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sacrifice

sacrifice

sacrifice Sentence Examples

  • I admire the effort and sacrifice you put into it.

  • Is being in control so important that you're willing to sacrifice the happiness of your only son?

  • It also told me he was willing to make a sacrifice for her protection.

  • I can't believe she would want you to sacrifice...

  • Stymieing her sunny nature now was a small sacrifice compared to seeing it snuffed forever.

  • This sacrifice was the least he could do for his friend.

  • She wondered how accurate her dream had been, if her only way to save Rhyn was to sacrifice herself.

  • He.d lost his lover, Jade, that way, a sacrifice that still stung.

  • While Kris would love to sacrifice a certain infuriating mortal to further his cause, he wouldn.t even sacrifice her, let alone allow Darkyn.s to wipe out a village.

  • Why is it that men think a woman is perverted when she won't sacrifice her morals for him, but she's a slut when she gives in for the other guy?

  • I chose to sacrifice my life so that you'd have the chance to do this, Rhyn.

  • He bristled at the mention of Rhyn in the same sentence as Andre.  One half-brother had been noble, courageous, honorable, willing to sacrifice himself for their cause.  Rhyn was the opposite.

  • "That's not quite what I'm saying.  I know you understand that great sacrifice is sometimes warranted for a greater good.  And what you might be learning is that the greater good also sometimes requires doing what might be called evil," she said.

  • I know you do, and I love you all the more for the sacrifice you're willing to make.

  • We were impressed by your sight and sacrifice.

  • "It's only a sacrifice if they don't live through this!" she snapped.

  • She suspected even his promise to sacrifice her if it meant saving their world would melt in the furnace of his fury.

  • A small sacrifice for saving your people.

  • Even as he spoke the words, he knew he couldn't sacrifice her for the kingdom.

  • "Sacrifice is –" "You saved the human world.

  • She remembered the strong, thoughtful little boy whose life she decided to sacrifice for her cause.

  • He was as strong as she was in that way, willing to sacrifice anyone and anything.

  • You didn't carry that bauble with you for twenty years to sacrifice it now.

  • Xander was enjoying his newfound status too much to sacrifice it now, especially when he had a line of women ready to please him.

  • The only vamp that could change someone without them following the normal rite requiring human sacrifice, Xander had once created an army in months.

  • He wanted the only woman who chose to sacrifice herself to the Original Other, as part of a horribly planned attempt to save those she loved.

  • He was in fact a typical representative of the unscrupulous selfseeking Polish magnates of the 17th century who were always ready to sacrifice everything, their country included, to their own private ambition.

  • In late versions this legend was expanded and varied, the martyrdom was connected with a refusal to take part in a great sacrifice ordered at Octodurum and the name of Exsuperius was added to that of Mauritius.

  • Frazer formerly held Virbius to be a wood and tree spirit, to whom horses, in which form tree spirits were often represented, were offered in sacrifice.

  • It was supposed to be the offspring of Pasiphae, the wife of Minos, and a snow-white bull, sent to Minos by Poseidon for sacrifice.

  • When the third sacrifice came round Theseus volunteered to go, and with the help of Ariadne slew the Minotaur (Plutarch, Theseus, 15-19; Diod.

  • The slaying of the Minotaur by Theseus in that case indicates the abolition of such sacrifice by the advance of Greek civilization.

  • In the Roman Church the alb is now reckoned as one of the vestments proper to the sacrifice of the Mass.

  • again tried to make his peace with the court in January 1792, but he was so insulted that he was not encouraged to sacrifice himself for the sake of the king and queen, who persisted in remembering all old enmities in their time of trouble.

  • One party threatened to return to Romanism; another threatened to sacrifice the independence of Geneva and submit to Berne.

  • The stricter party urged the adoption of the Westminster standards and conformity thereto; the broader party were unwilling to sacrifice their liberty.

  • 11); the new moons and the Sabbaths alike called men to the sanctuary to do sacrifice (Isa.

  • Thus the old Hindus chose the new and the full moon as days of sacrifice; the eve.

  • Then he may offer sacrifice so that his prayers be accepted."

  • One of the oldest and most widespread methods of divining the future, both among primitive people and among several of the civilizations of antiquity, was the reading of omens in the signs noted on the liver of the animal offered as a sacrifice to some deity.

  • The one is that the animal sacrificed was looked upon as a deity, and that, therefore, the liver represented the soul of the god; the other theory is that the deity in accepting the sacrifice identified himself with the animal, and that, therefore, the liver as the soul of the animal was the counterpart of the soul of the god.

  • On the other hand, serious difficulties arise if we assume that every animal sacrificed represents a deity; and even assuming that such a belief underlies the rite of animal sacrifice, a modification of the belief must have been introduced when such sacrifices became a common rite resorted to on every occasion when a deity was to be approached.

  • that the daily sacrifices which form a feature of advanced cults involved the belief of the daily slaughter of some deity, and even before this stage was reached the primitive belief of the actual identification of the god with the animal must have yielded to some such belief as that the deity in accepting the sacrifice assimilates the animal to his own being, precisely as man assimilates the food that enters into his body.

