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rudiments

rudiments Sentence Examples

  • Of Kirkby, from whom he learned the rudiments of English and Latin grammar, he speaks gratefully, and doubtless truly, so far as he could trust the impressions of childhood.

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  • Lubbock traced at least twenty moults in Cloeon; at about the tenth rudiments of the wingcases began to appear.

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  • The eggcell or oosphere is a large cell containing a single large nucleus, and in the green plants the rudiments of plastids.

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  • Until he was fifteen he could have acquired only the simplest rudiments of education, and those chiefly from his parents.

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  • He received the rudiments of his education at the monastery of Caltagirone in Sicily, but was expelled from it for misconduct and disowned by his relations.

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  • "You are too good," said the master of Trinity, "to die of drinking punch in the torrid zone"; and Watson, instead of becoming, as he had flattered himself, a great orientalist, remained at home to be elected professor of chemistry, a science of which he did not at the time possess the simplest rudiments.

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  • Infant asylums (where the first rudiments of instruction are imparted to children between two and a half and six years of age) and elementary schools have increased in number.

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  • I Ernst Haeckel will not allow us to call his system " Ma.t,erialism," because he affirms that the rudiments of matter are also rudimentary " mind stuff " (to use W.

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  • Here in the course of two years (1749-1750), interrupted by danger and debility, he " painfully climbed into the third form "; but it was left to his riper age to " acquire the beauties of the Latin and the rudiments of the Greek tongue."

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  • Floral diagram of typical orchid flower; 1, labellum; a, anther; s, rudiments of barren stamens (staminodes).

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  • In most orchids the only stamen developed to maturity is the posterior one of the three opposite to the lip (anterior before the twisting of the ovary), the other two, as well as all three inner ones, being entirely absent, or present only in the form of rudiments.

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  • The next work on the husbandry of Scotland is The Countryman's Rudiments, or an Advice to the Farmers in East Lothian, how to labour and improve their Grounds, said to have been written by John Hamilton, 2nd Lord Belhaven about the time of the Union, and reprinted in 1723.

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  • mes, Rudiments of the skeleto-trophic tissues.

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  • Farther up, within the velar area, the rudiments of the cerebral nerve-ganglion ng are seen separating from the ectoderm.

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  • He finds that the endoderm arises may be readily distinguished, six of which subsequently enter into from an anterior and a posterior rudiment derived from the " endothe formation of the head, three going to the thorax and twelve to blast," that many of the cells of these rudiments wander into the the abdomen.

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  • part by the yolk, and in part by those anterior and posterior rudiments Its composition has been the subject of prolonged difference of which usually form the mesenteron, but that in some Hexapoda opinion.

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  • The intercalary segment has no appendages, nor rudiments thereof, except, according to H.

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  • The three pairs --Mx 2 of legs appear very early as rudiments.

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  • In some embryos there is but a single pair of these rudiments (or vestiges) situate on the first abdominal segment, and in some cases they become invaginations of a glandular nature.

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  • This by successive divisions forms a group of four to eight cells, which subsequently pass through the blastoderm, and dividing into two groups become symmetrically arranged and surrounded by the rudiments of the ovarian tubes.

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  • The presence of rudiments of the genital ducts of both sexes in the embryo of either sex is interesting and suggestive.

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  • during post-embryonic development - no insect being hatched with the smallest external rudiments of those organs - and on the necessity for successive castings or " moults " (ecdyses) of the cuticle.

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  • The imaginal disks for the outer wall of the body, some of them, at any rate, include mesodermal rudiments (from which the muscles are developed) as well as hypodermis.

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  • - Nymph of May-fly (Chloeon dipterum), with wing rudiments (a) and tracheal gill-plates (b, b).

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  • Save for the barest rudiments of reading and writing, he tells us that he had no master; yet we find him at Verona in 1521 an esteemed teacher of mathematics.

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  • The brilliant success of Humperdinck's Hansel and Gretel, in which Wagnerian technique is applied to the diatonic style of nursery songs with a humorous accuracy undreamed of by Wagner's imitators, points a moral which would have charmed Wagner himself; but until the revival of some rudiments of musical common sense becomes widespread, there is little prospect of the influence of Wagner's harmonic style being productive of anything better than nonsense.

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  • In 1781 he writes," I cannot but observe that these were the first rudiments of the Methodist societies."In the presence of such facts we can understand the significance of the mission to Georgia.

