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ruskin

ruskin

ruskin Sentence Examples

  • In 1873 John Ruskin set up at Orpington a private publishing house for his works, in the hands of his friend George Allen.

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  • Harrison, Tennyson, Ruskin, Mill (1899); John Watson, Comte, Mill and Spencer (1895); T.

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  • Biliotti many fine painted vases of styles which were called later the third and fourth "Mycenaean"; but these, bought by John Ruskin, and presented to the British Museum, excited less attention than they deserved, being supposed to be of some local Asiatic fabric of uncertain date.

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  • The whole subject is magnificently treated in Ruskin's Stones of Venice.

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  • Polo, a late central Gothic building (1380-1400) which Ruskin describes as "of the finest kind and superb in its effect of colour when seen from the side.

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  • The great staircase and the lower and upper halls contain the unrivalled series of paintings by Tintoretto, which called forth such unbounded enthusiasm on the part of Ruskin.

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  • Giovanni Elemosinario at Rialto (1398-1400) is called by Ruskin "the most interesting piece of central Gothic remaining comparatively intact in Venice."

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  • A lively agitation all over Europe, and particularly in England (conducted by Ruskin and William Morris), led the Italian government to discard the Austrian plan of restoration, at least as regards the interior of the Basilica, and to respect the ancient portions which had stood the test of time and had escaped "renewal" by man.

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  • The success of this exhibition (visited by 407,930 persons) led to the organization of a fourth exhibition in 1901, largely devoted to the works of Ruskin.

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  • Their importance will never be comparable to that of his music; but, just as the reaction against Ruskin's ascendancy as an art-critic has coincided with an increased respect for his ethical and sociological thought, so the rebellious forces that are compelling Wagnerism to grant music a constitution coincide with a growing admiration of his general mental powers.

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  • Brantwood, a house beside Coniston Lake, was the home of Ruskin during the last years of his life.

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  • A few, like Ruskin, were doubtful about "that increased quietness of style"; one or two already suspected that the "sweetness" was obtained at some sacrifice of force, and that the "purity" involved a concession to Victorian conventionality.

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  • 3 See an eloquent description by Ruskin, Stones of Venice, iii.

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  • As regards his intellectual attainments we may set Julius Hare's verdict "the greatest mind since Plato" over against Ruskin's "by nature puzzle-headed and indeed wrong-headed."

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  • Of his separate publications, the most important are his lives of Cromwell (1888), William the Silent, (1897), Ruskin (1902), and Chatham (1905); his Meaning of History (1862; enlarged 1894) and Byzantine History in the Early Middle Ages (1900); and his essays on Early Victorian Literature (1896) and The Choice of Books (1886) are remarkable alike for generous admiration and good sense.

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  • Other works include the Sheridan monument in Washington; " Mares of Diomedes " and " Ruskin " in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; statue of Lincoln, Newark, N.J.; statue of Henry Ward Beecher, Brooklyn; the Wyatt Memorial, Raleigh, N.C.; " The Flyer " at the university of Virginia; gargoyles for a Princeton dormitory; " Wonderment of Motherhood " and " Conception."

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  • Freeman (London, 1895); Frederic Harrison, Tennyson, Ruskin, Mill and other Literary Estimates (London, 1899); James Bryce, "E.

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  • JOHN RUSKIN (1819-1900), English writer and critic, was born in London, at Hunter Street, Brunswick Square, on the 8th of February 1819, being the only child of John James Ruskin and Margaret Cox.

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  • They were Scots, first cousins, the grandchildren of a certain John Ruskin of Edinburgh (1732-1780).

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  • The name Ruskin is said to be a variant of Erskine, or Roskeen, or Rogerkin, and even Roughskin.

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  • It is more probably Rusking, an Anglian family, which passed northwards and became Ruskyn, Rusken and Ruskin.

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  • John Ruskin, the author's grandfather, a handsome lad of twenty, ran away with Catherine Tweddale, daughter of the Covenanting minister and of Catherine Adair, then a beautiful girl of sixteen.

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  • His son, John James Ruskin (1785-1864), father of the author, was sent to the High School at Edinburgh under Dr A.

