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rubric

rubric

rubric Sentence Examples

  • According to the rubric of the Roman Missal (tit.

    31
    16
  • The evidence is now clear that the Rubric refers to the first Prayer Book.

    23
    14
  • The rubric of 1532 had this curious wording: "And after the Second Lesson shall be used and said, Benedictus in English, as followeth."

    15
    32
  • The rubric of 1532 had this curious wording: "And after the Second Lesson shall be used and said, Benedictus in English, as followeth."

    15
    32
  • It becomes, then, a question whether the present-day practice of many of the clergy, ostensibly based on the rubric of 1549, is in fact covered by this.

    13
    17
  • The use of the mitre, pastoral staff and pectoral cross, which had fallen into complete disuse by the end of the 18th century, has been now very commonly, though not universally, revived; and, in some cases, the interpretation put upon the "Ornaments rubric" by the modern High Church school has led to a more complete revival of the pre-Reformation vestments.

    9
    140
  • The law was invoked, and, confronted for the first time with the intricacies of the Ornaments Rubric, spoke with an uncertain voice.

    7
    19
  • The Rubric in the Prayer Book of 1559 ran: "...

    7
    31
  • 4 a rubric enjoins the recital of the hymn of the Frasegerd.

    5
    10
  • Leo of Rome, Athanasius, Gregory of Nyssa, Theophylactus, Cyril of Jerusalem and others, trine immersion was regarded as being symbolic of the three days' entombment of Christ; and in the Armenian baptismal rubric this interpretation is enjoined, as also in an epistle of Macarius of Jerusalem addressed to the Armenians (c. 330).

    5
    10
  • With this the bishop of Exeter (Ornaments Rubric, p. 30) would seem to agree, when he says that "the customs of the present day do not fully accord with any reasonable interpretation of the rubric. The stole, now nearly universal, is only covered by the rubric if the word ' vestment ' be taken to include it (a very dubious point), and then only at Holy Communion."

    5
    43
  • The other vigils are recognized in the calendar (including those of the saints) and the rubric directs that "the collect appointed for any Holy-day that hath a Vigil or Eve, shall be said at the Evening Service next before."

    4
    10
  • In the short rubric before the communion service the celebrating priest is directed to "put upon him.

    4
    10
  • Under the head of statute law Burn includes ` the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion, agreed upon in Convocation in the year 1562; and in like manner the Rubric of the Book of Common Prayer, which, being both of them established by Acts of Parliament, are to be esteemed as part of the statute law.'" The first principle of the ecclesiastical law in England is the assertion of the supremacy of the crown, which in the present state of the constitution means the same thing as the supremacy of parliament.

    4
    11
  • In the Church of England, however, it was retained among the episcopal ornaments prescribed by the first Prayerbook of Edward VI., and, though omitted in the second Prayerbook, its use seemed once more to be enjoined under the Ornaments Rubric of Elizabeth's Prayer-book.

    3
    8
  • This direction was omitted in the second Prayer-book; but the " Ornaments Rubric " Church of of Queen Elizabeth's Prayer-book seemed again to make them obligatory.

    3
    8
  • Tomlinson, The Prayer Book, Articles and Homilies (1897), a polemical work from the Protestant point of view, but scholarly and based on a mass of contemporary authorities to which references are given; the bishop of Exeter, The Ornaments Rubric (London, 1901), a pamphlet.

    3
    9
  • In 1662 the rubric was altered and it was substituted for the Apostles' Creed.

    3
    9
  • In baptism the rubric ordains that the baptized be plunged three times in the font in commemoration of the entombment during three days of the Lord.

    3
    10
  • By the rubric of the Prayer Book and by the 59th canon of 2603 the clergy are enjoined to teach the catechism in church on Sundays and holidays after the second lesson at Evening Prayer.

    2
    2
  • c. i, and, without admitting that the canons of the church, which are not binding on the laity, could specify a lawful cause for rejection, held that no lawful cause within the meaning of either the canons or the rubric had been shown.

    2
    3
  • But such is not the view of the Church of England in her doctrinal standards, and there is an express rubric directing that any that remains of that which was consecrated is not to be carried out of the church, but reverently consumed.

