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russia

russia

russia Sentence Examples

  • In Russia, Joseph Stalin had thousands of writers, intellectuals, and scientists arrested and put into concentration camps.

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  • Minsk, Russia (Government) >>

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  • She published on her return an account of her experiences, under the title of Through Bolshevik Russia (1920).

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  • In 1920 she went to Russia as a member of one of the various Labour delegations invited to inspect Soviet conditions of government.

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  • Smallpox affected the rich and the poor and it changed the course of history: It killed Queen Mary II of England in 1694, King Louis I of Spain in 1724, Emperor Peter II of Russia in 1730, and King Louis XV of France in 1774, and changed the succession to the thrones of nations a dozen more times.

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  • If it has come to this--we must fight as long as Russia can and as long as there are men able to stand...

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  • On the 16th of January 1547, he was crowned the first Russian tsar by the metropolitan of Moscow; on the 3rd of February in the same year he selected as his wife from among the virgins gathered from all parts of Russia for his inspection, Anastasia Zakharina-Koshkina, the scion of an ancient and noble family better known by its later name of Romanov.

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  • The terror of their name had long preceded them, and Bela, in 1235 or 1236, sent the Dominican monk Julian, by way of Constantinople, to Russia, to collect information about them from the "ancient Magyars" settled there, possibly the Volgan Bulgarians.

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  • The terror of their name had long preceded them, and Bela, in 1235 or 1236, sent the Dominican monk Julian, by way of Constantinople, to Russia, to collect information about them from the "ancient Magyars" settled there, possibly the Volgan Bulgarians.

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  • After speaking about the economic costs of war, the burden it places on the economy, and the toll this takes on the people, Eisenhower closed by describing the peace proposals he was offering Russia and China.

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  • White Church), a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 32 m.

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  • Russia, obligated by treaty to defend Serbia, mobilized its army.

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  • Early in 1877 the disastrous war with Russia followed.

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  • In Russia her influence has been greater.

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  • You're like that sick lady who put her kid on a plane to Russia 'cause she don't want him no more!

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  • Turkestan is a good wheat-producing country, cereals were actually imported from Russia and Siberia and cotton exported in exchange.

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  • His actions--without the smallest deviation--were all directed to one and the same threefold end: (1) to brace all his strength for conflict with the French, (2) to defeat them, and (3) to drive them out of Russia, minimizing as far as possible the sufferings of our people and of our army.

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  • When on the following morning the Emperor said to the officers assembled about him: "You have not only saved Russia, you have saved Europe!" they all understood that the war was not ended.

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  • This per-person threshold actually exceeds the average income of three-quarters of the countries on the planet, including Mexico, Russia, and Brazil, and is about 20 percent higher than the average income of the entire planet.

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  • At the Woman's building we met the Princess Maria Schaovskoy of Russia, and a beautiful Syrian lady.

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  • It is only necessary for one powerful nation like Russia--barbaric as she is said to be--to place herself disinterestedly at the head of an alliance having for its object the maintenance of the balance of power of Europe, and it would save the world!

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  • Kutuzov alone would not see this and openly expressed his opinion that no fresh war could improve the position or add to the glory of Russia, but could only spoil and lower the glorious position that Russia had gained.

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  • That's when I found out she moved back to Russia on me.

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  • Next the plains of eastern Europe were lost, then the AraloCaspian region, southern Russia and finally the valley of the Danube.

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  • Its geographical range was formerly very extensive, and included Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Germany, Bohemia, Hungary, Poland, Transylvania, Galicia, the Caucasus as far as the Caspian, southern Russia, Italy, Spain, Greece, Rumania, Bulgaria, Servia, and portions of central and northern Asia.

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  • In 1858 he was sent to St Petersburg on a special mission to seek the support of Russia against Napoleon III.

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  • Russia alone must save Europe.

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  • He must be recovered and brought back to Russia at all hazards.

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  • He sounds like he's from Russia.

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  • In the end, he finally lost her somewhere in Russia.

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  • All his life long he had been working incessantly with a single object - the regeneration of Russia.

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  • But there was no getting over the fact that his father had sworn "before the Almighty and His judgment seat" to pardon him and let him live in peace if he returned to Russia.

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  • MEMEL, or Niemen, a river of Russia and Prussia, rising in the middle of the Russian government of Minsk at an altitude of 580 ft.

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  • In 1873 he attacked Khiva, took the capital, and forced the khan to become a vassal of Russia.

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  • It was originally built in 1781 as a frontier fortress of the Turks against Russia.

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  • A serious breach with Russia followed, which was widened by the part which the prince subsequently played in encouraging the national aspirations of the Bulgarians.

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  • But his success was short-lived, for in 1029 the Norwegian nobles, seething with discontent, rallied round the invading Knut the Great, and Olaf had to flee to Russia.

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  • A larger product of the vine was in the form of raisins and currants, of which quantities were exported to Russia.

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  • Few people south of the Balkans dreamed that Bulgaria could be anything but a Russian province, and apprehension was entertained of the results of the union until it was seen that Russia really and entirely disapproved of it.

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  • His greatest work in this period was the purchase of Alaska from Russia, in 1867.

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  • In 1793 it was united to Russia.

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  • Between Kuhsan and Zulfikar it forms the boundary between Afghanistan and Persia, and from Zulfikar to Sarakhs between Russia and Persia.

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  • Paul I Of Russia >>

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  • The outcome of it all was the War of the Second Coalition, in which Russia, Austria, Great Britain, Naples and some secondary states of Germany took part.

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  • fatal to that body and to popular institutions in France After the coup detat of Brumaire (November 1799) he as First Con~uI, began to~ organize an expedition against th~ Atistrians (Russia having now retired from the coalition), ii northern Italy.

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  • On the other hand, they suffered from the rigorous measures of the continental system, which seriously crippled trade at the ports and were not compensated by the increased facilities for trade with France which Napoleon opened up. The drain of men to supply his armies in Germany, Spain and Russia was also a serious loss.

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  • It is said that out of 27,000 Italians who entered Russia with Eugene, only 333 saw their country again.

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  • The French system of taxation was maintained because it brought in ampler revenues; but feudalism, the antiquated legislation and bureaucracy were revived, and all the officers and officials still living who had served the state before the Revolution, many of them now in their dotage, were restored to their posts; only nobles were eligible for the higher government appointments; all who had served under the French administration were dismissed pr reduced in rank, and in the army beardless scions of the aristocracy were placed over the, heads of war-worn veterans who had commanded regiments in Spain and Russia.

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  • Calderai, who may be compared to the Black Hundreds of modern Russia, the revolutionary spirit continued to grow, but it was not at first anti-dynastic. The granting of the Spanish constitution of 1820 proved the signal for the beginning of the Italian.

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  • and Russia, and Germany, Austria and Great Britain, he scarcely seemed alive to the possible effect of such agreements upon Italy.

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  • Growing rivalry between Austria and Russia in the Balkans rendered the continuance of the League of the Three Emperors a practical impossibility.

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  • five years, to -have pledged the contracting parties to join in resisting attack upon the territory of any one of them, and to have specified the military disposition to be adopted by each in case attack should come either from France, or from Russia, or from both simultaneously.

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  • A third Italian army would, if expedient, pass into Germany, to operate against either France or Russia.

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  • Austria undertook to guard the Adriatic on land and sea, and to help Germany by checkmating Russia on land.

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  • Possibly Germany and Austria may have been influenced by the secret treaty signed between Austria, Germany and Russia on.

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  • The occupation, effected on the 5th of February, was accelerated by fear lest Italy might be forestalled by France or Russia, both of which powers were suspected of desiring to establish themselves firmly on the Red Sea and to exercise a protectorate over Abyssinia.

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  • Russia alone neglected to take note of the communication, and persisted in the hostile attitude she had assumed at the moment of the occupation of Massawa.

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  • cif Italian influence to a part of northern Somaliland and to the Benadir coast, had, with the support of France and Russia, completed his preparations for asserting his authority as independent ruler of Ethiopia.

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  • The action of the tsar of Russia in convening the Peace Conference at The Hague in May 1900 gave rise to a question as to the right of the Vatican to be officially represented, and Admiral Canevaro, supported by Great Britain and Germany, succeeded in prevent~ ing the invitation of a papal delegate.

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  • The acceptance by the powers of the Murzsteg programme and the appointment of Austrian and Russian financial agents in Macedonia was an advantage for Austria and a set-back for Italy; hut the latter scored a success in the appointment of General de Giorgis as commander of the international Macedonian gendarmerie; she also obtained, with the support of Great Britain, France and Russia, the assignment of the partly Albanian district of Monastir to the Italian officers of that corps.

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  • The empire of Russia has in the matter of ecclesiastical jurisdiction partly developed into other forms, partly systematized 4th century and later Byzantine rules.

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  • The provincial system does not exist; or it may be said that all Russia is one province.

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  • After the taking of Constantinople in 1452, the Russian metropolitans were always chosen and consecrated in Russia, appeals ceased, and Moscow became de facto autocephalous (Joyce, ubi sup. p. 379; Mouravieff, op. cit.

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  • The subject matter of ecclesiastical jurisdiction in Russia during the whole patriarchal period included matrimonial and testamentary causes, inheritance and sacrilege, and many questions concerning the Church domains and Church property, as well as spiritual offences of clergy and laity (ib.).

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  • There remain to the spiritual courts in Russia the purely ecclesiastical discipline of clerks and laity and matrimonial causes.