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  • There, in 1809, he founded the sherry business of Ruskin, Telford & Domecq; Domecq being proprietor of a famous vineyard in Spain, Telford contributing the capital of the firm, and Ruskin having sole control of the business.

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  • John James Ruskin, a typical Scot, of remarkable energy, probity and foresight, built up a great business, paid off his father's debts, formed near London a most hospitable and cultured home, where he maintained his taste for literature and art, and lived and died, as his son proudly wrote upon his tomb, "an entirely honest merchant."

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  • After a delay of nine years, having at last obtained an adequate income, he married his cousin, Margaret Cox, who had already lived for eighteen years with his mother, the widow of John Ruskin of Edinburgh.

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  • Margaret Ruskin, the author's mother, was a handsome,.

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  • Her younger daughter married Mr Richardson, a baker, of Croydon; the elder, Margaret, married John James Ruskin.

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  • Writing as an old man, long after her death, Ruskin speaks of his early love without any sort of rapture.

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  • Ruskin's Oxford career, broken by the two years passed abroad, was not very full of incident or of usefulness.

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  • Long before Ruskin published books he had appeared in print.

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  • Having recovered his health and spirits by care and foreign travel, and having taken his degree and left Oxford, Ruskin set to work steadily at Herne Hill on the more elaborate defence of Turner, which was to become his first work.

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  • On the 10th of April 1848, a day famous in the history of Chartism, Ruskin was married at Perth to Euphemia Chalmers Gray, a lady of great beauty, of a family long intimate with the Ruskins.

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  • But Ruskin, immersed in various studies and projects, was no husband for a brilliant woman devoted to society.

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  • John Ruskin returned to his parents, with whom he resided till their death; and neither his marriage nor the annulling of it seems to have affected seriously his literary career.

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  • Ruskin's architectural studies, of which The Seven Lamps was the first fruit, turned him from Turner and Modern Painters.

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  • This delicate art was carried even farther in the later volumes of Modern Painters by the school of engravers whom Ruskin inspired and gathered round him.

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  • Although Ruskin was practised in drawing from the time that he could hold a pencil, and had lessons in painting from some eminent artists, he at no time attempted to paint pictures.

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  • In his gift for recording the most subtle characters of architectural carvings and details, Ruskin has hardly been surpassed by the most distinguished painters.

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  • This marks an epoch in the career of John Ruskin; and the year 1860 closed the series of his works on art strictly so called; indeed, this was the last of his regular works in substantial form.

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  • The entire set of Ruskin's publications amounts to more than fifty works having distinctive titles.

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  • For some years before 1860 Ruskin had been deeply stirred by reflecting on the condition of all industrial work and the evils of modern society.

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  • In 1864 Ruskin's father died, at the age of 79, leaving his son a large fortune and a fine property at Denmark Hill.

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  • John still lived there with his mother, aged 83, infirm, and failing in sight, to whom came as a companion their cousin, Joanna Ruskin Agnew, afterwards Mrs Arthur Severn.

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  • At the end of the year 1864 Ruskin delivered at Manchester a new series of lectures - not on art, but on reading, education, woman's work and social morals - the expansion of his earlier treatises on economic sophisms. This afterwards was included with a Dublin lecture of 1868 under the fantastic title of Sesame and Lilies (perhaps the most popular of his social essays), of which 44,000 copies were issued down to 1900.

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  • Ruskin himself endowed the museum with works of art and money; a full account of it has been given in Mr E.

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  • Cook's Studies in Ruskin (1890), which contains the particulars of his university lectures and of his economic and social experiments.

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  • In Fors, which was continued month by month for seven years, Ruskin poured out his thoughts, proposals and rebukes on society and persons with inexhaustible fancy, wit, eloquence and freedom, until he was attacked with a violent brain malady in the spring of 1878 (aet.

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  • In 1874 Ruskin himself had begun to doubt its lawfulness.

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  • "Ruskin Societies" were founded in many parts of the kingdom.

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  • Ruskin's literary life may be arranged in three divisions.

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  • John Ruskin founded the Reformation in Art.

