chili.

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  • Monorail ticket Cheats Go to Saffron City and talk to the girl copycat.

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  • creamy risotto whose yellow flavor did not offer an empty promise, it really tasted of saffron.

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  • saffron Walden takes its name from the saffron crocus once grown around the town.

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  • But don't expect ot see crocuses in Saffron Waldon in Essex.

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  • Cornish Saffron buns are made with yeast and include currants and candied peel.

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  • Little Warden's control tower A slight detour led us to the site of Little Walden, near Saffron Walden.

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  • My steamed halibut came on a bed of creamy risotto flavored with spring onions and with a sauce made from mussels infused with saffron.

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  • Sautéed langoustine with Chardonnay reduction, grilled asparagus with saffron aioli or grilled salmon with Thai curry sauce and basmati rice.

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  • He murmurs to himself like a painter who has found the right color - lemon and saffron delight him lime is his lucky mascot.

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  • They gave up their possessions, put on a saffron robe, shaved their head, and became mendicants or wandering monks.

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  • Notable starters were the Irish rock oysters and the scallops with truffle oil or Saffron sauce.

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  • Other uncommon plants include meadow saffron, saw-wort and herb Paris.

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  • When ready to serve, divide the saffron pilaf between two plates, and top each with a chicken skewer and some raita.

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  • poached cod with saffron and chili.

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  • Additional side dishes are available at extra cost but we found the accompanying puy lentils and kale and the saffron rice perfectly adequate.

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  • It came with a creamy risotto whose yellow flavor did not offer an empty promise, it really tasted of saffron.

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  • On the day I was there, the younger monks, some wearing their saffron robes, were playing football against the local traders.

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  • Remove from heat, and add the remaining liquid saffron.

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  • Our recipe is a luxurious recipe that includes crushed organic saffron.

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  • Next, via country lanes to saffron Waldon, a village once famed for growing saffron.

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  • saffron infused crispy rice pudding.

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  • I saw an American (a rarity in Dubai) who had bought some saffron being pressed to buy more.

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  • The seed taken in wine with a little saffron removes obstruction of the liver and is good for the yellow jaundice.

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  • Maker (Clarke / Hicks / Nash) Days of yellow saffron.

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  • Product description: Spanish saffron The most expensive of spices by weight.

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  • saffron Walden takes its name from the saffron crocus once grown around the town.

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  • saffron robes, were playing football against the local traders.

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  • saffron buns or ginger cookies to her parents.

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  • saffron rice.

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  • saffron rice To one cup of rice add 8 saffron strands, soaked in warm water for 8 minutes.

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  • saffron cream sauce.

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  • In autumn the meadows bloom once more, this time with meadow saffron - a plant associated with ancient grasslands.

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  • Pan-fried scallops were overpowered by their bed of broad bean mash, which in turn swamped the accompanying saffron dressing.

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  • M: filet of sea bass with smoked salmon mousse and saffron cream sauce; twice baked roquefort and red onion souffle.

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  • Saffron, as a herb, is made from the dried stamen of the crocus and is widely used in the oriental kitchen.

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  • stigmas of the flowers had to be picked to make one pound of saffron.

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  • Auburn hues Soaked saffron strands and its soaking liquid lend delicate streaks of color and flavor to fluffy boiled rice.

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  • add the turmeric or saffron, then drop in the mussels in their shells.

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  • I must say I thought it a silly idea, until the then unborn Saffron started moving every time the light was switched on.

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  • The main course was a simple choice of savory cr è pes or griddled tuna served with saffron rice and haricots verts.

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  • SIR THOMAS SMITH (1513-1577), English scholar and diplomatist, was born at Saffron Walden in Essex on the 23rd of December 1513.

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  • COLCHICUM, the Meadow Saffron, or Autumn Crocus (Colchicum autumnale), a perennial plant of the natural order Liliaceae, found wild in rich moist meadow-land in England and Ireland, in middle and southern Europe, and in the Swiss Alps.

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  • The Blackwater in Essex, which rises near Saffron Walden, has a course of about 40 m.

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  • The country around is flat and fertile, producing much wine, dates, oranges, oil, saffron and aniseed.

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  • A similar notoriety attached to Saffron Hill on the eastern confines of the borough.

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  • From early times George Fox and many others had taken a keen interest in education, and in 1779 there was founded at Ackworth, near Pontefract, a school for boys and girls; this was followed by the reconstitution, in 1808, of a school at Sidcot in the Mendips, and in 1811, of one in Islington Road, London; it was afterwards removed to Croydon, and, later, to Saffron Walden.