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  • From his father he received the rudiments of his education, which was continued at Leiden under A.

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  • abp 4 to abp', Rudiments of the four appendages which carry the pulmonary lamellae.

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  • I to VI, Rudiments of the six limbs of the prosoma.

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  • His earliest tastes were literary rather than scientific, and he learned the rudiments of geometry during his first year at the college of Turin, without difficulty, but without distinction.

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  • The body is stout and thickly built; the legs are short and strong, and armed, especially the anterior pair, with long curved claws; the tail is short; and the ears are reduced to rudiments.

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  • The envoys returned to Kiev in 912 after being shown the splendours of the Greek capital and being instructed in the rudiments of the Greek faith.

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  • Some of the central cells remain in clumps as "germ-balls," others form a mesenchyma in which "flame-cells" arise; others again give rise to muscles; and at the thicker end of the body, rudiments of the brain and digestive system are observable.

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  • He first opened an English school in which the Bible was the centre of the school work, and along with it all kinds of secular knowledge were taught from the rudiments upwards to a university standard.

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  • After several moults the rudiments of two pairs of wings appear, and then the insect creeps up to the surface of the earth, and on to the vine.

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  • He received the rudiments of an excellent education at a free school in Dublin, and afterwards spent a year or two (1751-1752) under his father's roof at Skeyton rectory, Norfolk, and elsewhere, and for a short time he had Gibbon as a fellow-pupil.

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  • There is sufficient evidence that his family was of Croatian stock: a fact which throws light upon the distinctively Slavonic character of much of his music. He received the first rudiments of education from his father, a wheelwright with twelve children, and at an early age evinced a decided musical talent.

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  • Even the rudiments of Roman law were not then included in the ordinary training of English lawyers; it was assumed at the universities that any good Latin scholar could qualify himself at short notice for keeping up such tradition of civilian studies as survived.

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  • of Homer and Plato, though his knowledge of the language was limited to the barest rudiments.

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  • They founded the monastery of Sord as a civilizing centre, and after giving Absalon the rudiments of a sound education at home, which included not only book-lore but every manly and martial exercise, they sent him to the university of Paris.

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  • Other Gentile converts would require instruction in the very rudiments of ethical and monotheistic religion.

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  • The dawn of the science covers the first observation of facts and the rudiments of true interpretation.

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  • They are all such rudiments as Aristotle might well polish into the more developed expositions in the first four books of the Nicomachean Ethics.

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  • At the age of ten he was apprenticed to a tailor, his spare hours being spent in acquiring the rudiments of an education.

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  • mes, Rudiments of the skeletotrophic tissues.

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  • He was taught the use of the astrolabe (which Prince Yakov Dolgoruki, with intent to please, had brought him from Paris) by a Dutchman, Franz Timmerman, who also instructed him in the rudiments of geometry and fortifications.

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  • He received the rudiments of education at St Anthony's School in Threadneedle Street, at that time under Nicolas Holt, held to be the best in the city.

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  • He acquired the rudiments of his education at Dalkeith, and in his fourteenth year matriculated at the university of Edinburgh.

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  • It will be convenient now to pass to the fully-developed altar of the Western Church with its accessories, though the rudiments of most of the additional details are traceable in the earlier period.

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  • The rudiments of Latin he obtained at the grammar school of Montrose, after leaving which he learned Greek for two years under Pierre de Marsilliers, a Frenchman whom John Erskine of Dun had induced to settle at Montrose; and such was Melville's proficiency that on going to the university of St Andrews he excited the astonishment of the professors by using the Greek text of Aristotle, which no one else there understood.

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  • Born between 720 and 725 Paulus received an exceptionally good education, probably at the court of the Lombard king Ratchis in Pavia, learning from a teacher named Flavian the rudiments of Greek.

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  • But there are grounds for believing that some of the rudiments of chivalry are to be detected in early Teutonic customs, and that they may have made some advance among the Franks of Gaul.

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  • These leaf-buds contain the rudiments of a shoot, and consist of leaves covering a growing point.

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  • His doctrines were developed in his edition of Aldrich's Artis logicae rudiments (1849) - his chief contribution to the reviving study of Aristotle - and in his Prolegomena logica: an Inquiry into the Psychological Character of Logical Processes (1851, 2nd ed.

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  • Schools were rare, and teachers qualified only to impart the merest rudiments.

