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sabine

sabine

sabine Sentence Examples

  • and Oscan, (3) Messapian, (4) North Oscan, (5) Volscian, (6) East Italic or Sabellic, (7) Latinian, (8) Sabine, (9) Iguvine or Umbrian, (10) Gallic, (11) Ligurian and (12) Venetic.

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  • For instance, he asserts the number of the Sabine virgins to have been exactly 527; again, in a certain year when no Greek or Latin writers mention any important campaign, Antias speaks of a big battle with enormous casualties.

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  • Pliny, on the other hand, calls it Sabine.

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  • QUIRINUS, the Sabine name of the god Mars, probably an adjective meaning "wielder of the spear" (Quiris, cf.

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  • Other suggested etymologies are: (i) from the Sabine town Cures; (2) from curia, i.e.

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  • 9, in the Sabine country near Reate.

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  • Northwards and eastwards it extends through the Parry Islands and Grinnell Land to north Greenland, reaching on the west coast as far south as Melville Bay; and it also occurs at Sabine Island on the east coast.

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  • the Sabine river, from the Gulf to 32° N., and, thence to the parallel of 33°, a line a little W.

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  • high are hills in Sabine, Claiborne and Vernon parishes.

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  • through and along the border of the state, the Red river, the Ouachita (or Washita), Sabine and Pearl; all except the last are navigable at all stages of the water.

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  • Of this class are Pontchartrain, Borgne, Maurepas and Sabine.

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  • P. Banks at Sabine Cross Roads near Mansfield and were themselves repulsed at Pleasant Hill, these battles being incidental to.

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  • Another Sabine prince, Titus Tatius, had dedicated a stone to Terminus on the Capitoline hill.

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  • 4 Captains Edward Sabine and Clavering (1823) visited the coast between 72° 5' and 75° 12' N.

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  • Sabine, London, 1859); Lieut.-Colonel W.

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  • Nor is this its only association with science; for it was one of the spots chosen by Sir Edward Sabine for his series of pendulum experiments in 1823.

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  • by Arkansas and Louisiana, the Sabine river separating it in part from Louisiana; on the S.E.

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  • border of the Great Plains; the Sabine and the Trinity, on the Prairie Plains; and numerous small streams, on the Coastal Plain.

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  • They were to be, in general terms, the Sabine river, the 94th meridian (approximately), the Red river, the tooth meridian, the Arkansas river, and the 42nd parallel.

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  • SABINE, SIR EDWARD (1788-1883), English astronomer and geodesist, was born in Dublin on the 14th of October 1788, a scion of a family said to be of Italian origin.

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  • Sabine was for ten years (1861-1871) president of the Royal Society, and was made K.C.B.

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  • Of Sabine's scientific work two branches in particular deserve very high credit - his determination of the length of the second's pendulum, and his extensive researches connected with terrestrial magnetism.

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  • These bears are strong swimmers, Sir Edward Sabine having found one " swimming powerfully 40 m.

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  • Appius Sabinus Inregillensis, Or Regillensis, Claudius, so called from Regillum (or Regilli) in Sabine territory, founder of the Claudian gens.

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  • Skirmishing constantly with the Confederates under Kirby Smith and Taylor, the Federals eventually on the 8th and 9th of April suffered serious reverses at Sabine Cross Roads and Pleasant Hill.

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  • Though on the edge of the Sabine mountains, it was a member of the Latin League.

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  • Sabine remarked when awarding him the Rumford medal of the Royal Society in 1872, contains a fundamental principle of spectrum analysis, and though for a number of years it was overlooked it entitles him to rank as one of the founders of spectroscopy.

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  • VESTINI, an ancient Sabine tribe which occupied the eastern and northern bank of the Aternus in central Italy, entered into the Roman alliance, retaining its own independence, in 304 B.C., and issuing coins of its own in the following century.

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  • A northerly section round Amiternum near the passes into Sabine country probably received the Caerite franchise soon after.

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  • The inscription of Scoppito shows that at the time at which it was written the upper Aternus valley must be counted Vestine, not Sabine, in point of dialect.

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  • ARICINI, the ancient inhabitants of Aricia, the form of the name ranking them with the Sidicini, Marrucini, &c., as one of the communities belonging probably to the earlier or Volscian stratum of population on the west side of Italy, who were absorbed by the Sabine or Latin immigrants.

