Rouse sentence examples

rouse
  • When I sleep normally, it takes a lot more than that to rouse me.

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  • Only when the moon was halfway across the sky did he rouse himself.

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  • Natasha asked quickly in a whisper, afraid to move lest she should rouse the dozing baby.

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  • He was quiet long enough to rouse her interest, and she glanced up to determine the cause of his silence.

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  • For many years he made the aspects of life at sea his particular theme, and he contrived to rouse the patriotic enthusiasm of the Danish public as it had never been roused before.

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  • Nerves made her movements clumsy while her mind sought some forgotten information about a threat great enough to rouse the Undersecretary and his staff in the middle of the night.

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  • John Rouse Merriott Chard >>

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  • "My dear!" exclaimed his mother imploringly, again laying her hand on his arm as if that touch might soothe or rouse him.

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  • While holding this commission, he had the humiliation of witnessing from a distance the sack of Rome and the imprisonment of Clement, without being able to rouse the perfidious duke of Urbino into activity.

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  • In Tuscany particularly the Inquisition made persistent efforts to suppress them; Florence afflicted them with severe laws, but failed to rouse the populace against them.

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  • He had just time to create a favorable impression by his first proceedings, when his brother Robert, who had returned from Palestine and resumed possession of Normandy, landed at Portsmouth to claim the crown and to rouse his partisans among the English baronage.

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  • The social and political decrepitude of Italy, where patriotism was unknown, and only selfishness survived of all the motives that rouse men to action, found its representative and exponent in Guicciardini.

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  • Having failed to rouse Spain and Venice against the Turks, Gregory attempted to form a general coalition against the Protestants.

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  • He was not a monarch to rouse enthusiasm, while much was expected from his brilliant, clever and handsome son Henry VIII., whose magnificent presence and manly vigour recalled the early prime of Edward IV.

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  • She actually had no intent of inviting him to the house, but thought it might rouse a reaction.

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  • Thus spurred to renewed efforts against the Hussites, the elector was endeavouring to rouse the German princes to aid him in prosecuting this war when the Saxon army was almost annihilated at Aussig on the 16th of August 1426.

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  • Rouse in The Year's Work in Classical Studies (1907 and 1908), chap. i.; J.

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  • In 1647 he was staying at the home of Lady Rouse of Rouse-Lench, and there, in much physical weakness, wrote a great part of his famous work, The Saints' Everlasting Rest (1650).

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  • He then undertook a political campaign to rouse the republican party throughout France, which culminated in a speech at Romans (September 18, 1878) formulating its programme.

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  • Rouse Ball in his History of the Study of Mathematics at Cambridge (1889), p. 193, states that he can find no record of any European examinations by means of written papers earlier than those introduced by R.

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  • The plot was forced on prematurely by the suspicions excited at court, and the rash attempt to rouse the city of London (8th of February 1601) proved a complete fiasco.

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  • On Palm Sunday 1282, in a time of peace, David suddenly attacked and burnt Hawarden Castle, whereupon all Wales was up in arms. Edward, greatly angered and now bent on putting an end for ever to the independence of the Principality, hastened into Wales; but whilst the king was campaigning in Gwynedd, Prince Llewelyn himself was slain in an obscure skirmish on the 11th of December 1282 at Cefn-ybedd, near Builth on the Wye, whither he had gone to rouse the people of Brycheiniog.

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  • Rouse, 1907).

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  • His intimacy with foreigners and his imitation of their ways were sufficient to rouse fanaticism and create dissatisfaction.

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  • He endeavoured also to rouse the French peasantry against the Allies, but in vain, for Wellington's justice and moderation afforded them no grievances.

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  • Rouse, Greek Votive Offerings (1902).

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  • in his attempt to rouse the Western Isles through Douglas agency, and in 1482 was excluded from the general pardon granted by James III.

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  • The discussions on the budget entirely monopolized public attention for the year, and while the measure was defended by Mr Lloyd George in parliament with much suavity, and by Mr Asquith, Sir Edward Grey and Mr Haldane outside the House of Commons with tact and moderation, the feelings of its opponents were exasperated by a series of inflammatory public speeches at Limehouse and elsewhere from the chancellor of the exchequer, who took these opportunities to rouse the passions of the working-classes against the landed classes and the peers.

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  • We shall rouse against you princes and prelates, who, alas, will arm nations and kingdoms against this land ...

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  • The gloom and harshness of these Spanish mystics are absent from the tender, contemplative spirit of Francois de Sales (1567-1622); and in the quietism Fof Mme Guyon (1648-1717) and Miguel de Molinos (1627-1696) there is again a sufficient implication of mystical doctrine to rouse the suspicion of the ecclesiastical authorities.

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  • Passing the Bloemfontein-Thaba Nchu line a third time, he crossed the Orange to join Hertzog and rouse the Cape Dutch.

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  • It is a rare privilege to watch the birth, growth, and first feeble struggles of a living mind; this privilege is mine; and moreover, it is given me to rouse and guide this bright intelligence.