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  • But the negative part of Ruskin's teaching on economics, social and political problems, has been much more effective than the positive part of his teaching.

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  • In art, Ruskin had enjoyed an unexampled training, which made him a consummate expert.

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  • Ruskin's life and writings have been the subject of many works composed by friends, disciples and admirers.

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  • Cook, published his Studies in Ruskin in 1890, with full details of his career as professor.

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  • Hobson, in John Ruskin, Social Reformer (2nd ed., 1899), has elaborately discussed his social and economic teaching, and claims him as "the greatest social teacher of his age."

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  • His art theories have been discussed by Professor Charles Waldstein of Cambridge in The Work of John Ruskin (1894), by Robert de la Sizeranne in Ruskin et la religion de la beaute (1897), and by Professor H.

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  • Brunhes of Fribourg in Ruskin et la Bible (1901).

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  • The monumental "library edition" of Ruskin's works (begun in 1903), prepared by Mr E.

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  • 1869), a native of Missouri, and the organizer of the Ruskin Hall Workingmen's College, Oxford, England.

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  • The college was removed to Glen Ellyn, Illinois, in 1903 and after 1906 to Ruskin, Florida.

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  • Carlyle's doctrines, entirely opposed to the ordinary opinions of Whigs and Radicals, found afterwards an expositor in his ardent disciple Ruskin, and have obvious affinities with more recent socialism.

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  • His infirmities enforced a very retired life, but he was constantly visited by Froude, and occasionally by his disciple Ruskin.

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  • They were known among themselves as the "Brotherhood"; they read together theology, ecclesiastical history, medieval poetry, and, among moderns, Tennyson and Ruskin.

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  • Essentially the child of the Gothic revival, he had put an ineffaceable stamp on Victorian ornament and design, his place being that of a follower of Ruskin and Pugin, but with a greater practical influence than either.

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  • de Calonne, Histoire de la ville d'Amiens (1900); John Ruskin, The Bible of Amiens (1881); La Picardie historique et monumentale, tome i., published by the Societe des Antiquaires de Picardie (1893).

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  • (2) In painting, the term is used for the effect produced by accidental lights (Ruskin, Modern Painters, I.

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  • Ruskin considered that there was "nothing so perfect in its simplicity" as the west window, the design of which resembles a leaf.

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  • Other institutions are the Whitelands training college for school-mistresses, in which Ruskin took deep interest; the St Mark's college for school-masters; the Victoria and the Cheyne hospitals for children, a cancer hospital, the Southwestern polytechnic, and a public library containing an excellent collection relative to local history.

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  • Regulus and the tomb of Ilaria del Carretto by Jacopo della Quercia of Siena (described by Ruskin in Modern Painters, ii.), the earliest of his extant works (1406), and one of the earliest decorative works of the Renaissance.

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  • abridged edition of John Ruskin's Modern Painters.

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  • Richard Dutton ---------------------------- Let the artifice be apparent: a Ruskin sentence is like a vision of an anaconda with a spastic colon.

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  • The Victorian art critic Ruskin denounced the excesses of capitalism in his essay collection ' Unto This Last ' .

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  • I've always been a big fan of the pathetic fallacy, unlike Ruskin, who coined the term.

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  • The Ruskin Laboratory, which coordinates many aspects of the School's research, has developed interdisciplinary working relationships within Oxford, and beyond.

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  • JOHN Ruskin's lifelong love affair with Venice is captured in an exhibition at Brantwood, Coniston.

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  • pathetic fallacy, unlike Ruskin, who coined the term.

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  • Details Most Theology graduates will take the Anglia Ruskin University's MA or Diploma in Pastoral theology graduates will take the Anglia Ruskin University's MA or Diploma in Pastoral Theology part-time over two years.

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  • Kurt Jackson studied zoology at St Peters College Oxford during which time he attended art courses at Ruskin College of Art in Oxford.

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  • In 1873 John Ruskin set up at Orpington a private publishing house for his works, in the hands of his friend George Allen.

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  • Harrison, Tennyson, Ruskin, Mill (1899); John Watson, Comte, Mill and Spencer (1895); T.