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  • On the other hand there are two or three forms called Sabine by Latin writers which do appear to show the sound q unchanged, especially the name of the Sabine god Quirinus, which seems to be at least indirectly connected with the name of the Sabine town Cures.

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  • The glosses and place-names of the ancient Sabine district are collected by R.

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  • For the history of the Sabine district see Mommsen, C.I.L.

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  • Sabine, treasurer of the Royal Society, he was elected F.R.S.

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  • 340) - genus huic materna superbum Nobilitas dabat, incertum de patre ferebat - indicates a very different system of family ties from the famous patria potestas and agnation of the Patrician and Sabine clans.

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  • Nomentum was a few miles farther north, between the Apennines and the Tiber, and close to the Sabine frontier.

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  • of the city, and close to the Tiber; and Crustumerium, in the hilly tract farther north towards the Sabine frontier.

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  • The correlative of the Via Salaria was the Via Campana, so called because it led past the grove of the Arvales along the right bank of the Tiber to the Campus Salinarum Romanarum,' the salt marshes, from which the Via Salaria took its name, inasmuch as it was the route by which Sabine traders came from the interior to fetch the salt.

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  • it includes a considerable part of the Sabine mountains and Apennines.

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  • The forests of the Alban hills and near the coast produce much charcoal and light timber, while the Sabine and Volscian hills have been largely deforested and are now bare limestone rocks.

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  • General Sabine, Sir John Franklin, Prof. Selim Lemstrom, Dr David Walker (at Fort Kennedy in 1858-1859), Captain Parry (Fort Bowen, 1825) and others - have seen aurora below the clouds or between themselves and mountains.

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  • They were supposed to have descended from their mountain home near Reate (an ancient Sabine town) upon Latium, whence they expelled the Siceli and subsequently settled down as Latini under a King Latinus (Dion Halic. i.

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  • dramas founded on Roman history or legend; thus, the Ambracia treated of the capture of that city by his patron Nobilior, the Sabinae of the rape of the Sabine women.

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  • 1835), author of In the Sabine Mountains (1871), and other romances.

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  • Thus one of the oldest roads in Italy is the Via Salaria, by which the produce of the salt pans of Ostia was carried up into the Sabine country.

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  • Its smaller congener Sabine's gull, X.

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  • In 1916 Ekblaw crossed Ellesmere Land from Cape Sabine to Bay Fjord and, passing by Nansen Sound, Greely Fjord and Lake Hazen, reached Fort Conger, Greely's former station on Robeson Channel.

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  • In 1917 a detailed survey was made of the coast of Ellesmere Land from Cape Sabine to Clarence Head, which considerably altered the charts based on the rough surveys of Inglefield, Kane and Hayes.

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  • Greely, Schley was appointed to command the third Greely relief expedition; and near Cape Sabine on the 22nd of June rescued Greely and six (of his twenty-four) companions.

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  • (London, 1855); Arago's Autobiography, translated by the Rev. Baden Powell (London, 1855, 1858); Arago's Meteorological Essays, with introduction by Humboldt, translated under the superintendence of Colonel Sabine (London, 1855), and Arago's Biographies of Scientific Men, translated by Smyth, Powell and Grant, 8vo (London, 1857).

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  • Maglia is a native of the Chilean coast as far south as the Chonos Archipelago, and was cultivated in the garden of the Horticultural Society at Chiswick in 1822, being con sidered by Sabine, in his paper on the native country of the wild potato, to be the true S.

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  • tuberosum and the origin of the cultivated forms. This species was also found by Darwin in Chile, and was considered by him, as by Sabine before him, to be the wild potato.

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  • Baker refers to the plants figured by Sabine (Trans.

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  • Under (From Sabine's figure in the Trans.

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  • But it is characteristic of his strong nature that, where he does betray any sign of human sympathy or tenderness, it is for those who by their weakness and position are dependent on others for their protection - as for " the peasant boy with the little dog, his playfellow," 1 or for " the home-sick lad from the Sabine highlands, who sighs for his mother whom he has not seen for a long time, and for the little hut and the familiar kids."2 If Juvenal is to be ranked as a great moralist, it is not for his greatness and consistency as a thinker on moral questions.

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  • QUINTUS SERTORIUS, Roman statesman and general, was a native of Nursia in Sabine territory.

