Rubicon sentence example

rubicon
  • I was like one who never casts a look behind, who hesitates before some Rubicon to be crossed, but having touched the farther bank sees no more the shore he has just left."
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  • Caesar took possession of it immediately after crossing the Rubicon.
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  • Caesar occupied it in 49 B.C. after his crossing of the Rubicon.
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  • By September he had crossed the Rubicon, Henry Newman (his rector at Shepton Beauchamp and Sparkford) accompanying him on a tour in Carnarvonshire.
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  • In 1823 he accompanied his mother to Italy, visiting his father at Florence, and his grandmother Letitia at Rome, and dreaming with Le Bas on the banks of the Rubicon.
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  • In 90 B.C. it acquired Roman citizenship, but in 82 B.C. having been held by the partisans of Marius, it was plundered by those of Sulla (who probably made the Rubicon the frontier of Italy instead of the Aesis), and a military colony settled there.
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  • No, the winery and Gustave Niebaum's Chateau is still there with its history, Coppola just converted his Niebaum-Inglenook winery to Rubicon Estate to showcase and market his high-brow premium Rubicon Estate wines.
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  • Send a statement with a 2-bottle Rubicon giftbox handmade of rosewood from New Zealand and etched with the winery's logo.
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  • Coppola has moved his value line of wines to Sonoma County at Rosso Bianco and confines his Napa winery for his top flight Rubicon Estate wines.
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  • Rubicon Marketing Group was part of the beta test group and quickly became Fortune Compass believers, after implementing the compass readings which resulted in a record for contracting new business.
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  • But after World War I, styles changed drastically and women's fashion crossed the Rubicon, with hems rising to the knee and evening dresses baring shoulders.
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  • As such it was assigned to Julius Caesar, together with Transalpine Gaul, and it was not till he crossed the Rubicon that he entered Italy in the strict sense of the term.
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  • It was separated from Etruria and Umbria by the main chain of the Apennines; and the river Ariminus was substituted for the far-famed Rubicon as its limit on the Adriatic.
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  • Caesar occupied it, however, as a strong position after crossing the Rubicon; and it received a Roman colony, perhaps under the triumvirs, and became a place of some importance.
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  • But all attempts at negotiation failed, and in January 49 B.C., martial law having been proclaimed on the proposal of the consuls, the tribunes Antony and Cassius fled to Caesar, who crossed the Rubicon (the frontier of Italy) with a single legion, exclaiming "Alea jacta est."
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  • The historic importance of this event gave rise to the phrase "crossing the Rubicon" for a step which definitely commits a person to a given course of action.
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  • His first task was the re-establishment of a regular and constitutional government, such as had not existed since Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon twenty years before.
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  • It was separate from Italy proper, the Aesis first and then the Rubicon being the boundary on the east, and the Arnus the boundary on the west, so that, for example, Luca remained outside the boundaries of Italy proper, even in 89 B.C. Romanization had, however, progressed considerably, the foundation of colonies and the construction of roads had gone on during the 2nd century, and the whole district as far as the Padus was given the Roman franchise in 89 B.C., while the Transpadanes received Latin rights, and were fully enfranchised forty years later.
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  • It was adopted by Augustus as the boundary of Gallia Cispadana; the far-famed Rubicon was a trifling stream a few miles farther north, now called Fiumicino.
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  • His first efforts in the Prospects on the Rubicon (1787) were directed against Pitt's war policy, and towards securing friendly relations with France.
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  • The transition from the medieval to the modern order was now secured if not accomplished, and a Rubicon had been crossed from which no retrogression to the past was possible.
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