This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

root

root

root Sentence Examples

  • I'll do new potatoes and roasted root vegetables.

    150
    75
  • I'll do new potatoes and roasted root vegetables.

    148
    75
  • Its preamble stated that its object was " to exterminate the root and ground of this pest."

    51
    21
  • I'd rather root them out and have them killed.

    45
    46
  • Unwilling to root for either animal, Carmen turned Ed back toward the tree line.

    27
    33
  • He sounded like he was agreeing to a root canal.

    25
    27
  • lenzin, lengizin, lenzo, probably from the same root as "long" and referring to "the lengthening days"), in the Christian Church, the period of fasting preparatory to the festival of Easter.

    22
    20
  • Little did the dusky children think that the puny slip with its two eyes only, which they stuck in the ground in the shadow of the house and daily watered, would root itself so, and outlive them, and house itself in the rear that shaded it, and grown man's garden and orchard, and tell their story faintly to the lone wanderer a half-century after they had grown up and died--blossoming as fair, and smelling as sweet, as in that first spring.

    18
    19
  • In 1572 a formal manifesto was published, entitled an Admonition to Parliament, the leading ideas in which were: parity of ministers, appointment of elders and deacons; election of ministers by the congregation; objection to prescribed prayer and antiphonal chanting; preaching, the chief duty of a minister; and the power of the magistrates to root out superstition and idolatry.

    17
    18
  • Katie nodded and sawed at the root, dripped more blood, then sawed again.  She forced herself to continue even as she grew tired.  Sticky blood covered the hilt of the dagger, her pants, the root, Deidre's shoe and pants leg.  Katie kept on, uncertain what might happen if she stopped for a break.

    16
    20
  • The root has nothing to do with resting in the sense of enjoying repose; in transitive forms and applications it means to "sever," to "put an end to," and intransitively it means to "desist," to "come to an end."

    15
    20
  • Teutonic root meaning ":heal," and is etymologically di..

    14
    18
  • After the second larval moult, he passes through a passive stage comparable to the pupa-stadium of an b insect, and during this stage, which occurs inside the root, the reproductive organs are perfected.

    12
    12
  • "I'm getting you out of here," she said, thrilled.  With a grimace, she sliced the palm of her hand and smeared the blood on the root.  "You're insane," Deidre breathed.

    12
    19
  • She did not know and would not have believed it, but beneath the layer of slime that covered her soul and seemed to her impenetrable, delicate young shoots of grass were already sprouting, which taking root would so cover with their living verdure the grief that weighed her down that it would soon no longer be seen or noticed.

    11
    16
  • Thus the doctrine of signatures is evident in the use of the celebrated Ginseng root of China, which, like that of the mandrake (Gen.

    10
    11
  • root irpo, first or chief).

    10
    14
  • They have no friend Iolaus to burn with a hot iron the root of the hydra's head, but as soon as one head is crushed, two spring up.

    10
    15
  • We should really be fed and cheered if when we met a man we were sure to see that some of the qualities which I have named, which we all prize more than those other productions, but which are for the most part broadcast and floating in the air, had taken root and grown in him.

    10
    15
  • She started to saw at them with the knife.  The wood was thick and wet.  She shifted closer, gasping when the root healed the cuts she'd just made.  Furious at the latest trick from the Immortal underworld, Katie sawed furiously at the root, until her arm ached.  She'd barely made a dent when she switched arms.

    9
    13
  • A little story called "The Frost King," which I wrote and sent to Mr. Anagnos, of the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was at the root of the trouble.

    8
    13
  • "We promised Martha we'd follow through on this business," Cynthia added, clinching the obligation like a root canal appointment.

    8
    14
  • She had barely sat when a servant bearing a tray of coffee and diet root beer -- her favorite --set down the drinks in front of her.

    8
    14
  • In spite of almost insuperable difficulties the colony took root, trade began, the fleet lay in wait for the Spanish treasure ships, the settlements of the Spaniards were raided, and their repeated attempts to retake the island were successfully resisted.

    7
    11
  • The thought of going to college took root in my heart and became an earnest desire, which impelled me to enter into competition for a degree with seeing and hearing girls, in the face of the strong opposition of many true and wise friends.

    7
    12
  • Multiradial apocentricities lie at the root of many of the phenomena that have been grouped under the designation convergence.

    6
    11
  • planta (for plancta, the root being that seen in planus, flat, cf.

    6
    11
  • The plant has a well-developed main root (tap-root) and a single or branched leafy stem which is provided with a means of secondary increase in thickness.

    6
    11
  • U, Absorbing cell, with process (root-hair) from piliferous layer of root of Phanerogam.

    6
    11
  • So our human life but dies down to its root, and still puts forth its green blade to eternity.

    6
    12
  • He belonged to the Root and Branch party, and spoke in favour of the petition of the London citizens for the abolition of episcopacy on the 9th of February 1641, and pressed upon the House the Root and Branch Bill in May.

    5
    7
  • But he desired to root out the popular respect for the names of Charlemont and Grattan, and to transfer to more violent leaders the conduct of the national movement.

    5
    10
  • 14-16), owed its employment to the fact that the root often divides into branches resembling the arms and legs of a man, and this resemblance gave rise to the belief that it conferred strength and virility.

    4
    7
  • The name Albania (in the Tosk dialect Arberia, in the Gheg Arbenia), like Albania in the Caucasus, Armenia, Albany in Britain, and Auvergne (Arvenia) in France, is probably connected with the root alb, alp, and signifies "the white or snowy uplands."

    4
    8
  • Science, he says, may be compared to a tree; metaphysics is the root, physics is the trunk, and the three chief branches are mechanics, medicine and Ouvres, viii.

    4
    9
  • In Caulerpa the imitation of a higher plant by the differentiation of fixing, supporting and assimilating organs (root, stem and leaf) from different branches of the single cell is strikingly complete.

    4
    9
  • The sound came again, the cry of someone who was hurt.  Katie wiped her eyes.  She was drenched with rain and curled against the large root of a tree.  The birds of the jungle made screaming sounds, but this was different.  This was human.

    4
    10
  • A few of the medicinal plants are ginseng, pleurisy root, snake root, blood root, blue flag and marshmallow.

    4
    10
  • They are characterized by the absence of that differentiation of the body into root, stem and leaf which is so marked a feature in the higher plants, and by the simplicity of their internal structure.

    4
    10
  • The sporophyte is the plant which is differentiated into stem, leaf and root, which show a wonderful variety 01 form; the internal structure also shows increased complexity and variety as compared with the other group of vascular plants, the Pteridophyta.

    4
    10
  • This universal motive is further connected, as by Paley, through the will of God, with the "general good, the root where out all our rules of conduct and sentiments of honour are to branch."

    4
    12
  • In Ireland the game took root very gradually, but in Ulster, owing doubtless to constant intercourse with Scotland, such clubs as have been founded are strong in numbers and play.

    3
    7
  • The name Varuna may be Indo-European, identifiable, some believe, with the Greek ofpavos (Uranus), and ultimately referable to a root var, " to cover," Varuna thus meaning "the Encompasser."

    3
    7
  • Katie hesitated before shuffling forward on her knees.  She carefully touched the woman's leg then patted it as she followed it down to the thick roots wrapped around her ankles.  Unable to see exactly how she was stuck, Katie used her cold fingers to fumble around the root and the woman's sneakers.  "It's really jammed in there," she said at last.

    3
    9
  • It is quite possible that shabattum and nubattum are from the same root and originally denoted much the same thing - a pause, abstention, from whatever cause or for ceremonial purposes.

    3
    9
  • The thermal G G detectors are especially useful for the purpose of quantitative measurements, because they indicate the true effective or square root of mean square value of the current or train of oscillations passing through the hot wire.

    3
    9
  • He uses "radicatum" for power (for root, power, exponent, his words are radix, radicatum, index).

    2
    10
  • Google Analytics - Perhaps the most valuable tool is this invisible code that you put at the top of the root page of your website.

    1
    1
  • They are primarily used for internal links, because you can reference any directory that exists within the root web folder.

    1
    1
  • Instead, we can think of it as many cuisines that all exist simultaneously--from fish to beef to rice and beans, from root vegetables to tropical fruit.

    1
    1
  • In Germany a few Cartesian lecturers taught at Leipzig and Halle, but the system took no root, any more than in Switzerland, where it had a brief reign at Geneva after 1669.

    1
    7
  • I tripped in the rain.  I think my foot is stuck in a root.

    0
    0
  • "I'm Katie.  If I go through your shoe or something, just yell," she said and began sawing at the root.

    0
    0
  • Damian had assigned her here to help Jonny root out the vamps who were working with Others in the Black God's ranks.

    0
    0
  • The Confession of Faith and the Larger and Shorter Catechisms are recognized and venerated standards in all the lands where British Presbyterianism, with its sturdy characteristics, has taken root.

    0
    0
  • But the system never took root.

    0
    0
  • Hydrorhiza (root).

    0
    0
  • tw, Tentacle root.

    0
    0
  • It is also described as a bifurcation of two twigs, mental and bodily creation out of a common root.

    0
    0
  • His attitude is prophylactic, rather than polemic, for the "philosophy" has not as yet taken deep root.

    0
    0
  • The surface layer of the rhizome bears rhizoids, and its whole structure strikingly resembles that of the typical root of a vascular plant.

    0
    0
  • The primary root is a downward prolongation of the primary axis of the plant.