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  • TERENTIUS VARRO (116-27 B.C.), Roman polymath and man of letters, was born at Reate in the Sabine country.

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  • Here he imbibed in his earlier years a good measure of the hardy simplicity and strong seriousness which the later Romans attributed to the men of the early republic - characteristics which were supposed to linger in the Sabine land after they had fled from the rest of Italy.

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  • DENTATUS, MANIUS CURIUS, Roman general, conqueror of the Samnites and Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, was born of humble parents, and was possibly of Sabine origin.

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  • With a very few exceptions the speeches are dignified in tone, full of life and have at least a dramatic propriety, while of such incongruous and laboured absurdities as the speech which Dionysius puts into the mouth of Romulus, after the rape of the Sabine women, there are no instances in Livy.

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  • Later in June Polk, who assumed that the Rio Grande rather than the Nueces was the south-western boundary of Texas, ordered him to take up a position at the mouth of the Sabine, or at some other point best suited for an advance to the former river.

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  • He won the victory of Sabine Cross Roads over the Union expedition under Gen.

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  • above sealevel - in a series of picturesque ravines, skirts the west foot of the Sabine Mountains in a broad shallow valley, then crosses the Roman Campagna, cutting its way through Rome, and finally enters the Tyrrhenian (Mediterranean) Sea by two arms at Ostia and Fiumicino, the latter artificial.

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  • Her worship appears to have been promoted in Rome chiefly by the family of the Claudii, whose Sabine origin, together with their use of the name of "Nero," has suggested an identification of Bellona with the Sabine war goddess Nerio, herself identified, like Bellona, with Virtus.

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  • The ancient Nursia was a Sabine city, though close to the Umbrian border.

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  • It was governed by octoviri like other Sabine towns and became a municipium under the empire.

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  • According to another view, he was the god of good counsel, who was said to have " advised " Romulus to carry off the Sabine women (Ovid, Fasti, iii.

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  • There is a hardness about the younger Horace which might have been, but is not made, imposing, and Sabine's effect on the action is quite out of proportion to the space she occupies.

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  • TARPEIA, in Roman legend, daughter of the commander of the Capitol during the war with the Sabines caused by the rape of the Sabine women.

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  • It was a Latin town, but was by some considered to be Sabine, and, like Fidenae and Ficulea, was excluded from the first region by Augustus, who made the Anio its northern boundary.

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  • NUMA POMPILIUS, second legendary king of Rome (715-672 B.C.), was a Sabine, a native of Cures, and his wife was the daughter of Titus Tatius, the Sabine colleague of Romulus.

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  • FALISCI, a tribe of Sabine origin or connexions, but speaking a dialect closely akin to Latin, who inhabited the town of Falerii, as well as a considerable tract of the surrounding country, probably reaching as far south as to include the small town of Capena.

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  • The cult of Semo Sancus never possessed very great importance at Rome; authorities differ as to whether it was of Sabine origin or not.

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  • Jannettaz, Etude sur Semo Sancus Fidius (Paris, 1885), according to whom he was a Sabine fire god.

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  • reproductive biology of Sabine's Gull in the Canadian Arctic.

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  • and Oscan, (3) Messapian, (4) North Oscan, (5) Volscian, (6) East Italic or Sabellic, (7) Latinian, (8) Sabine, (9) Iguvine or Umbrian, (10) Gallic, (11) Ligurian and (12) Venetic.

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  • It was on that occasion pointed out that the ethnica or tribal and oppidan names of communities belonging to the Sabine stock were marked by the use of the suffix -NOas in Sabini; and that there was some linguistic evidence that this stratum of population overcame an earlier population, which used, generally, ethnica in -CO-- or -TI- (as in Marruci, Ardeates, transformed later into Marrucini, A rdeatini).

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  • For instance, he asserts the number of the Sabine virgins to have been exactly 527; again, in a certain year when no Greek or Latin writers mention any important campaign, Antias speaks of a big battle with enormous casualties.

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  • Pliny, on the other hand, calls it Sabine.

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  • QUIRINUS, the Sabine name of the god Mars, probably an adjective meaning "wielder of the spear" (Quiris, cf.

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  • Other suggested etymologies are: (i) from the Sabine town Cures; (2) from curia, i.e.

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  • 9, in the Sabine country near Reate.