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  • Since the War of Independence, the kingdom of Greece has been ecclesiastically organized after the model of Russia, as one autocephalous " province," separated from its old patriarchate of Constantinople, with an honorary metropolitan and honorary archbishops (Neale, op. cit.

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  • In 1069 he succeeded in placing Izaslaus on the throne of Kiev, thereby confirming Poland's overlordship over Russia and enabling Boleslaus to chastise his other enemies, Bohemia among them, with the co-operation of his Russian auxiliaries.

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  • The Strelitz were gradually drawn to the western frontier of Russia, and in 1698 they rose in mutiny for the last time.

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  • In Austria, Germany, Italy, Rumania and Russia the number of pharmacies is limited according to the population.

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  • In Russia a prescription containing any of the poisons indicated in the schedules A and B in the Russian pharmacopoeia may not be repeated, except by order of the doctor.

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  • The period of study is eighteen months in Denmark or Norway, and two in Austria, Finland, Germany, Portugal, Russia, Sweden and Switzerland, three in Belgium, France, Greece and Italy, four to six in Holland, and five in Spain.

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  • Bar, Russia >>

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  • Taken by storm on New Year's day 1813 by the Russians, Lenkoran was in the same year formally surrendered by Persia to Russia by the treaty of Gulistan, along with the khanate of Talysh, of which it was the capital.

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  • He reached the White Sea, performed the journey overland to Moscow, where he was well received, and may be said to have been the founder of the trade between Russia and England.

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  • He travelled through Russia to Bokhara, and returned by.

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  • Another English merchant, named Jonas Hanway, arrived at Astrabad from Russia, and travelled to the camp of Nadir at Kazvin.

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  • The fossil egg of a struthious bird, Struthiolithus, has been found near Cherson, south Russia, and in north China.

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  • Vitebsk, Russia (Government) >>

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  • Much fine amethyst comes from Russia, especially from near Mursinka in the Ekaterinburg district, where it occurs in drusy cavities in granitic rocks.

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  • He first engaged himself to a country wine merchant, for whom he travelled in Germany, Russia and the Netherlands.

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  • Chernomorskaya), a military district of the province of Kuban, formerly an independent province of Transcaucasia, Russia; it includes the narrow strip of land along the N.E.

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  • Russia possesses large deposits of sulphur in Daghestan in Transcaucasia, and in the Transcaspian steppes.

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  • Upon Russia declaring war against Turkey in 1853, he was appointed commander-in-chief of the troops which occupied Moldavia and Wallachia.

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  • In July the siege of Silistria was raised, and the Russian armies recrossed the Danube; in August they withdrew to Russia.

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  • Gorchakov perceived that Russian designs against Turkey, supported by Great Britain and France, were impracticable, and he counselled Russia to make no more useless sacrifices, but to accept the bases of a pacification.

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  • At the same time, although he attended the Paris conference of 1856, he purposely abstained from affixing his signature to the treaty of peace after that of Count Orlov, Russia's chief representative.

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  • Not long after his accession to office Gorchakov issued a circular to the foreign powers, in which he announced that Russia proposed, for internal reasons, to keep herself as free as possible from complications abroad, and he added the now historic phrase, "La Russie ne boude pas; die se recueille."

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  • The appointment was hailed with enthusiasm in Russia, and at that juncture Prince Chancellor Gorchakov was unquestionably the most powerful minister in Europe.

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  • An approchement now began between the courts of Russia and Prussia; and in 1863 Gorchakov smoothed the way for the occupation of Holstein by the Federal troops.

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  • This seemed equally favourable to Austria and Prussia, but it was the latter power which gained all the substantial advantages; and when the conflict arose between Austria and Prussia in 1866, Russia remained neutral and permitted Prussia to reap the fruits and establish her supremacy in Germany.

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  • When the Franco-German War of 1870-71 broke out Russia answered for the neutrality of Austria.

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  • In return for Russia's service in preventing the aid of Austria from being given to France, Gorchakov looked to Bismarck for diplomatic support in the Eastern Question, and he received an instalment of the expected support when he successfully denounced the Black Sea clauses of the treaty of Paris.

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  • In 1875 Bismarck was suspected of a design of again attacking France, and Gorchakov gave him to understand, in a way which was not meant to be offensive, but which roused the German chancellor's indignation, that Russia would oppose any such scheme.

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  • In the latter part of his career his main object was to raise the prestige of Russia by undoing the results of the Crimean War, and it may fairly be said that he in great measure succeeded.

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  • On his arrival in Russia he rapidly rose to distinction, and was made professor of chemistry in the university of St Petersburg; he ultimately became_rector, and in 1764 secretary of state.

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  • In 1762 he was invited by Catherine of Russia to become tutor to her son at a yearly salary of 100,000 francs.

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  • (3) Diaspora in Germany, Switzerland, France, Denmark, Norway, Russia, Poland.

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  • In many countries, such as Germany and Russia, the term has retained its original meaning of an officer on the personal staff, and is the designation of personal aides-de-camp to the sovereign.

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  • A small -mausoleum contains the remains of Prince Alexander; there are monuments to the tsar Alexander II., to Russia, to the medical officers who fell in the war of 1877 and to the patriot Levsky.

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  • RUSSIA (Rossiya), the general name for the European and Asiatic dominions of the " Tsar of All the Russias."

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  • Although the name is thus correctly applied, both in English and Russian, to the whole area of the Russian empire, its application is often limited, no less correctly, to European Russia, or even to European Russia exclusive of Finland and Poland.

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  • The use of the name in its most comprehensive sense dates only from the expansion of the empire in the 19th century; to the historian who writes of the earlier growth of the empire, Russia means, at most, Russia in Europe, or Muscovy, as it was usually called until the 18th century, from Moscow, its ancient capital.

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  • The origin of the term " Russia " has been much disputed.

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  • of European Russia.

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  • On the Pamirs Russia has since 1885 been conterminous with British India (Kashmir); but the boundary then swings away N.

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  • But it excludes Manchuria, with the Liao-tung peninsula and Port Arthur, upon which Russia only placed her grasp in 1898-99, a grasp which she was compelled by Japan to release after the war of 1904-5.

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  • Russia has no oceanic possessions; her islands are all appendages of the mainland to which they belong.

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  • The flat lands which extend from the base of the Alpine foothills to the shores of the Arctic Ocean, assume the character either of dry deserts, as in the Aral-Caspian depression, or of low tablelands, as in central Russia and E.

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  • Russia and Finland, or of marshy prairies in W.

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  • Russia; the Valdai tablelands, where all the great rivers of Russia take their rise; the broad and gently sloping meridional belt of the Ural Mountains; and lastly the Taimyr, Tunguzka and Verkhoyansk ranges in Siberia, which, notwithstanding their sub-Arctic position, do not reach the snow-line.

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  • There the Volga, the Ural, the Syr-darya and the Amu-darya discharge their waters without reaching the ocean, but they bring life to the rapidly desiccating Transcaspian steppes, and link together the most remote parts of Russia.

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  • The most striking feature in the geology of Russia is its remarkable freedom from disturbances, either in the form of mountain folding or of igneous intrusions.

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  • Russia remained constantly above the sea; but there were several oscillations.

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  • Russia and in the Upper Carboniferous and Permian periods it was confined to the E.

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  • of Russia rose above the waves.

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  • Russia until the beginning of the Quaternary period.

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  • During the first part of the Glacial period Russia seems to have been covered by an immense ice-sheet, which extended also over central Germany, and of which the E.

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  • Russia, the Ural Mountains and the Caucasus.

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  • Russia they form the floor upon which lies a thin covering of Tertiary beds, and they are exposed to view in the valleys of the Dnieper and the Bug.

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  • Russia, as a narrow strip on the Urals, and in the Dnieper ridge.

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  • The Ordovician and Silurian systems are widely developed, and it is most probable that, with the exception of the Archean continents of Finland and the S, the sea covered the whole of Russia.

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  • Russia (Esthonia, Livonia, St Petersburg and on the Volkhov), where all the subdivisions of the system have been found; in the Timan ridge; on the W.

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  • and middle Russia they contain a special fauna, and it appears that the Lower Devonian series of W.

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  • and central Russia, where only the Middle and Upper Devonian divisions are found.

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  • Russia, their W.

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  • Russia has three large coalbearing regions - the Moscow basin, the Donets region and the Urals.

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  • Russia of much less extent than that assigned to them by Murchison.

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  • Russia, rich in salt-springs, but very poor in fossils, are now held by most Russian geologists to be Triassic. The Permian deposits contain marine shells and also remains of plants similar to those of England and Germany.

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  • During the Jurassic period the sea began again to invade Russia from S.E.

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  • They are much denuded in the higher parts of this region, and appear but as isolated islands in central Russia.

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  • Russia.

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  • Russia, S.

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  • The thick Quaternary, or Post-Pliocene, deposits which cover nearly all Russia were for a long time a puzzle to geologists.

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  • and central Russia, often takes the shape of ridges parallel to the direction of the motion of the boulders.

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  • Such being the characters of the Quaternary deposits in Russia, the majority of Russian geologists now adopt the opinion that Russia was covered, as far as the above limits, with an immense ice-sheet which crept over central Russia and central Germany from Scandinavia and N.

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  • The deposits of the Post-Glacial period are represented throughout Russia, Poland and Finland, as also throughout Siberia and Central Asia, by very thick lacustrine deposits, which show that, after the melting of the ice-sheet, the country was covered with immense lakes, connected by broad channels (the fjarden of the Swedes), which later on gave rise to the actual rivers.

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  • The Lacustrine period has not yet reached its close in Russia.