    0
    0
  • The root differs from the shoot in the characters of its surface tissues, in the absence of the green assimilative pigment chlorophyll, in the arrangement of its vascular system and in the mode of growth at the apex, all features which are in direct relation to its normally subterranean life and its fixative and absorptive functions.

    0
    0
  • Alike in root, stem and leaf, we can.

    0
    0
  • They are widely distributed, but are particularly abundant in certain tropical climates where active root absorption goes on while the air is nearly saturated with water vapour.

    0
    0
  • The surface layer of the root, sometimes included under tht term epidermis, is fundamentally different from the epidermis of the stem.

    0
    0
  • In correspondence with its water-absorbing epidermis function it is not cuticularized, but remains usually thinof Root, walled; the absorbing surface is increased by its cell~

    0
    0
  • At the apex of a root, covering and protecting th~ delicate tissue of the growing point, is a special root-cap consistinf of a number of layers of tissue whose cells break down into mucilagi towards the outer surface, thus facilitating the passage of the ape~ as it is pushed between the particles of soil.

    0
    0
  • The cortex of the older stem of the root frequently acts as a reserve store-house for food which generally takes the form of starch, and it also assists largel) in providing the stereom of the plant.

    0
    0
  • Scattered single stereids or bundles of fibres are no imnrornmnn in the rnrtev of the root The innermost layer of the cortex, abutting on the central cylinder of the stem or on the bundles of the leaves, is called the jthloeoterma, and is often differentiated.

    0
    0
  • In the downward growing part of the axis (primary root), Aflangehowever, the peripheral mantle of phloem is interrupted, ~7ii ~.

    0
    0
  • Such a vascular cylinder is called a haplostele, and the axis containing it is said to be haplostelic. In the stele of the root the strands of tracheids along the lines where the xylem touches the pericycle are spiral or annular, and are the xylem elements first formed when the cylinder is developing.

    0
    0
  • Ftc. 3.Dlarch stele of root of a F stem of young Fern.

    0
    0
  • To this type of steIn having a ground-tissue pith, whether with or without internal phloem, is given the name siphonostele to distinguish it from the solid haplostele characteristic of the root, the first-formed portion of the stem, and in the more primitive Pteridophytes, of the whole of the axis.

    0
    0
  • if.Poiyarch root of Veratrum (a monocotyfedon).

    0
    0
  • In such cases the vascular system is said to be polycyclic in contrast with the ordinary monocyclic condition, These internal strands or cylinders are to be regarded as peculiar types of elaboration of the stele, and probably act as reservoirs for water-storage which can be drawn upon when the water supply from the root is deficient.

    0
    0
  • i&Vertical section of a Palm-stem showing the root as it is found in most Pteridophytes vascular bundle,, Jr. curving and many Phanerogams has been already inwards and then outwards.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes, however, the centre of a bulky root stale has strands of metaxylem (to which may be added strands of metaphioem) scattered through it, the interstices being filled with conjunctive.

    0
    0
  • This localization takes place first at the two free ends of the primary axis, the descending part of which is the primary root, and the ascending the primary shoot.

    0
    0
  • developed at its base, usually becoming continuous with the cylinde of the root; the strand of the second leaf is formed in a similar wa~ and runs down to join that of the first, so that the stem stele is forme.

    0
    0
  • In other cases, however, continuous primitive stele is developed, extending from the primar stem to the primary root, the leaf-traces arising later.

    0
    0
  • In cases where the development of the embryo is advanced at the resting period, traces run from the cotyledons and determine the symmetry of the stele of the primitive axis, the upperpart of which often shows stem-structure, in some respects at least, and is called the hypocoty- ledonary stem or hypocotyl, while the lower part is the primary root .~-,

    0
    0
  • 2o.Laticiferous vessels from the cortex of the root Scoyzonera hispanica, tangential secf ion.

    0
    0
  • In other cases the root structure of the stele continues up to the cotyledonary node, though the hypocotyl is still to be distinguished from the primary root by the character of its epidermis.

    0
    0
  • In most Pteridophytes there is a single large apical cell at the end of each stem and root axis.

    0
    0
  • In both stem and root early walli separate the cortex from the stele.

    0
    0
  • The epidermis in the stair and the surface layer of the root soon becomes differentiated froit the underlying tissue.

    0
    0
  • 21.Median Longitudinal Section through the Apex of the Root of Pteris cretica.

    0
    0
  • The separation of layers in the apical meristem of the root is usually very much more obvious than in that of the stem.

    0
    0
  • The root hairs grow out from the cells of the piliferous layer immediately behind the elongating tegion.

    0
    0
  • This is known as exogenous branch-formation In the root, on the other hand, the origin of branches is endogenous The cells of the pericycle, usually opposite a protoxylem strand divide tangentially and give rise to a new growing-point.

    0
    0
  • The ne~ root thus laid down burrows through the cortex of the mother-root and finally emerges into the soil.

    0
    0
  • The cambium in the root, which is found generally in those plants which possess a cambium in the stem, always begins in the conjunctive tissue internal to the primary phloems, and Camblum forms new (secondary) phloem in contact with the In Roots primary, and secondary xylem internally.

    0
    0
  • Thus the structure of an old thickened root approximates to that of an old thickened stem, and so far as the vascular tissue is concerned can often only be distinguished from the latter by the position and orientation of the primary xylems. The cambium of the primary root, together with the tissues which it forms, is always directly continuous with that of the primary stem, just in the same way as the tissues of the primary stele.

    0
    0
  • Cork is also formed similarly in the root after the latter has passed through its primary stage as an absorptive organ, and its structure is becoming assimilated to that of the stem.

    0
    0
  • Its most usual seat of origin in the stem is the external layer of the cortex immediately below the epidermis; in the root, the pericycle.

    0
    0
  • The great turgidity which is thus caused exerts a considerable hydrostatic pressure on the stele of the root, the vessels of the wood of which are sometimes filled with water, but at other times contain air, and this often under a pressure less than the ordinary atmospheric pressure.

    0
    0
  • This pressure of the turgid cortex on the central stele is known as root pressure, and is of very considerable amount.

    0
    0
  • This pressure leads to the filling of the vessels of the wood of both root and stem in the early part of the year, before the leaves have expanded, and gives rise to the exudation of fluid known as bleeding when young stems are cut in early spring.

    0
    0
  • Root pressure is one of the forces co-operating in the forcing of the water upwards.

    0
    0
  • If we examine the seat of active growth in a young root or twig, we find that the cells in which the organic substance, the protoplasm, of the plant is being formed and increased, are not supplied with carbon dioxide and mineral matter, but with such elaborated material as sugar and proteid substances, or others closely allied to them.

    0
    0
  • In the first, which are called ectotropic, the fungal filaments form a thick felt or sheath round the root, either completely enclosing it or leaving the apex free.

    0
    0
  • The other type is called endctropic. The fungal filaments either penetrate the epidermis of the root, or enter it from the stem and ramify in the interior.

    0
    0
  • One of these hairs can be seen to be penetrated at a particular spot, and the entering body is then found to grow along the length of the hair till it reaches the cortex of the root.

    0
    0
  • After making its way into the interior, the intruder sets up a considerable hyper trophy of the tissue, causing the formation of a tubercle, which soon shows a certain differentiation, branches of the vascular bundles of the root being supplied to it.

    0
    0
  • When the root dies later such of these as remain are discharged into the soil, and are then ready to infect new plants.

    0
    0
  • Whichever opinion is held on this point, there seems no room for doubt that the fixation of the nitrogen is concerned only with the root, and that the green leavec take no part in it.

    0
    0
  • If we consider the be~aviour of a growing organ such as a root, we find that, like a cell, it shows a grand period, of growth.

    0
    0
  • Here it is that the actual extension in length of the root takes place, and the cells reach the maximum point of the grand period.

    0
    0
  • The region of growth in the stem is, as a rule, much longer than that of the root.

    0
    0
  • If a root is similarly illuminated, a similar change of direction of growth follows, but in this case the organ grows away from the light.

    0
    0
  • The root is made to press its way into the darker cracks and crannies of the soil, so bringing its root-hairs into better contact with the particles round which the hygroscopic water hangs.

    0
    0
  • When a root comes in contact at its tip with scme hard body, such as might impede its progress, a curvature of the growing part is set up, which takes the young tip away from the stone, or what-not, with which it is in contact.

    0
    0
  • Even the root tip, which shows a certain differentiation into root cap and root apex, cannot be said to be a definite sense organ in the same way as the sense organs of an animal.

    0
    0
  • The root is continually growing and so the sensitive part is continually changing its composition, cells being formed, growing and becoming permanent tissue.

    0
    0
  • The same plants have sometimes a superficial root system in addition, and are thus able to utilize immediately the water from rain showers and perhaps also from dew, as Volkensl maintains.

    0
    0
  • bracts of Strelitzia, &c.), and in the root of the carrot.

    0
    0
  • These tubes penetrate to all parts of the plant and occur in all parts of the root, stem and leaves.

    0
    0
  • Joachim Jung, in his Isagoge phytoscopica (1678), recognized that the plant-body consists of certain definite members, root, stem and leaf, and defined them by their different form and by their mutual relations.

    0
    0
  • The tisallus (thallome) is a plant-body which is not differentiated into the members root, stem and leaf; it is the morphologically simplest body, such as is of common occurrence in the lower plants (e~.

    0
    0
  • The root is an axis which never bears either leaves or the proper reproductive organs (whether sexual or asexual) of the plant.