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  • Then, too, there are various dyewoods; rosewood, logwood (or campeachy wood), indigo, manaju (Garcinia Morella), Brazil-wood and saffron.

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  • Among other important productions of the Ottoman Empire are sesame, coleseed, castor oil, flax, hemp, aniseed, mohair, saffron, olive oil, gums, scammony and liquorice.

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  • Tofieldia, an arctic and alpine genus of small herbs with a slender scape springing from a tuft of narrow ensiform leaves and bearing a raceme of small green flowers; Narthecium (bog-asphodel), herbs with a habit similar to Tofieldia, but with larger golden-yellow flowers; and Colchicum, a genus with about 30 species including b the meadow saffron or autumn crocus (C. autumnale).

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  • - Corm of Meadow Saffron (Colchicum autumnale).

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  • SAFFRON (Arab.

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  • za`faran), a product manufactured from the dried stigmas and part of the style of the saffron crocus, a cultivated form of Crocus sativus; some of the wild forms (var.

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  • The Egyptians, though acquainted with the bastard safflower, do not seem to have possessed saffron; but it is named in Canticles iv.

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  • It is also repeatedly mentioned (Kpkos) by Homer, Hippocrates and other Greek writers; and the word "crocodile" was long supposed to have been derived from Kancos and whence we have such stories as that "the crocodile's tears are never true save when he is forced where saffron groweth" (Fuller's Worthies).

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  • It was especially cultivated near Hinton in Cambridgeshire and in Essex at Saffron Walden, its cultivators being called "crokers."

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  • The ` streets of Rome were sprinkled with saffron when Nero made his entry into the city.

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  • One grain of saffron rubbed to powder with sugar and a little water imparts a distinctly yellow tint to ten gallons of water.

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  • This colouring power is due to the presence of polychlorite, a substance whose chemical formula appears to be C4 8 1-160018, and which may be obtained by treating saffron with ether, and afterwards exhausting with water.

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  • Saffron is chiefly cultivated in Spain, France, Sicily, on the lower spurs of the Apennines and in Persia and Kashmir.

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  • The stigmas and a part of the style are carefully picked out, and the wet saffron is then scattered on sheets of paper to a depth of 2 or 3 in.; over this a cloth is laid, and next a board with a heavy weight.

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  • This is known as cake saffron to distinguish it from hay saffron, which consists merely of the dried stigmas.

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  • Thus in Nuremberg a regular saffron inspection was held, and in the 15th century we read of men being burned in the market-place along with their adulterated saffron, while on another occasion three persons convicted of the same crime were buried alive.

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  • Grease and butter are still very frequently mixed with the cake, and shreds of beef dipped in saffron water are also used.

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  • Good saffron has a deep orange-red colour; if it is light yellow or blackish, it is bad or too old.

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  • Saffron Walden >>

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  • shelheleth), the celebrated odoriferous shell of the ancients, the operculum or "nail" of a species of Strombus or "wing shell," formerly well known in Europe under the name of Blatta byzantina; it is still imported into Bombay to burn with frankincense and other incense to bring out their odours more strongly; saffron (Heb.

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  • German residents are found mainly in the western and west central districts; French mainly in the City of Westminster (especially the district of Soho), St Pancras and St Marylebone; Italians in Holborn (Saffron Hill), Soho and Finsbury; and Russians and Poles in Stepney and Bethnal Green.

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  • Aquila has some trade in lace and saffron, and possesses other smaller industries.

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  • Manzanares has manufactures of soap, bricks and pottery, and an active trade in wheat, wine, spirits, aniseed and saffron.

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  • Wheat, maize, rice, oil, flax and hemp, of fine quality, are grown in considerable quantities; as well as saffron, madder, liquorice, sumach, and a variety of fruits.

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  • HAVERHILL, a market town of England, in the Sudbury parliamentary division of Suffolk, and the Saffron Walden division of Essex.

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  • Wheat and other cereals are cultivated, with fruits of many kinds, olives, and vines which yield a wine of fair quality; while saffron is largely produced, and some attention is given to the keeping of bees and silkworms. Stock-farming, for which the wide plains afford excellent opportunities, employs many of the peasantry; the bulls of Albacete are in demand for bull-fighting, and the horses for mounting the Spanish cavalry.