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  • Russia, which is going on from Esthonia and Finland to the Kola peninsula and Novaya Zemlya, at an average rate of about two feet per century.

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  • This upheaval - the consequences of which have been felt even within the historic period, by the drainage of the formerly impracticable marshes of Novgorod and at the head of the Gulf of Finland - together with the destruction of forests, contributes towards a decrease of precipitation over Russia and towards increased shallowness of her rivers.

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  • Russia witness the formation of numerous miniature canons, or ovraghi (deep ravines), the summits of which rapidly advance and ramify in the loose surface deposits.

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  • l Bibliography: Memoirs, Izvestia and Geological Maps of the Committee for the Geological Survey of Russia; Memoirs and Sborniks of the Mineralogical Society, of the Academy of Science and of the Societies of Naturalists at the Universities; Mining Journal; Murchison's Geology of Russia; Helmersen's and MSller's Geological Maps of Russia and the Urals; Inostrantsev in Appendix to Russian translation of Reclus's Geogr.

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  • Russia and Caucasia.

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  • During the years 1900-4 inclusive the total emigrants from Russia numbered 2,358,539, of whom 1,144,246 were Russians; while the immigrants numbered 2,333,053, of whom 1,432,057 were foreigners.

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  • There is also some emigration from central Russia to the S.

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  • According to the results obtained by the census committee of 1897, working on a linguistic basis, the distribution of races was as given in the table opposite: 1 Taken as a whole, only 13% of the population of Russia lived in towns in 1897, but in the years 1857-60 less than 10% was urban.

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  • In Russia proper less than 2% emigrated from the C villages to the towns during the forty years ending 1897.

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  • The following table shows the urban population in the various divisions of the empire in 1897: - There were in European Russia and Poland only twelve cities with more than too,000 inhabitants in 1884; in 1900 there were sixteen, namely, St Petersburg, Moscow, Warsaw, Odessa, Lodz, Riga, Kiev, Kharkov, Vilna, Saratov, Kazan, Ekaterinoslav, Rostov-on-the Don, Astrakhan, Tula and Kishinev.

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  • While only three of these are in middle Russia (Moscow, Tula and Kazan), eight are in S.

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  • There are thirty-four cities in European Russia and Poland, and forty in the entire empire, with from 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants each.

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  • They are larger, but still small, in White Russia, Lithuania and the region of the lakes; but in the steppe governments they are very appreciably bigger, some of the Cossack stanitsas or settlements exceeding 20,000, and many of them numbering more than 10,000 inhabitants each.

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  • - Russia was described in the Almanach de Gotha for 1910 as " a constitutional monarchy under an autocratic tsar."

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  • Before this date the fundamental laws of Russia described the power of the emperor as " autocratic and unlimited."

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  • This is the first time since Peter the Great that the clergy have been given a voice in secular affairs in Russia.

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  • Not that the regime in Russia had become in any true sense constitutional, far less parliamentary; but the " unlimited autocracy " had given place to a " self-limited autocracy," whether permanently so limited, or only at the discretion of the autocrat, remaining a subject of heated controversy between conflicting parties in the state.

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  • This deprives parliament of control over the administrative departments, all the ministries being thus " armour-plated " - to use the cant phrase current in Russia - except that of ways and communications (railways).

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  • By the law of the 18th of October (November i) 1905, to assist the emperor in the supreme administration a Council of Ministers (Sovyet Ministrov) was created, under a ministerresident the first a earance of a rime P, PP P minister in Russia.

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  • The Holy Synod (established in 1721) is the supreme organ of government of the Orthodox Church in Russia.

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  • For purposes of provincial administration Russia is divided into 78 governments (guberniya), 18 provinces (oblast) and r district (okrug).

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  • Of these 11 governments, 17 - provinces and 1 district (Sakhalin) belong to Asiatic vincial Russia.

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  • European Russia thus embraces 59 governments and 1 province (that of the Don).

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  • - Alongside the local organs of the central government in Russia there are three classes of local elected bodies charged with administrative functions: (I) the peasant assemblies in the mir and the volost, ' From Catherine II.'s time to that of Alexander II.

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  • (2) the zemstvos in the 34 governments of Russia proper, (3) the municipal dumas.

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  • The system of local self-government is continued, so far as the 34 governments of old Russia are concerned, 6 in the elective district and provincial assemblies (zemstvos).

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  • Since 1870 the municipalities in European Russia have had institutions like those of the zemstvos.

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  • Not the least valuable of the gifts of the " tsar emancipator," Alexander II., to Russia was the judicial System system established by the statute (Sudebni Ustav) of the 10th of November 1864.

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  • superseded was not indigenous to Russia, but had been set up by Peter the Great, who had taken as his model the inquisitorial procedure at that time in vogue on the continent of western Europe.

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  • Two important classes in Russia stood more or less outside the competence of the above systems: the clergy and the peasants.

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  • P.) Previous to the revolution of 1905 but little progress had been made in Russia as regards education.

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  • A characteristic feature of the intellectual movement in Russia is its tendency to extend to women the means of higher instruction.

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  • The natural sciences are much cultivated in Russia.

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  • The work achieved by Russian savants, especially in biology, physiology and chemistry, and in the sciences descriptive of the vast territory of Russia, is well known to Europe.

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  • The total national debt of Russia nearly trebled between 1852 (£57,038,600) and 1862 (£145,50o,000), and again between 1872 (£242,277,000) and 1892 (£526,109.000) it more than doubled, while by 1906 it amounted altogether to £812,040,000.

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  • Before the Japanese war Russia maintained four separate squadrons: the Baltic, the Black Sea, the Pacific and the Caspian.

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  • The chief first-class fortresses of Russia are Warsaw and Novogeorgievsk in Poland, and Brest-Litovsk and Kovno in Lithuania.

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    0
  • Russia, and the remainder (mere fortified posts) in the Asiatic dominions.

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    0
  • European Russia Geography.

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    0
  • - The administrative boundaries of European Russia, apart from Finland, coincide broadly with the natural limits of the East-European plains.

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    0
  • to embrace Poland, and separating Russia from Prussia, Austrian Galicia and Rumania.

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    0
  • It is a special feature of Russia that she has no free outlet to the open sea except on the ice-bound shores of the Arctic Ocean.

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    0
  • coast of the Black Sea belongs properly to Transcaucasia, a great chain of mountains separating it from Russia.

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    0
  • But even this sheet of water is an inland sea, the only outlet of which, the Bosphorus, is in foreign hands, while the Caspian, an immense shallow lake, mostly bordered by deserts, possesses more importance as a link between Russia and her Asiatic settlements than as a channel for intercourse with other countries.

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    0
  • The great territory occupied by European Russia - 1600 m.

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    0
  • to S.E., would be represented in Russia by the Caucasus in the S.

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    0
  • of the Caspian, comprising the lower Volga and the Ural and Emba rivers, and establishing a link between Russia and the Aral-Caspian region.

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    0
  • with broad plateaus which join those of central Russia, but their orographical relations to other upheavals must be more closely studied before they can be definitely pronounced on.

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    0
  • By their means the plains of the central plateau - the very heart of Russia, whose natural outlet was the Caspian - were brought into water-communication with the Baltic, and the Volga basin was connected with the Gulf of Finland.

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    0
  • But although the rivers of Russia rank before the rivers of W.

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    0
  • basin, thinly-peopled and available only for cattle-breeding and for hunting, is quite isolated from Russia by the Timan ridge.

    0
    0
  • Russia from a remote antiquity, but now navigable only in its lower portion, and the Embach, navigated by steamers to Dorpat (Yuryev).

    0
    0
  • in Russia, rises in the N.

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    0
  • of Minsk, leaves Russia at Yurburg, and enters the Kurisches Haff; rafts are floated upon it almost from its.

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    0
  • The Pruth rises in Austrian Bukovina, and separates Russia from Rumania; it enters the Danube, which flows along the Russian frontier for 100 m.

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    0
  • in Russia) rises in Galicia.

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    0
  • Dvina, and the Pripet, both very important for navigation - as well as several smaller tributaries on which rafts are floated; on the left the Sozh, the Desna, one of the most important rivers of Russia, navigated by steamers as far as Bryansk, the Sula, the Psiol and the Vorskla.

    0
    0
  • The Ural, in its lower part, constitutes the frontier between European Russia and the Kirghiz steppe; it receives the Sakmara on the right and the Ilek on the left.

    0
    0
  • The soil of Russia depends chiefly on the distribution of the boulder-clay and loess.

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    0
  • Vast areas in Russia are quite unfit for cultivation, 19% of the aggregate surface of European Russia (apart from Poland and Finland) being occupied by lakes, marshes, sand, &c., 39% by forests, 16% by prairies, and only 26% being under cultivation.

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    0
  • Notwithstanding the fact that Russia extends from N.

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    0
  • There is no place in Russia, Archangel and Astrakhan included, where the thermometer does not rise in summer nearly to 86° Fahr.

    0
    0
  • It is only on the Black Sea coast that the absolute range of temperature does not exceed 108°, while in the remainder of Russia it reaches 126° to 144°, the oscillations being between - 22° and - 31°, occasionally going down as low as - 54°, and rising as high as 86° to 104°, or even 109°.

    0
    0
  • Though thus exhibiting the distinctive features of a continental climate, Russia does not lie altogether outside the reach of the moderating influence of the ocean.

    0
    0
  • Russia, though it does reach as far as the Urals and beyond.

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    0
  • An orohydrographical map of Russia in four sheets was published in 1878.