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  • iv., 1824), he published a brief account of Egyptian research, with five plates containing the rudiments of an Egyptian vocabulary.

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  • On the other hand, Palaeosyops is connected with Titanotherium by means of Telmatotherium of the upper Bridger and Washakia Eocene, a larger animal, with a longer and flatter skull, showing rudiments of horn-cores, only two pairs of lower incisors, and a general approximation in dental character to Titanotherium.

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  • It is not surprising, therefore, that they have been regarded as the rudiments of leaves.

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  • Here the younger boys are collected and instructed in the rudiments of reading, writing and religious creed by the village mullah, or priest, who thereby acquires an early influence over the Afghan mind.

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  • His earliest governesses were the wives of a tailor and a vintner from the Dutch settlement; a sailor called Norman taught him the rudiments of navigation; and, when he grew older, he was placed under the care of a Hungarian refugee, Janos Zeikin, who seems to have been a conscientious teacher.

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  • The rudiments of some of these ideas can be found in the prophets, but their development took place after the exile, and indeed for the most part after the conclusion of the writings accounted canonical.

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  • Of his work nothing remained, not a written word, nor more than the rudiments of an organization.

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  • The Roman colonies were thus not merely valuable as propugnacula of the state, as permanent supports to Roman garrisons and armies, but they proved a most effective means of extending over wide bounds the language and the laws of Rome, and of inoculating the inhabitants of the provinces with more than the rudiments of Roman civilization.

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  • The new synthesis reveals a universal decline from the 5th to the 10th centuries, while the Germanic races were learning the rudiments of culture, a decline that was deepened by each succeeding wave of migration, each tribal war of Franks or Saxons, and reached its climax in the disorders of the 9th and 10th centuries when the half-formed civilization of Christendom was forced to face the migration of the Northmen by sea, the raids of the Saracen upon the south and the onslaught of Hungarians and Sla y s upon the east.

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  • - a, Atrium; al, alimentary canal; y blood-vessel; cv, cerebral vesicle; df, dorsal section of myocoel (= fin spaces); e, " eyespot"; end, endostyle; gl, club-shaped gland; lm, edge of left metapleur; m, lower edge of mouth; n, notochord; nt, pigmented nerve tube; ps, primary gill-slits, I, 9, and 14; rc, renal cells on atrial floor; rm, edge of right metapleur; so, sense organ opening into praeoral pit; ss, thickenings, the rudiments of the row of secondary gill-slits.

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  • To be a gentleman in Italy meant at this epoch to be a man acquainted with the rudiments at least of scholarship, refined in diction, capable of corresponding or of speaking in choice phrases, open to the beauty of the arts, intelligently interested in archaeology, taking for his models of conduct the great men of antiquity rather than the saints of the church.

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  • Its inhabitants, surrounded by Moorish or Spanish enemies and distracted by civil war, derived such rudiments of civilization as they possessed from Arabic or Leonese sources.

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  • On four feet (i, k,1, m) are the rudiments of the lamellae which subsequently form the brood-cavity.

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  • The rudiments of the first three pairs of appendages commonly appear simultaneously, and, even in forms with embryonic development, they show differences in their mode of appearance from the succeeding somites.

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  • The rudiments of the paired eyes appear under the integument at the sides of the head, but only become pedunculated at a comparatively late stage.

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  • He places Palaeopolis at Gaiola Point and has discovered the remains of the harbour, the town hall and various other rudiments of the ancient city.

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  • His Pindaric Odes, written at this period or earlier, in the manner of Cowley, indicate the rudiments of a real satirist, but a satirist struggling with a most uncongenial form of expression.

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  • In the Californian Pinus monophylla each spur bears usually one needle, but two are not uncommon; it would seem that rudiments of two needles are always produced, but, as a rule, only one develops into a needle.

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  • Computations are made with it by means of balls of bone or ivory runp ing on slender bamboo rods, similar to the simpler board, fitted up with beads strung on wires, which is employed in teaching the rudiments of arithmetic in English schools.

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  • Bogdan, after learning to read and write, a rare accomplishment in those days, entered the Cossack ranks, was dangerously wounded and taken prisoner in his first battle against the Turks, and found leisure during his two years' captivity at Constantinople to acquire the rudiments of Turkish and French.

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  • After having acquired the rudiments of education at two small schools in hamlets close to Woolsthorpe, Newton was sent at the age of twelve to the grammar school of Grantham.