    0
    0
  • Further, it has been found convenient to designate the leaf-bearing stem as a whole by the term shoot, so that the body may, as Sachs suggested, be primarily analysed into shoot and root.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the abstract terms stem, leaf, root, &c., are absolutely indispensable; and are continually used in this sense by the most ardent organographers.

    0
    0
  • Metamorphosis.It has already been pointed out that each kind of member of the body may present a variety of forms. For example, a stem may be a tree-trunk, or a twining stem, or a tendril, or a thorn, or a creeping rhizome, or a tuber; a leaf may be a green foliage-leaf, or a scale protecting a bud, or a tendril, or a pitcher, or a floral leaf, either sepal, petal, stamen or carpel (sporophyll); a root may be a fibrous root, or a swollen tap-root like that of the beet or the turnip. All these various forms are organs discharging some special function, and are examples of what Wolff called modification, and Goethe metamorphosis.

    0
    0
  • there is morphological differentiation, which can be traced in the distinction of the members of the body, root, stem, leaf, &c.; there is physiological differentiation, which can be traced in the adaptation of these members to various functions.

    0
    0
  • It is partly due to this early meaning that the derivation from the root of " brood " has been usually accepted; this the New English Dictionary regards as " inadmissible."

    0
    0
  • A smaller corm is then formed from the old one, close to its root; and this in September and October produces the crocus-like flowers.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, there is reason to believe that the magical spell proper is a self-contained and selfsufficient form of utterance, and that it lies at the root of much that has become address, and even prayer in the fullest sense.

    0
    0
  • The new creed, the new speech, the new social system, had taken such deep root that the descendants of the Scandinavian settlers were better fitted to be the armed missionaries of all these things than the neighbours from whom they had borrowed their new possessions.

    0
    0
  • The fashion could hardly have taken root except in a land where the tradition had gone before it.

    0
    0
  • But it took firm root on Norman soil; it made its way to England at an early stage of its growth, and from that time it went on developing and improving on both sides of the Channel till the artistic revolution came by which, throughout northern Europe, the Romanesque styles gave way to the Gothic. Thus the history of architecture in England during the 11th and 12th centuries is a very different story from the history of the art in Sicily during the same time.

    0
    0
  • In germination of the seed the root of the embryo (radicle) grows out to get a holdfast for the plant; this is generally followed by the growth of the short stem immediately above the root, the so-called "hypocotyl," which carries up the cotyledons above the ground, where they spread to the light and become the first green leaves of the plant.

    0
    0
  • A similar growth occurs in the root.

    0
    0
  • This increase in the diameter of stem and root is correlated with the increase in leaf-area each season, due to the continued production of new leaf-bearing branches.

    0
    0
  • But none of these classifications of expense reaches the root of the matter.

    0
    0
  • 7 No better derivation is forthcoming of the word nabhi', " prophet," than that it is a Katil form of the root naba = Assyr.

    0
    0
  • The original root is seen in Skt.

    0
    0
  • The lower part of the trunk bears huge buttresses, each of which ends in a long branching far-spreading; root, from the branches of which spring the peculiar knees which, rise above the level of the water.

    0
    0
  • The root appears more or less disguised in a vast number of river names all over the Celtic area in Europe.

    0
    0
  • The names Punjab, Doab, &c., show the root in a clearer shape.

    0
    0
  • He was Assistant Secretary of State, 1905-9, and then for a short time was Secretary of State, succeeding Elihu Root on the latter's election to the Senate.

    0
    0
  • Schwenkfeld's mysticism was the cause of his divergence from Protestant orthodoxy and the root of his peculiar religious and theological position.

    0
    0
  • 1 3Xaa477uLa, profane language, slander, probably derived from root of Ovi rrEt y, to injure, and 017µr7, speech), literally, defamation or evil speaking, but more peculiarly restricted to an indignity offered to the Deity by words or writing.

    0
    0
  • Some took root in the strange lands, and, as later popular stories indicate, evidently reached high positions; others, retaining a more vivid tradition of the land of their fathers, cherished the ideal of a restored Jerusalem.

    0
    0
  • It was not a new religion that took root; older tendencies were diverted into new paths, the existing material was shaped to new ends.

    0
    0
  • This circumstance deserves attention owing to the special connexion traditionally existing between the Minyans of Iolcus and those of Orchomenus, the point of all others on this side where the early Cretan influence seems most to have taken root.

    0
    0
  • They live on small animals or soft vegetable substances, which they root up from the bottom.

    0
    0
  • root is wen-, to desire, whence Eng.

    0
    0
  • The vowels play no part in differentiating the roots, for the vowels are practically the same in the corresponding forms of every root.

    0
    0
  • Where the same root exists in Arabic, Syriac and Hebrew, its fundamental consonants are usually the same in all three languages.

    0
    0
  • He possesses the cool temperament of the man of science rather than the fervid Godward aspiration of the mystic proper; and the speculative impulse which lies at the root of this form of thought is almost entirely absent from his writings.

    0
    0
  • The order is well represented in Britain by 18 genera, which include several species of Orchis: Gymnadenia (fragrant orchis), Habenaria (butterfly and frog orchis), Aceras (man orchis), Hermin- ium (musk orchis), Ophrys (bee, spider and fly orchis), Epipactis (Helleborine), Cephalanthera, Neottia (bird's-nest orchis), one of the few saprophytic genera, which have no green leaves, but derive their nourishment from decaying organic matter in the soil, Listens (Tway blade), Spiranthes (lady's tresses), Malaxis (bog-orchis), Liparis (fen-orchis), Corallorhiza (coral root), also a saprophyte, and Cypripedium (lady's slipper), represented by a single species now very rare in limestone districts in the north of England.

    0
    0
  • It would appear probable, however, that the former of these words was derived from an Assyrian or Hebrew root, which signifies the west or setting sun, and the latter from a corresponding root meaning the east or rising sun, and that they were used at one time to imply the west and the east.

    0
    0
  • At the root of the work lies a theory, whencesoever derived, which identified the Goths with the Scythians, whose country Darius Hystaspes invaded, and with the Getae of Dacia, whom Trajan conquered.

    0
    0
  • Many of Bentham's phrases, such as "international," "utilitarian," "codification," are valuable additions to our language; but the majority of them, especially those of Greek derivation, have taken no root in it.

    0
    0
  • The hot drought of 1893 extended over the spring and summer months, but there was an abundant rainfall in the autumn; correspondingly there was an unprecedentedly bad yield of corn and hay crops, but a moderately fair yield of the main root crops (turnips and swedes).

    0
    0
  • The existence of the root nodules had long been recognized, but hitherto no adequate explanation had been afforded as to their function.

    0
    0
  • But much less potash than phosphoric acid is exported in the cereal grains, much more being retained in the straw, whilst the other products of the rotation - the root and leguminous crops - which are also supposed to be retained on the farm, contain very much more potash than the cereals, and comparatively little of it is exported in meat and milk.

    0
    0
  • Under such conditions of supply, however, the root-crops, gross feeders as they are, and distributing a very large extent of fibrous feeding root within the soil, avail themselves of a much larger quantity of the nitrogen supplied than the cereal crops would do in similar circumstances.

    0
    0
  • In a single season Aberdeenshire suffered nearly 90,000 worth of damage owing to the ravages of the diamond back moth on the root crops; in New York state the codling moth caused a loss of $3,000,000 to apple-growers.

    0
    0
  • It kills all root pests.

    0
    0
  • At the root of all economic investigation lies the conception of the standard of life of the community.

    0
    0
  • In Switzerland and parts of Germany, where it is collected in some quantity for commerce, a long strip of bark is cut out of the tree near the root; the resin that slowly accumulates during the summer is scraped out in the latter part of the season, and the slit enlarged slightly the following spring to ensure a continuance of the supply.

    0
    0
  • i, Interspaces between the muscular bundles of the root of the foot, causing the separate areae seen in fig.

    0
    0
  • (Lankester.) c, Muscular bundles forming the root of the foot, and adherent to the shell.

    0
    0
  • Muscular substance forming the root of the foot.

    0
    0
  • The right otocyst is seen at the root of the foot.

    0
    0
  • Man, root, 185, No.

    0
    0
  • This view of nature Bacon considered fundamental, and it lies, indeed, at the root of his whole philosophy.

    0
    0
  • Schultens (Vita Sal., Index geogr.) cites Tatmur as a variant of the Arabic name; this might mean " abounding in palms " (from the root tamar); otherwise Tadmor may have been originally an Assyrian name.

    0
    0
  • Planters appreciate generally the value of broad-leaved and narrow-leaved plants and root crops, but there is an absence of exact knowledge, with the result that their practices are very varied.

    0
    0
  • In " Root rot," as the name implies, the roots are attacked, the fungus being a species of Ozonium, which envelops the roots in a white covering of mould or mycelium.

    0
    0
  • It is sometimes assumed that this is measured perfectly by the standard deviation,' which is obtained by taking the squares of the differences between the average and the individual prices, summing them and extracting the square root.

    0
    0
  • He displayed his political tact in the choice of the American delegation, which was led by Secretary Hughes and included, besides Elihu Root, two members of the Senate, Lodge and Underwood, the Republican and Democratic leaders respectively.

    0
    0
  • Since the current passing through the balance when equilibrium is obtained with a given weight is proportional to the square root of the couple due to this weight, it follows that the current strength when equilibrium is obtained is proportional to the product of the square root of the weight used and the square root of the displacement distance of this weight from its zero position.