    0
    0
  • Throughout Russia the winter is of long duration.

    0
    0
  • The spring is exceptionally beautiful in central Russia; late as it usually is, it sets in with vigour, and vegetation develops with a rapidity which gives to this season in Russia a special charm, unknown in warmer climates.

    0
    0
  • Russia between May the 18th and the 24th, sa that it is only in June that warm weather sets in definitely, and it reaches its maximum in the first half of July (or of August on the Black Sea coast).

    0
    0
  • Russia the summer is much warmer than in the corresponding latitudes of France, and really hot weather is.

    0
    0
  • Russia in the beginning of October, and are felt on the Caucasus about the middle of November.

    0
    0
  • The temperature drops so rapidly that a month later, about October the oth on the middle Urals and November the 15th throughout Russia, the thermometer ceases to rise above the freezing-point.

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    0
  • throughout Russia; in the west only does it rise above 22°.

    0
    0
  • Even at Kiev and Lugansk the average of March is below 30°, while in central Russia it is 25° to 22°, and as low as 20° and 16° at Samara and Orenburg.

    0
    0
  • Russia; thus the isotherm of 39° runs from St Petersburg to Orenburg, and that of 35° from Tornea in Finland to Uralsk.

    0
    0
  • The laws and relations of the cyclones and anti-cyclones in Russia are not yet thoroughly understood.

    0
    0
  • Russia (N.

    0
    0
  • In July they are pushed farther towards the N., and cross the Gulf of Bothnia, while another series of cyclones sweep across middle Russia, between 50° and 55° N.

    0
    0
  • Russia, while E.

    0
    0
  • The average amount of cloud is 73 to 75% on the White Sea and in Lithuania, 68 to 64 in central Russia, and only 59 to 53 in the S.

    0
    0
  • The flora of Russia, which represents an intermediate link between the flora of Germany and the flora of Siberia, is strikingly uniform over a very large area.

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    0
  • place, it appears so if the space occupied by Russia be taken into account, only 3300 species of phanerogams and ferns 2 Bibliography of Meteorology: Memoirs of the Central Physical Observatory; Repertorium fiir Meteorologie and Meteorological Sbornik, published by the same body; Veselovsky, Climate of Russia (Russian); H.

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    0
  • Reiches (1881); Voyeikov, The Climates of the Globe (Russ., 1884), containing the best general information about the climate of Russia.

    0
    0
  • The characteristics of the oak region, which comprises all central Russia, are totally different.

    0
    0
  • Thus the beech (Fagus sylvatica) is unable to survive the continental climate of Russia, and does not penetrate beyond Poland and the S.W.

    0
    0
  • The silver fir does not extend over Russia, and the oak does not cross the Urals.

    0
    0
  • In central Russia the species become still more numerous, and, though the local floras are not yet complete, they number 850 to 1050 species in the separate governments, and about 1600 in the best explored parts of the S.W.

    0
    0
  • Russia it hardly gets N.

    0
    0
  • Apricots and walnuts flourish at Warsaw, but in Russia they do not thrive beyond 50°.

    0
    0
  • Russia, may be subdivided into two zones-an intermediate zone and that of the steppes proper.

    0
    0
  • Russia belongs to the same zoo-geographical region as central Europe and N.

    0
    0
  • Russia, however, towards the Caspian, there is a notable admixture of Asiatic species.

    0
    0
  • (1884); Regel, Flora Rossica (1884); Brown, Forestry in the Mining Districts of the Urals (1885); Reports by Commissioners of Woods and Forests in Russia (1884) birds, even to hazel-hen (Tetrao bonasa), capercailzie (T.

    0
    0
  • - Remains of Palaeolithic man, contemporary with the large Quaternary mammals, are few in Russia; they have been discovered only in Poland, Poltava and Voronezh, and perhaps also on the Oka.

    0
    0
  • Russia was 'the seat of the empire' of the Khazars, who drove the Bulgarians, descendants of the Huns, from the Don, one Section of them migia.tiug up thu Volga to found there the Bulgarian empire, and the remainder travelling towards the Danube.

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    0
  • 2 Bibliography of Fauna: see Pallas, Zoographia Rosso-Asiatica; Syevertsov for the birds of south-eastern Russia; M.

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    0
  • Russia on their way to the basin of the Danube.

    0
    0
  • Russia into Siberia.

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    0
  • Russia), as also in N.

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    0
  • Russia, the S.W.

    0
    0
  • Russia, even then were subdivided into Ugrians, Permyaks, Bulgarians and Finns proper, who drove back the previous Lapp population from what is now Finland, and about the 7th century penetrated to the S.

    0
    0
  • At present the races of Finnish origin are represented in Russia by the following: (a) the W.

    0
    0
  • The following are the chief subdivisions of the Turko-Tatars in European Russia: - (i) The Tatars, of whom three different branches must be distinguished: (a) the Kazan Tatars on both banks of the Volga, below the mouth of the Oka, and on the lower Kama, but penetrating farther S.

    0
    0
  • The Mongol race is represented in Russia by the Kalmucks, who inhabit the steppes of Astrakhan between the Volga, the Don and the Kuma.

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    0
  • The law of Russia prohibits them from entering Great Russia, only the wealthiest and best educated enjoying this privilege; nevertheless they are met with everywhere, even on the Urals.

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    0
  • provinces of Lithuania, White and Little Russia, and Bessarabia.

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    0
  • Russia speak Polish.

    0
    0
  • Europeans, the Germans only attain considerable numbers in European Russia.

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    0
  • Russia, as separate agricultural colonies, and these have since then gradually extended into the Don region and N.

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    0
  • Russia, and appearing in larger numbers only in the district of Rostov.

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    0
  • Indeed it is estimated that there are more than 12,000,000 Dissenters in Great Russia alone.

    0
    0
  • It is this political rather than religious spirit which also underlies the repressive attitude of the government, and of the Orthodox Church as the organ of the government, towards the various dissident sects (Raskolniki, from raskol, schism), which for more than two centuries past have played an important part in the popular life of Russia, and, since the political developments of the end of the 19th and early years of the zoth century, have tended to do so more and more.

    0
    0
  • To understand the problem of the Raskolniki it is necessary to bear two things in mind: the fundamental principle of Eastern Orthodoxy as distinct from Western Catholicism, and the practical identification in Russia of the National Church with the National State.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, Western Protestantism has also made great headway, notably the Stundists, whose rationalisticProtestant teaching has gained a firm foothold especially in Little Russia, where the Raskol never penetrated.

    0
    0
  • The serfdom which had sprung up in Russia in the 16th century, and became consecrated by law in 1609, taking, however, nearly one hundred and fifty years to attain its full growth, was abolished in 1861.

    0
    0
  • The redemption was not calculated on the value of the allotments of land, but was considered as a compensation for the loss of the compulsory labour of the serfs; so that throughout Russia, with the exception of a few provinces in the S.E., it was - and still remains, notwithstanding a very great increase in the value of land - much higher than the market value of the allotment.

    0
    0
  • Every year more than half the adult males (in some districts three-fourths of the men and one-third of the women) quit their homes and wander throughout Russia in search of labour.

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    0
  • In Little Russia, where the allotments were personal (the mir existing only among state peasants), the state of affairs does not differ for the better, on account of the high redemption taxes.

    0
    0
  • This measure, which was endorsed by the third Duma in an act passed on the 21st of December 1908, is calculated to have far-reaching and profound effects upon the rural economy of Russia.

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    0
  • i.; Collection of Materials on Landholding, and Statistical Descriptions of Separate Governments, published by several zemstvos (Moscow, Tver, Nyzhniy-Novgorod, Tula, Ryazan, Tambov, Poltava, Saratov, &c.); Kawelin, The Peasant Question; Vasilchikov, Land Property and Agriculture (2 vols.), and Village Life and Agriculture; Ivanukov, The Fall of Serfdom in Russia; Shashkov, " Peasantry in the Baltic Provinces," in Russkaya Mysl.

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    0
  • V., Agric. Sketches of Russia; Golovachov, Capital and Peasant Farming; Engelhardt's Letters from the Country.

    0
    0
  • All over Russia there is a network of such artels - in the cities, in the forests, on the banks of the rivers, on journeys and even in the prisons.

    0
    0
  • The chief occupation of approximately seven-eighths of the population of European Russia is agriculture, but its character varies considerably according to the soil, the climate and Agri- the geographical position of the different regions.

    0
    0
  • Flax is almost of as much importance as wheat, and the potato is more cultivated than in any other part of Russia.

    0
    0
  • In middle Russia the winters are both longer and harder, and agriculture is consequently carried on under greater difficulties.

    0
    0
  • Since their emancipation in 1861, the peasants of the central governments of Russia have in large numbers drifted away into the black earth zone, or have gone to the factories.

    0
    0
  • The actual distribution of arable land, forests and meadows, in European Russia and Poland is shown in the following table The land in European Russia and Poland (Caucasia being excluded) is divided amongst the different classes of owners as follows Down to January 1st 1903, the peasants had actually redeemed out of the land allotted to them in 1861 a total of 280,530,516 acres..

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    0
  • Taking the whole of European Russia and Poland, almost exactly two-thirds of the total area is sown every year with cereals.

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    0
  • But generally in from 18 to 33 out of the 72 governments in European Russia (including Caucasia) and Poland the yield of cereals is not sufficient for the wants of the people.

    0
    0
  • and central Russia, and have led recently to the establishment of factories for canning fruit and for making jam and pickles.

    0
    0
  • Russia are fine animals, and those of the Kirghiz, though not big, are famous for their endurance.