    2
    3
  • But such is not the view of the Church of England in her doctrinal standards, and there is an express rubric directing that any that remains of that which was consecrated is not to be carried out of the church, but reverently consumed.

    2
    3
  • of writing a letter or a report on a particular subject with a particular object in view, of translating from or into a foreign language, of solving a mathematical problem, of criticizing a passage from a literary work, of writing an essay on an historical or literary subject with the aid of books in a library, of diagnosing the malady of a patient, of analysing a chemical mixture or compound; and (the highest form under the rubric) of making an original contribution to learning or science as the result of personal investigation or experiment.

    2
    4
  • He did not perceive how much of reason the "ritualists" had on their side: that they were fighting for practices which, they contended, were covered by the letter of the rubric; and that, where rubrics were notoriously disregarded on all hands, it was not fair to proceed against one class of delinquent only.

    2
    4
  • The act of judgment " which refers an ideal content (recognized as such) to a reality beyond the act " is the unit for logic. Grammatical subject and predicate necessarily both fall under the rubric of the adjectival, that is, within the logical idea or ideal content asserted.

    2
    4
  • Thus, to take only one prominent example, the profound speculations of Meister Eckhart (q.v.) are always treated under the head of Mysticism, but they might with equal right appear under the rubric Theosophy.

    2
    4
  • To him at least is due the Prayer-book rubric which explains that, when kneeling at the sacrament is ordered, "no adoration is intended or ought to be done."

    2
    4
  • The only procession formerly prescribed in the Book of Common Prayer is that in the order of the burial of the dead, where the rubric directs that "the priest and clerks meeting the corpse at the entrance of the churchyard, and going before it, either into the church, or towards the grave, shall say, or sing" certain verses of Scripture.

    2
    4
  • To him at least is due the Prayer-book rubric which explains that, when kneeling at the sacrament is ordered, "no adoration is intended or ought to be done."

    2
    4
  • 24 and 58), and argued convincingly that the revisers of the Prayer Book in 1662, in restoring the Tomlinson (The Prayer Book, Articles and Homilies, p. 122 seq.) argues that this was a "fraud rubric" inserted without authority, and utterly perverting the meaning of the proviso in the Act of Uniformity.

    2
    6
  • The bishops' Interpretations and Further Considerations, issued in 1560, tolerated a lower vestiarian standard than was prescribed by the rubric of 1559; the Advertisements, which Parker published in 1566, to check the Puritan descent, had to appear without specific royal sanction; and the Reformatio legum ecclesiasticarum, which Foxe published with Parker's approval, received neither royal, parliamentary nor synodical authorization.

    2
    7
  • The York rubric directed him to do it immediately after the first saying of the Introit, which in England was thrice said.

    2
    7
  • Perhaps the York rubric implies that this was done when it orders (which the others do not) the thurible to be carried round the choir with the Gospel while the Creed was being sung.

    2
    7
  • (5) The Elizabethan Act of Uniformity contained a provision that at the universities the public services, with the exception of the Eucharist, might be in a language other than English; and in 1560 there appeared a Latin version of the Prayer-Book, issued under royal letters patent, in which there was a rubric prefixed to the Order for the Communion of the Sick, based on that in the first Prayer-Book of Edward VI.

    2
    7
  • 4, under the rubric Bar Simus, we find the god Mihir (Mihryazd), the liberator, the compassionate, invoked along with Fredon, the good; and later on we read as follows: "with his mighty glance may the god of pure name, Predon, the king and Jacob Nareman, protect religion and us the sons."

    2
    7
  • those in Essays on Ceremonial, p. 246) are quite inconclusive, as ` vestment ' is often a convertible term with ' chasuble '; and it does not seem to be at all conclusively established that ' vestment ' with ' alb ' mentioned separately, and ' cope ' given as an alternative, in a document with the precision and directive force of a Rubric, means more than the actual chasuble."

    2
    8
  • At the revision of the Prayer-Book in 1552 all mention of reservation is omitted, and the rubric directs that the communion is to be celebrated in the sick person's house, according to a new form; and this service has continued, with certain minor changes, down to the present day.