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    0
  • Biliotti many fine painted vases of styles which were called later the third and fourth "Mycenaean"; but these, bought by John Ruskin, and presented to the British Museum, excited less attention than they deserved, being supposed to be of some local Asiatic fabric of uncertain date.

    0
    0
  • The whole subject is magnificently treated in Ruskin's Stones of Venice.

    0
    0
  • Polo, a late central Gothic building (1380-1400) which Ruskin describes as "of the finest kind and superb in its effect of colour when seen from the side.

    0
    0
  • The great staircase and the lower and upper halls contain the unrivalled series of paintings by Tintoretto, which called forth such unbounded enthusiasm on the part of Ruskin.

    0
    0
  • Giovanni Elemosinario at Rialto (1398-1400) is called by Ruskin "the most interesting piece of central Gothic remaining comparatively intact in Venice."

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    0
  • A lively agitation all over Europe, and particularly in England (conducted by Ruskin and William Morris), led the Italian government to discard the Austrian plan of restoration, at least as regards the interior of the Basilica, and to respect the ancient portions which had stood the test of time and had escaped "renewal" by man.

    0
    0
  • The success of this exhibition (visited by 407,930 persons) led to the organization of a fourth exhibition in 1901, largely devoted to the works of Ruskin.

    0
    0
  • Their importance will never be comparable to that of his music; but, just as the reaction against Ruskin's ascendancy as an art-critic has coincided with an increased respect for his ethical and sociological thought, so the rebellious forces that are compelling Wagnerism to grant music a constitution coincide with a growing admiration of his general mental powers.

    0
    0
  • Brantwood, a house beside Coniston Lake, was the home of Ruskin during the last years of his life.

    0
    0
  • A few, like Ruskin, were doubtful about "that increased quietness of style"; one or two already suspected that the "sweetness" was obtained at some sacrifice of force, and that the "purity" involved a concession to Victorian conventionality.

    0
    0
  • 3 See an eloquent description by Ruskin, Stones of Venice, iii.

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    0
  • As regards his intellectual attainments we may set Julius Hare's verdict "the greatest mind since Plato" over against Ruskin's "by nature puzzle-headed and indeed wrong-headed."

    0
    0
  • Of his separate publications, the most important are his lives of Cromwell (1888), William the Silent, (1897), Ruskin (1902), and Chatham (1905); his Meaning of History (1862; enlarged 1894) and Byzantine History in the Early Middle Ages (1900); and his essays on Early Victorian Literature (1896) and The Choice of Books (1886) are remarkable alike for generous admiration and good sense.

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  • Other works include the Sheridan monument in Washington; " Mares of Diomedes " and " Ruskin " in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; statue of Lincoln, Newark, N.J.; statue of Henry Ward Beecher, Brooklyn; the Wyatt Memorial, Raleigh, N.C.; " The Flyer " at the university of Virginia; gargoyles for a Princeton dormitory; " Wonderment of Motherhood " and " Conception."

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  • Freeman (London, 1895); Frederic Harrison, Tennyson, Ruskin, Mill and other Literary Estimates (London, 1899); James Bryce, "E.

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  • JOHN RUSKIN (1819-1900), English writer and critic, was born in London, at Hunter Street, Brunswick Square, on the 8th of February 1819, being the only child of John James Ruskin and Margaret Cox.

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  • They were Scots, first cousins, the grandchildren of a certain John Ruskin of Edinburgh (1732-1780).

    0
    0
  • The name Ruskin is said to be a variant of Erskine, or Roskeen, or Rogerkin, and even Roughskin.

    0
    0
  • It is more probably Rusking, an Anglian family, which passed northwards and became Ruskyn, Rusken and Ruskin.

    0
    0
  • John Ruskin, the author's grandfather, a handsome lad of twenty, ran away with Catherine Tweddale, daughter of the Covenanting minister and of Catherine Adair, then a beautiful girl of sixteen.

    0
    0
  • His son, John James Ruskin (1785-1864), father of the author, was sent to the High School at Edinburgh under Dr A.

    0
    0
  • There, in 1809, he founded the sherry business of Ruskin, Telford & Domecq; Domecq being proprietor of a famous vineyard in Spain, Telford contributing the capital of the firm, and Ruskin having sole control of the business.