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  • Though cunning, he was destitute alike of foresight and of self-control; he could never discern the way in which his conduct would be judged by other men, because he lacked even the rudiments of a conscience.

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  • If this be really the case, the rudiments of an earlier set of teeth which have been detected in the jaws of some members of the order, represent, not the milk-series, but a prelacteal dentition.

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  • Men had to receive the very rudiments of culture before they could appreciate its niceties.

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  • His tutor was Philippe Le Bas, son of the well-known member of the Convention and follower of Robespierre, an able man, imbued with the ideas of the Revolution, while Vieillard, who instructed him in the rudiments, was a democratic imperialist also inspired with the ideal of nationalism.

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  • In 1493 he went to Paris and thence to Italy, studying canon and civil law, patristics and the rudiments of Greek.

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  • Upon these projections the rudiments of the pollen-sacs are then seen, usually four in number, two on each lobe.

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  • rudiments of pop music.

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  • rudiments of the language.

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  • rudiments of education through the poverty or carelessness of its parents.

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  • rudiments of this world.

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  • rudiments of the game through to match play standards.

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  • rudiments of word processing.

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  • They taught the rudiments of the course, I did take part in this.

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  • They will learn the rudiments of Web Page Design to create a small website on the intranet.

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  • During that year he acquired the rudiments of Latin grammar.

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  • We went to this bourn in order that I might show my son the spot where I received the rudiments of my education.

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  • His collection includes rudiments for learning to read music.

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  • BeatLab's Training mode has a multitude of patterns that will help you practice your snare drum rudiments.

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  • This is a non contact exercise sport which involves learning the basic rudiments of how to box.

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  • You do not seem to know the first rudiments of agriculture.

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  • However he did resolve to carry out the task, and began investigating various primers on musical rudiments then popular with instrumental pupils.

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  • I will in this place only give some instances of such rudiments.

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  • He received the rudiments of his education at the monastery of Caltagirone in Sicily, but was expelled from it for misconduct and disowned by his relations.

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  • attained his majority, he was ignorant of the very rudiments of state-craft and almost illiterate.

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  • "You are too good," said the master of Trinity, "to die of drinking punch in the torrid zone"; and Watson, instead of becoming, as he had flattered himself, a great orientalist, remained at home to be elected professor of chemistry, a science of which he did not at the time possess the simplest rudiments.

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  • Infant asylums (where the first rudiments of instruction are imparted to children between two and a half and six years of age) and elementary schools have increased in number.

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  • I Ernst Haeckel will not allow us to call his system " Ma.t,erialism," because he affirms that the rudiments of matter are also rudimentary " mind stuff " (to use W.

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  • One of Harvey's prime objects is to defend and establish, on the basis of direct observation, the opinion already held by Aristotle, that, in the higher animals at any rate, the formation of the new organism by the process of generation takes place, not suddenly, by simultaneous accretion of rudiments of all or the most important of the organs of the adult, nor by sudden metamorphosis of a formative substance into a miniature of the whole, which subsequently grows, but by epigenesis, or successive differentiation of a relatively homogeneous rudiment into the parts and structures which are characteristic of the adult.

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  • The eggcell or oosphere is a large cell containing a single large nucleus, and in the green plants the rudiments of plastids.

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  • Of Kirkby, from whom he learned the rudiments of English and Latin grammar, he speaks gratefully, and doubtless truly, so far as he could trust the impressions of childhood.

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  • Here in the course of two years (1749-1750), interrupted by danger and debility, he " painfully climbed into the third form "; but it was left to his riper age to " acquire the beauties of the Latin and the rudiments of the Greek tongue."

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  • Floral diagram of typical orchid flower; 1, labellum; a, anther; s, rudiments of barren stamens (staminodes).

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  • In most orchids the only stamen developed to maturity is the posterior one of the three opposite to the lip (anterior before the twisting of the ovary), the other two, as well as all three inner ones, being entirely absent, or present only in the form of rudiments.

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  • The next work on the husbandry of Scotland is The Countryman's Rudiments, or an Advice to the Farmers in East Lothian, how to labour and improve their Grounds, said to have been written by John Hamilton, 2nd Lord Belhaven about the time of the Union, and reprinted in 1723.

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  • mes, Rudiments of the skeleto-trophic tissues.

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  • Farther up, within the velar area, the rudiments of the cerebral nerve-ganglion ng are seen separating from the ectoderm.

