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rowland

rowland

rowland Sentence Examples

  • A sister of the widow of somebody named Roland Rowland who'd owned it since the 1920's sold it to him.

  • Nobody I talked to ever heard of Dawkins, but Mrs. Worthington said she remembers reading about this Rowland guy.

  • It was Blackie Rowland's old workings, back during the war, Roger answered.

  • My pa used to play cards with Blackie Rowland.

  • A man named Dawkins bought the mine from the Rowland estate.

  • Suppose it was Brandon, acting alone, who killed the Blackie Rowland?

  • That wouldn't make what Uncle Rowland did any less terrible!

  • Instead of yielding to this, he joined with Henry Bristowe Wilson and Rowland Williams, who had been similarly attacked, in the production of the volume known as Essays and Reviews.

  • Rowland and others, necessitated by modern requirements, have shown that it is in error, but by less than 1%.

  • In the Rowland multiple method of telegraphic working, the transmitter consists of a mechanical keyboard provided with a series of levers, which effect certain combinations of positive and negative currents for each letter.

  • There is much material in the Encyclopaedia of Mississippi History (2 vols., Madison, Wisconsin, 1907), edited by Dunbar Rowland.

  • The tradition that he was descended from Dr Rowland Taylor, Cranmer's chaplain, who suffered martyrdom under Mary, is grounded on the untrustworthy evidence of a certain Lady Wray, said to have been a granddaughter of Jeremy Taylor.

  • In 1872 he became vicar of St Jude's, Commercial Street, Whitechapel, and in the next year married Henrietta Octavia Rowland, who had been a co-worker with Miss Octavia Hill and was no less ardent a philanthropist than her husband.

  • See Kate Mason Rowland, Life and Writings of George Mason (2 vols., New York, 1892).

  • He had early fallen under the influence of the great revival movement in Wales, and at the age of seventeen had been "converted" by a sermon of Daniel Rowland's.

  • Wellington fell back before him down the left bank, ordering up Rowland Hill's force from the Badajoz road, the peasantry having been previously called upon to destroy their crops and retire within the lines of Torres Vedras.

  • Rowland and others have used an earth coil for calibrating the galvanometer, a known change of induction through the coil being produced by turning it over in the earth's magnetic field, but for several reasons it is preferable to employ an electric current as the source of a known induction.

  • Rowland.'

  • 18 is copied from Rowland's paper.

  • Rowland, believing that the curve would continue to fall in a straight line meeting the horizontal axis, inferred that the induction corresponding to the point B-about 17,500-was the highest I Phil.

  • Rowland in support of compressive stress.

  • There are strong reasons for believing that magnetism is a phenomenon involving rotation, and as early as 1876 Rowland, carrying out an experiment which had been proposed by Maxwell, showed that a revolving electric charge produced the same magnetic effects as a current.

  • Rowland,' whose careful experiments led to general recognition of the fact previously ignored by nearly all investigators, that magnetic susceptibility and permeability are by no means constants (at least in the case of the ferromagnetic metals) but functions of the magnetizing force.

  • At the outbreak of the Civil Wars the town and castle were garrisoned for parliament by the mayor, John Poyer, a leading Presbyterian, who was later appointed governor, with Rowland Laugharne of St Brides for his lieutenant.

  • But it is possible that, as suggested by Rowland,' the structure of natural spectra may be too coarse to give opportunity for resolving powers much higher than those now in use.

  • Rowland to his brilliant invention of concave gratings, by which spectra can be photographed without any further optical appliance.

  • This disposition is adopted in Rowland's instrument; only, in addition to the central image formed at the angle 4' =4), there are a series of spectra with various values of 4', but all disposed upon the same circle.

  • Rowland's investigation is contained in the paper already referred to; but the following account of the theory is in the form adopted by R.

  • 2 " In the same way we may conclude that in flat gratings any departure from a straight line has the effect of causing the dust in the slit and the spectrum to have different foci - a fact sometimes observed " (Rowland, " On Concave Gratings for Optical Purposes," Phil.