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  • Northwards and eastwards it extends through the Parry Islands and Grinnell Land to north Greenland, reaching on the west coast as far south as Melville Bay; and it also occurs at Sabine Island on the east coast.

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  • the Sabine river, from the Gulf to 32° N., and, thence to the parallel of 33°, a line a little W.

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  • high are hills in Sabine, Claiborne and Vernon parishes.

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  • through and along the border of the state, the Red river, the Ouachita (or Washita), Sabine and Pearl; all except the last are navigable at all stages of the water.

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  • Of this class are Pontchartrain, Borgne, Maurepas and Sabine.

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  • P. Banks at Sabine Cross Roads near Mansfield and were themselves repulsed at Pleasant Hill, these battles being incidental to.

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  • Another Sabine prince, Titus Tatius, had dedicated a stone to Terminus on the Capitoline hill.

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  • 4 Captains Edward Sabine and Clavering (1823) visited the coast between 72° 5' and 75° 12' N.

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  • Sabine, London, 1859); Lieut.-Colonel W.

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  • It is said to have been conquered by Romulus after the rape of the Sabine women, and to have assisted the Tarquins.

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  • Nor is this its only association with science; for it was one of the spots chosen by Sir Edward Sabine for his series of pendulum experiments in 1823.

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  • The next period is the meridian of his genius, the time of his greatest lyrical inspiration, which he himself associates with the peace and leisure secured to him by his Sabine farm.

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  • by Arkansas and Louisiana, the Sabine river separating it in part from Louisiana; on the S.E.

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  • border of the Great Plains; the Sabine and the Trinity, on the Prairie Plains; and numerous small streams, on the Coastal Plain.

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  • They were to be, in general terms, the Sabine river, the 94th meridian (approximately), the Red river, the tooth meridian, the Arkansas river, and the 42nd parallel.

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  • SABINE, SIR EDWARD (1788-1883), English astronomer and geodesist, was born in Dublin on the 14th of October 1788, a scion of a family said to be of Italian origin.

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  • Sabine was for ten years (1861-1871) president of the Royal Society, and was made K.C.B.

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  • Of Sabine's scientific work two branches in particular deserve very high credit - his determination of the length of the second's pendulum, and his extensive researches connected with terrestrial magnetism.

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  • These bears are strong swimmers, Sir Edward Sabine having found one " swimming powerfully 40 m.

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  • Appius Sabinus Inregillensis, Or Regillensis, Claudius, so called from Regillum (or Regilli) in Sabine territory, founder of the Claudian gens.

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  • Skirmishing constantly with the Confederates under Kirby Smith and Taylor, the Federals eventually on the 8th and 9th of April suffered serious reverses at Sabine Cross Roads and Pleasant Hill.

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  • Though on the edge of the Sabine mountains, it was a member of the Latin League.

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  • Sabine remarked when awarding him the Rumford medal of the Royal Society in 1872, contains a fundamental principle of spectrum analysis, and though for a number of years it was overlooked it entitles him to rank as one of the founders of spectroscopy.

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  • VESTINI, an ancient Sabine tribe which occupied the eastern and northern bank of the Aternus in central Italy, entered into the Roman alliance, retaining its own independence, in 304 B.C., and issuing coins of its own in the following century.

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    0
  • A northerly section round Amiternum near the passes into Sabine country probably received the Caerite franchise soon after.

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    0
  • The inscription of Scoppito shows that at the time at which it was written the upper Aternus valley must be counted Vestine, not Sabine, in point of dialect.

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    0
  • ARICINI, the ancient inhabitants of Aricia, the form of the name ranking them with the Sidicini, Marrucini, &c., as one of the communities belonging probably to the earlier or Volscian stratum of population on the west side of Italy, who were absorbed by the Sabine or Latin immigrants.

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  • 715); and (5) the traditional name of the Sabine king, Numa Pompilius (contrasted with Lat.

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  • Quinctilius), indicate clearly certain peculiarities in Sabine phonology: namely, (I) the representation of the Indo-European palatal aspirate gh by f instead of Lat.

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  • On the other hand there are two or three forms called Sabine by Latin writers which do appear to show the sound q unchanged, especially the name of the Sabine god Quirinus, which seems to be at least indirectly connected with the name of the Sabine town Cures.