  • To sacrifice phrasing, and distinctness in real partwriting, to a crude imitation of the richness produced mechanically on the harpsichord by drawing 4-ft.

  • The foreign policy of ViscontiVenosta may be said to have reinforced the international position of Italy without sacrifice of dignity, and without the vacillation and short-sightedness which was to characterize the ensuing administrations of the Left.

  • The conclusion of the treaty of Bardo on the 12th of May, however, compelled Cairoli to sacrifice himself to popular indignation.

  • At the two Diets held by him, at Kassa and Talya, in 1683, the estates, though not uninfluenced by his personal charm, showed some want of confidence in him, fearing lest he might sacrifice the national independence to the Turkish alliance.

  • The principal other ceremonies of this class are the new and full moon offerings, the oblations made at the commencement of the three seasons, the offering of first-fruits, the animal sacrifice, and the Agnihotra, or daily morning and evening oblation of milk, which, however, is also included amongst the grihya, or domestic rites, as having to be performed daily on the domestic fire by the householder who keeps no regular set of sacrificial fires.

  • This is what may conveniently be called the Prajapati theory, by which the "Lord of Creatures," the efficient cause of the universe, is identified with both the sacrifice;(yajna) and the sacrificer (yajamana).

  • In this primeval, or rather timeless because ever-proceeding, sacrifice, time itself, in the shape of its unit the year, is made to take its part, inasmuch as the three seasons - spring, summer and autumn - of which it consists, constitute the ghee (clarified butter), the offering-fuel and the oblation respectively.

  • These speculations may be said to have formed the foundation on which the theory of the sacrifice, as propounded in the Brahmanas, has been reared.

  • According to Frazer, these traditions may be " distorted reminiscences " of the practice of human sacrifice, especially of divine kings, the object of which was to ensure fertility in the animal and vegetable worlds.

  • When his father was attacked by Memnon, he saved his life at the sacrifice of his own (Pindar, Pyth.

  • His ashes, with those of Achilles and Patroclus, were deposited in a mound on the promontory of Sigeum, where the inhabitants of Ilium offered sacrifice to the dead heroes (Odyssey, xxiv.

  • This spirit of do ut des will be found to go closely with the gift-theory of sacrifice, and to be especially characteristic of those religions of middle grade that are given over to sacrificial worship as conducted in temples and by means of organized priesthoods.

  • Since 1879 their leading doctrines have been formulated as follows: (I) the total depravity of man; (2) the real Godhead and real humanity of Christ; (3) justification and redemption through the sacrifice of Christ; (4) work of the Holy Spirit; (5) good works as fruits of the Spirit; (6) fellowship of believers; (7) second coming of Christ; (8) resurrection of the dead to life or judgment.

  • To appease these, offerings are made to them either direct or through the mediation of the Devas (domestic or agrarian deities); and if these avail not, the Menyepi or Great Sacrifice is resorted to.

  • In the course of this ceremony, after the sacrifice, men rush in all directions carrying torches; the women also carry fire-brands, or knock on the houses with rice-crushers and other heavy implements, and thus the evil spirits are considered to be driven away.

  • The lines run: "Thou cheat'st us, Ford; mak'st one seem two by art: What is Love's Sacrifice but the Broken Heart ?"

  • In a third tragedy, Love's Sacrifice (acted c. 1630; printed in 1633), he again worked on similar materials; but this time he unfortunately essayed to base the interest of his plot upon an unendurably unnatural possibility - doing homage to virtue after a fashion which is in itself an insult.

  • But neither of them is a copy, as Friar Bonaventura in Ford's second play may be said to be a copy of Friar Lawrence, whose kindly pliability he disagreeably exaggerates, or as D'Avolos in Love's Sacrifice is clearly modelled on Iago.

  • SACRIFICE (from Lat.

  • The sacrifice of desacralization is, however, also found; hence MM.

  • and Mauss describe a sacrifice as "a religious act, which, by the consecration of a victim, modifies the moral state of the sacrificer or of certain material objects which he has in view," i.e.

  • By this definition the term sacrifice is extended to cover the inanimate offering which is consumed by fire, broken or otherwise rendered useless for the purpose of human life.

  • Theories of Sacrifice.

  • - Explanations of sacrifice, as of other rites, are naturally not wanting among the peoples who have practised or still practise it; but they are often of the nature of aetiological myths and give no clue to the original meaning.

  • (a) According to the view put forward by Dr Tylor, the sacrifice is originally a gift, offered to supernatural beings by man for the purpose of securing their favour or minimizing their hostility.

  • These were, in fact, simply the popular theories of sacrifice put on an evidential basis by facts drawn from various stages of culture.

  • (iii.) In the mystical sacrifice the god is himself slain and eaten by his worshippers.

  • The sacrifice is in its origin a communion; god and worshippers have a bond of kinship between them; but it is liable to be interrupted or its strength diminished.

  • From the communion sacrifice sprang the piaculum, which here becomes a subsidiary form and finds its full explanation in the ideas connected with the mystic union of god and worshippers.