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  • From Mongolia come leather, saddlery, sheep and horses, with coral, amber and small diamonds from European sources; from Kham perfumes, fruits, furs and inlaid metal saddlery; from Sikkim and Bhutan rice, musk, sugar-balls and tobacco; from Nepal broadcloth, indigo, brasswork, coral, pearls, sugar, spices, drugs and Indian manufactures; from Ladak saffron, dried fruits and articles from India.

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  • Usually they are of a different colour, and may be black, brown, yellowish, or also less frequently rose-coloured, rusty-red, orange-reddish, saffron, or of various intermediate shades.

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  • He resigned the great seal on the 21st of April 1544, and died on the 30th, being buried at Saffron Walden, where he had prepared for himself a splendid tomb.

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  • Eschscholtzia californica: hardy, II ft., yellow with saffron eye.

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  • Of plants used for dyeing, the principal are bastard saffron, madder, woad and the indigo plant.

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  • The chief crop is maize; but wheat, rye and other grains, potatoes, saffron, hemp, flax and tobacco are also grown.

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  • SAFFRON WALDEN, a market-town and municipal borough in the Saffron Walden parliamentary division of Essex, England, beautifully situated near the Cam in a valley surrounded by hills, on a branch of the Great Eastern railway, 431 m.

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  • Saffron Walden (Waledana) was almost certainly fortified by the Britons, and probably by some earlier race.

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  • The culture of saffron was the most characteristic industry at Walden from the reign of Edward III.

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  • Saffron is grown and exported.

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  • It is surrounded by a fertile plain, and has considerable trade in saffron and agricultural produce.

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  • The most important vegetable productions are - cereals, cotton, gum tragacanth, liquorice, olive oil, opium, rice, saffron, salep, tobacco and yellow berries.

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  • The crops principally raised are wheat and maize, though here, as well as in other parts of the government, barley, flax, tobacco, water-melons, gourds, fruit, wine, saffron and madder are grown.

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  • The trade is mainly in these products and in wine and saffron.

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  • The environs are occupied by vineyards, gardens and orchards, in which madder, saffron and tobacco, as well as figs, peaches, pears and other fruits, are cultivated.

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  • Sandals and shoes of bronze are mentioned in Irish literature, and quite a number are to be seen in museums. A loose flowing garment, intermediate between the brat and lend, usually of linen dyed saffron, was commonly worn in outdoor life, and was still used in the Hebrides about 1700.

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  • Caravans from Sus laden with copper-ware, olive oil, butter, saffron, wax, skins, dates, dried roses, &c., are sent to Marrakesh, four days' journey from Tarudant.

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  • Among the vegetable products not yet mentioned the most important are the mulberry, grown in almost all provinces, but principally in those bordering on the Mediterranean, and above all in Valencia, the chief seat of the Spanish silk production and manufacture; tobacco, which is also imported, hemp and flax, grown chiefly in Galicia and other northern provinces; among dye-plants, madder, saffron, woad (Isatis tinctoria), and wild woad or dyers weed (Reseda luteola); ground-nuts (Arachis hypogaea), grown for their oil, for the preparation of which the nuts are exported in considerable quantity to France; liquorice, cummin, colocynth, &c. Esparto, chiefly from the arid lands of the south-east, is largely exported to Great Britain.

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  • The hill-sides were clothed with vine and fir, and the rich broad plain of Hermus produced large quantities of corn and saffron.

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  • Additional side dishes are available at extra cost but we found the accompanying puy lentils and kale and the saffron rice perfectly adequate.

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  • We rise early to witness the unforgettable sight of saffron robed monks collecting alms from local people at dawn.

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  • On the day I was there, the younger monks, some wearing their saffron robes, were playing football against the local traders.

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  • Remove from heat, and add the remaining liquid saffron.

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    0
  • Our recipe is a luxurious recipe that includes crushed organic saffron.

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    0
  • Next, via country lanes to Saffron Waldon, a village once famed for growing saffron.

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  • The milk pudding was wobbly and delicate and came with delicious saffron infused crispy rice pudding.

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  • I saw an American (a rarity in Dubai) who had bought some saffron being pressed to buy more.

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  • The seed taken in wine with a little saffron removes obstruction of the liver and is good for the yellow jaundice.

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  • Maker (Clarke / Hicks / Nash) Days of yellow saffron.

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  • Product description: Spanish saffron The most expensive of spices by weight.