    0
    0
  • Each instrument is accompanied by a pair of weights and by a square root table, so that the product of the square root of the number corresponding to the position of the sliding weight and the ascertained constant for each weight, gives at once the value of the current in amperes.

    0
    0
  • Worterbuch, who derives the element bel from an old Celtic root meaning shining, &c.) (W.

    0
    0
  • This book evidently afforded the root idea of the Ignatian and more famous book.

    0
    0
  • Farn; the Indo-European root, seen in the Sanskrit parna, a feather, shows the primary meaning; cf.

    0
    0
  • 7-trihydroxyxanthone, is found in the form of its methyl ether (gentisin) in gentian root; it is obtained synthetically by condensing phloroglucin with hydroquinone carboxylic acid.

    0
    0
  • Methyl Salicylate, C,H 4 (OH) CO 2 CH 31 found in oil of wintergreen, in the oil of Viola tricolor and in the root of varieties of Polygala, is a pleasant-smelling liquid which boils at 222° C. On passing dry ammonia into the boiling ester, it gives salicylamide and dimethylamine.

    0
    0
  • The scale of that map, as determined by the equator or centre meridian, we will suppose to be i: 125,000,000, while the encircling meridian indicates a scale of i: 80,000,000; and a " mean " scale, equal to the square root of the proportion which the area of the map bears to the actual area of a hemisphere, is r: 112,000,000.

    0
    0
  • from the tip of the nose to the root of the tail.

    0
    0
  • The first accurate description of the plant is given by Theophrastus, from whom we learn that it grew in shallows of 2 cubits (about 3 ft.) or less, its main root being of the thickness of a man's wrist and 10 cubits in length.

    0
    0
  • From this root, which lay horizontally, smaller roots pushed down into the mud, and the stem of the plant sprang up to the height of 4 cubits, being triangular and tapering in form.

    0
    0
  • Of the head nothing could be made but garlands for the shrines of the gods; but the wood of the root was employed in the manufacture of different utensils as well as for fuel.

    0
    0
  • bharb, to eat), in botany, the name given to those plants whose stem or stalk dies entirely or down to the root each year, and does not become, as in shrubs or trees, woody or permanent, such plants are also called "herbaceous."

    0
    0
  • 3: the knowledge of God's power (that is, a righteous life) is the root of immortality.

    0
    0
  • On the 4th of May Milner penned a memorable despatch to the Colonial Office, in which he insisted that the remedy for the unrest in the Transvaal was to strike at the root of the evil - the political impotence of the injured.

    0
    0
  • KoXXa, glue, and root yevof yevv6.aav, to produce, yiyvEo Oat, to become), the ground-substance of bones and tissues, is decomposed by boiling water or on warming with acids into substances named gelatin, glutin or glue.

    0
    0
  • It seems not unlikely that Pelagianism had taken root among the Christian communities of Ireland, and it was found necessary to send a bishop to combat the heresy.

    0
    0
  • The equation then becomes a 2 /V = k, or a = A / Vk, so that the molecular conductivity is proportional to the square root of the dilution.

    0
    0
  • qvarn and various forms in Old German; cognate words are found in Slavonic languages pointing to a pre-Aryan root.

    0
    0
  • The root rubber prepared by the natives of the Congo and the S.

    0
    0
  • It is closely related to the Manioc, cassava or tapioca plant (Manihot utilissima) which it resembles when young and exhibits a similar tuberous root system.

    0
    0
  • After brushing away the loose stones and dirt from the root of the tree by means of a handful of twigs, the collector lays down large leaves for the latex to drop upon.

    0
    0
  • The word is commonly used in the Alexandrian Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) for the Hebrew word (ger) which is derived from a root (gur) denoting to sojourn.

    0
    0
  • Under cultivation this root becomes much enlarged, as in turnip, swede and others.

    0
    0
  • In the case of the determinant of order 4 the square root is Al2A34 - A 13 A 24 +A14A23.

    0
    0
  • If al, a2, ...a, n be the roots of f=o, (1, R2, -Ai the roots of 0=o, the condition that some root of 0 =o may qq cause f to vanish is clearly R s, 5 =f (01)f (N2) � �;f (Nn) = 0; so that Rf,q5 is the resultant of f and and expressed as a function of the roots, it is of degree m in each root 13, and of degree n in each root a, and also a symmetric function alike of the roots a and of the roots 1 3; hence, expressed in terms of the coefficients, it is homogeneous and of degree n in the coefficients of f, and homogeneous and of degree m in the coefficients of 4..

    0
    0
  • The resultant being a product of mn root differences, is of degree mn in the roots, and hence is of weight mn in the coefficients of the forms; i.e.

    0
    0
  • af Expression in Terms of Roots.-Since x+y y =mf, if we take cx any root x 3, y1, ofand substitute in mf we must obtain, y 1 C) zaZ1 �; hence the resultant of and f is, disregarding numerical factors, y,y2...y,,.

    0
    0
  • (x y m - x m y), ar _ y1(x y 2 - and substituting in the latter any root of f and forming the product, we find the resultant of f and d, viz.

    0
    0
  • If in the identity f =f l f 2 ...fm we introduce a new root A we change a 8 into a8+/la8_l, and we obtain (1 +AD1 2 D2+...

    0
    0
  • For such functions remain unaltered when each root receives the same infinitesimal increment h; but writing x-h for x causes ao, a1, a 2 a3,...

    0
    0
  • The discriminant of f is equal to the discriminant of 0, and is therefore (0, 0') 2 = R; if it vanishes both f and 0 have two roots equal, 0 is a rational factor of f and Q is a perfect cube; the cube root being equal, to a numerical factor pres, to the square root of A.

    0
    0
  • For it is easy to establish] the formula (yx) 2 0 4 = 2f.4-2(f y 1) 2 connecting the Hessian with the quartic and its first and second polars; now a, a root of f, is also a root of Ox, and con se uentl the first polar 1 of of q y p f?

    0
    0
  • =y la xl -i-y2a x2 must also vanish for the root a, and thence ax, and a must also vanish for the same root; which proves that a is a double root of f, and f therefore a perfect square.

    0
    0
  • of f=0, :and notices that they become identical on substituting 0 for k, and -f for X; hence, if k1, k2, k 3 be the roots of the resolvent -21 2 = (o + k if) (A + k 2f)(o + k 3f); and now, if all the roots of f be different, so also are those of the resolvent, since the latter, and f, have practically the same discriminant; consequently each of the three factors, of -21 2, must be perfect squares and taking the square root 1 t = -' (1)�x4; and it can be shown that 0, x, 1P are the three conjugate quadratic factors of t above mentioned.

    0
    0
  • We have A +k 1 f =0 2, O+k 2 f = x2, O+k3f =4) 2, and Cayley shows that a root of the quartic can be xpressed in the determinant form 1, k, 0.1y the remaining roots being obtained by varying 1, k, x the signs which occur in the radicals 2 u The transformation to the normal form reduces 1, k 3, ?

    0
    0
  • If 4) = rx.sx, the Y2 =1 normal form of a:, can be shown to be given by (rs) 4 .a x 4 = (ar) 4s: 6 (ar) 2 (as) 2rxsy -I- (as) 4rx; 4) is any one of the conjugate quadratic factors of t, so that, in determining rx, sx from J z+k 1 f =o, k 1 is any root of the resolvent.

    0
    0
  • If Hebrew, it might be derived from the root p rr (to embrace) as an intensive term of affection.

    0
    0
  • The crown or upper portion of the root gives rise to new plants.

    0
    0
  • When put to the lip, the juice of the aconite root produces a feeling of numbness and tingling.

    0
    0
  • The horse-radish root, which belongs to the natural order Cruciferae, is much longer than that of the aconite, and it is not tapering; its colour is yellowish, and the top of the root has the remains of the leaves on it.

    0
    0
  • The root of Aconitum luridum, of the Himalayas, is said to be as virulent as that of A.

    0
    0
  • They are easily propagated by divisions of the root or by seeds; great care should be taken not to leave pieces of the root about owing to its very poisonous character.

    0
    0
  • From the root of Aconitum Napellus are prepared a liniment and a tincture.

    0
    0
  • The action of aconitine on the circulation is due to an initial stimulation of the cardio-inhibitory centre in the medulla oblongata (at the root of the vagus nerves), and later to a directly toxic influence on the nerve-ganglia and muscular fibres of the heart itself.

    0
    0
  • When the compass is far from the magnet, the vibrations will be comparatively slow; when it is near a pole, they will be exceedingly rapid, the frequency of the vibrations varying as the square root of the magnetic force at the spot.

    0
    0
  • The long and bushy tail in the northern species has a white tip and a dark gland-patch near the root, but the backs of the ears are fawn-coloured.

    0
    0
  • At their root lay a common Eastern origin rather than any borrowing.

    0
    0
  • The great majority of the people are unused to wheaten bread, using the coarse flour of the mandioca root instead, consequently the demand for wheat and flour is confined to the large cities, which can obtain them from Argentina more cheaply than they can be produced in the country.

    0
    0
  • Begun about 1880, this propaganda took deep root in the educated classes, creating a desire for change and culminating in the military conspiracy of November 1889, by which monarchy was replaced by a republican form of government.

    0
    0
  • In Bosnia the persistent attempts of the Magyar princes to root out the stubborn, crazy and poisonous sect of the Bogomils had alienated the originally amicable Bosnians, and in 1353 Louis was compelled to buy the friendship of their Bar Tvrtko by acknowledging him as king of Bosnia.