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    0
  • provinces, Little Russia and the far N.

    0
    0
  • Of the 55 million sheep kept in Russia only about 15 millions belong to the fine merino breed, and these are pastured chiefly on the Black Sea steppes.

    0
    0
  • Modern dairy-farming is only just beginning in Russia, but butter is being exported in increasing quantities to W.

    0
    0
  • Agriculture stands at a low level in Russia.

    0
    0
  • Russia, namely, 80 `2 of their total indebtedness.

    0
    0
  • The state is the chief owner of forests (almost exclusive owner in Archangel), and owns no less than 289,226,000 acres in European Russia and Poland (235,000,000 acres of good forests), while private persons own 171,800,000 acres, the peasant communities 67,250,000 and the imperial family 22,400,000 acres.

    0
    0
  • Russia, was reduced to a very low ebb, in consequence of the silkworm disease, and was only renewed with any vigour towards the end of the 'eighties.

    0
    0
  • Russia and in Poland.

    0
    0
  • Altogether raw silk and silk yarn to an annual value exceeding 1-1 millions sterling are exported from Russia.

    0
    0
  • As a producer of iron Russia nevertheless runs France neck and neck for the fourth place amongst the iron-producing countries of the world, her annual output having increased from 1,004,800 metric tons in 1891 to 2,808,000 in 1901 and to 2,900,000 in 1904.

    0
    0
  • The two principal mining centres of European Russia are the Urals, Ekaterinoslav, Kharkov and the Don Cossacks territory.

    0
    0
  • The amount of iron and steel produced in the Urals is not quite 20% of the total in all European Russia and Poland.

    0
    0
  • The output of coal in the Urals is, altogether, less than 3% of the total for all the empire and 4% of the output of European Russia (exclusive of Poland) alone.

    0
    0
  • At one time all Russia was supplied with salt from the Urals, but at the present time the output is extremely small, less than 350 tons annually.

    0
    0
  • Russia is much more important.

    0
    0
  • Coal takes, however, an altogether secondary place as a fuel in Russia; wood is much more extensively used, not only for domestic, but also for industrial purposes.

    0
    0
  • Russia and Caucasia, and on the steamboats of the Volga system.

    0
    0
  • Manufacturing industry in the modern sense can hardly be said to have existed in Russia ' See Russian Journal of Financial Statistics, in English (2 vols., St Petersburg, 1901).

    0
    0
  • The peculiar feature of Russian industry is the development out of the domestic petty handicrafts of central Russia of a semifactory on a large scale.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the forced abstention from agricultural labour in the winter months the peasants of central Russia, more especially those of the governments of Moscow, Vladimir, Yaroslavl, Kostroma, Tver, Smolensk and Ryazan have for centuries carried on a variety of domestic handicrafts during the period of compulsory leisure.

    0
    0
  • Flour-mills play an important part in the general industry of Russia, and there are several tobacco and hemp factories.

    0
    0
  • The wealth of Russia consisting mainly of raw produce, the trade of the country turns chiefly on the purchase of this for export, and on the sale of manufactured and imported goods I in exchange.

    0
    0
  • Altogether, no fewer than 16,600 fairs are held in Russia, 85% of them in European Russia.

    0
    0
  • The two best customers of Russia are Germany, which takes 23.3% of her total exports, and the United Kingdom, which takes 22.9%.

    0
    0
  • The countries from which Russia buys most extensively are Germany (34%), the United Kingdom (152) and the United States (92).

    0
    0
  • The total mercantile marine of Russia does not aggregate 700,000 tons; and it is distributed in the following proportions: 35'4% in the Caspian Sea, 34'7% in the Black Sea and Shipping.

    0
    0
  • In 1860 Russia possessed less than 1000 m.

    0
    0
  • 1 0m.or8 34, 5 4'3% were in European Russia and nearly 6400 m.

    0
    0
  • (15.7%) in Asiatic Russia.

    0
    0
  • This railway has become important for the export of raw cotton from Central Asia to Russia.

    0
    0
  • A third line of great importance is the junction line between the Transcaucasian railway - which runs from Batum and Poti to Baku, via Tiflis, with a branch line to Kars - and the railway system of Russia proper.

    0
    0
  • The Volga is reached from central Russia by seven lines of railways, including one to Kazan, and three main lines radiate from the Volga E.

    0
    0
  • Russia, and even to Moscow.

    0
    0
  • Russia, and along the shores of the Arctic Ocean.

    0
    0
  • A general popular description of Russia entitled Rossiya, containing excellent geographical, geological and other descriptions of separate regions, and very well-chosen illustrations, was begun in 1899 under the editorship of V.

    0
    0
  • Mackenzie Wallace, Russia (2 vols., new ed., 1905, London); A.

    0
    0
  • Martin, The Future of Russia (Eng.

    0
    0
  • Kovalevsky, Russian Political Institutions (Chicago, 1902), Modern Customs and Ancient Laws of Russia (London, 1891), Le Regime economique de la Russie (Paris, 1898), and Die produktiven Krcifte Russlands (Paris, 1896); A.

    0
    0
  • Meakin, Russia (London, 1906); G.

    0
    0
  • Machat, La Developpement economique de la Russie (Paris, 1902); Industries of Russia, by the Department of Trade and Manufactures (English by J.

    0
    0
  • Rittich, " Die Ethnographic Russlands " in Petermanns Mitteilungen, Erganzungsheft 54 (Gotha, 1878); C. Joubert, Russia as it really is (London, 1904).

    0
    0
  • BE.) History The history of Russia may be conveniently divided into four consecutive periods: (I) the period of Independent Principalities; (2) the Mongol Domination; (3) the Tsardom of Muscovy; and (4) the Modern Empire.

    0
    0
  • This question has given rise to an enormous amount of discussion among learned men, and some of the disputants have not yet laid down their arms; but for impartial outsiders who have carefully studied the evidence there can be little doubt that 1 See Researches into the State of Fisheries in Russia (9 vols.), edited by Minister of Finance (1896, Russian); Kusnetzow's Fischerei and Thiererbeutung in den Gewassern Russlands (1898).

    0
    0
  • The khanate closely connected with the history of Russia was that of Kipchak or the Golden Horde, the khans of which settled, as we have seen, on the lower Volga and built for themselves a capital called Sarai.

    0
    0
  • Here they had their headquarters and held Russia in subjection for nearly three centuries.

    0
    0
  • Already Dimitri of the Don was called the grand-prince of all Russia, but the assumption of such an ambitious title was hardly justified by facts, because there were still in his time principalities with grand princes who claimed to be independent.

    0
    0
  • Now the tsar of Muscovy and of all Russia adopted the airs and methods of a Tatar khan and surrounded himself with the pomp and splendours of a Byzantine emperor.

    0
    0
  • It was not till he was about seventeen that he took an active part in the administration, and one of his first acts foreshadowed his future policy: he insisted on the metropolitan crowning him, not as grand-prince of Muscovy, but as tsar of all Russia (1547).

    0
    0
  • had already been described in the Church service as " the ruler and autocrat of all Russia, the new Tsar Constantine in the new city of Constantine Moscow," but on no previous occasion had a grand-prince been crowned under that title.

    0
    0
  • When the two became united under one ruler towards the end of the 14th century they formed a broad strip of territory stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea and separating Russia from central Europe.

    0
    0
  • He not only insisted that his daughter's religion should be duly respected, but he constituted himself the protector of the Orthodox population and this led to a new war in 1499, which went on till 1503, when it was concluded by the cession to Russia of Chernigov, Starodub and 17 other towns.

    0
    0
  • Boris has often been called the creator of serfage in Russia, but in reality he merely accelerated a process which was the natural result of economic conditions.

    0
    0
  • Such had been for a considerable time the condition of Russia, and the small proprietors were now becoming so impoverished that they could no longer fulfil their duties to the state.

    0
    0
  • Russia was thus in a very critical condition.

    0
    0
  • At the conclusion of the armistice in 1632, during a short interregnum in Poland, he attempted to avenge past injuries and recover lost territory; but the campaign was not successful, and in 1634 he signed a definitive treaty by no means favourable to Russia.

    0
    0
  • In the reign of Michael's successor, Alexius (1645-76), the country recovered its strength so rapidly that the tsar was tempted to revive the energetic aggressive policy and put forward claims to Livonia, Lithuania and Little Russia, but he was obliged to moderate his pretensions.

    0
    0
  • Smolensk and Chernigov were definitely incorporated in the tsardom of Muscovy, and great progress was made towards the absorption of Little Russia.

    0
    0
  • Roughly speaking, Little Russia, otherwise called the Ukraine, may be described as the basin of the Dnieper southward of the 51st parallel of latitude.

    0
    0
  • For some time Tsar Alexius hesitated, because he knew that intervention could entail a war with Poland, but after consulting a National Assembly on the subject, he decided to take Little Russia under his protection, and in January 1654 a great Cossack assembly ratified the arrangement, on the understanding that a large part of the old local autonomy should be preserved.

    0
    0
  • In the expected war with Poland, which followed quickly, the Russians were so successful that the arrangement was upheld; but it was soon found that the Cossacks, though they professed unbounded devotion to the Orthodox tsar, disliked Muscovite, quite as much as Polish, interference in their internal affairs, and some of their leaders were in favour of substituting federation with Poland for annexation by Russia.

    0
    0
  • The incident afforded a new proof, where no proof was required, that the autocratic power in Russia was supreme.