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  • He finds that the endoderm arises may be readily distinguished, six of which subsequently enter into from an anterior and a posterior rudiment derived from the " endothe formation of the head, three going to the thorax and twelve to blast," that many of the cells of these rudiments wander into the the abdomen.

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  • fore and hind endodermal rudiments arise from the blastoderm by Head Segments.

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  • part by the yolk, and in part by those anterior and posterior rudiments Its composition has been the subject of prolonged difference of which usually form the mesenteron, but that in some Hexapoda opinion.

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  • The intercalary segment has no appendages, nor rudiments thereof, except, according to H.

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  • The three pairs --Mx 2 of legs appear very early as rudiments.

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  • In some embryos there is but a single pair of these rudiments (or vestiges) situate on the first abdominal segment, and in some cases they become invaginations of a glandular nature.

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  • Whether cerci, stylets and gonapophyses are developed from these rudiments has been much debated.

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  • This by successive divisions forms a group of four to eight cells, which subsequently pass through the blastoderm, and dividing into two groups become symmetrically arranged and surrounded by the rudiments of the ovarian tubes.

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  • The presence of rudiments of the genital ducts of both sexes in the embryo of either sex is interesting and suggestive.

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  • during post-embryonic development - no insect being hatched with the smallest external rudiments of those organs - and on the necessity for successive castings or " moults " (ecdyses) of the cuticle.

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  • The imaginal disks for the outer wall of the body, some of them, at any rate, include mesodermal rudiments (from which the muscles are developed) as well as hypodermis.

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  • - Nymph of May-fly (Chloeon dipterum), with wing rudiments (a) and tracheal gill-plates (b, b).

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  • (The first volume, containing his life and correspondence, was issued separately in two parts, 1831-1832.) His first appearance as an author was in 1761, when he published the Scripture Doctrine of Remission and the Rudiments of English Grammar.

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  • Save for the barest rudiments of reading and writing, he tells us that he had no master; yet we find him at Verona in 1521 an esteemed teacher of mathematics.

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  • The brilliant success of Humperdinck's Hansel and Gretel, in which Wagnerian technique is applied to the diatonic style of nursery songs with a humorous accuracy undreamed of by Wagner's imitators, points a moral which would have charmed Wagner himself; but until the revival of some rudiments of musical common sense becomes widespread, there is little prospect of the influence of Wagner's harmonic style being productive of anything better than nonsense.

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  • In 1781 he writes," I cannot but observe that these were the first rudiments of the Methodist societies."In the presence of such facts we can understand the significance of the mission to Georgia.

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  • Lubbock traced at least twenty moults in Cloeon; at about the tenth rudiments of the wingcases began to appear.

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  • From his father he received the rudiments of his education, which was continued at Leiden under A.

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  • abp 4 to abp', Rudiments of the four appendages which carry the pulmonary lamellae.

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  • I to VI, Rudiments of the six limbs of the prosoma.

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  • His earliest tastes were literary rather than scientific, and he learned the rudiments of geometry during his first year at the college of Turin, without difficulty, but without distinction.

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  • The body is stout and thickly built; the legs are short and strong, and armed, especially the anterior pair, with long curved claws; the tail is short; and the ears are reduced to rudiments.

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  • It was there that he had to pick up such rudiments of knowledge as formed his first equipment in life, but from his earliest years he was indefatigable in the work of self-cultivation.

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  • The cultivated vine has usually hermaphrodite flowers; but as it occurs in a wild state, or as an escape from cultivation, the flowers manifest a tendency towards unisexuality: that is, one plant bears flowers with stamens only, or only the rudiments of the pistil, while on another plant the flowers are bisexual.

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  • The young shoots from these buds are to be gently brought to a horizontal position, by bending them a little at a time, and tied in, and usually opposite about the fourth leaf the rudiments of a bunch will be developed.

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  • The envoys returned to Kiev in 912 after being shown the splendours of the Greek capital and being instructed in the rudiments of the Greek faith.

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  • Some of the central cells remain in clumps as "germ-balls," others form a mesenchyma in which "flame-cells" arise; others again give rise to muscles; and at the thicker end of the body, rudiments of the brain and digestive system are observable.

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  • He first opened an English school in which the Bible was the centre of the school work, and along with it all kinds of secular knowledge were taught from the rudiments upwards to a university standard.