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  • The attempt of five or six hundred Jacobins (7th of September) to rouse the soldiers at Grenelle met with no better success.

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  • The fall of Olynthus (348) brought Aeschines into the political arena, and he was sent on an embassy to rouse the Peloponnesus against Philip. In 347 he was a member of the peace embassy to Philip of Macedon, who seems to have won him over entirely to his side.

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  • Attendance at the March lecture surprised our lecturer, Clive Rouse, who considered the subject rather abstruse.

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  • After this repulse, the royalists, under Stofflet and La Rochejaquelein, attempted to rouse the Cotentin and crossed the Loire.

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  • i.-vi., by Chalmers, Neil, Francis, and Rouse, 1895-1897; Buddhism in Translations, by Warren, 1896; Buddhistische Anthologie, by Neumann, 1892.

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  • With David's capture practically all serious Welsh resistance to the English arms ceased, if we except the unsuccessful attempt made to rouse the crushed nation in 1293 by Llewelyn's natural son, Madoc, who ended his days as a prisoner in the Tower of London.

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  • This proposal, as might have been expected, only served to rouse suspicions as to Russia's plans; it was politely rejected, and the whole Eastern Question slumbered, until, early in 1850, it was awakened by an incident trivial enough in itself, but pregnant with future trouble: a quarrel of Catholic and Orthodox monks about the holy places in Palestine.

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  • He beat the French at Sidi Brahim, raided the tribes of the Tell Oranais which had abandoned him, penetrated as far as the borders of the Metija, and reached the Jurjura, where he endeavoured to rouse the Kabyles.

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  • All this time William and Louis were indefatigably making preparations for a new campaign, and striving by their agents to rouse the people to active resistance.

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  • Sitting thus on the 13th of July he heard in the evening a young woman begging to be admitted to see him, saying that she brought news from Caen, where the escaped Girondins were trying to rouse Normandy.

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  • Rouse Ball, Origin and History of the Mathematical Tripos (Cambridge, 1880); Adolf Beier, Die hoheren Schulen in Preussen and ihre Lehrer (1902-1906) (in progress); Cloudesley Brereton, " A New Method of awarding Scholarships," School World, 1907, p. 409; G.

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  • In the evening, when Prince Andrew went to him and, trying to rouse him, began to tell him of the young Count Kamensky's campaign, the old prince began unexpectedly to talk about Princess Mary, blaming her for her superstitions and her dislike of Mademoiselle Bourienne, who, he said, was the only person really attached to him.

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  • ill-treated woman, and that was enough to rouse popular feeling.

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  • brass wind instruments have an innate power to rouse, to stimulate.

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  • A bruised reputation redeveloping the rouse big ugly exit get away from.

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  • Rouse's The Year's Work in Classical Studies (1907); C. Pascal, Studii di antichitd e Mitologia (1896).

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  • If you suspect someone has swallowed a poison or an overdose of drugs and they appear to be unconscious, try to rouse them.

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  • rouse the suspicions of a Scottish policeman.

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  • rouse such negative passions elsewhere in Europe or in the United States.

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  • rouse such strong emotions in an audience is something very special indeed.

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  • His letters and his conversation were always full of whatever could awaken a healthy interest, and free from anything that might rouse illfeeling.

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  • He returned more resolved than ever to do his utmost to rouse the civilized world to put down the desolating slave-trade.

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  • They soon reached Rome, and a Dominican monk, Prierius, wrote a reply in defence of the papal power, in an insolent tone which first served to rouse Luther's suspicion of the theology of the papal Curia.

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  • After his master's death, in the third period of his own life, and during his connexion with Alexander, but before the final construction of his philosophy into a system, he was tending to write more and more in the didactic style; to separate from dialectic, not only metaphysics, but also politics, rhetoric and poetry; to admit by the side of philosophy the arts of persuasive language; to think it part of their legitimate work to rouse the passions; and in all these ways to depart from the ascetic rigidity of the philosophy of Plato, so as to prepare for the tolerant spirit of his own, and especially for his ethical doctrine that virtue consists not in suppressing but in moderating almost all human passions.

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  • The metrical psalms also, which are still sung in Scottish churches, were adopted at this time; they are based mainly on the version, which had been approved by the Westminster Assembly, of Francis Rouse (1579-1659), a member of the English House of Commons.

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  • From the first the attempt to rouse the denomination to organized effort for the propagation of the gospel met with much opposition, agents of the Convention being looked upon by the less intelligent pastors and churches as highly-paid and irresponsible collectors of money to be used they knew not how, or for purposes of which they disapproved.

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  • The inherent weakness of the government, the vigour and eloquence of his opposition, and a series of military disasters abroad combined to rouse a public feeling of indignation which could not be withstood, and in December 1756 Pitt, who now sat for Okehampton, became secretary of state, and leader of the Commons under the premiership of the duke of Devonshire.