    2
    8
  • On the one hand, it is widely felt that neither the form for the Communion of the Sick, nor yet the teaching with regard to spiritual communion in the third rubric at the end of that service, is sufficient to meet all the cases that arise or may arise.

    2
    8
  • In the rubric in question words are altered here and there in a way which shows that its reappearance can hardly be a mere printer's error; but in any case its importance is very slight, for the Act of Uniformity specially provides that the English service alone is to be used for the Eucharist.

    2
    15
  • At his consecration the bishop-elect is, according to the rubric, presented to the consecrating bishops vested in a rochet only; after the "laying on of hands" he retires and puts on "the rest of the episcopal habit," i.e.

    1
    2
  • It is there that Fra Mauro's great map (1459) presents a fine city with the rubric, "Qui it Preste Janni fa residentia principal."

    1
    2
  • (2) Nor can it be said that the rubric just referred to is in itself a condemnation of reservation: it is rather directed, as its history proves, against the irreverence which prevailed when it was made; and in fact its wording is based upon that of a pre-Reformation order which coexisted with the practice of reservation (Lyndwood, Provinciale, lib.

    1
    2
  • It was, however, certainly one of the "ornaments of the minister" in the second year of Edward VI., the rubric in the office for Holy Communion directing the priest's "helpers" to wear "albes with tunacles."

    1
    2
  • It has since remained, with the exception of the cope (q.v.), the sole vestment authorized by law for the ministers, other than bishops, of the Church of England (for the question of the vestments prescribed by the "Ornaments Rubric" see Vestments).

    1
    3
  • Thirty years after the Ridsdale judgment, the ritual confusion in the Church of England was worse than ever, and the old ideal expressed in the Acts of Uniformity had given place to a desire to sanctify with some sort of authority the parochial "uses" which had grown up. In this respect the dominant opinion in the Church, intent on compromise, seems to have been expressed in the Report presented in 1908 to the convocation of the province of Canterbury by the sub-committee of five bishops appointed to investigate the matter, namely, that under the Ornaments Rubric the vestments prescribed in the first Prayer Book of Edward VI.

    1
    5
  • But there was little chance that any change in the rubric, even in the improbable event of its receiving the sanction of parliament, would produce any appreciable effect.

    1
    5
  • The division into five books was known to Hippolytus, but a closer examination of the doxologies shows that it does not represent the original scheme of the Psalter; for, while the doxologies to the first three books are no part of the psalms to which they are attached, but really mark the end of a book in a pious fashion not uncommon in Eastern literature, that to book IV., with its rubric addressed to the people, plainly belongs to the psalm, or rather to its liturgical execution, and does not therefore really mark the close of a collection once separate.

    1
    8
  • Ecclesiastical vestments, with which the present article is solely concerned, are the special articles of costume worn by the officers of the Christian Church "at all times of their ministration" - to quote the Ornaments Rubric of the English Book of Common Prayer, i.e.

    1
    54
  • What, then, are the vestments sanctioned by the Ornaments Rubric ?

    0
    0
  • It is equally absurd to include in the same category the ignorant Bizocchi and Segarellists and such learned disciples of Michael of Cesena and Louis of Bavaria as William of Occam and Bonagratia of Bergamo, who have often been placed under this comprehensive rubric.

    0
    0
  • The following rubric will be used in the examination paper: You should attempt all questions.

    0
    0
  • Spend the first few minutes reading the rubric so that you are very clear about what you should do.

    0
    0
  • It was thus decided to add a rubric forbidding baptism by the laity.

    0
    0
  • Qualified referees use and help to develop a standard rubric for analysis.

    0
    0
  • Students are provided a rubric (see Table II) specifying how each section of the portfolio will be assessed.

    0
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  • rubric for degree exam papers.

    0
    0
  • Calculators Calculators may be used, except where specifically precluded by the rubric of the exam paper.

    0
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  • He gave four lectures under the general rubric ' problematics of sociology ', the title of the book under review here.

    0
    0
  • In any case, the US does not have the right to attack Iraq under the same rubric that it claimed for Afghanistan.

    0
    0
  • Wittgenstein as showing how to dissolve philosophical problems without any of the conceptual rubric devised by later commentators.

    0
    0
  • The new approach is now meant to have a wider rubric, inclusive of poverty reduction.