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  • Neither of the heroines has any but the rudiments of a moral sense; but Roxana, both in her original transgression and in her subsequent conduct, is actuated merely by avarice and selfishness - vices which are peculiarly offensive in connexion with her other failing, and which make her thoroughly repulsive.

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  • After several moults the rudiments of two pairs of wings appear, and then the insect creeps up to the surface of the earth, and on to the vine.

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  • He received the rudiments of an excellent education at a free school in Dublin, and afterwards spent a year or two (1751-1752) under his father's roof at Skeyton rectory, Norfolk, and elsewhere, and for a short time he had Gibbon as a fellow-pupil.

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  • Until he was fifteen he could have acquired only the simplest rudiments of education, and those chiefly from his parents.

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  • There is sufficient evidence that his family was of Croatian stock: a fact which throws light upon the distinctively Slavonic character of much of his music. He received the first rudiments of education from his father, a wheelwright with twelve children, and at an early age evinced a decided musical talent.

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  • Hostages were given, oaths of fealty renewed, while many accepted Christianity, and the rudiments of an ecclesiastical system were established.

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  • Even the rudiments of Roman law were not then included in the ordinary training of English lawyers; it was assumed at the universities that any good Latin scholar could qualify himself at short notice for keeping up such tradition of civilian studies as survived.

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  • of Homer and Plato, though his knowledge of the language was limited to the barest rudiments.

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  • They founded the monastery of Sord as a civilizing centre, and after giving Absalon the rudiments of a sound education at home, which included not only book-lore but every manly and martial exercise, they sent him to the university of Paris.

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  • Other Gentile converts would require instruction in the very rudiments of ethical and monotheistic religion.

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  • - The dawn of the science covers the first observation of facts and the rudiments of true interpretation.

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  • In the 16th century the Mayas and Quiches had attained a high level of civilization (see Central America, Archaeology), and at least two of the Guatemalan languages, Quiche and Cakchiquel, possess the rudiments or the relics of a literature.

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  • The shell-gland 'disappears, the mantle-skirt is raised as a ridge, the paired shellvalves are secreted, the anus opens by a proctodaeal ingrowth into the rectal peduncle, and the rudiments of the gills (br) and of the renal organs (B) appear (fig.

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  • They are all such rudiments as Aristotle might well polish into the more developed expositions in the first four books of the Nicomachean Ethics.

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  • At the age of ten he was apprenticed to a tailor, his spare hours being spent in acquiring the rudiments of an education.

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  • mes, Rudiments of the skeletotrophic tissues.

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  • He was taught the use of the astrolabe (which Prince Yakov Dolgoruki, with intent to please, had brought him from Paris) by a Dutchman, Franz Timmerman, who also instructed him in the rudiments of geometry and fortifications.

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  • He received the rudiments of education at St Anthony's School in Threadneedle Street, at that time under Nicolas Holt, held to be the best in the city.

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  • He acquired the rudiments of his education at Dalkeith, and in his fourteenth year matriculated at the university of Edinburgh.

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  • It will be convenient now to pass to the fully-developed altar of the Western Church with its accessories, though the rudiments of most of the additional details are traceable in the earlier period.

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  • The rudiments of Latin he obtained at the grammar school of Montrose, after leaving which he learned Greek for two years under Pierre de Marsilliers, a Frenchman whom John Erskine of Dun had induced to settle at Montrose; and such was Melville's proficiency that on going to the university of St Andrews he excited the astonishment of the professors by using the Greek text of Aristotle, which no one else there understood.

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  • Born between 720 and 725 Paulus received an exceptionally good education, probably at the court of the Lombard king Ratchis in Pavia, learning from a teacher named Flavian the rudiments of Greek.

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  • But there are grounds for believing that some of the rudiments of chivalry are to be detected in early Teutonic customs, and that they may have made some advance among the Franks of Gaul.

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  • From the chaplain and his mistress and her damsels he learnt the rudiments of religion, of rectitude and of love, 3 from his master and his squires the elements of military exercise, to cast a spear or dart, to sustain a shield, and to march with the measured tread of a soldier; and from his master and his huntsmen and falconers the " mysteries of the woods and rivers," or in other words the rules and practices of hunting and hawking.

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  • These leaf-buds contain the rudiments of a shoot, and consist of leaves covering a growing point.

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  • 1-76, and De Corpore Politico, or the Elements of Law, Moral and Politic, pp. 77-228).1 In 1651 2 he published his translation of the De Cive under the title of Philosophical Rudiments concerning Government and Society (E.W.