    0
    0
  • It took no root in the soil.

    0
    0
  • The grammatical forms are expressed, as in Turkish, by means of affixes modulated according to the high or low vowel power of the root or chief syllables of the word to which they are appended-the former being represented by e, o, S, ii, i l l, the latter by a, d, o, 6, u, it; the sounds e, i, i are regarded as neutral.

    0
    0
  • " him," " her," " the man," &c.), ldtok, " I see " (indefinite); the insertion of the causative, frequentative, diminutive and potential syllables after the root of the verb, e.g.

    0
    0
  • In n = a P, a is the root or base, p is the index or logarithm, and n is the power or antilogarithm.

    0
    0
  • - It should be observed that the radix of the scale is exactly the same thing as the root mentioned under (ii.) above; and it is better to use the term " root " throughout.

    0
    0
  • Denoting the root by a, and the number 2222222 in this scale by N, we have N = 2222222.

    0
    0
  • (iii.) By writing (A+a) 2 = A 2 + 2Aa+a 2 in the form (A+a)2= A 2 +(2A+a)a, we obtain the rule for extracting the square root in arithmetic.

    0
    0
  • But it may be shown that (r being > o) This only gives one root.

    0
    0
  • As to the other root, see � 47 (iii.).

    0
    0
  • Algebraical division therefore has no definite meaning unless dividend and divisor are rational integral functions of some expression such as x which we regard as the root of the notation (� 28 (iv.)), and are arranged in descending or ascending powers of x.

    0
    0
  • obtained by taking the qth root of I + p (1) x+ p (2) x 2 + ..., is an infinite series, i.e.

    0
    0
  • two equal roots) and in other cases no root, but also to see why there cannot be more than two roots.

    0
    0
  • (The root jabara is also met with in the word algebrista, which means a " bone-setter," and is still in common use in Spain.) The same derivation is given by Lucas Paciolus (Luca Pacioli), who reproduces the phrase in the transliterated form alghebra e almucabala, and ascribes the invention of the art to the Arabians.

    0
    0
  • The name l'arte magiore, the greater art, is designed to distinguish it from l'arte minore, the lesser art, a term which he applied to the modern arithmetic. His second variant, la regula de la cosa, the rule of the thing or unknown quantity, appears to have been in common use in Italy, and the word cosa was preserved for several centuries in the forms toss or algebra, cossic or algebraic, cossist or algebraist, &c. Other Italian writers termed it the Regula rei et census, the rule of the thing and the product, or the root and the square.

    0
    0
  • The square root he denoted by (j), whereas Paciolus, Cardan and others used the letter R.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the connexion of medicine with these seats of learning, it was natural that the study of the structure and functions of the human body and of the animals nearest to man should take root there; the spirit of inquiry which now for the first time became general showed itself in the anatomical schools of the Italian universities of the 16th century, and spread fifty years later to Oxford.

    0
    0
  • In the first quadrant there is no root after zero, since tan u> u, and in the second quadrant there is none because the signs of u and tan u are opposite.

    0
    0
  • The first root after zero is thus in the third quadrant, corresponding to m =1.

    0
    0
  • Even in this case the series converges sufficiently to give the value of the root with considerable accuracy, while for higher values of m it is all that could be desired.

    0
    0
  • That important legal work, The Laws of the Emperors Constantine, Theodosius and Leo, which was composed in Greek about 475, and " which lies at the root of all subsequent Christian Oriental legislation in ecclesiastical, judicial and private matters" (Wright), must have been repeatedly translated into Syriac. The oldest form is contained in a British Museum MS. which dates from the earlier part of the 6th century, and this was edited by Land (Anecd.

    0
    0
  • When the trigeminus nerve is divided (Majendie), or when its root is compressed injuriously, say Iby a tubercular tumour, the cornea begins to show points of ulceration, which, increasing in area, may bring about total disintegration of the eyeball.

    0
    0
  • The root of the French vine is attacked by the Phylloxera, but that of the American vine, whose epidermis is thicker, is protected from it.

    0
    0
  • Haller's definition of irritability as a property of muscular tissue, and its distinction from sensibility as a property of nerves, struck at the root of the prevailing hypothesis respecting animal activity.

    0
    0
  • In England his system took little root.

    0
    0
  • ketzioth), the root of the Aucklandia Costus (Falconer), native of Kashmir; frankincense (Heb.

    0
    0
  • nerd), the root of the Nardostachys Jatamansi of Nepal and Bhutan; stacte (Heb.

    0
    0
  • olibanum of Java), corrupted in the parlance of Europe into benjamin and benzoin; camphor, produced by Cinnamomum Camphora, the "camphor laurel" of China and Japan, and by Dryobalanops aromatica, a native of the Indian Archipelago, and widely used as incense throughout the East, particularly in China; elemi, the resin of an unknown tree of the Philippine Islands, the elemi of old writers being the resin of Boswellia Frereana; gumdragon or dragon's blood, obtained from Calamus Draco, one of the ratan palms of the Indian Archipelago, Dracaena Draco, a liliaceous plant of the Canary Island, and Pterocarpus Draco, a leguminous tree of the island of Socotra; rose-malloes, a corruption of the Javanese rasamala, or liquid storax, the resinous exudation of Liquidambar Altingia, a native of the Indian Archipelago (an American Liquidambar also produces a rose-malloes-like exudation); star anise, the starlike fruit of the Illicum anisatum of Yunan and south-western China, burnt as incense in the temples of Japan; sweet flag, the root of Acorus Calamus, the bath of the Hindus, much used for incense in India.

    0
    0
  • The mere control of existing traffic, local street improvements and provision of new means of communication between casual points, were felt to miss the root of the problem, and in 1903 a Royal Commission was appointed to consider the whole question of locomotion and transport in London, expert evidence being taken from engineers, representatives of the various railway and other companies, of the County Council, borough councils and police, and others.

    0
    0
  • When we remember that more than half of the area of London was occupied by these establishments, and that about a third of the inhabitants were monks, nuns and friars, it is easy to imagine how great must have been the disorganization caused by this root and branch reform.

    0
    0
  • This is illustrated in the "harbinger of spring," a name given to a small plant belonging to the Umbelliferae, which has a tuberous root, and small white flowers; it is found in the central states of North America, and blossoms in March.

    0
    0
  • Birdwood's force had taken root since April were spurs of a tangled mountain mass known as Sari Bair, from the topmost ridges of which the Straits about the Narrows were partially visible at a distance of 4 or 5 miles.

    0
    0
  • to the root of the tail, while the tail itself measures from 11 to 13 in.

    0
    0
  • Glas, perhaps derived from an old Teutonic root gla-, a variant of glo-, having the general sense of shining, cf.

    0
    0
  • Though often spoken of as the American lion, chiefly on account of its colour, it rather resembles the leopard of the Old World in size and habits: usually measuring from nose to root of tail about 40 in., the tail being rather more than half that length.

    0
    0
  • Mycelium of the fungus attacking root of vine (reduced).

    0
    0
  • Portion of vine root, showing masses of fructification (perithecia) of the fungus (reduced).

    0
    0
  • The plant is readily propagated by cuttings, a piece of the stem bearing buds at its nodes will root rapidly when placed in sufficiently moist ground.

    0
    0
  • The roots were grown under exactly the same cultivation and conditions as a crop of mangel-wurzel - that is to say, they had the ordinary cultivation and manuring of the usual root crops.

    0
    0
  • Pomegranate root, or, better, the sulphate of pelletierine in dose of 5 grains with an equal quantity of tannic acid, may be used to replace the male fern.

    0
    0
  • Both solea and solum are, of course, from the same root.

    0
    0
  • It may be so compact that root development is checked or stopped altogether, in which case the plant suffers.

    0
    0
  • A good soil should be deep to allow of extensive root development and, in the case of arable soils, easy to work with implements.

    0
    0
  • This is due to the nitrogenous root residues left in the land.

    0
    0
  • Early meanings of the root gild or geld were expiation, penalty, sacrifice or worship, feast or banquet, and contribution or payment; it is difficult to determine which is the earliest meaning, and we are not certain whether the gildsmen were originally those who contributed to a common fund or those who worshipped or feasted together.

    0
    0
  • 296) connects the word with the IndoEuropean root meaning "to float," seen in the Gr.

    0
    0
  • From the under surface a root with a well-developed sheath grows downwards into the water.

    0
    0
  • It may be the Spanish word for the hanging branches of a vine which strike root in the ground, or the name may have been given from a species of bearded fig-tree.

    0
    0
  • A third variety of jalap known as woody jalap, male jalap, or Orizaba root, or by the Mexicans as Purgo macho, is derived from Ipomaea orizabensis, a plant of Orizaba.

    0
    0
  • The root occurs in fibrous pieces, which are usually rectangular blocks of irregular shape, 2 in.

    0
    0
  • or more in diameter, and are evidently portions of a large root.

    0
    0
  • The root of the tree is very strong and ramifying.

    0
    0
  • It is the plural form of Targi," a raider."The Tawareq call themselves by some variant of the root MasheqTamasheq, Imoshagh, &c.

    0
    0
  • A root hawah is represented in Hebrew by the nouns howah (Ezek., Isa.

    0
    0
  • The derivation of Yahweh from hawah is formally unimpeachable, and is adopted by many recent scholars, who proceed, however, from the primary sense of the root rather than from the specific meaning of the nouns.