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    0
  • John James Ruskin, a typical Scot, of remarkable energy, probity and foresight, built up a great business, paid off his father's debts, formed near London a most hospitable and cultured home, where he maintained his taste for literature and art, and lived and died, as his son proudly wrote upon his tomb, "an entirely honest merchant."

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    0
  • After a delay of nine years, having at last obtained an adequate income, he married his cousin, Margaret Cox, who had already lived for eighteen years with his mother, the widow of John Ruskin of Edinburgh.

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    0
  • Margaret Ruskin, the author's mother, was a handsome,.

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  • Her younger daughter married Mr Richardson, a baker, of Croydon; the elder, Margaret, married John James Ruskin.

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  • At the age of seventeen he saw Adele, the French daughter of Monsieur Domecq, Mr Ruskin's partner, a lovely girl of fifteen.

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  • Writing as an old man, long after her death, Ruskin speaks of his early love without any sort of rapture.

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  • Ruskin's Oxford career, broken by the two years passed abroad, was not very full of incident or of usefulness.

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    0
  • Long before Ruskin published books he had appeared in print.

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    0
  • Having recovered his health and spirits by care and foreign travel, and having taken his degree and left Oxford, Ruskin set to work steadily at Herne Hill on the more elaborate defence of Turner, which was to become his first work.

    0
    0
  • On the 10th of April 1848, a day famous in the history of Chartism, Ruskin was married at Perth to Euphemia Chalmers Gray, a lady of great beauty, of a family long intimate with the Ruskins.

    0
    0
  • But Ruskin, immersed in various studies and projects, was no husband for a brilliant woman devoted to society.

    0
    0
  • John Ruskin returned to his parents, with whom he resided till their death; and neither his marriage nor the annulling of it seems to have affected seriously his literary career.

    0
    0
  • Ruskin's architectural studies, of which The Seven Lamps was the first fruit, turned him from Turner and Modern Painters.

    0
    0
  • This delicate art was carried even farther in the later volumes of Modern Painters by the school of engravers whom Ruskin inspired and gathered round him.

    0
    0
  • Although Ruskin was practised in drawing from the time that he could hold a pencil, and had lessons in painting from some eminent artists, he at no time attempted to paint pictures.

    0
    0
  • In his gift for recording the most subtle characters of architectural carvings and details, Ruskin has hardly been surpassed by the most distinguished painters.

    0
    0
  • This marks an epoch in the career of John Ruskin; and the year 1860 closed the series of his works on art strictly so called; indeed, this was the last of his regular works in substantial form.

    0
    0
  • The entire set of Ruskin's publications amounts to more than fifty works having distinctive titles.

    0
    0
  • For some years before 1860 Ruskin had been deeply stirred by reflecting on the condition of all industrial work and the evils of modern society.

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    0
  • These two small books contain the earliest and most systematic of all Ruskin's efforts to depict a new social Utopia: they contain a vehement repudiation of the orthodox formulas of the economists; and they are for the most part written in a trenchant but simple style, in striking contrast to the florid and discursive form of his works on art.

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  • In 1864 Ruskin's father died, at the age of 79, leaving his son a large fortune and a fine property at Denmark Hill.

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  • John still lived there with his mother, aged 83, infirm, and failing in sight, to whom came as a companion their cousin, Joanna Ruskin Agnew, afterwards Mrs Arthur Severn.

    0
    0
  • At the end of the year 1864 Ruskin delivered at Manchester a new series of lectures - not on art, but on reading, education, woman's work and social morals - the expansion of his earlier treatises on economic sophisms. This afterwards was included with a Dublin lecture of 1868 under the fantastic title of Sesame and Lilies (perhaps the most popular of his social essays), of which 44,000 copies were issued down to 1900.

    0
    0
  • Ruskin himself endowed the museum with works of art and money; a full account of it has been given in Mr E.

    0
    0
  • Cook's Studies in Ruskin (1890), which contains the particulars of his university lectures and of his economic and social experiments.