    0
    0
  • F o i Notwithstanding the efforts of the Poles and the Military Orders to exclude Russia from the shores of the Baltic and keep her in a state of isolation, she was coming slowly into closer relations with central and western Europe.

    0
    0
  • Already the desire to make his country a great naval power was becoming his ruling passion, and when he found by experience that the White Sea, Russia's sole maritime outlet, had great practical inconveniences as a naval base, he revived the project of getting a firm footing on the shores of the Black Sea or the Baltic. At first he gave the preference to the former, and with the aid of a flotilla of small craft, constructed on a tributary of the Don, he succeeded in capturing Azov from the Turks.

    0
    0
  • During a halt of a few days in Poland on his way back from Vienna, King Augustus had explained to him a project for partitioning the transBaltic provinces of Sweden, by which Poland should recover Livonia and annex Esthonia, Russia should obtain Ingria and Karelia, and Denmark should take possession of Holstein.

    0
    0
  • Several of his immediate predecessors had come to recognize that Russia, with her antiquated military organization, was unable to cope with her Western neighbours, and had begun to organize, with the help of foreigners, a military force more in accordance with modern requirements; but the progress made in that direction had been slow and unsatisfactory.

    0
    0
  • Her hatred of Germans showed itself likewise in her persistent struggle with Frederick the Great, which cost Russia 300,000 men and 30 millions of roubles - an enormous sum for those days - but in the choice of a successor she could not follow her natural inclinations, for among the few descendants of Michael Romanov there was no one, even in the female line, who could be called a genuine Russian.

    0
    0
  • Within a few months of her accession, having heard that the publication of the famous French Encyclopedie was in danger of being stopped by the French government on account of its irreligious spirit, she proposed to Diderot that he should complete his great work in Russia under her protection.

    0
    0
  • The next country to feel the expansive tendencies of Russia was Poland, which had now very little Poland.

    0
    0
  • Whilst Russia, Austria, Prussia and France were becoming powerful monarchies with centralized administration, Poland had remained a weak feudal republic with an elected king chosen under foreign influence and fettered by constitutional restrictions.

    0
    0
  • This led to the second partition (1793), by which Russia obtained the eastern provinces with three millions of inhabitants.

    0
    0
  • When the patriots under Koscziusko made a desperate effort to recover the national independence the struggle produced a third partition (1795), by which the remainder of the kingdom was again divided between Russia, Prussia and Austria.

    0
    0
  • Russia's advance westward raised indirectly the Eastern Question, because it threatened two of France's traditional allies, Sweden and Poland, and Choiseul considered that the best means of checkmating Catherine's 7l aryl, aggressive schemes was to incite France's third traditional ally, Turkey, to attack her.

    0
    0
  • The Tatars of the Bug, of the Crimea and of the Kuban were liberated from the suzerainty of the Porte; Azov, Kinburn and all the fortified places of the Crimea were ceded to Russia; the Bosphorus and Dardanelles were opened to Russian merchant vessels; and Russian ambassadors obtained the right to intervene in favour of the inhabitants of the Danubian principalities.

    0
    0
  • It was intended that Russia should take what remained of the northern coast of the Black Sea, Austria should annex the Turkish provinces contiguous to her territory, the Danubian principalities and Bessarabia should be formed into an independent kingdom called Dacia, the Turks should be expelled from Europe, the Byzantine empire should be resuscitated, and the grand-duke Constantine, second son of the Russian heir-apparent, should be placed on the throne of the Palaeologi.

    0
    0
  • At that time, in respect of foreign affairs, Russia was entering on a new phase of her history.

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    0
  • The sovereigns of Sardinia, Naples, Portugal and Spain were dethroned, the pope was driven from Rome, the Rhine Confederation was extended till France obtained a footing on the Baltic, the grand-duchy of Warsaw was reorganized and strengthened, the promised evacuation of Prussia was indefinitely postponed, an armistice between Russia and Turkey was negotiated by French diplomacy in such a way that the Russian troops should evacuate the Danubian principalities, which Alexander intended to annex to his empire, and the scheme for breaking up the Ottoman empire and ruining England by the conquest of India, which had been one of the most attractive baits in the Tilsit negotiations, but which had not been formulated in the treaty, was no longer spoken of.

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  • Russia now remained the only unconquered power on the continent, and it was evident that the final struggle with her could not be long delayed.

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  • In Russia such societies began to be formed about 1816.

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  • The Decembrists' abortive attempt at revolution and the Polish insurrection of 1831, which he crushed with great severity, confirmed him in his conviction that Russia must be ruled with a strong hand.

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  • Here, on the 14th of September 1829, was signed a treaty by which the Porte ceded to Russia the islands at the mouth of the Danube and several districts on the Asiatic frontier, granted full liberty to Russian navigation and commerce in the Black Sea, and guaranteed the autonomous rights previously accorded to Moldavia, Walachia and Servia.

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  • 'This attempt of Russia to secure the sole prestige of liberating Greece was, however, frustrated by the action of the other Powers in putting forward the principle of the independence of the new Greek state, with a further extension of frontiers.

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  • The result of the war was to make Russia supreme at Constantinople; and before long an opportunity of further increasing her influence was created by Mehemet Ali, the ambitious pasha of Egypt, who in November 1831 began a war with his sovereign in Syria, gained a series of victories over the Turkish forces in Asia Minor and threatened Constantinople.

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  • after appealing in vain to Great Britain for active assistance turned in despair to Russia.

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  • In a secret article of the treaty the sultan undertook in the event of a casus foederis arising, and in consideration of being relieved of his obligations under the articles of the public treaty, to close the Dardanelles to the warships of all nations " au besoin," which meant in effect that in the event of Russia being threatened with an attack from the Mediterranean he would close the Dardanelles against the invader.

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  • interests were sacrificed to that of making Russia a great military power, the guardian of order in Europe and the predominant factor in the Eastern Question, had been tried and found wanting.

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  • For the first time in the history of Russia public opinion in the modern sense became a power in the state and influenced strongly the policy of the government.

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  • In short, it became only too evident that there was no royal road to national prosperity, and that Russia, like other nations, must be content to advance slowly and laboriously along the rough path of painful experience.

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  • In return for these services Bismarck helped Russia to recover a portion of what she had lost by the Crimean War, for it was thanks to his connivance and diplomatic support that she was able in 1871 to denounce with impunity the clauses of the treaty of Paris which limited Russian armament in the Black Sea.

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  • Six years later began the rapid expansion of Russia in Central Asia, and at the end xxiii.

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  • Even in European Russia the regions near the frontier contain a great variety of nationalities, languages and religions.

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  • He suspected Bismarck of harbouring hostile designs against Russia, and he came to recognize that the permanent weakening of France was not in accordance with Russian political interests.

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  • From that time Russia gravitated slowly towards an alliance with France, and sought to create a counterpoise against the Triple Alliance of Germany, Austria and Italy.

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  • In the complimentary speeches delivered by the president of the French Republic and the tsar, France and Russia were referred to as allies, and the term " nations alliees " was afterwards repeatedly used on occasions of a similar kind.

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  • The forward movement of Russia was thus stopped in the direction of Herat, but it continued with great activity farther east in the region of the Pamirs, until another Anglo-Russian convention was signed in 1895.

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  • When the British government seemed disposed to use coercive measures for the protection of the Armenians, he gave it clearly to be understood that any such proceeding would be opposed by Russia.

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  • In Asia, after the accession of Nicholas II., the expansion of Russia, following the line of least resistance and stimulated by the construction of the Trans-Siberian railway, took the direction of northern China and the effete little kingdom of Korea.

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  • This grandiose project was unexpectedly destroyed by the energetic resistance of Japan, who had ear-marked the Hermit Kingdom for herself, and who declared plainly that she would never tolerate the exclusive influence of Russia in Manchuria.

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  • In France the Revolution had been the work of the middle classes; in Russia an indigenous middle class has, comparatively speaking, no existence, the peasants forming the overwhelming majority of the population.'

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  • The supreme peril to the autocracy in Russia lay in the genuine grievances of the peasants, less political than economic, which had opened their minds to revolutionary propaganda.

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  • In 1909 the number of exiles for political reasons from Russia was reckoned at 180,000; but the third Duma, purged and packed by an ingenious franchise system, was in its third year passing measures of beneficent legislation, in complete harmony with the government.

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  • For days the whole mechanism of civilized existence in Russia was at a standstill, all intercourse 4 Sazonov's sentence of twenty years' hard labour was commuted by Nicholas II.

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  • publicly announced his intention of granting free institutions to Russia.

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  • with the outside world cut off; until at last the government was forced to yield, and on the 17/30th of tionstitu- October 1 05 the tsar issued the famous manifesto tional 9 manifesto promising to Russia a constitution based on the of October main principles of modern Liberalism: national re 1 9 /5.

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  • Stolypin of the fact that there was plenty of land in Russia for the peasants without any attack on private property.

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  • A year later the Duma again came into collision with the government in a matter highly illuminating of the struggle between the ancient traditions and the new ideas in Russia.

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  • At first it had seemed that the new birth of Russia would lead to a revival of pan-Slavism, directed not, Neo-Slav as in the middle of the i 9th century, against Austria and pan= but against Germany.

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  • As an international force Russia had been, of course, all but completely crippled by the outcome of the Japanese War and the subsequent revolution.

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  • On national the 30th of July 1907 she signed a convention with position Japan of mutual respect for treaty and territorial of Russia.

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  • - The history of Russia, especially that of the last few years, has formed the subject of a vast number of works, of very varying authority, in many languages.

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  • In Russia itself the first great history of the Russian empire was that of N.

