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ros

ros Sentence Examples

  • TAYGETUS (Tau-ye ros or T a67Erov, mod.

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  • It is certainly derived, through Rossiya, from Slavonic Rus or Ros (Byzantine `Pws or `Pc o-oc), a name first given to the Scandinavians who founded a principality on the Dnieper in the 9th century; and afterwards extended to the collection of Russian states of which this principality formed the nucleus.

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  • In 1317 John de Lilleburn, who was holding the castle of Knaresburgh for Thomas duke of Lancaster against the king, surrendered under conditions to William de Ros of Hamelak, but before leaving the castle managed to destroy all the records of the liberties and privileges of the town which were kept in the castle.

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  • high, approached on either side by a flight of steps leading to the top; this block, which Curtius supposes to have been the primitive altar of Zeus "T ' w ros, may be safely identified with the orators' bema, 6 X Wos Ev 7-?7 IIUKvL (Aristoph.

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  • His Belle Dame sans merci was translated into English by Sir Richard Ros about 1640, with an introduction of his own; and Clement Marot and Octavien de Saint-Gelais, writing fifty years after his death, find many fair words for the old poet, their master and predecessor.

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  • be added in order to produce ros.

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  • or (b) ros.

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  • In ordinary life it was generally pulled up through the girdle and formed a KC)R?ros (Greek Art, fig.

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  • Ross (Ros, Rosse) was granted to the see of Hereford by Edmund Ironside, but became crown property by an exchange effected in 1559.

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  • The first mention of his name is in a passage of William of Malmesbury, recording the discovery of his tomb in the province of Ros in Wales.

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  • 18 In John, Christ is a " propitiation " (tXaa l uos) provided by the love of God that man may be cleansed from sin; He is also their advocate (HapetOsi ros) with God that they may be forgiven, for His name's sake.

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  • It is therefore reasonable to suppose that the book was composed not later than the first half of the 2nd century B.C.,or (if we give the looser meaning to hair ros) even before the beginning of the century.

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  • Auch), Rosemarkie, Resolis (Gaelic rudha or ros soluis, " cape of the light") or Kirkmichael and Cromarty.

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  • The number of passengers carried in the same period ros from 121/8 to over 22 millions, and the weight of goods from slightly under 3,000,000 to nearly 6,750,000 tons.

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  • The name - which Bede (730) wrote Mailros and Simeon of Durham (1130) Melros - is derived from the Celtic maol ros, " bare moor," and the town figures in Sir Walter Scott's Abbot and Monastery as "Kennaquhair."

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  • 10) to be both internal, in the soul (6 g o-co ?6yos, Ev T 71 ikvx fj), and external, in language (6 g 5w X6yos): hence after Aristotle the Stoics distinguished X6yos EvScfiO€ros and 7rp040pcK6s.

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  • This consisted of a paf3Sos or bronze rod; a 7rM6aTcy, a small disk or basin, resembling a scale-pan; a larger disk (XEKavis); and (in 1 The epithet Kara&ros (let down) may refer to the rod, which might be' raised or lowered as required; to the lower disk, which might be moved up and down the stem; to the moving up and down of the scales, in the supposed variety of the game mentioned below.

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  • The egg is said to be pushed in by means of the long ros trum.

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  • out of the Ros.

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  • irapa, beside, cr ros food), literally "mess-mate," a term originally conveying no idea of reproach or contempt, as in later times.

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  • The long prevalent estimation of Priscillian as a heretic and Manichaean rested upon Augustine, Turibius of Astorga, Leo the Great and Orosius, although at the Council of Toledo in 400, fifteen years after Priscillian's death, when his case was reviewed, the most serious charge that could be brought was the error of language involved in rendering a',' ni ros by innascibilis.

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  • Dionysius devoted two special treatises to Demosthenes, - one on his language and style (Xektckos To ros), the other on his treatment of subject-matter (7rpa^y,uaruKinTolros).

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  • Among other historic families connected with Lincolnshire were the Wakes of Bourne and the d'Eyncourts, who flourished at Blankney from the Conquest to the reign of Henry VI.; Belvoir Castle was founded by the Toenis, from whom it passed by the Daubeneys, then to the Barons Ros and later to the Manners, earls of Rutland.

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  • HORSE (a word common to Teutonic languages in such forms as hors, hros, ros; cf.

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  • I i€ros, vomiting) are substances given for the purpose of causing vomiting, e.g.

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  • Ros Needle landed a 6lbs carp using a boilie hook bait Middle Pond Joel Rees caught a 7lb carp on Wednesday.

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  • disgusted to find that Ros has given away Doreen's present of perfume to Chrissie.

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  • No by mine honor, but I was bid to come for you Ros.

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  • Ros provided a sumptuous feast including copious strawberry meringues and sarnies to die for.

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  • soared majestically, reminding me of similar performances from acts like Sigur Ros.