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  • His doctrines were developed in his edition of Aldrich's Artis logicae rudiments (1849) - his chief contribution to the reviving study of Aristotle - and in his Prolegomena logica: an Inquiry into the Psychological Character of Logical Processes (1851, 2nd ed.

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  • Schools were rare, and teachers qualified only to impart the merest rudiments.

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  • iv., 1824), he published a brief account of Egyptian research, with five plates containing the rudiments of an Egyptian vocabulary.

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  • On the other hand, Palaeosyops is connected with Titanotherium by means of Telmatotherium of the upper Bridger and Washakia Eocene, a larger animal, with a longer and flatter skull, showing rudiments of horn-cores, only two pairs of lower incisors, and a general approximation in dental character to Titanotherium.

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  • It is not surprising, therefore, that they have been regarded as the rudiments of leaves.

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  • In its rudiments it is akin to the HamitoSemitic group. It possesses two grammatical genders, not masculine and feminine, but the human and the non-human; the adjective agrees in assonance with its noun, and euphony plays a great part in verbal and nominal inflections.

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  • Here the younger boys are collected and instructed in the rudiments of reading, writing and religious creed by the village mullah, or priest, who thereby acquires an early influence over the Afghan mind.

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  • His earliest governesses were the wives of a tailor and a vintner from the Dutch settlement; a sailor called Norman taught him the rudiments of navigation; and, when he grew older, he was placed under the care of a Hungarian refugee, Janos Zeikin, who seems to have been a conscientious teacher.

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  • The rudiments of some of these ideas can be found in the prophets, but their development took place after the exile, and indeed for the most part after the conclusion of the writings accounted canonical.

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  • Of his work nothing remained, not a written word, nor more than the rudiments of an organization.

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  • The Roman colonies were thus not merely valuable as propugnacula of the state, as permanent supports to Roman garrisons and armies, but they proved a most effective means of extending over wide bounds the language and the laws of Rome, and of inoculating the inhabitants of the provinces with more than the rudiments of Roman civilization.

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  • The new synthesis reveals a universal decline from the 5th to the 10th centuries, while the Germanic races were learning the rudiments of culture, a decline that was deepened by each succeeding wave of migration, each tribal war of Franks or Saxons, and reached its climax in the disorders of the 9th and 10th centuries when the half-formed civilization of Christendom was forced to face the migration of the Northmen by sea, the raids of the Saracen upon the south and the onslaught of Hungarians and Sla y s upon the east.

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  • - a, Atrium; al, alimentary canal; y blood-vessel; cv, cerebral vesicle; df, dorsal section of myocoel (= fin spaces); e, " eyespot"; end, endostyle; gl, club-shaped gland; lm, edge of left metapleur; m, lower edge of mouth; n, notochord; nt, pigmented nerve tube; ps, primary gill-slits, I, 9, and 14; rc, renal cells on atrial floor; rm, edge of right metapleur; so, sense organ opening into praeoral pit; ss, thickenings, the rudiments of the row of secondary gill-slits.

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  • To be a gentleman in Italy meant at this epoch to be a man acquainted with the rudiments at least of scholarship, refined in diction, capable of corresponding or of speaking in choice phrases, open to the beauty of the arts, intelligently interested in archaeology, taking for his models of conduct the great men of antiquity rather than the saints of the church.

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  • Its inhabitants, surrounded by Moorish or Spanish enemies and distracted by civil war, derived such rudiments of civilization as they possessed from Arabic or Leonese sources.

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  • On four feet (i, k,1, m) are the rudiments of the lamellae which subsequently form the brood-cavity.

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  • The rudiments of the first three pairs of appendages commonly appear simultaneously, and, even in forms with embryonic development, they show differences in their mode of appearance from the succeeding somites.

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  • The rudiments of the paired eyes appear under the integument at the sides of the head, but only become pedunculated at a comparatively late stage.

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  • Being ignorant even of the rudiments of letters, Justin entrusted the administration of state to his wise and faithful quaestor Proclus and to his nephew Justinian, though his own experience dictated several improvements in military affairs.

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  • Of all the ancient books not one was more prized by him than the Yi-king, or " The Book of Changes," the rudiments of which are assigned to Fuh-hi about the 30th century B.C. Those rudiments, however, are merely the 8 trigrams and 64 hexagrams, composed of a whole and a broken line (, - -), without any text or explanation of them earlier than the rise of the Chow dynasty.