  • For this purpose Rowland places the eye-piece at 0, so that 0 =o, and then by (11) the value of '" in the m th spectrum is o- sin $' = tmX.

  • In spite of the many improvements introduced by Rowland and of the care with which his observations were made, recent workers have come to the conclusion that .errors of unexpected amount have crept into his measurements of wave-lengths, and there is even a disposition to discard the grating altogether for fundamental work in favour of the so-called " interference methods," as developed by A.

  • In Rowland's dividing engine the screws were prepared by a special process devised by him, and the resulting gratings, plane and concave, have supplied the means for much of the best modern optical work.

  • At the present time excellent reproductions of Rowland's speculum gratings are on the market (Thorp, Ives, Wallace), prepared, after a suggestion of Sir David Brewster, by coating the original with a varnish, e.g.

  • Among the rectors of Hadleigh several notable names appear, such as Rowland Taylor, the martyr, who was burned at the stake outside the town in 1 555, and Hugh James Rose, during whose tenancy of the rectory an initiatory meeting of the leaders of the Oxford Movement took place here in 1833.

  • Smith, Rowland Prothero and G.

  • Such a bridge was the Wearmouth bridge, designed by Rowland Burdon and erected in 1793-1796, with a span of 235 ft.

  • Rowland was deeply moved, and became an ardent apostle of the new movement.

  • Rowland and Harris had been at work fully eighteen months before they met, at a service in Devynock church, in the upper part of Breconshire.

  • Rowland had never been to a university, but, like Harris, he had been well grounded in general knowledge.

  • Rowland, Williams and John Powell - afterwards of Llanmartin - (clergymen), Harris, John Humphreys and John Cennick (laymen) were present.

  • This led the bishop of St David's to suspend Rowland's license, and Rowland had to confine himself to a meeting-house at Llangeitho.

  • Llangeitho became the Jerusalem of Wales, and Rowland's popularity never waned until his physical powers gave way.

  • Edward Rowland Sill >>

  • Rowland's efforts the construction of gratings has been improved to such an extent that their use is becoming universal whenever great power or accuracy is required.

  • See Rowland Jackson, The History of the Town and Township of Barnsley (1858); Victoria County History - Yorkshire.

  • Like Rowland, almost invariably, Lee was locally successful.

  • Bruce castle, on the site of the old mansion of the Bruces, but built probably by Sir William Compton in the beginning of the 16th century, was occupied by a boarding-school founded by Mr (afterwards Sir) Rowland Hill in 1827 on the system instituted by him at Hazlewood, Birmingham.

  • He is commemorated by a statue, as is Sir Rowland Hill, the introducer of penny postage, who was born here in 1795.

  • Whitelocke married (I) Rebecca, daughter of Thomas Bennet, (2) Frances, daughter of Lord Willoughby of Parham, and (3) Mary Carleton, widow of Rowland Wilson, and left children by each of his wives.

  • Rowland.

  • Rowland (Prot.

  • Rowland'S Apparatus Is Shown In Fig.

  • Rowland Himself Considered His Results To Be Probably Correct To One Part In 500, And Supposed That The Greatest Uncertainty Lay In The Comparison Of The Scale Of His Mercury Thermometer With The Air Thermometer.

  • The Specific Heat Of Water Are Shown In The Curve Marked Rowland In Fig.

  • Expressed In J Oules Per Calorie The Result Is 4.1832, Which Agrees Very Closely With The Value Foand By Rowland As The Mean Over The Range 15° To 20° C. The Value 4.183 Is Independently Confirmed In A Remarkable Manner By The Results Of The Electrical Method Described Below, Which Give 4.185 Joules For The Mean Calorie, If Rowland'S Value Is Assumed As The Starting Point, And Taken To Be 4.180 Joules At 20° C.

  • In Spite Of The Large Corrections The Results Were Extremely Consistent, And The Value Of The Temperature Coefficient Of The Diminution Of The Specific Heat Of Water, Deduced From The Observed Variation In The Rate Of Rise At Different Points Of The Range 15° To 25°, Agreed With The Value Subsequently Deduced From Rowland'S Experiments Over The Same Range, When His Thermometers Were Reduced To The Same Scale.