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  • The assumption that Latin was properly the language of the Latian plain and of the Plebs at Rome, which the conquering patrician nobles learnt from their subjects, and substituted for their own kindred but different Safine idiom, renders easier to understand the borrowing of a number of words into Latin from some dialect (presumably Sabine) where the velars had been labialized; for example, the very common word bos, which in pure Latin should have been *vos.

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  • The glosses and place-names of the ancient Sabine district are collected by R.

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  • For the history of the Sabine district see Mommsen, C.I.L.

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  • Sabine, treasurer of the Royal Society, he was elected F.R.S.

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  • 340) - genus huic materna superbum Nobilitas dabat, incertum de patre ferebat - indicates a very different system of family ties from the famous patria potestas and agnation of the Patrician and Sabine clans.

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  • Nomentum was a few miles farther north, between the Apennines and the Tiber, and close to the Sabine frontier.

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  • of the city, and close to the Tiber; and Crustumerium, in the hilly tract farther north towards the Sabine frontier.

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  • The correlative of the Via Salaria was the Via Campana, so called because it led past the grove of the Arvales along the right bank of the Tiber to the Campus Salinarum Romanarum,' the salt marshes, from which the Via Salaria took its name, inasmuch as it was the route by which Sabine traders came from the interior to fetch the salt.

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  • it includes a considerable part of the Sabine mountains and Apennines.

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  • The forests of the Alban hills and near the coast produce much charcoal and light timber, while the Sabine and Volscian hills have been largely deforested and are now bare limestone rocks.

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    0
  • General Sabine, Sir John Franklin, Prof. Selim Lemstrom, Dr David Walker (at Fort Kennedy in 1858-1859), Captain Parry (Fort Bowen, 1825) and others - have seen aurora below the clouds or between themselves and mountains.

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    0
  • They were supposed to have descended from their mountain home near Reate (an ancient Sabine town) upon Latium, whence they expelled the Siceli and subsequently settled down as Latini under a King Latinus (Dion Halic. i.

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    0
  • dramas founded on Roman history or legend; thus, the Ambracia treated of the capture of that city by his patron Nobilior, the Sabinae of the rape of the Sabine women.

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    0
  • 1835), author of In the Sabine Mountains (1871), and other romances.

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  • Thus one of the oldest roads in Italy is the Via Salaria, by which the produce of the salt pans of Ostia was carried up into the Sabine country.

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  • SUMMANUS, according to some, an old Sabine or Etruscan deity; the name, however, is Latin, formed by assimilation from sub-manus (cf.

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  • There is reason to believe that the patricians were a Sabine race which conquered a Ligurian people of whom the plebeians were the survivors (see Rome: History).

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  • Its smaller congener Sabine's gull, X.

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  • In 1916 Ekblaw crossed Ellesmere Land from Cape Sabine to Bay Fjord and, passing by Nansen Sound, Greely Fjord and Lake Hazen, reached Fort Conger, Greely's former station on Robeson Channel.

    0
    0
  • In 1917 a detailed survey was made of the coast of Ellesmere Land from Cape Sabine to Clarence Head, which considerably altered the charts based on the rough surveys of Inglefield, Kane and Hayes.

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    0
  • Greely, Schley was appointed to command the third Greely relief expedition; and near Cape Sabine on the 22nd of June rescued Greely and six (of his twenty-four) companions.

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    0
  • (London, 1855); Arago's Autobiography, translated by the Rev. Baden Powell (London, 1855, 1858); Arago's Meteorological Essays, with introduction by Humboldt, translated under the superintendence of Colonel Sabine (London, 1855), and Arago's Biographies of Scientific Men, translated by Smyth, Powell and Grant, 8vo (London, 1857).

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  • Maglia is a native of the Chilean coast as far south as the Chonos Archipelago, and was cultivated in the garden of the Horticultural Society at Chiswick in 1822, being con sidered by Sabine, in his paper on the native country of the wild potato, to be the true S.

    0
    0
  • tuberosum and the origin of the cultivated forms. This species was also found by Darwin in Chile, and was considered by him, as by Sabine before him, to be the wild potato.

    0
    0
  • Baker refers to the plants figured by Sabine (Trans.

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    0
  • Under (From Sabine's figure in the Trans.