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  • The first efforts of Urquiza to rouse the country against the oppressor were unsuccessful, but in 1851 he concluded an alliance with Brazil, to which Uruguay afterwards adhered.

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  • Upon his return he preached a characteristic sermon entitled The United States of America compared with some European Countries, particularly England (published 1826), in which, although there was some praise for the English church, he so boldly criticized the establishment, state patronage, cabinet appointment of bishops, lax discipline, and the low requirements of theological education, as to rouse much hostility in England, where he had been highly praised for two volumes of Sermons on the Principal Events and Truths of Redemption (1824).

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  • Mithradates next appealed to the national spirit of the peoples of the East generally, and endeavoured to rouse them to a united effort.

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  • At Lincoln's request he undertook a mission to the border states and the North-west to rouse the spirit of Unionism; he spoke in West Virginia, Ohio and Illinois.

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  • The name tarantella, in use at the present time, applies both to a dance still in vogue in Southern Italy and also to musical pieces resembling in their stimulating measures those that were necessary to rouse to activity the sufferer from tarantism in the middle ages.

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  • If your little landlubber is into pirates, then he'll likely enjoy a pirate alarm clock to rouse him from his slumber.

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  • Some people prefer to travel light yet still long for a reliable and super-cool alarm clock to rouse them from their well-earned slumber.

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  • Tip: Onions, garlic, and ginger rouse the body's antioxidant mechanisms.

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  • Rouse's The Year's Work in Classical Studies (1907)].

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  • rouse co peanuts to be small ukiah california police department patrol car.

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  • rouse acquisition as the company was been up front suspect the next.

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  • rouse deal just depends on pressure was low arm wound have.

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  • Sit for a while, then rouse myself for mighty matters: the lawn.

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  • rouse only on the night of the full moon.

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  • The powerful wrens, cheerful chaffinches, delicate sparrows and whistling starlings then weave in melodies, sweet enough to rouse the sun.

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  • General growth rouse bar in twenty-nine the Kevlar survivors ' .

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  • A low key approach may fail to rouse the interest of a potential Vandal.

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  • The argument is that Gauden had prepared the book to inspire sympathy with the king by a representation of his pious and forgiving disposition, and so to rouse public opinion against his execution.

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  • In fact it was the cry of "tyrant city" which went furthest to rouse public opinion in Greece against Athens and to bring on the Peloponnesian War which ruined the Athenian empire (431-404).

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  • Third, and worst of all, he had prefixed a preface to the sixth volume, in which he went out of his way to rouse the enmity of the men on whom depended his annual re-election to the post of examiner for the Polytechnic school.

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  • The cock bird, when, to use the fenman's expression, he has not "his show on," and the hen at all seasons, offer no very remarkable deviation from ordinary sandpipers; outwardly there is nothing, except the unequal size of the two sexes, to rouse suspicion of any abnormal peculiarity.

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  • Anything that suggests a tinker always seems to rouse the suspicions of a Scottish policeman.

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  • Rouse acquisition as the company was been up front suspect the next.

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  • dedicatory inscription to " Johannes Smyth et Joanne Rouse " .

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  • Years before the danger from Macedon was urgent, Demosthenes had begun the work of his life, - the effort to lift the spirit of Athens, to revive the old civic loyalty, to rouse the city into taking that place and performing that part which her own welfare as well as the safety of Greece ca uses.

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  • In 1809 it was the scene of the death of Ferdinand von Schill, in his gallant though ineffectual attempt to rouse his countrymen against the French invaders.

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  • With other disclosures regarding German machinations against the United States it materially contributed to rouse American national feeling, which found expression in the decisive votes of the Senate and the House of Representatives on April 5 in favour of declaring war upon Germany.

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  • But suddenly, while he was trying to rouse public opinion against the treaties of 1815, the news of the battle of K6niggratz came as a bolt from the blue to ruin his hopes.

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  • Later, she indicates from the stage - while obviously trying to rouse herself - she'd had too much tequila the night before.

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  • Emin tends not to rouse such negative passions elsewhere in Europe or in the United States.

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  • But for a young cast to rouse such strong emotions in an audience is something very special indeed.

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  • The rouse co peanuts to be small ukiah california police department patrol car.

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  • The rouse deal just depends on pressure was low arm wound have.

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  • Around 30 BC she began to rouse only on the night of the full moon.

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  • General growth rouse bar in twenty-nine the kevlar survivors '.

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  • Later, she indicates from the stage - while obviously trying to rouse herself - she 'd had too much tequila the night before.

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  • A low key approach may fail to rouse the interest of a potential vandal.

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  • To tell if someone is either sleeping or in a coma, pinch the person's skin or do something else to try to rouse that person.

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  • The tingling feeling experienced when hands begin to wake up can rouse you from sleep.

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  • However, it is known that when infants sleep on their backs they are more prone to arousal, and SIDS is often thought to involve a failure to rouse from sleep.

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  • But why should we care a hoot about what Rouse thinks?

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