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  • Documents relating to the political and social movements in Russia (London, 1897).

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  • Krausse, Russia in Asia, 1558-1899 (1899); W.

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  • Morfill, Russia (Story of the Nations Series, New York, 1891), History of Russia (New York, 1902); H.

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  • Skrine, The Expansion of Russia, 1815-1900 (Cambridge, 1903) V.

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  • P. Thomsen, The Relation between Ancient Russia and Scandinavia and the Origin of the Russian State (London, 1877); the series of works by K.

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  • For the relations of Russia with the papacy, see T.

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  • The only history of Little Russia is that in Russian by D.

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  • de Arnaud, The New Era in Russia (Washington, 1890); E.

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  • " Russia of To-day," 1904); G.

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  • Miliukov, La Crise russe (Paris, 1907; an earlier English edition appeared in 1905); Bernard Pares, Russia and Reform (1907); A.

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  • trans., 1896), an admirable account, partly historical, partly based on personal observation of the government, religion and the social and economic conditions of Russia; Combes de Lestrade, La Russie economique et sociale (Paris, 1896); " Nikolai " (pseudonym of Danielson), Histoire des developpement economique de la Russie depuis l'abolition du servage (Paris, 1899).

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  • Kovalevsky, Modern Customs and Ancient Laws of Russia (London, 1891); Max von Ottingen, Abriss des russischen Staatsrechts (1899); F.

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  • " Russia " in the Subject Index of the London Library (1909).

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  • 309,974 Australia 17,766 Asia 56,181 Table II., classifying the mileage of Europe, shows that Russia has taken the lead, instead of Germany, as in former years.

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  • Central Russia in Asia.

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  • 56,181 Although more than half of the total mileage of Asia is in British India, it is probable that the greatest proportionate gains in the near future will be in China, Siberia and Manchuria, and Central Russia in Asia.

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  • It has generally come to be that of Germany and, so far as the finances of the countries allow, of Austria and Russia; British India also affords not a few examples of the same method.

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  • The Trans-Siberian railway was a military necessity if Russia was to exercise dominion throughout Siberia and maintain a port on the Yellow Sea or the Sea of Japan.

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  • 54 in., and that of Russia 5 ft.

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  • In Hungary and Russia a zone-tariff system is in operation, whereby the charge per mile decreases progressively with the length of the journey, the traveller paying according to the number of zones he has passed through and not simply according to the distance traversed.

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  • CHUGUYEV, a town of Russia, in the government of Kharkov, 2 5 m.

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  • He served as judge of the Superior Court (1865-72), as secretary of war (1876) and as attorneygeneral of the United States (1876-77) in President Grant's cabinet; and as minister to Austria-Hungary (1882-84) and to Russia (1884-85) .

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  • But a year later he acquiesced in the establishment of a Labour council of action, and in the threat of a general strike in case of any military or naval intervention against the Soviet Government of Russia.

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  • BOBRUISK, a town and formerly a first-class fortress of Russia, in the government of Minsk, and zoo m.

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  • IZMAIL, or Ismail, a town of Russia, in the government of Bessarabia, on the left bank of the Kilia branch of the Danube, 35 m.

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  • The town was again transferred to Russia by the peace of Berlin (1878).

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  • Politically he was a pupil of Alexis Bestuzhev; consequently, when in the middle 'fifties Russia suddenly turned Francophil instead of Francophobe, Panin's position became extremely difficult.

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  • Panin was the inventor of the famous "Northern Accord," which aimed at opposing a combination of Russia, Prussia, Poland, Sweden, and perhaps Great Britain, against the Bourbon-Habsburg League.

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  • Great Britain, for instance, could never be persuaded that it was as much in her interests as in the interests of Russia to subsidize the antiFrench party in Sweden.

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  • Yet the idea of the "Northern Accord," though never quite realized, had important political consequences and influenced the policy of Russia for many years.

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  • All the diplomatic questions concerning Russia from 1762 to 1783 are intimately associated with the name of Panin.

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  • It was only when the impossibility of realizing the "Northern Accord" became patent that his influence began to wane, and Russia sacrificed millions of roubles fruitlessly in the endeavour to carry out his pet scheme.

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  • on the throne, in order that Poland, undivided and as strong as circumstances would permit, might be drawn wholly within the orbit of Russia.

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  • But he did not foresee the complications which were likely to arise from Russia's interference in the domestic affairs of Poland.

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  • He was forced to acquiesce in the first partition of Poland, and when Russia came off third best, Gregory Orlov declared in the council that the minister who had signed such a partition treaty was worthy of death.

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  • SERGIYEVO, a town of Russia, in the government of Moscow, 44 m.

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  • The Troitsk or Trinity monastery is the most sacred spot in " middle Russia, the Great Russians regarding it with more veneration than even the cathedrals and relics of the Kremlin at Moscow.

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  • His monastery acquired great fame and became the wealthiest in middle Russia.

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  • The foreign policy of this period brought about the complete isolation of Austria, and the ingratitude towards Russia, as shown during the period of the Crimean War, which has become proverbial, caused a permanent estrangement between the two great Eastern empires and the imperial families.

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  • The story of the Jews in Russia and Rumania remains a black spot on the European record.

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  • In Russia the Jews are more numerous and more harshly treated than in any other part of the world.

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  • In the remotest past Jews were settled in much of] the territory now included in Russia, but they are still treated.

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  • Despite a huge emigration of Jews from Russia, the congestion within the pale is the cause of terrible destitution and misery.

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  • The immigration of Jews from Russia was mainly responsible for the ineffective yet oppressive Aliens Act of 1905.

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  • After the Declaration of Independence, Jews are found all over America, where they have long enjoyed complete emancipation, and have enormously increased in numbers, owing particularly to immigration from Russia.

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  • The Jews of America have also taken a foremost place in the succour of their oppressed brethren in Russia and other parts of the world.

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  • While in Russia this took the form of actual massacre, in Germany and Austria it assumed the shape of social and civic ostracism.

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  • Baron Hirsch (q.v.) founded the Jewish colonial association, which has undertaken vast colonizing and educational enterprises, especially in Argentina, and more recently the Jewish territorial organization has been started to found a home for the oppressed Jews of Russia.

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  • Rightly or wrongly, he was held personally responsible for the rapprochement with France and Russia and the opposition to the Powers of the Triple Alliance; and this attitude had its effect on his career when Leo XIII.

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  • The countries which accept the largest share of Cretan produce are Turkey, England, Egypt, Austria and Russia.

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  • The allied powers (France, England and Russia) decided, however, that Crete should not be included amongst the islands annexed to the newly-formed kingdom of Greece; but recognizing that some change was necessary, they obtained from the sultan Mahmud II.

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  • Eventually the Cretan chiefs invoked the mediation of England, which Turkey, exhausted by her struggle with Russia, was ready to accept, and the convention known as the Pact of Halepa was drawn up in 1878 under the auspices of Mr Sandwith, the British consul, and Adossides Pasha, both of whom enjoyed the confidence of the Cretan population.

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  • After the revolution in Russia in the spring of 1917 Mr. Henderson visited that country on behalf of the British Government.

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  • In the autumn of 1921 he undertook the general supervision of relief work in Russia, first having exacted, as a condition, the release of all American prisoners held by the Soviet authorities.

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  • of Russia.

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  • King George married, on the 27th of October 1867, the grand duchess Olga Constantinovna of Russia, who became distinguished in Greece for her activity on behalf of charitable objects.

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  • 1876), who married in 1900 the grand duke George Michailovich of Russia.

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  • Augustus, who showed neither talent nor inclination for government, was content to leave Poland under the influence of Russia, and Saxony to the rule of his ministers.

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  • Though he was unable to reach Khiva the results of the journey afforded a great deal of political, geographical and military information, especially as to the advance of Russia in central Asia.

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  • Two years later, having meanwhile left England, he entered the service of Turkey in the war with Russia.

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  • The two states were conquered by Abdur Rahman in 1882, but were assigned to Russia by the Durand agreement of 1893.

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  • Since that agreement Russia has retired from all districts previously occupied by her on the left bank of the Panja, or upper Oxus.

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  • The tribes 'to the north, subject to Russia, are naturally more peaceable, and have been brought into some degree of discipline.

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  • In the southern half of the range are the chief mining districts of Russia.

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  • Ex Ploration The progress of geodetic surveys in Russia had long ago extended across the European half of the great empire, St Petersburg being connected with Tiflis on the southern slopes of the Caucasus by a direct system of triangulation carried out with the highest scientific precision.

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  • St Petersburg, again, is connected with Greenwich by European systems of triangulation; and the Greenwich meridian is adopted by Russia as the zero for all her longitude values.

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  • But beyond the eastern shores of the Caspian no system of direct geodetic measurements by first-class triangulation has been possible, and the surveys of Asiatic Russia are separated from those of Europe by the width of that inland sea.

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  • The astronomical observatory at Tashkent is adopted for the initial starting-point of the trans-Caspian triangulation of Russia; the triangulation ranks as second-class only, and now extends to the Pamir frontier beyond Osh.

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  • Exact surveys in Russia, based upon triangulation, extend as far east as Chinese Turkestan in longitude about 75° E.

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  • He visited the sources of the Hwang-ho (Yellow river) and the Salween, and then returned to Russia.

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  • On the western edge of the Kashgar plains, the political boundary between Russia and China is defined by the meridional range of Sarikol.

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  • Asiatic Russia, especially eastern Siberia and Mongolia, have been brought within the sphere of Russian exploration, with results so surprising as to form an epoch in the history of Asia.