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  • Ros talks to Pat in another cell in solitary through the toilet bowl to try to find out why she is in solitary.

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  • TAYGETUS (Tau-ye ros or T a67Erov, mod.

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  • It is certainly derived, through Rossiya, from Slavonic Rus or Ros (Byzantine `Pws or `Pc o-oc), a name first given to the Scandinavians who founded a principality on the Dnieper in the 9th century; and afterwards extended to the collection of Russian states of which this principality formed the nucleus.

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  • In 1317 John de Lilleburn, who was holding the castle of Knaresburgh for Thomas duke of Lancaster against the king, surrendered under conditions to William de Ros of Hamelak, but before leaving the castle managed to destroy all the records of the liberties and privileges of the town which were kept in the castle.

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  • high, approached on either side by a flight of steps leading to the top; this block, which Curtius supposes to have been the primitive altar of Zeus "T ' w ros, may be safely identified with the orators' bema, 6 X Wos Ev 7-?7 IIUKvL (Aristoph.

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    0
  • His Belle Dame sans merci was translated into English by Sir Richard Ros about 1640, with an introduction of his own; and Clement Marot and Octavien de Saint-Gelais, writing fifty years after his death, find many fair words for the old poet, their master and predecessor.

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  • be added in order to produce ros.

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  • or (b) ros.

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    0
  • In ordinary life it was generally pulled up through the girdle and formed a KC)R?ros (Greek Art, fig.

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    0
  • Ross (Ros, Rosse) was granted to the see of Hereford by Edmund Ironside, but became crown property by an exchange effected in 1559.

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    0
  • The first mention of his name is in a passage of William of Malmesbury, recording the discovery of his tomb in the province of Ros in Wales.

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    0
  • 18 In John, Christ is a " propitiation " (tXaa l uos) provided by the love of God that man may be cleansed from sin; He is also their advocate (HapetOsi ros) with God that they may be forgiven, for His name's sake.

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    0
  • It is therefore reasonable to suppose that the book was composed not later than the first half of the 2nd century B.C.,or (if we give the looser meaning to hair ros) even before the beginning of the century.

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    0
  • Auch), Rosemarkie, Resolis (Gaelic rudha or ros soluis, " cape of the light") or Kirkmichael and Cromarty.

    0
    0
  • The number of passengers carried in the same period ros from 121/8 to over 22 millions, and the weight of goods from slightly under 3,000,000 to nearly 6,750,000 tons.

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    0
  • The name - which Bede (730) wrote Mailros and Simeon of Durham (1130) Melros - is derived from the Celtic maol ros, " bare moor," and the town figures in Sir Walter Scott's Abbot and Monastery as "Kennaquhair."

    0
    0
  • 10) to be both internal, in the soul (6 g o-co ?6yos, Ev T 71 ikvx fj), and external, in language (6 g 5w X6yos): hence after Aristotle the Stoics distinguished X6yos EvScfiO€ros and 7rp040pcK6s.

    0
    0
  • This consisted of a paf3Sos or bronze rod; a 7rM6aTcy, a small disk or basin, resembling a scale-pan; a larger disk (XEKavis); and (in 1 The epithet Kara&ros (let down) may refer to the rod, which might be' raised or lowered as required; to the lower disk, which might be moved up and down the stem; to the moving up and down of the scales, in the supposed variety of the game mentioned below.

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  • The egg is said to be pushed in by means of the long ros trum.

    0
    0
  • out of the Ros.

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    0
  • irapa, beside, cr ros food), literally "mess-mate," a term originally conveying no idea of reproach or contempt, as in later times.

    0
    0
  • The long prevalent estimation of Priscillian as a heretic and Manichaean rested upon Augustine, Turibius of Astorga, Leo the Great and Orosius, although at the Council of Toledo in 400, fifteen years after Priscillian's death, when his case was reviewed, the most serious charge that could be brought was the error of language involved in rendering a',' ni ros by innascibilis.

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    0
  • Dionysius devoted two special treatises to Demosthenes, - one on his language and style (Xektckos To ros), the other on his treatment of subject-matter (7rpa^y,uaruKinTolros).

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  • Among other historic families connected with Lincolnshire were the Wakes of Bourne and the d'Eyncourts, who flourished at Blankney from the Conquest to the reign of Henry VI.; Belvoir Castle was founded by the Toenis, from whom it passed by the Daubeneys, then to the Barons Ros and later to the Manners, earls of Rutland.

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  • HORSE (a word common to Teutonic languages in such forms as hors, hros, ros; cf.

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  • I i€ros, vomiting) are substances given for the purpose of causing vomiting, e.g.

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  • Dreamlike and captivating their tunes rose and soared majestically, reminding me of similar performances from acts like Sigur Ros.

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  • Ros talks to Pat in another cell in solitary through the toilet bowl to try to find out why she is in solitary.

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