    0
    0
  • discipulus, from discere, to learn, and root seen in pupillus), but chiefly used of the personal followers of Jesus Christ, including the inner circle of the Apostles.

    0
    0
  • autumnus, auctumnus, from augere, to increase, the period of ripening or fruiting) and "winter" (common Teutonic, possibly a nasalized form of root seen in "wet").

    0
    0
  • Two manuscripts, indeed, the British Museum and Mons texts, preserve a fragment relating the birth and infancy of the hero, which appears to represent the source at the root alike of Chretien and of the German Parzival, but it is only a fragment, and so far no more of the poem has been discovered.

    0
    0
  • The probability seems to be that the earliest Perceval-Grail romance was composed at Fescamp, and was coincident with the transformation, under the influence of the Saint-Sang legend, of the originally Pagan talisman known as the Grail into a Christian relic, and that this romance was more or less at the root of all subsequent versions.

    0
    0
  • He was fundamentally too much a man of strong convictions to be correctly described as open-minded, for if nature ever determined any man's faith, it was his; the root of his whole intellectual life, which was too deep to be disturbed by any superficial change in his philosophy, being the feeling for God.

    0
    0
  • hel, a Teutonic word from a root meaning "to cover," cf.

    0
    0
  • &c., where p+pq is the quantity whoseTi power or root is required, p the first term of that quantity, and q the quotient of the rest divided by p, m the power, which may be a positive or negative integer or a fraction, and a, b, c, &c., the several terms in order, In a second letter, dated the 24th of October 1676, to Oldenburg, Newton gave the train of reasoning by which he devised the theorem.

    0
    0
  • In algebra, if a be a real positive quantity and w a root of unity, then a is the amplitude of the product aw.

    0
    0
  • root ac-, sharp; acere, to be sour), the name loosely applied to any sour substance; in chemistry it has a more precise meaning,denoting a substance containing hydrogen which may be replaced by metals with the formation of salts.

    0
    0
  • It is found in the form of its acid potassium salt in many plants, especially in wood-sorrel (Oxalis acetosella) and in varieties of Rumex; as ammonium salt in guano; as calcium salt in rhubarb root, in various lichens and in plant cells; as sodium salt in species of Salicornia and as free acid in varieties of Boletus.

    0
    0
  • The aim of the historical works is to show the necessary connexion between philosophical concepts and the age to which they belong; the same idea is at the root of his constructive speculation.

    0
    0
  • This conception of the nature of the numina and man's relation to them is the root notion of the old Roman religion, and the fully-formed state cult of the di indigetes even at the earliest historical period, must have been the result of long and gradual development, of which we can to a certain extent trace the stages.

    0
    0
  • These confessions teach the root idea of Calvin's theology, the immeasurable awfulness of God, His eternity, and the immutability of His decrees.

    0
    0
  • To remedy the evil, Casimir drew up and promulgated the severe statute of Great Poland, which went to the very root of the matter and greatly strengthened the hands of the king's justices.

    0
    0
  • The meaning of the root from which it is derived is very doubtful; cf.

    0
    0
  • Skeat refers it to a root meaning "to kill," which may connect it with Gr.

    0
    0
  • During the summer they need considerable heat, all the light possible and plenty of air; in winter a temperature of 45° or 50° will be sufficient, and they must be kept tolerably dry at the root.

    0
    0
  • Under- (Radicola) of Phylloxera, with proneath, between the legs, lies the boscis inserted into tissue of root rostrum, which reaches back to of vine.

    0
    0
  • The insect is fixed by this rostrum, which is inserted into the root of the vine for the purpose of sucking the sap. The abdomen consists of seven segments, and these as well as the anterior segments bear four rows of small tubercles on their dorsal surface.

    0
    0
  • The root kol is common to all the Teutonic nations, while in French and other Romance languages derivatives of the Latin carbo are used, e.g.

    0
    0
  • AMIR, or AMEER (an Arabic word meaning "commander," from the root amr, " commanding"), a title common in the Mahommedan East.

    0
    0
  • root gag - meaning to sway to and fro, as preserved in numerous forms: e.

    0
    0
  • to Germany in order to root out the growing heresy, led a few princes who had openly favoured Luther to unite also.

    0
    0
  • In this sense modern philosophy had a common root in revolt against medievalism.

    0
    0
  • It was, however, Berkeley who first sought to utilize the conclusions that were implicit in Locke's starting-point to disprove " the systems of impious and profane persons which exclude all freeedom, intelligence, and design from the formation of things, and instead thereof make a selfexistent, stupid, unthinking substance the root and origin of all beings."

    0
    0
  • Hence, whatever we begin by saying, we must ultimately say ` mind ' " (Caird, Kant, 1.443) While the form in which these doctrines were stated proved fatal to them in the country of their birth, they took deep root in the next generation in English philosophy.

    0
    0
  • In taking root in England idealism had to contend against the traditional empiricism represented by Mill on the one hand and the pseudo-Kantianism which was rendered current by Mansel and Hamilton on the other.

    0
    0
  • bobr'; the root bhru has given "brown," and, through Romanic, "bronze" and "burnish."

    0
    0
  • While the English plantations were striking root along the coast, by somewhat prosaic but fruitful industry, and were growing in population with rapid strides, two other movements were in progress.

    0
    0
  • In 662 he was again brought to Constantinople and was condemned by a synod to be scourged, to have his tongue cut out by the root, and to have his right hand chopped off.

    0
    0
  • That world of the learned offers us non-dogmatic definitions, drawn up from the outside; definitions which do not share the root assumptions either of Catholicism or of post-Reformation Protestant orthodoxy.

    0
    0
  • DRAGOMAN (from the Arabic terjuman, an interpreter or translator; the same root occurs in the Hebrew word targum signifying translation, the title of the Chaldaean translation of the Bible), a comprehensive designation applied to all who act as intermediaries between Europeans and Orientals, from the hotel tout or travellers' guide, hired at a few shillings a day, to the chief dragoman of a foreign embassy whose functions include the carrying on of the most important political negotiations with the Ottoman government, or the dragoman of the imperial divan (the grand master of the ceremonies).

    0
    0
  • to root them out from their stronghold in southern.

    0
    0
  • dregil, trigil, trikil, a slave, and would therefore be derived from the root meaning "to run," seen in O.

    0
    0
  • Under the empire we find Eastern cults taking root here sooner than in Rome.

    0
    0
  • (4) The transverse line below this which passes from the ulnar border a little above the level of the head of the fifth metacarpal and ends somewhere about the root of the index finger is the line of the heart.

    0
    0
  • These lines isolate certain swellings or monticuli, the largest of which is (I) the ball of the thumb, called the mountain of Venus; (2) that at the base of the index finger is the mountain of Jupiter; (3) at the root of the middle finger is the mountain of Saturn, while those at the bases of ring and little finger are respectively the mountains of the (4) Sun and (5) of Mercury.

    0
    0
  • This sentence from Browne's spiritual autobiography contains the root of the whole matter, and explains the title of his other chief work, also of 1582, A Treatise of Reformation without tarrying for any, and of the wickedness of those Preachers which will not reform till the Magistrate command or compel them.

    0
    0
  • Haue; the root is seen in "hew," to cut, cleave; the word must be distinguished from "hoe," promontory, tongue of land, seen in place names, e.g.

    0
    0
  • Several types of horse-drawn hoe capable of working one or more rows at a time are used among root and grain crops.

    0
    0
  • Blue flag, snake root, ginseng, lobelia, tansy, wormwood, wintergreen, pleurisy root, plantain, burdock, sarsaparilla and horehound are among its medicinal plants.

    0
    0
  • The etymology of the word is uncertain, but it has been taken to be connected with a root meaning "to twist."

    0
    0
  • The real root of the difficulty to Platonist as to Gnostic was his sharp antithesis of form as good and matter as evil.

    0
    0
  • 28 a subordinate place; it was perhaps only a collective name for the companies of merchants who conducted the SouthArabian export trade (the root saba in the inscriptions meaning to make a trading journey), and in that case would be of such late origin as to hold one of the last places in a list that has genealogical form.

    0
    0
  • In 1841 Father Peter John De Smet (1801-1872), a Belgian Jesuit missionary established Saint Mary's Mission in Bitter Root Valley, but, as the Indians repeatedly attacked the mission, it was abandoned in 1850.

    0
    0
  • AMEN, a Hebrew word, of which the root meaning is "stability," generally adopted in Christian worship as a concluding formula for prayers and hymns.

    0
    0
  • Elihu Root >>

    0
    0
  • More probably, however, this is but an accidental coincidence; both adam and adamu may come from the same Semitic root meaning "to make."

    0
    0
  • This being the root and origin of their power, renders them responsible to the party from whom all their immediate or consequential powers are derived."

    0
    0
  • The etymology of rivus and ripa is disputed; some scholars refer both to the root ri-, to drop, flow; others take ripa to be from the root seen in Gr.

    0
    0
  • It is doubtful whether this root meant originally to " cover " or " wipe out "; but probably it is used as a technical term without any consciousness of its etymology.

    0
    0
  • The keynote of his History is contained in his assertion that the Reformation was "the root and source of the expansive force which has spread the Anglo-Saxon race over the globe."

    0
    0
  • That the name of 17w was borrowed from the Canaanites appears certain, for that out of the multiplicity of words for soothsayers and the like common to Hebrew and Arabic (either formed from a common root or expressing exactly the same idea - '?Y'!', ' arraf; :h, habir; nisi, r i, hazi; p op, cf.