  • The Difference From Rowland'S Value, 4.181, Could Be Explained By Supposing The E.M.F.

  • Of The Clark Cell Is Probably Less Than 1.4340 Volts (The Value Assumed By Schuster And Gannon), There Is No Difficulty In Reconciling The Result With That Of Rowland.

  • Assuming This Value, The Result Found By This Method For The Specific Heat Of Water At 20° C. Agrees With That Of Rowland Within The Probable Limits Of Error.

  • The Work Of Rowland By The Mechanical Method Was The First In Which Due Attention Was Paid To The Thermometry And To The Reduction Of The Results To The Absolute Scale Of Temperature.

  • Stracciati By The Method Of Mixture Between O° And 30° C., Though Their Curve Is Otherwise Similar To Rowland'S, Had Appeared To Indicate A Minimum At 20° C., Followed By A Rapid Rise.

  • This Effect Is Probably Due, As Suggested By Rowland, To The Presence Of A Certain Proportion Of Ice Molecules In The Liquid, Which Is Also No Doubt The Cause Of The Anomalous Expansion.

  • The Value 4.180 Joules At 20° C. Is The Mean Between Rowland'S Corrected Result 4.181 And The Value 4.179, Deduced From The Experiments Of Reynolds And Moorby On The Assumption That The Ratio Of The Mean Specific Heat O° To 100° To That At 20° Is 1.043'6, As Given By The Formulae Representing The Results Of Callendar And Barnes.

  • This Would Indicate That Rowland'S Corrected Values Should, If Anything, Be Lowered.

  • The Quantity Actually Observed By Rowland Was The Total Heat.

  • It May Be Remarked That Starting From The Same Value At 5°, For The Sake Of Comparison, Rowland'S Values Of The Total Heat Agree To I In 5000 With Those Calculated From The Formulae.

  • It Was Supposed At The Time, From The Original Reduction Of Rowland'S Experiments, That This Would Be Nearly At 10° C., But It Now Appears That It May Be As Low As 5° C., Which Would Be Inconvenient.

  • See Thomas Quinton Stow's Memoirs of Rowland Ta y lor (1833); Dict.

  • See also the papers of Rowland in the Proc. Amer.

  • Before he was twenty-one he had preached nearly a thousand times, and in 1788 he had for a while occupied Rowland Hill's pulpit in London.

  • Rowland, E.

  • This council of Wales, the headquarters of which had been fixed at Ludlow, undoubtedly did good service on behalf of law and order under such capable presidents as Bishop Rowland Lee and William Herbert, earl of Pembroke; but it had long ceased to be of any practical use, and had in fact become an engine of oppression by the time of the Commonwealth, although it was not definitely abolished till the revolution of 1688.

  • Meanwhile the writings and personal example of the pious rector of Llanddowror were stirring other Welshmen in the work of revival, chief amongst them being Howell Harris of Trevecca (1713-1773), a layman of brilliant abilities but erratic temperament; and Daniel Rowland (1713-1790), curate of Llangeitho in Mid-Cardiganshire, who became in time the most eloquent and popular preacher throughout all Wales.

  • The enthusiastic course of the Methodist movement under Howell Harris, Daniel Rowland and William Williams; the establishment of Welsh Sunday Schools; the founding of the Bible Society under Thomas Charles of Bala; and the revival early in the 19th century of the Eisteddfodau (the ancient bardic contests of music, poetry and learning), have all contributed to extend the use of the Welsh language and to strengthen its hold as a popular medium of education throughout the Principality.

  • Rowland, Grammar of the Welsh Language 4 (1876), containing a large collection of facts about the modern language, badly arranged and wholly undigested; Rhys, Lectures on Welsh Philology 2 (1879); J.

  • It was Sir Rowland Hill who first suggested the possibilities of a press which should print both sides at once, from a roll or reel of paper.