    0
    0
  • rubric on examination papers had been altered to take into account tamper-proof labels.

    0
    0
  • rubric level and within each ICPC chapter.

    0
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  • rubric at the head of the examination paper.

    0
    0
  • rubric of the examination paper.

    0
    0
  • The use of dictionaries is not permitted unless specifically provided for in the examination rubric.

    0
    0
  • However, by 1926 internal self-government within the rubric of unified imperial policy was no longer the hallmark of dominion status.

    0
    0
  • subsumed under a single rubric.

    0
    0
  • The other vigils are recognized in the calendar (including those of the saints) and the rubric directs that "the collect appointed for any Holy-day that hath a Vigil or Eve, shall be said at the Evening Service next before."

    0
    0
  • The bishops' Interpretations and Further Considerations, issued in 1560, tolerated a lower vestiarian standard than was prescribed by the rubric of 1559; the Advertisements, which Parker published in 1566, to check the Puritan descent, had to appear without specific royal sanction; and the Reformatio legum ecclesiasticarum, which Foxe published with Parker's approval, received neither royal, parliamentary nor synodical authorization.

    0
    0
  • The rubric of the mass for this feast actually runs: In fine Missae Sacerdos versus ad populum vice, Ite missa est, Hinhannabit: populus vero vice, Deo Gratias, ter respondebit Hinham, Hinham, Hinham (At the close of the mass the priest turning to the people instead of saying, Ite missa est, shall bray thrice: the people, instead of Deo gratias, shall thrice respond Hee-haw, Hee-haw, Hee-haw).

    0
    0
  • In the Church of England, however, it was retained among the episcopal ornaments prescribed by the first Prayerbook of Edward VI., and, though omitted in the second Prayerbook, its use seemed once more to be enjoined under the Ornaments Rubric of Elizabeth's Prayer-book.

    0
    0
  • Ecclesiastical vestments, with which the present article is solely concerned, are the special articles of costume worn by the officers of the Christian Church "at all times of their ministration" - to quote the Ornaments Rubric of the English Book of Common Prayer, i.e.

    0
    0
  • In the controversies as to the interpretation of the Anglican "Ornaments Rubric" (see below) the term "vestments" has been applied particularly to those worn at the celebration of mass, which is what is meant when it is said that "the vestments" are worn at such and such a church.

    0
    0
  • According to the rubric of the Roman Missal (tit.

    0
    0
  • At the outset the followers of Newman and Pusey were more concerned with doctrine than with ritual; but it was natural that a reassertion of Catholic teaching should be followed by a revival of Catholic practice, and by the middle of the century certain "Ritualists," pleading the letter of the Ornaments Rubric in the Prayer Book, had revived the use of many of the pre-Reformation vestments.

    0
    0
  • The law was invoked, and, confronted for the first time with the intricacies of the Ornaments Rubric, spoke with an uncertain voice.

    0
    0
  • Apart from those clergy (still the majority) who follow in all essentials the post-Reformation traditions of the English Church, there are three schools among those who justify the use of the ancient "eucharistic" 1 vestments: (I) a small number who affect to ignore the rules of the Prayer Book altogether, on the ground that no local or national Church has the right to alter the doctrines or practice of the Catholic Church, of which they are priests in virtue of their ordination, and whose prescriptions and usages they are in conscience bound to follow; (2) those who maintain that the Ornaments Rubric, in the phrase "second year of King Edward VI.," prescribes the ornaments in use before the first Prayer Book.; (3) those who hold that under the Rubric the ornaments prescribed in the first Prayer Book are to be "had in use."

    0
    0
  • What, then, are the vestments sanctioned by the Ornaments Rubric ?

    0
    0
  • The Rubric in the Prayer Book of 1559 ran: "...

    0
    0
  • The evidence is now clear that the Rubric refers to the first Prayer Book.

    0
    0
  • Whatever the letter of the law under th.e rubric, the Protestant bishops and the commissioners made short work of such "popish stuff" as chasubles, albs and the like.