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  • Russia, Persia, Afghanistan, Baluchistan, India and China have all revised their borders, and with the revision the political relations between these countries have acquired a new and more assured basis.

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  • The advance of Russia to the Turkoman deserts and the Oxus demanded a definite boundary between her trans-Caspian conquests and the kingdom of Afghanistan.

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  • This was determined Southern boundary on the north-west by the Russo-Afghan Boundary Coin of Russia m i ss i on of 1884-1886.

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  • above the crossing-point of the Russian Trans-Caspian railway at Charjui, the main channel of the Oxus river becomes the northern boundary of Afghanistan, separating that country from Russia, and so continues to its source in Victoria Lake of the Great Pamir.

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  • Eastwards of this the great Kashgar depression, which includes the Tarim desert, separates Russia from the vast sterile highlands of Tibet; and a continuous series of desert spaces of low elevation, marking the limits of a primeval inland sea from the Sarikol meridional watershed to the Khingan mountains on the western borders of Manchuria, divide her from the northern provinces of China.

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  • From the Khingan ranges to the Pacific, south of the Amur, stretch the rich districts of Manchuria, a province which connects Russia with the Korea by a series of valleys formed by the Sungari and its affluents - a land of hill and plain, forest and swamp, possessing a delightful climate, and vast undeveloped agricultural resources.

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  • The sturgeons, which abound in the Black Sea and Caspian, and ascend the rivers that fall into them, are also found in Asiatic Russia, and an allied form extends to southern China.

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  • The Turks are Mahommedans; their tribes extend up the Oxus to the borders of Afghanistan and Persia, and to the Caspian, and under the name of Kirghiz into Russia, and their language is spoken over a large part of western Asia.

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  • (ii.) The invasion and temporary subjection of Russia by the Mongols, who penetrated as far west as Silesia.

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  • The Aryans appear to have been settled to the north of the Hindu Kush, and to have migrated south-eastwards about 150o B.C. Their original home has been a subject of much discussion, but the view now prevalent is that they arose in southern Russia or Asia Minor, whence a section spread eastwards and divided into two closely related branches - the Hindus and Iranians.

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  • The advance of Russia in Asia is entirely different from that of the other powers, since it has taken place by land and not by sea.

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  • The conquest of Siberia and central Asia presented no real difficulties: Persia and Constantinople were left on one side, and Russia was defeated as soon as she was opposed by a vigorous power in the Far East.

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  • As the Russian possessions in Asia are continuous with European Russia, it is only natural that they should have been russified far more thoroughly than the British possessions have been anglicized.

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  • He nourished the grandiose idea of driving out the hordes of Tamerlane, freeing all Russia from the Tatar yoke, and proclaiming himself emperor of the North and East.

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  • In the following June he was transferred to the office of secretary of state for foreign affairs, and having acquitted himself with credit with regard to the war between Russia and Turkey, and to affairs in Greece, Portugal and France, he resigned with Wellington in November 1830, and shared his leader's attitude towards the Reform Bill of 1832.

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  • TAGANROG, a seaport of southern Russia, on the N.

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  • The commercial importance of the town dates from the second half of the r9th century; in 1870 its population had risen to 38,000, and after it was brought into railway connexion with Kharkov and Voronezh, and thus with the fertile provinces of south and south-east Russia, the increase was still more rapid, the number reaching 56,047 in 1885, and 58,928 in 1900 - Greeks, Jews, Armenians and West-Europeans being important elements.

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  • KUNGRAD, a trading town of Asiatic Russia, in the province of Syr-darya, in the delta of the Amu-darya, 50 m.

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  • In that year he was made an adjutant-general, lieutenant-colonel of the Preobrazhensky Guards, a member of the council of state, and, in the words of a foreign contemporary diplomatist, "the most influential personage in Russia."

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    0
  • Somewhat later he was created a count, and appointed commander-in-chief and governor-general of "New Russia," as the conquered provinces in the Ukraine were then called.

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    0
  • He was deeply interested in the question of the southern boundaries of Russia and consequently ij1 the fate of the Turkish Empire.

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    0
  • The same year the second Turkish War began, and the founder of New Russia took upon himself the responsibilities of commanderin-chief.

    0
    0
  • The German pamphlet: Pansalim Fiirst der Finsterniss and seine Geliebte, published in 1794, is a fair specimen of the opinion of those who regarded him as the evil genius of Catherine and of Russia.

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  • Towards the foothills of the Caucasus they are clothed with thick forests, while in the west they merge into the steppes of south Russia or end in marshy ground, choked with reeds and rushes, in the delta of the Kuban.

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  • The very extensive internal trade with Russia can only be mentioned.

    0
    0
  • The principal approach to Caucasia from Russia by rail is the line that runs from Rostov-on-Don to Vladikavkaz at the foot of the central Caucasus range.

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    0
  • This railway, together with the driving roads over the Caucasus mountains via the Mamison pass (the Ossetic military road) and the Darial pass (the Georgian military road), and the route across the Black Sea to Poti or Batum are the chief means of communication between southern Russia and Transcaucasia.

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    0
  • In 1770, during the course of a war between Russia and Turkey, the Russians crossed over the Caucasus and assisted the Imeretians to resist the Turks, and from the time of the ensuing peace of Kuchuk-kainarji the Georgian principalities looked to their powerful northern neighbour as their protector against the southern aggressors the Turks.

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    0
  • In 1783 George XIII., prince of Georgia and Mingrelia, formally put himself under the suzerainty of Russia, and after his death Georgia was converted (r80r) into a Russian province.

    0
    0
  • By the peace of Gulistan in 1813 Persia ceded to Russia several districts in eastern Caucasia, from Lenkoran northwards to Derbent.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless the mountain tribes who inhabited the higher parts of the Caucasus were still independent, and their subjugation cost Russia a sustained effort of thirty years, during the course of which her military commanders were more than once brought almost to the point of despair by the tenacity, the devotion and the adroitness and daring which the mountaineers displayed in a harassing guerilla warfare.

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    0
  • After acquiring the northern edge of the Armenian plateau, partly from Persia in 1828 and partly from Turkey in 1829, Russia crushed a rising which had broken out in the Caspian coast districts of Daghestan on the north of the Caucasus.

    0
    0
  • During the RussoTurkish War of 1877-78 the self-exiled Circassians and other Caucasian mountaineers, supported by a force of 14,000 Turks, made a determined attempt to wrest their native glens from the power of Russia; but, after suffering a severe defeat at the hands of General Alkhazov, the Turks withdrew, and were accompanied by some 30,000 Abkhasians, who settled in Asia Minor.

    0
    0
  • By the ensuing peace of Adrianople, Russia still further enlarged her Transcaucasian territories by the acquisition of the districts of Kars, Batum and Ardahan.

    0
    0
  • After a peaceful period of a quarter of a century the Armenian subjects of Russia in Transcaucasia were filled with bitterness and discontent by the confiscation of the properties of their national (Gregorian) church by the Russian treasury.

    0
    0
  • In 1785 Bentham started, by way of Italy and Constantinople, on a visit to his brother, Samuel Bentham, a naval engineer, holding the rank of colonel in the Russian service; and it was in Russia that he wrote his Defence of Usury.

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    0
  • In the 18th century it had two illustrious guests in Peter the Great of Russia and Christian VII.

    0
    0
  • Great tracts of low country along the southern shores of the Baltic and in northern Russia are covered with forests of spruce.

    0
    0
  • of Russia, had won the friendship of that potentate, whose resentment against his former allies, Austria and England, facilitated a re-grouping of the Powers.

    0
    0
  • His own violations of the treaties of Luneville and Amiens were overlooked; and in particular men forgot that the weakening of the Knights of St John by the recent confiscation of their lands in France and Spain, and the protracted delay of Russia and Prussia to guarantee their tenure of power in Malta, furnished England with good reasons for keeping her hold on that island.

    0
    0
  • These actions proclaimed so unmistakably Napoleon's intention of making Italy an annexe of France as to convince Francis of Austria and Alexander of Russia that war with him was inevitable.

    0
    0
  • Disputes with Russia respecting Malta and the British maritime code kept the two states apart for nearly a year; and Austria was too timid to move.

    0
    0
  • Negotiations with England and Russia served to show the extent of his ambition.

    0
    0
  • For Austria we may read Prussia; for Ulm, Jena-Auerstadt; for the occupation of Vienna, that of Berlin; for Austerlitz, Friedland, which again disposed of the belated succour given by Russia.

    0
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  • Equally important was the secret treaty of alliance between France and Russia signed on that same day.

    0
    0
  • Napoleon also promised to mediate between Russia and Turkey in the interests of the former, and (in case the Porte refused to accept the proffered terms) to help Russia to drive the Turks from Europe, "the city of Constantinople and the province of Rumelia alone excepted."

    0
    0
  • Both Russia and Prussia now agreed rigorously to exclude British ships and goods from their dominions.

    0
    0
  • After some diplomatic fencing Russia and Prussia broke with England and entered upon what was, officially at least, a state of war with her.

    0
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  • The duchy of Warsaw and the fortress of Danzig formed new outworks of his power and enabled him to overawe Russia.

    0
    0
  • The House of Habsburg now ceded Salzburg and the Inn-Viertel to Napoleon (for his ally, the king of Bavaria); a great portion of the spoils which Austria had torn from Poland in 1795 went to the grand duchy of Warsaw, or Russia; and the cession of her provinces Carinthia, Carniola and Istria to the French empire cut her off from all access to the sea.

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