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  • He places Palaeopolis at Gaiola Point and has discovered the remains of the harbour, the town hall and various other rudiments of the ancient city.

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  • His Pindaric Odes, written at this period or earlier, in the manner of Cowley, indicate the rudiments of a real satirist, but a satirist struggling with a most uncongenial form of expression.

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  • In the Californian Pinus monophylla each spur bears usually one needle, but two are not uncommon; it would seem that rudiments of two needles are always produced, but, as a rule, only one develops into a needle.

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  • Computations are made with it by means of balls of bone or ivory runp ing on slender bamboo rods, similar to the simpler board, fitted up with beads strung on wires, which is employed in teaching the rudiments of arithmetic in English schools.

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  • Bogdan, after learning to read and write, a rare accomplishment in those days, entered the Cossack ranks, was dangerously wounded and taken prisoner in his first battle against the Turks, and found leisure during his two years' captivity at Constantinople to acquire the rudiments of Turkish and French.

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  • After having acquired the rudiments of education at two small schools in hamlets close to Woolsthorpe, Newton was sent at the age of twelve to the grammar school of Grantham.

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  • Though cunning, he was destitute alike of foresight and of self-control; he could never discern the way in which his conduct would be judged by other men, because he lacked even the rudiments of a conscience.

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  • If this be really the case, the rudiments of an earlier set of teeth which have been detected in the jaws of some members of the order, represent, not the milk-series, but a prelacteal dentition.

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  • The latter may differ from the foliage leaves and be arranged in definite cones, or the two may be similar and occupy alternate zones of a shoot with continued growth; sometimes rudiments of sporangia are found at the bases of the leaves (fig.

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  • Men had to receive the very rudiments of culture before they could appreciate its niceties.

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  • His tutor was Philippe Le Bas, son of the well-known member of the Convention and follower of Robespierre, an able man, imbued with the ideas of the Revolution, while Vieillard, who instructed him in the rudiments, was a democratic imperialist also inspired with the ideal of nationalism.

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  • In 1493 he went to Paris and thence to Italy, studying canon and civil law, patristics and the rudiments of Greek.

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  • Upon these projections the rudiments of the pollen-sacs are then seen, usually four in number, two on each lobe.

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  • I believe every child has hidden away somewhere in his being noble capacities which may be quickened and developed if we go about it in the right way; but we shall never properly develop the higher natures of our little ones while we continue to fill their minds with the so-called rudiments.

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  • Contemporary music schools and academies are springing up around the country, overwhelmed by pupils eager to learn the rudiments of pop music.

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  • Teaching for this consists mainly of intensive instruction in the rudiments of the language.

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  • What the State does is to say that no child shall lack the rudiments of education through the poverty or carelessness of its parents.

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  • Hence it is altogether independent of what the apostle calls the rudiments of this world.

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  • Each individual can be educated from the rudiments of the game through to match play standards.

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  • In fact, producing your own worksheets and departmental notes is a very good way to get to learn the rudiments of word processing.

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  • They taught the rudiments of the course, I did take part in this.

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  • They will learn the rudiments of Web Page Design to create a small website on the intranet.

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  • During that year he acquired the rudiments of Latin grammar.

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  • We went to this bourn in order that I might show my son the spot where I received the rudiments of my education.

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  • His collection includes rudiments for learning to read music.

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  • BeatLab 's Training mode has a multitude of patterns that will help you practice your snare drum rudiments.

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  • This is a non contact exercise sport which involves learning the basic rudiments of how to box.

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  • You do not seem to know the first rudiments of agriculture.

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  • However he did resolve to carry out the task, and began investigating various primers on musical rudiments then popular with instrumental pupils.

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  • I will in this place only give some instances of such rudiments.

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  • Many students will never reach the most complicated sectors of mathematical inquiry due to a lack of understanding the rudiments.

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  • Hence, fortifying your child's training from an early age can provide the necessary rudiments for a solid cheerleading future.

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  • Eating fresh foods as close to their natural form will provide you with the rudiments of a healthy diet.

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  • It was there that he had to pick up such rudiments of knowledge as formed his first equipment in life, but from his earliest years he was indefatigable in the work of self-cultivation.

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  • Hostages were given, oaths of fealty renewed, while many accepted Christianity, and the rudiments of an ecclesiastical system were established.

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