    0
    0
  • 24 and 58), and argued convincingly that the revisers of the Prayer Book in 1662, in restoring the Tomlinson (The Prayer Book, Articles and Homilies, p. 122 seq.) argues that this was a "fraud rubric" inserted without authority, and utterly perverting the meaning of the proviso in the Act of Uniformity.

    0
    0
  • rubric of 1559, had no idea of legalizing any vestments other than those in customary use under the Advertisements, and the canons (cf.

    0
    0
  • Thirty years after the Ridsdale judgment, the ritual confusion in the Church of England was worse than ever, and the old ideal expressed in the Acts of Uniformity had given place to a desire to sanctify with some sort of authority the parochial "uses" which had grown up. In this respect the dominant opinion in the Church, intent on compromise, seems to have been expressed in the Report presented in 1908 to the convocation of the province of Canterbury by the sub-committee of five bishops appointed to investigate the matter, namely, that under the Ornaments Rubric the vestments prescribed in the first Prayer Book of Edward VI.

    0
    0
  • In the short rubric before the communion service the celebrating priest is directed to "put upon him.

    0
    0
  • It becomes, then, a question whether the present-day practice of many of the clergy, ostensibly based on the rubric of 1549, is in fact covered by this.

    0
    0
  • those in Essays on Ceremonial, p. 246) are quite inconclusive, as ` vestment ' is often a convertible term with ' chasuble '; and it does not seem to be at all conclusively established that ' vestment ' with ' alb ' mentioned separately, and ' cope ' given as an alternative, in a document with the precision and directive force of a Rubric, means more than the actual chasuble."

    0
    0
  • With this the bishop of Exeter (Ornaments Rubric, p. 30) would seem to agree, when he says that "the customs of the present day do not fully accord with any reasonable interpretation of the rubric. The stole, now nearly universal, is only covered by the rubric if the word ' vestment ' be taken to include it (a very dubious point), and then only at Holy Communion."

    0
    0
  • But there was little chance that any change in the rubric, even in the improbable event of its receiving the sanction of parliament, would produce any appreciable effect.

    0
    0
  • Tomlinson, The Prayer Book, Articles and Homilies (1897), a polemical work from the Protestant point of view, but scholarly and based on a mass of contemporary authorities to which references are given; the bishop of Exeter, The Ornaments Rubric (London, 1901), a pamphlet.

    0
    0
  • The division into five books was known to Hippolytus, but a closer examination of the doxologies shows that it does not represent the original scheme of the Psalter; for, while the doxologies to the first three books are no part of the psalms to which they are attached, but really mark the end of a book in a pious fashion not uncommon in Eastern literature, that to book IV., with its rubric addressed to the people, plainly belongs to the psalm, or rather to its liturgical execution, and does not therefore really mark the close of a collection once separate.

    0
    0
  • The York rubric directed him to do it immediately after the first saying of the Introit, which in England was thrice said.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps the York rubric implies that this was done when it orders (which the others do not) the thurible to be carried round the choir with the Gospel while the Creed was being sung.

    0
    0
  • But it was expressly st'.ced in a rubric that the old service of the mass was to proceed without variation of any rite or ceremony until after the priest had received the sacrament, that is, until long after the last of the three occasions for the use of incense explained above.

    0
    0
  • At his consecration the bishop-elect is, according to the rubric, presented to the consecrating bishops vested in a rochet only; after the "laying on of hands" he retires and puts on "the rest of the episcopal habit," i.e.

    0
    0
  • c. i, and, without admitting that the canons of the church, which are not binding on the laity, could specify a lawful cause for rejection, held that no lawful cause within the meaning of either the canons or the rubric had been shown.

    0
    0
  • In 1662 the rubric was altered and it was substituted for the Apostles' Creed.

    0
    0
  • It is there that Fra Mauro's great map (1459) presents a fine city with the rubric, "Qui it Preste Janni fa residentia principal."

    0
    0
  • By the rubric of the Prayer Book and by the 59th canon of 2603 the clergy are enjoined to teach the catechism in church on Sundays and holidays after the second lesson at Evening Prayer.

    0
    0
  • At the revision of the Prayer-Book in 1552 all mention of reservation is omitted, and the rubric directs that the communion is to be celebrated in the sick person's house, according to a new form; and this service has continued, with certain minor changes, down to the present day.