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  • She serves coffee and saffron buns or ginger cookies to her parents.

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  • The Ross - Pan fried supreme of chicken topped with an Orkney smoked cheese sauce on a bed of saffron rice.

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  • Saffron rice To one cup of rice add 8 saffron strands, soaked in warm water for 8 minutes.

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  • Vintage: 2004 Food Choice: Fish in filo pastry with saffron cream sauce.

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  • In autumn the meadows bloom once more, this time with meadow saffron - a plant associated with ancient grasslands.

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  • Pan-fried scallops were overpowered by their bed of broad bean mash, which in turn swamped the accompanying saffron dressing.

    0
    0
  • M: filet of sea bass with smoked salmon mousse and saffron cream sauce; twice baked roquefort and red onion souffle.

    0
    0
  • Saffron, as a herb, is made from the dried stamen of the crocus and is widely used in the oriental kitchen.

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  • Up to a quarter of a million stigmas of the flowers had to be picked to make one pound of saffron.

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  • Auburn hues Soaked saffron strands and its soaking liquid lend delicate streaks of color and flavor to fluffy boiled rice.

    0
    0
  • Add the turmeric or saffron, then drop in the mussels in their shells.

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  • I must say I thought it a silly idea, until the then unborn Saffron started moving every time the light was switched on.

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  • As the most expensive spice in the world, you may wonder what saffron tastes like.

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  • In fact, saffron is somewhat bitter, but its flavor is also complex.

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  • Taken from the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), saffron refers to the dried stigmas of the flower.

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  • You can purchase saffron as pure "threads" or as powder.

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  • Used in cuisines throughout the world, saffron contributes not only flavor, but also visual pop.

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  • Though saffron threads are red, they diffuse into a golden yellow.

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  • Yet the consensus for saffron is that it possesses a honey-like taste.

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  • Saffron adds a very distinct flavor, and for some dishes, such as Spain's paella or Iran's chelow kabab, it is essential.

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  • Generally, people describe saffron as a mixture of sweet and bitter, and when it comes to this herb, a pinch goes a long way.

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  • As a rule, for a meal serving four to six people, a pinch of saffron should be enough.

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  • Tints: Saffron offers an attractive color for hair, as well as skin tone.

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  • Dyes: For garments, a little saffron can impart a beautiful hue.

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  • Foods: Saffron remains a main ingredient for many recipes, such as Spanish rice, Italian risotto, and Swedish bread.

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  • Medicines: Believed to be an antidote for blood disorders and poisons, saffron as an herb is still used today in Ayurvedic medicines (India).

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  • Cooking is a science, and while there's room for creativity in many dishes, you'll need to follow the recipe precisely when using saffron.

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  • The reason is that saffron's bitter quality can overwhelm a dish if too much is used.

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  • FamilyOven provides recipes like saffron rice, saffron potatoes, and saffron buns.

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  • MyRecipes include over 50 magazine recipes that make use of saffron.

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  • With a price tag like saffron, it's fortunate that a little goes a long way.

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  • The darker the threads, the older the saffron.

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  • Also, whenever possible, purchase full saffron threads.

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  • While saffron is widely available in powder form, it's more difficult to tell if it's pure or not.

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  • Since ancient times, saffron has been adulterated with other spices, such as safflower and the more bitter turmeric.

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  • Even with the lofty price tag, saffron is a worthy spice to grace your spice rack.

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  • Soon you'll be mastering those exotic dishes with your secret ingredient - just a pinch of saffron.

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  • Saffron: Though expensive, these tiny stems from the crocus plant are, in fact, a good way to reduce high blood pressure.

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  • You can add saffron to the dishes you prepare to get the benefits from it.

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  • It is a recommendation that you consume a small amount of saffron on a daily basis to see significant results in your blood pressure.

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  • Turmeric has been used as a substitute for saffron as well as an ingredient in foods like curry, mustard, and cheese - both for its flavor and color.

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  • I was disappointed that Nagarmotha and saffron did not present themselves more strongly; these are such special notes in a blend of otherwise common elements that it seems a shame they didn't stand out more.

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  • Cinnamon sticks, bay leaves, whole cloves, nutmeg and one of the most expensive spices, saffron, are likely to grace the shelves.

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  • Saffron Marigold offers curtains with a wide variety of styles ranging from tropical, casual outhouse, cool contemporary, Asian, or formal and elegant.