    0
    0
  • Perkin also had a large share in the introduction of artificial alizarin, the red dye of the madder root.

    0
    0
  • (3) This more liberal policy, however, probably never had deep root in French public opinion.

    0
    0
  • Root, Colonial Tariffs (Liverpool, 1906); E.

    0
    0
  • Since, moreover, the Hebrew root n-z-r is only dialectically different from n-d-r, " to vow," both corresponding to the same original Semitic root (Arab.

    0
    0
  • Bedier, is that there was one poem, and one only, at the root of the various versions preserved to us, and that that poem, composed in England, probably by an AngloNorman, was a work of such force and genius that it determined for all time the form of the Tristan story.

    0
    0
  • Razin proclaimed that his object was to root out the boyars and all officials, to level all ranks and dignities, and establish Cossackdom, with its corollary of absolute equality, throughout Muscovy.

    0
    0
  • éclat, the root being seen also in Ger.

    0
    0
  • meoluc; from a common Indo-European root, cf.

    0
    0
  • i passes into a, as genus, generis, generatum; into o, as sari, saxosus; q passes into s, as torqueo, torsi, &c. (3) The resolution of a word into root or stem and inflexional or derivative affixes was an idea wholly unknown, and the rules of formation are often based on unimportant phenomena; e.g.

    0
    0
  • In 1842 Hammer-Purgstall correctly explained the name as meaning the "warm-flowing" (tab= warm, same root as tep in "tepid") from some warm mineral springs in the neighbourhood, and compared it with the synonymous Teplitz in Bohemia.

    0
    0
  • Philo, De posteriori Caini, § 3, explains the name as meaning iroru ryos,"watering" or "irrigation," connecting it with the Hebrew root Sh Th Josephus, Ant.

    0
    0
  • This is given somewhat as follows: the distance represented by the square root of a negative quantity cannot be measured in the line backwards or forwards, but can be measured in the same plane above the line, or (as appears elsewhere) at right angles to the line either in the plane, or in the plane at right angles thereto.

    0
    0
  • This called forth a letter' from St Paul, who felt himself compelled to grapple at close quarters with teaching which he saw cut at the very root of his own.

    0
    0
  • 3 8 53), which connects it with another verbal root naba, " bubble" or "gush."

    0
    0
  • While he connects it with the Arabic root naba'a," come into prominence" (conj.

    0
    0
  • trans., p. 554 seq.), the etymological sense of the word K'is is comparatively unimportant: The root seems to mean "to start up," "to rise into prominence," and so "to become audible."

    0
    0
  • the root of the soul.

    0
    0
  • The small ratio, or ratiuncula, is in fact that of the millionth root of to to unity, and if we denote it by the ratio of a to 1, then the ratio of 2 to I will be nearly the same as that of a301'°30 to i, and so on; or, in other words, if a denotes the millionth root of 10, then 2 will be nearly equal to a 301,030, 3 will be nearly equal to a477,1u, and so on.

    0
    0
  • 10 I each quantity in the left-hand column being the square root of the one above it, and each quantity in the right-hand column being the half In vol.

    0
    0
  • He then by means of a simple proportion deduced that log (I 00000 00000 00000 I)=o 00000 00000 00000 0 434 2 944 81 90325 1804, so that, a quantity 1.00000 00000 00000 x (where x consists of not more than seventeen figures) having been obtained by repeated extraction of the square root of a given number, the logarithm of I 00000 00000 00000 x could then be found by multiplying x by 00000 00000 00000 04342 To find the logarithm of 2, Briggs raised it to the tenth power, viz.

    0
    0
  • 1024, and extracted the square root of 1.024 forty-seven times, the result being i 00000 00000 00000 16851 60 57 0 53949 77.

    0
    0
  • Adding the characteristic 3, and dividing by 10, he found (since 2 is the tenth root of 1024) log 2 = 30102 9995 6 63981 195.

    0
    0
  • KARMA, sometimes written Karman, a Sanskrit noun (from the root kri, to do), meaning deed or action.

    0
    0
  • Louis Dollo especially has Fossorial Amphibious Digitigrade Grass Herb Herbivorous Shrub Fruit Root Dentition reduced Omnivorous Fish Carnivorous-{Flesh Carrion contributed most brilliant discussions of the theory of alternations of habitat as applied to the interpretation of the anatomy of the marsupials, of many kinds of fishes, of such reptiles as the herbivorous dinosaurs of the Upper Cretaceous.

    0
    0
  • In Gnosticism salvation always lies at the root of all existence and all history.

    0
    0
  • elongata which produces the " henequen " fibre, or sisal hemp, of Yucatan, silk or tree-cotton (Ceiba casearia), sugar-cane, cotton (Gossypium), indigo and " canaigre " (Rumex hymenosepalus) whose root contains a large percentage of tannin.

    0
    0
  • A comparatively new product in this region is that of canaigre, which is grown for the tannin found in its root.

    0
    0
  • The natural and forest products of Mexico include the agave and yucca (ixtle) fibres already mentioned; the " ceibon " fibre derived from the silk-cotton tree (Bombax pentandria); rubber and vanilla in addition to the cultivated products; palm oil; castor beans; ginger; chicle, the gum extracted from the " chico-zapote " tree (Achras sapota); logwood and other dye-woods; mahogany, rosewood, ebony, cedar and other valuable woods; " cascalote " or divi-divi; jalap root (Ipomaea); sarsaparilla (Smilax); nuts and fruits.

    0
    0
  • It must have reality for itself, a reality which stands in no'conflict with its ideal character, a reality the inner structure of which is ideal, a reality the root and spring of which is spirit.

    0
    0
  • The general or typical coloration is, however, a rich tan upon the head, neck, body, outside of legs, and tail near the root.

    0
    0
  • The tail has large black spots near the root, some with light centres, and from about midway of its length to the tip it is ringed with black.

    0
    0
  • from the nose to root of tail.

    0
    0
  • The bark, of nearly the same tint as that of the redwood, is extremely thick and is channelled towards the base with vertical furrows; at the root the ridges often stand out in buttress-like projections.

    0
    0
  • round the root, and a cut stump is 31 ft.

    0
    0
  • of scrupus, a rough stone, figuratively uneasiness of mind, probably to be connected with the root skar, to cut, cf.

    0
    0
  • The average length is about 40 in., and the general tone of colour tawny mingled with black and white above and whitish below, the tail having a black tip and likewise a dark glandpatch near the root of the upper surface.

    0
    0
  • Potatoes and turnips are the only root crops that succeed, and barley and oats are grown in some of the islands.

    0
    0
  • This idea that to partake of sacrifice is to devote oneself to the deity, lies at the root of the ancient idea of worship, whether Jewish or heathen; and St Paul uses it as being readily understood.

    0
    0
  • In England, during the religious changes of the 16th century, such of these customs as had already taken root were abolished; and with them the practice of reserving the Eucharist in the churches appears to have died out too.

    0
    0
  • mola, a mill, molere, to grind; from the same root, mol, is derived " meal;" the word appears in other Teutonic languages, cf.

    0
    0
  • The old hand-mill was known as a " quern," a word which appears in this sense in many Indo-European languages; the ultimate root is gar-, to grind.

    0
    0
  • Its numerous root extractions amply justify a stronger expression than " multo labore," especially in an epitaph.

    0
    0
  • In 1873 Charles Hermite proved that the base of the Napierian logarithms cannot be a root of a rational algebraical equation of any degree.3 To prove the same proposition regarding 7r is to prove that a Euclidean construction for circle-quadrature is impossible.

    0
    0
  • The word was derived in antiquity from the town of Helos in Laconia, but is more probably connected with 'Aos, a fen, or with the root of AEiv, to capture.

    0
    0
  • Elihu Root, secretary of war for the United States government; and Senator George Turner.

    0
    0
  • Practically the only grain crops that are cultivated are oats (which greatly predominate) and barley, while the favoured root crops are turnips (much the most extensively grown) and potatoes.

    0
    0
  • 36, from a root meaning "to seize the heel" or "supplant"), son of Isaac and Rebekah in the Biblical narrative, and the father of the twelve tribes of Israel.

    0
    0
  • GINSENG, the root of a species of Panax (P. Ginseng), native of Manchuria and Korea, belonging to the natural order Araliaceae, used in China as a medicine.

    0
    0
  • The root of the wild plant is preferred to that of cultivated ginseng, and the older the plant the better is the quality of the root considered to be.

    0
    0
  • The account given by Koempfer of the preparation of nindsin, the root of Sium ninsi, in Korea, will give a good idea of the preparation of ginseng, ninsi being a similar drug of supposed weaker virtue, obtained from a different plant, and often confounded with ginseng.

    0
    0
  • "In the beginning of winter nearly all the population of Sjansai turn out to collect the root, and make preparations for sleeping in the fields.

    0
    0
  • The taste is mucilaginous, sweetish and slightly bitter and aromatic. The root is frequently forked, and it is probably owing to this circumstance that medicinal properties were in the first place attributed to it, its resemblance to the body of a man being supposed to indicate that it could restore virile power to the aged and impotent.

    0
    0
  • The cover of the root, according to its quality, was silk, either embroidered or plain, cotton cloth or paper."

    0
    0
  • The dose of the root is from 60 to 90 grains.

    0
    0
  • The powdered root of P. roseum and other species is used in the manufacture of insect powders.