    0
    0
  • In Fors, which was continued month by month for seven years, Ruskin poured out his thoughts, proposals and rebukes on society and persons with inexhaustible fancy, wit, eloquence and freedom, until he was attacked with a violent brain malady in the spring of 1878 (aet.

    0
    0
  • In 1874 Ruskin himself had begun to doubt its lawfulness.

    0
    0
  • "Ruskin Societies" were founded in many parts of the kingdom.

    0
    0
  • Ruskin's literary life may be arranged in three divisions.

    0
    0
  • John Ruskin founded the Reformation in Art.

    0
    0
  • But the negative part of Ruskin's teaching on economics, social and political problems, has been much more effective than the positive part of his teaching.

    0
    0
  • In art, Ruskin had enjoyed an unexampled training, which made him a consummate expert.

    0
    0
  • Ruskin's life and writings have been the subject of many works composed by friends, disciples and admirers.

    0
    0
  • Cook, published his Studies in Ruskin in 1890, with full details of his career as professor.

    0
    0
  • Hobson, in John Ruskin, Social Reformer (2nd ed., 1899), has elaborately discussed his social and economic teaching, and claims him as "the greatest social teacher of his age."

    0
    0
  • His art theories have been discussed by Professor Charles Waldstein of Cambridge in The Work of John Ruskin (1894), by Robert de la Sizeranne in Ruskin et la religion de la beaute (1897), and by Professor H.

    0
    0
  • Brunhes of Fribourg in Ruskin et la Bible (1901).

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    0
  • The monumental "library edition" of Ruskin's works (begun in 1903), prepared by Mr E.

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  • Rey, Il Monte Cervino (1904); John Ruskin, vol.

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  • In1900-1903it was the seat of Ruskin College, an institution founded by Walter Vrooman (b.

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  • 1869), a native of Missouri, and the organizer of the Ruskin Hall Workingmen's College, Oxford, England.

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  • The college was removed to Glen Ellyn, Illinois, in 1903 and after 1906 to Ruskin, Florida.

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    0
  • Carlyle's doctrines, entirely opposed to the ordinary opinions of Whigs and Radicals, found afterwards an expositor in his ardent disciple Ruskin, and have obvious affinities with more recent socialism.

    0
    0
  • His infirmities enforced a very retired life, but he was constantly visited by Froude, and occasionally by his disciple Ruskin.

    0
    0
  • They were known among themselves as the "Brotherhood"; they read together theology, ecclesiastical history, medieval poetry, and, among moderns, Tennyson and Ruskin.

    0
    0
  • Essentially the child of the Gothic revival, he had put an ineffaceable stamp on Victorian ornament and design, his place being that of a follower of Ruskin and Pugin, but with a greater practical influence than either.

    0
    0
  • de Calonne, Histoire de la ville d'Amiens (1900); John Ruskin, The Bible of Amiens (1881); La Picardie historique et monumentale, tome i., published by the Societe des Antiquaires de Picardie (1893).

    0
    0
  • (2) In painting, the term is used for the effect produced by accidental lights (Ruskin, Modern Painters, I.

    0
    0
  • Ruskin considered that there was "nothing so perfect in its simplicity" as the west window, the design of which resembles a leaf.

    0
    0
  • Other institutions are the Whitelands training college for school-mistresses, in which Ruskin took deep interest; the St Mark's college for school-masters; the Victoria and the Cheyne hospitals for children, a cancer hospital, the Southwestern polytechnic, and a public library containing an excellent collection relative to local history.

    0
    0
  • Regulus and the tomb of Ilaria del Carretto by Jacopo della Quercia of Siena (described by Ruskin in Modern Painters, ii.), the earliest of his extant works (1406), and one of the earliest decorative works of the Renaissance.

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    0
  • It is because my books are full of the riches of which Mr. Ruskin speaks that I love them so dearly.

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  • Ruskin followed this book with a second volume, developing his ideas about symbolism in art.

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  • Details Most Theology Graduates will take the Anglia Ruskin University 's MA or Diploma in Pastoral Theology part-time over two years.

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  • Kurt Jackson studied zoology at St Peters College Oxford during which time he attended art courses at Ruskin College of Art in Oxford.

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