  • The free library and art gallery of the corporation, a fourstoreyed building in Italian style erected in 1887, contains the library of the Rev. Rowland Williams (one of the authors of Essays and Reviews), the rich Welsh collection of the Rev. Robert Jones of Rotherhithe, a small Devonian section (presented by the Swansea Devonian Society), and about 8000 volumes and 2500 prints and engravings, intended to be mutually illustrative, given by the Swansea portrait-painter and art critic, John Deffett Francis, from 1876 to 1881, to receive whose first gift the library was established in 1876.

  • Ravenel, Macfadyen and Rowland have shown that several bacilli will bear exposure for seven days to the temperature of liquid air (- 192° C. to - 183° C.) and again grow when put into normal conditions.

  • uber den Bau der Cyanophyceen and Bakterien (Jena, 1897); Rowland, " Observations upon the Structure of Bacteria," Trans.

  • lxxiv.; Macfadyen and Rowland, Proc. R.

  • Rowland and Macfadyen for the same purpose introduced the method of grinding the bacilli in liquid air.

  • On the 29th of January 1555, Hooper, Rogers, Rowland Taylor and others were condemned by Gardiner and degraded by Bonner.

  • Pleasant; Rowland Hall Academy (1880; Protestant Episcopal) for girls at Salt Lake City; and Gordon Academy (1870; Congregational) at Salt Lake City.

  • HENRY AUGUSTUS ROWLAND (1848-1901), American physicist, was born at Honesdale, Pennsylvania, on the 27th of November 1848.

  • Rowland was one of the most brilliant men of science that America has produced, and it is Curious that at first his merits were not perceived in his own country, In America he was unable even to secure the publication of certain of his scientific papers; but Clerk Maxwell at once saw their excellence, and had them printed in the Philosophical Magazine.

  • For their production, therefore, dividing engines of extraordinary trueness and delicacy must be employed, and in the construction of such machines Rowland's engineering skill brought him conspicuous success.

  • The ultra-violet and the visual portion are recorded photographically; Rowland's classical work shows some 5700 lines in the former, and 14,200 in the latter, on a graduated scale of intensities from moo to o, or 0000, for the faintest lines; between a quarter and a third of these lines have been identified, fully 2000 belonging to iron, and several hundred to water vapour and other atmospheric absorption.

  • In Rowland's table lines from the arc-spectra of the following are identified.

  • Rowland's Tables of Wave-Lengths, many theoretical papers, and some reproductions of important papers issued elsewhere.

  • Also Rowland Ward, Records of Big Game (5th ed., London, 1906).

  • Other institutions of learning are: the Latter-Day Saints University (1887) and the Latter-Day Saints High School, St Mary's Academy (1875; under the Roman Catholic Sisters of the Holy Cross), All Hallows College (1886; Roman Catholic), Gordon Academy (1870; Congregational),Rowland Hall Academy (1880; Protestant Episcopal) and Westminster College (1897; Presbyterian).

  • with John Rogem and Rowland Taylor, and Bishops Ferrar of St Davids and looper of Gloucester.

  • In the same session they were forced against their will to adopt a reform, which had been recommended by Rowland Hill, and to confer on the nation the benefit of a uniform penny postage.

  • From James, Lord Berkeley, who died in 1463, descended Rowland Berkeley, a clothier of Worcester, who bought the estates of Spetchley.

  • Rowland's second son, Sir Robert Berkeley, the king's bench justice who supported the imposition of ship-money, was ancestor of the Berkeleys of Spetchley, now the only branch of the house among untitled squires.

  • Rowland (1848-1901) in 1882, about forty terrestrial elements have been identified in the sun.

  • It was the birthplace of Roger Wolcott, of the older Oliver Wolcott (1726-1797), of Oliver Ellsworth (whose home is now a historical museum), and of Edward Rowland Sill.

  • There he attracted the notice of Sir Rowland Cotton, an amateur Hebraist of some distinction, who made him his domestic chaplain at Bellaport.

  • Shortly after the removal of Sir Rowland to London, Lightfoot, abandoning an intention to go abroad, accepted a charge at Stone in Staffordshire, where he continued for about two years.

  • A sister of the widow of somebody named Roland Rowland who'd owned it since the 1920's sold it to him.

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