    0
    0
  • (2) Nor can it be said that the rubric just referred to is in itself a condemnation of reservation: it is rather directed, as its history proves, against the irreverence which prevailed when it was made; and in fact its wording is based upon that of a pre-Reformation order which coexisted with the practice of reservation (Lyndwood, Provinciale, lib.

    0
    0
  • (5) The Elizabethan Act of Uniformity contained a provision that at the universities the public services, with the exception of the Eucharist, might be in a language other than English; and in 1560 there appeared a Latin version of the Prayer-Book, issued under royal letters patent, in which there was a rubric prefixed to the Order for the Communion of the Sick, based on that in the first Prayer-Book of Edward VI.

    0
    0
  • In the rubric in question words are altered here and there in a way which shows that its reappearance can hardly be a mere printer's error; but in any case its importance is very slight, for the Act of Uniformity specially provides that the English service alone is to be used for the Eucharist.

    0
    0
  • On the one hand, it is widely felt that neither the form for the Communion of the Sick, nor yet the teaching with regard to spiritual communion in the third rubric at the end of that service, is sufficient to meet all the cases that arise or may arise.

    0
    0
  • 4 a rubric enjoins the recital of the hymn of the Frasegerd.

    0
    0
  • 4, under the rubric Bar Simus, we find the god Mihir (Mihryazd), the liberator, the compassionate, invoked along with Fredon, the good; and later on we read as follows: "with his mighty glance may the god of pure name, Predon, the king and Jacob Nareman, protect religion and us the sons."

    0
    0
  • These letters were issued in compliance with the second recommendation (1906) of the Royal Commission on Ecclesiastical Discipline, viz.: that " Letters of business should be issued to the Convocations with instructions: (a) to consider the preparation of a new rubric regulating the ornaments (that is to say, the vesture) of the ministers of the church, at the times of their ministrations, with a view to its enactment by parliament; and (b) to frame, with a view to their enactment of parliament, such modifications in the existing law relating to the conduct of Divine Service, and to the ornaments and fittings of churches as may tend to secure the greater elasticity which a reasonable recognition of the comprehensiveness of the Church of England and of its present needs seems to demand."

    0
    0
  • In baptism the rubric ordains that the baptized be plunged three times in the font in commemoration of the entombment during three days of the Lord.

    0
    0
  • It was, however, certainly one of the "ornaments of the minister" in the second year of Edward VI., the rubric in the office for Holy Communion directing the priest's "helpers" to wear "albes with tunacles."

    0
    0
  • In many Anglican churches it has therefore been restored, as a result of the ritual revival of the 19th century, it being claimed that its use is obligatory under the "ornaments rubric" of the Book of Common Prayer (see Vestments) .

    0
    0
  • It has since remained, with the exception of the cope (q.v.), the sole vestment authorized by law for the ministers, other than bishops, of the Church of England (for the question of the vestments prescribed by the "Ornaments Rubric" see Vestments).

    0
    0
  • of writing a letter or a report on a particular subject with a particular object in view, of translating from or into a foreign language, of solving a mathematical problem, of criticizing a passage from a literary work, of writing an essay on an historical or literary subject with the aid of books in a library, of diagnosing the malady of a patient, of analysing a chemical mixture or compound; and (the highest form under the rubric) of making an original contribution to learning or science as the result of personal investigation or experiment.

    0
    0
  • He did not perceive how much of reason the "ritualists" had on their side: that they were fighting for practices which, they contended, were covered by the letter of the rubric; and that, where rubrics were notoriously disregarded on all hands, it was not fair to proceed against one class of delinquent only.

    0
    0
  • The act of judgment " which refers an ideal content (recognized as such) to a reality beyond the act " is the unit for logic. Grammatical subject and predicate necessarily both fall under the rubric of the adjectival, that is, within the logical idea or ideal content asserted.

    0
    0
  • Thus, to take only one prominent example, the profound speculations of Meister Eckhart (q.v.) are always treated under the head of Mysticism, but they might with equal right appear under the rubric Theosophy.

    0
    0
  • This direction was omitted in the second Prayer-book; but the " Ornaments Rubric " Church of of Queen Elizabeth's Prayer-book seemed again to make them obligatory.