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  • You can shop for children's dresses in rich colors like plum and saffron, and know that you are supporting an African family.

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  • Meadow Saffron (Colchicum) - Hardy bulbs, some handsome in autumn.

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  • N. patellaris has a broad crown and a saffron rim, and blooms late; but the form usually met with early in May is N. recurvus, the Pheasants-eye of cottage gardens.

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  • Spring Meadow Saffron (Bulbocodium) - B. vernum is a pretty liliaceous bulb from 4 to 6 inches high, and one of the earliest of flowers, sending up large rosy-purple flower-buds, distinct in color.

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  • Additionally, you have more leeway when it comes to color selection; various shades, from grey to saffron to blush pink, are all perfectly appropriate colors.

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  • I thought that too and then I saw that Freddie Prinze Jr. was cast as a star and the supporting roles were filled by Saffron Burrows, Matthew Lilliard, and Jurgen Prochnow.

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  • Saffron Rouge only carries brands that source mineral, natural and organic ingredients in its products (it is akin to the Sephora of the natural and organic beauty world).

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  • Saffron Rouge offers everything an aromatherapy fanatic could possibly want - all in one spot.

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  • True to its name, it's part sweet and part edgy, with notes of mandarin, saffron and white thyme toying with hints of orchid and spicy ylang ylang.

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  • Common ingredients used in their recipes include saffron rice, apricots, ginger sauce and couscous.

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  • Recent offerings include arctic char filets, tea-steamed duck medallions and saffron thread risotto cakes.

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  • The Egyptians, though acquainted with the bastard safflower, do not seem to have possessed saffron; but it is named in Canticles iv.

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  • It is also repeatedly mentioned (Kpkos) by Homer, Hippocrates and other Greek writers; and the word "crocodile" was long supposed to have been derived from Kancos and whence we have such stories as that "the crocodile's tears are never true save when he is forced where saffron groweth" (Fuller's Worthies).

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  • It was especially cultivated near Hinton in Cambridgeshire and in Essex at Saffron Walden, its cultivators being called "crokers."

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  • The ` streets of Rome were sprinkled with saffron when Nero made his entry into the city.

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  • In ancient Ireland a king's mantle was dyed with saffron, and even down to the 17th century the "lein-croich," or saffron-dyed shirt, was worn by persons of rank in the Hebrides.

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  • One grain of saffron rubbed to powder with sugar and a little water imparts a distinctly yellow tint to ten gallons of water.

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  • This colouring power is due to the presence of polychlorite, a substance whose chemical formula appears to be C4 8 1-160018, and which may be obtained by treating saffron with ether, and afterwards exhausting with water.

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  • Saffron is chiefly cultivated in Spain, France, Sicily, on the lower spurs of the Apennines and in Persia and Kashmir.

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  • The stigmas and a part of the style are carefully picked out, and the wet saffron is then scattered on sheets of paper to a depth of 2 or 3 in.; over this a cloth is laid, and next a board with a heavy weight.

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  • A strong heat is applied for about two hours so as to make the saffron "sweat," and a gentler temperature for a further period of twenty-four hours, the cake being turned every hour so that every part is thoroughly dried.

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  • This is known as cake saffron to distinguish it from hay saffron, which consists merely of the dried stigmas.

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  • The chief crop is maize; but wheat, rye and other grains, potatoes, saffron, hemp, flax and tobacco are also grown.

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  • Saffron Walden (Waledana) was almost certainly fortified by the Britons, and probably by some earlier race.

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  • Sandals and shoes of bronze are mentioned in Irish literature, and quite a number are to be seen in museums. A loose flowing garment, intermediate between the brat and lend, usually of linen dyed saffron, was commonly worn in outdoor life, and was still used in the Hebrides about 1700.

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  • In ancient Ireland a king's mantle was dyed with saffron, and even down to the 17th century the "lein-croich," or saffron-dyed shirt, was worn by persons of rank in the Hebrides.

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  • A strong heat is applied for about two hours so as to make the saffron "sweat," and a gentler temperature for a further period of twenty-four hours, the cake being turned every hour so that every part is thoroughly dried.

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  • If the name was not derived from that of some English locality--Saffron Walden, for instance--one might suppose that it was called originally Walled-in Pond.

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  • za`faran), a product manufactured from the dried stigmas and part of the style of the saffron crocus, a cultivated form of Crocus sativus; some of the wild forms (var.

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  • Saffron Walden >>

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