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  • But it is characteristic of his strong nature that, where he does betray any sign of human sympathy or tenderness, it is for those who by their weakness and position are dependent on others for their protection - as for " the peasant boy with the little dog, his playfellow," 1 or for " the home-sick lad from the Sabine highlands, who sighs for his mother whom he has not seen for a long time, and for the little hut and the familiar kids."2 If Juvenal is to be ranked as a great moralist, it is not for his greatness and consistency as a thinker on moral questions.

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    0
  • QUINTUS SERTORIUS, Roman statesman and general, was a native of Nursia in Sabine territory.

    0
    0
  • TERENTIUS VARRO (116-27 B.C.), Roman polymath and man of letters, was born at Reate in the Sabine country.

    0
    0
  • Here he imbibed in his earlier years a good measure of the hardy simplicity and strong seriousness which the later Romans attributed to the men of the early republic - characteristics which were supposed to linger in the Sabine land after they had fled from the rest of Italy.

    0
    0
  • DENTATUS, MANIUS CURIUS, Roman general, conqueror of the Samnites and Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, was born of humble parents, and was possibly of Sabine origin.

    0
    0
  • With a very few exceptions the speeches are dignified in tone, full of life and have at least a dramatic propriety, while of such incongruous and laboured absurdities as the speech which Dionysius puts into the mouth of Romulus, after the rape of the Sabine women, there are no instances in Livy.

    0
    0
  • Later in June Polk, who assumed that the Rio Grande rather than the Nueces was the south-western boundary of Texas, ordered him to take up a position at the mouth of the Sabine, or at some other point best suited for an advance to the former river.

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    0
  • He won the victory of Sabine Cross Roads over the Union expedition under Gen.

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    0
  • above sealevel - in a series of picturesque ravines, skirts the west foot of the Sabine Mountains in a broad shallow valley, then crosses the Roman Campagna, cutting its way through Rome, and finally enters the Tyrrhenian (Mediterranean) Sea by two arms at Ostia and Fiumicino, the latter artificial.

    0
    0
  • Her worship appears to have been promoted in Rome chiefly by the family of the Claudii, whose Sabine origin, together with their use of the name of "Nero," has suggested an identification of Bellona with the Sabine war goddess Nerio, herself identified, like Bellona, with Virtus.

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    0
  • The ancient Nursia was a Sabine city, though close to the Umbrian border.

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    0
  • It was governed by octoviri like other Sabine towns and became a municipium under the empire.

    0
    0
  • According to another view, he was the god of good counsel, who was said to have " advised " Romulus to carry off the Sabine women (Ovid, Fasti, iii.

    0
    0
  • There is a hardness about the younger Horace which might have been, but is not made, imposing, and Sabine's effect on the action is quite out of proportion to the space she occupies.

    0
    0
  • TARPEIA, in Roman legend, daughter of the commander of the Capitol during the war with the Sabines caused by the rape of the Sabine women.

    0
    0
  • It was a Latin town, but was by some considered to be Sabine, and, like Fidenae and Ficulea, was excluded from the first region by Augustus, who made the Anio its northern boundary.

    0
    0
  • NUMA POMPILIUS, second legendary king of Rome (715-672 B.C.), was a Sabine, a native of Cures, and his wife was the daughter of Titus Tatius, the Sabine colleague of Romulus.

    0
    0
  • FALISCI, a tribe of Sabine origin or connexions, but speaking a dialect closely akin to Latin, who inhabited the town of Falerii, as well as a considerable tract of the surrounding country, probably reaching as far south as to include the small town of Capena.

    0
    0
  • The cult of Semo Sancus never possessed very great importance at Rome; authorities differ as to whether it was of Sabine origin or not.

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  • Jannettaz, Etude sur Semo Sancus Fidius (Paris, 1885), according to whom he was a Sabine fire god.

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  • My little Sabine farm is dear to me; for here I spend my happiest days, far from the noise and strife of the world.

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  • Reproductive biology of Sabine 's Gull in the Canadian Arctic.

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  • A Big Girl Like You 16-year-old Sabine is dissatisfied with her stultifying life in the French provinces.

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  • When the same situation arose in 2005, Budig left the show and was replaced by actress Sabine Singh.

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  • During her time away, All My Children opted to recast the role of Greenlee with relative newcomer Sabine Singh.

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  • When the actress left the role in 2007, it was later recast and relative newcomer Sabine Singh took over as Greenlee.

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