    0
    0
  • The question of how far this did so is a much-disputed one and is connected with the whole problem of the meaning and scope of the rubric (see Vestments).

    0
    0
  • This judgment, founded as was afterwards admitted on insufficient knowledge, produced no effect; and, in the absence of any authoritative pronouncement, advantage was taken of the ambiguous language of the Ornaments Rubric to introduce into many churches practically the whole ceremonial use of lights as practised in the pre-Reformation Church.

    0
    0
  • The use of the mitre, pastoral staff and pectoral cross, which had fallen into complete disuse by the end of the 18th century, has been now very commonly, though not universally, revived; and, in some cases, the interpretation put upon the "Ornaments rubric" by the modern High Church school has led to a more complete revival of the pre-Reformation vestments.

    0
    0
  • The only procession formerly prescribed in the Book of Common Prayer is that in the order of the burial of the dead, where the rubric directs that "the priest and clerks meeting the corpse at the entrance of the churchyard, and going before it, either into the church, or towards the grave, shall say, or sing" certain verses of Scripture.

    0
    0
  • Leo of Rome, Athanasius, Gregory of Nyssa, Theophylactus, Cyril of Jerusalem and others, trine immersion was regarded as being symbolic of the three days' entombment of Christ; and in the Armenian baptismal rubric this interpretation is enjoined, as also in an epistle of Macarius of Jerusalem addressed to the Armenians (c. 330).

    0
    0
  • Under the head of statute law Burn includes ` the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion, agreed upon in Convocation in the year 1562; and in like manner the Rubric of the Book of Common Prayer, which, being both of them established by Acts of Parliament, are to be esteemed as part of the statute law.'" The first principle of the ecclesiastical law in England is the assertion of the supremacy of the crown, which in the present state of the constitution means the same thing as the supremacy of parliament.

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  • It is equally absurd to include in the same category the ignorant Bizocchi and Segarellists and such learned disciples of Michael of Cesena and Louis of Bavaria as William of Occam and Bonagratia of Bergamo, who have often been placed under this comprehensive rubric.

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  • The following rubric will be used in the examination paper: You should attempt all questions.

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  • Spend the first few minutes reading the rubric so that you are very clear about what you should do.

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  • It was thus decided to add a rubric forbidding baptism by the laity.

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  • Qualified referees use and help to develop a standard rubric for analysis.

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  • Students are provided a rubric (see Table II) specifying how each section of the portfolio will be assessed.

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  • It is important to adhere carefully to the rubric for degree exam papers.

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  • Calculators Calculators may be used, except where specifically precluded by the rubric of the exam paper.

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  • He gave four lectures under the general rubric ' problematics of sociology ', the title of the book under review here.

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  • In any case, the US does not have the right to attack Iraq under the same rubric that it claimed for Afghanistan.

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  • There is a substantial literature in Muslim and European languages that fall under the broad rubric of biography.

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  • Wittgenstein as showing how to dissolve philosophical problems without any of the conceptual rubric devised by later commentators.

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  • The new approach is now meant to have a wider rubric, inclusive of poverty reduction.

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  • It was not clear to the Committee whether or not the rubric on examination papers had been altered to take into account tamper-proof labels.

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  • Inter- and intra-coder reliability: mean percentage correct scores calculated at ICPC chapter level, at individual rubric level and within each ICPC chapter.

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  • In such cases clear instructions will be given in the rubric at the head of the examination paper.

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  • This shall also be specified in the rubric of the examination paper.

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  • The use of dictionaries is not permitted unless specifically provided for in the examination rubric.

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  • However, by 1926 internal self-government within the rubric of unified imperial policy was no longer the hallmark of dominion status.

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  • Yet all these aims can be subsumed under a single rubric.

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  • Using a simple rubric, like the one on Kim's Korner, can also help students check their own work and the work of siblings to see if voice is developing or not.

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  • If you have a blog that promotes your business, choose Rubric for a very professional look.

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  • But it was expressly st'.ced in a rubric that the old service of the mass was to proceed without variation of any rite or ceremony until after the priest had received the sacrament, that is, until long after the last of the three occasions for the use of incense explained above.

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