  • For the object of the piaculum is the re-establishment of the broken alliance, which was precisely that of the communion sacrifice.

  • With the decline of totemism arose the need for human sacrifice - the only means of re-establishing the broken tie of kinship when the animal species was no longer akin to man.

  • Marillier further argues that if, on the other hand, there was no bond between god and people but that of the common meal, it does not appear that the god is a totem god; there is no reason why the animal should have been a totem; and in any case this idea of sacrifice can hardly have been anything but a slow growth and consequently not the origin of the practice.

  • Frazer has put forward the view that while the sacrifice of the god may have been piacular, it was also intended to preserve his divine life against the inroads of old age.

  • Marillier sacrifice was, at its origin, essentially a magical rite - the liberation by the effusion of a victim's blood of a magical force which was to bend the gods to the will of man; from this arose, under the influence of cult of the dead, the gift theory of sacrifice.

  • This they did by sacrificing a victim and effecting communion with the god by the application of its blood to the altar; or, more directly, by the sacrifice of the animal-god and the contact of the sacrificer with its blood.

  • (e) Dr Westermarck takes the view that human sacrifice is as a rule an act of substitution, in that men offer a victim in the hope of saving themselves; but he also recognizes funeral sacrifices of various kinds.

  • If, however, we turn to Australia, where sacrifice is unknown, we find more than ' one class of rites in which we can trace an idea akin to some forms of sacrifice.

  • Thus it appears that the gift theory may after all be primitive; the worship of, or care for, the dead may have supplied in other areas the motive for the transition from offering to sacrifice or the evolution may have been due to the spiritualization of the gods.

  • In Australia, among the Hottentots, in the Malay Peninsula and elsewhere, blood ceremonies are in use which are unconnected with the slaughter of a victim; in this blood ritual we may see another possible source of sacrifice.

  • In the sacrifice of sacralization the sanctity passes from the victim to the object; in that of desacralization, from the object to the victim.

  • (d) The form of the sacrifice is discussed in the next section.

  • For Hinduism and later Judaism we possess a wealth of material on which to base a comparative study of the forms of sacrifice; a form of this - animal sacrifice in the Vedas - has been analysed by MM.

  • The necessary elements of a Hindu sacrifice are: (I) the sacrificer, who provides the victim, and is affected, directly or indirectly, by the sacrifice; he may or may not be identical with (2) the officiant, who performs the rite; we have further (3) the place, (4) the instruments of sacrifice and (5) the victim; where the sacrificer enjoys only the secondary results, the direct influence of the sacrifice is directed towards (6) the object; finally, we may distinguish (7) three moments of the rite - (a) the entry, (b) the slaughter, (c) the exit.

  • The sacrifices of sacralization and desacralization mentioned above find their analogues in the Hindu scheme of the rite; sacralization and desacralization, sometimes performed by means of subsidiary sacrifices, are the essential elements of the preparation for sacrifice and the subsequent lustration.

  • errors of procedure, destructive of the efficacy of the sacrifice.

  • (3) Where there was an appointed place of sacrifice - the Temple at Jerusalem, according to later Jewish prescription - there was.

  • no need of preparation of a place of sacrifice; but the Hindu chose, each for himself, the site of his altar.

  • The object of the sacrifice being to bridge the gulf between the sacred and profane worlds, the sacrificer had to remain in contact with the victim, either personally, or, to avoid ritual perils, by the intermediary of the priest.

  • (6) Then followed the rites of desacralization, including burning of certain of the instruments, lustration of the post, destruction of the butter, &c. Finally the priest, the sacrificer and his wife performed a lustration, found in an exaggerated form in the "bath" which concluded the soma sacrifice, and the ceremonies were at an end.

  • How far this scheme of sacrifice holds good for other areas, and in particular for more primitive peoples, is an open question.

  • With our present knowledge the problem of the original form of sacrifice, if there be a single primary form, is insoluble.

  • The corpse may be burnt, in part or as a whole; portions may be assigned to the priest, the sacrificer and the gods; the skull, bones, &c., may receive special treatment; the fat or blood may be set aside, and they or the ashes may be singled out as the share of the god, to be offered upon the altar; the skin of the victim may be employed as a covering for the idol or material representative of the god, either permanently or till the next annual sacrifice.

  • It is equally impossible to give a general survey of the purposes of sacrifice; not only are they too numerous but it is rare to find any but mixed forms; the scapegoat, for example, is also a messenger to the dead, and its flesh is eaten by the sacrificers.

  • In both these rites we seem to have a duplication of ritual, and the parallelism of sacrifice and liberation is clear.

  • (ii.) As an example of the second class may be taken the sacrifice of the bull to Rudra.

  • Hubert and Mauss interpret this to mean that the sanctity of the remainder of the herd was concentrated on a single animal; the god, incarnate in the herd, was eliminated by the sacrifice, and the cattle saved from the dangers to which their association with the god exposed them.

  • But the Nazarite was equally bound to lay aside his holiness before mixing with common folk and returning to ordinary life; this he did by a sacrifice, which, with the offering of his hair upon the altar, freed him from his vow and reduced him to the same level of sanctity as ordinary men.

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