    0
    0
  • europaea) is, when grown in perfection, a stately tree with tall erect trunk, gradually tapering from root to summit, and horizontal branches springing at irregular intervals from the stem, and in old trees often becoming more or less drooping, but rising again towards the extremities; the branchlets or side shoots, very slender and pendulous, are pretty thickly studded with the spurs each bearing a fascicle of thirty or more narrow linear leaves, of a peculiar bright light green when they first appear in the spring, but becoming of a deeper hue when mature.

    0
    0
  • In Tirol, a single hole is made near the root of the tree in the spring; this is stopped with a plug, and the turpentine is removed by a scoop in the autumn; but each tree yields only from a few ounces to z lb by this process.

    0
    0
  • The trees for a considerable period show little sign of unhealthiness, but eventually the stem begins to swell somewhat near the root, and the whole tree gradually goes off as the disease advances; when cut down, the trunk is found to be decayed at the centre, the " rot " usually commencing near the ground.

    0
    0
  • The expanded anterior root of the zygomatic process has its front border oblique.

    0
    0
  • The front root of the zygomatic arch is nearly vertical, and placed so far back that it is above the second molar, while the orbit - a unique feature among rodents - is almost completely surrounded by bone.

    0
    0
  • Projecting brows, deeply sunk dark eyes, short noses, either straight or arched, but 'always depressed at the root, and moderately thick lips, with a somewhat receding chin, are general characteristics.

    0
    0
  • " The ever-increasing financial burdens," the Note went on, " strike at the root of public prosperity.

    0
    0
  • The present writer, therefore, in his Theory of Optics, adopted different names, and called the series respectively the " Trunk," the " Main Branch " and the " Side Branch," the main branch being identical with the second subordinate series; the limit of frequency for high values of s is called the " root " of the series, and it is found in all cases that the two branches have a common root at some point in the trunk.

    0
    0
  • According to an important law discovered by Rydberg and shortly afterwards independently by the writer, the frequency of the common root of the two branches is obtained by subtracting the frequency of the root of the trunk from that of its least refrangible and strongest member.

    0
    0
  • In the spectra of the alkali metals each line of the trunk is a doublet, and we may speak of a twin trunk springing out of the same root.

    0
    0
  • There are, therefore, two main branches and two side branches, but these are not twins springing out of the same root, but parallel branches springing out of different though closely adjacent roots.

    0
    0
  • C. Pickering discovered in the structure of the star E Puppis a series of lines which showed a remarkable similarity to that of hydrogen having the same root.

    0
    0
  • Lord Rayleigh,' who has also investigated vibrating systems giving series of lines approaching a definite limit of " root," remarks that by dynamical reasoning we are always led to equations giving the square of the period and not the period, while in the equation representing spectral series the simplest results are obtained for the first power of the period.

    0
    0
  • Equations of this form have received a striking observational verification in so far as they predict a tail or root towards which the lines ultimately tend when s is increased indefinitely.

    0
    0
  • inductive capacity may be considered uniform and equal to K, the frequency of the vibration is increased in the ratio of the square root of 1 - le-"+3(1 - K - 1) to 2.

    0
    0
  • scrob; the root, which is also seen in "shrimp" and "shrivel," means to contract.

    0
    0
  • The ultimate origin is usually taken to be the root men-, to think, the root of "mind."

    0
    0
  • The geometrical mean of n quantities is the nth root of their product.

    0
    0
  • The quadratic mean of n quantities is the square root of the arithmetical mean of their squares.

    0
    0
  • Thus a West African native who wants a suhman takes a rudely-cut wooden image or a stone, a root of a plant, or some red earth placed in a pan, and then he calls on a spirit of Sasabonsum ("a genus of deities, every member of which possesses identical characteristics") to enter the object prepared, promising it offerings and worship. If a spirit consents to take up its residence in the object, a low hissing sound is heard, and the suhman is complete.

    0
    0
  • From the root of the kalo is made the national dish called poi; after having been baked and well beaten on a board with a stone pestle it is made into a paste with water and then allowed to ferment for a few days, when it is ready to be eaten.

    0
    0
  • Again the root difference between the Presbyterian and Episcopalian conceptions of the church comes to light.

    0
    0
  • Kant's a priori synthesis of sensations into experience lies at the root of all German idealism.

    0
    0
  • It is interesting to watch the bird, in a state of freedom, foraging for worms, which constitute its principal food: it moves about with a slow action of the body; and the long, flexible bill is driven into the soft ground, generally home to the very root, and is either immediately withdrawn with a worm held at the extreme tip of the mandibles, or it is gently moved to and fro, by an action of the head and neck, the body of the bird being perfectly steady.

    0
    0
  • As lack of insight lay at the root of their troubles, it was not enough simply to enjoin the moral fidelity to conviction which is three parts of faith to the writer, who has but little sense of the mystical side of faith, so marked in Paul.

    0
    0
  • This has been partly preserved in some of their literary remains, and has taken deep root in the beliefs and traditions of the Bulgarians and other nations with whom they had come into close contact.

    0
    0
  • and W., with great certainty, without that multiplication of bearings of the points of the compass usual in our maps, which serves as the root of the others."

    0
    0
  • How clearly he read the causes of religious decadence, how deeply he himself was convinced of the need of trenchant reform, is best shown by his instructions to Chieregati, his nuncio to Germany, in which he laid the axe to the root of the tree with unheard-of freedom.

    0
    0
  • evyKOs, a bend; both connected with the Aryan root ank-, to bend: see Angling), in geometry, the inclination of one line or plane to another.

    0
    0
  • lawe; from an old Teutonic root lag, " lie," what lies fixed or evenly; cf.

    0
    0
  • The head is mesati-cephalic, verging on brachycephalic in the case of many of the Dokpa; the hair is black and somewhat wavy; the eyes are usually of a clear brown, in some cases even hazel; the cheek-bones are high, but not so high as with the Mongols; the nose is thick, sometimes depressed at the root, in other cases prominent, even aquiline, though the nostrils are broad.

    0
    0
  • The worship of images never seems to have taken root among Armenians; indeed they supplied the Greek world with iconoclast soldiers and emperors.

    0
    0
  • SOMA (Sanskrit for "pressed juice," from the root su, to press), in Hindu mythology the god who is a personification of the soma plant (Asclepias acida), from which an intoxicating milky juice is squeezed.

    0
    0
  • languages; probably first adopted in Teut.; the ultimate origin is not known; Skeat suggests the root rad-, to scratch; cf.

    0
    0
  • While discussing noses, he says that those with thick bulbous ends belong to persons who are insensitive, swinish; sharp-tipped belong to the irascible, those easily provoked, like dogs; rounded, large, obtuse noses to the magnanimous, the lion-like; slender hooked noses to the eagle-like, the noble but grasping; round-tipped retrousse noses to the luxurious, like barndoor fowl; noses with a very slight notch at the root belong to the impudent, the crow-like; while snub noses belong to persons of luxurious habits, whom he compares to deer; open nostrils are signs of passion, &c.

    0
    0
  • The root of this plant, when eaten by white pigs, caused their bones to turn to a pink colour and their hoofs to fall off, but the black pigs could eat the same plant with impunity.

    0
    0
  • The real meaning of the word `ibhri must ultimately be sought in the root `abhar, to pass across, to go beyond, from which is derived the noun `ebher, meaning the " farther bank " of a river.

    0
    0
  • It has been suggested that the root t abhar is to be taken in the sense of " travelling," and that Abram the wandering Aramaean (Deut.

    0
    0
  • In the latter part of the word we have, of course, the same root as in caedere, " to kill," but whether or not the former part is from pater, " a father," or from the same root that we have in per-peram, per-jurium, is a moot point.

    0
    0
  • But its linen manufactures, begun early in the 18th century, gradually restored prosperity; and when other industries had taken root its fortunes advanced by leaps and bounds, and there is now no more flourishing community in Scotland.

    0
    0
  • g As (the root of salt, halogen, &c.).

    0
    0
  • It took root and spread in spite of opposition until 1864, when an anti-foreign outbreak exterminated it.

    0
    0
  • The derivation of the name Alps is still very uncertain, some writers connecting it with a Celtic root alb, said to mean height, while others suggest the Latin adjective albus (white), referring to the colour of the snowy peaks.

    0
    0
  • The root, though not precluded from access of air, is not directly dependent for its growth on the agency of light.

    0
    0
  • Nutrition (assimilation) by the leaves includes the inhalation of air, and the interaction under the influence of light and in the presence of chlorophyll of the carbon dioxide of the air with the water received from the root, to form carbonaceous food.

    0
    0
  • It is a matter of familiar observation that the ends of the shoots of brambles take root when bent down to the ground.

    0
    0
  • A diminished supply of water at the root is requisite, so as to check energy of growth, or rather to divert it from leaf-making.

    0
    0
  • - Root suckers are young shoots from the roots of plants, chiefly woody plants, as may often be seen in the case of the elm and the plum.

    0
    0
  • If they spring from a thick root it is not to be wantonly severed, but the soil should be removed and the sucker taken off by cutting away a clean slice of the root, which will then heal and sustain no harm.

    0
    0
  • For propagation the bulbiferous portion is pegged down on the surface of a pot of suitable soil; if kept close in a moist atmosphere, the little buds will soon strike root and form independent plants.

    0
    0
  • Some plants root so freely that they need only pegging down; but in most cases the arrest of the returning sap to form a callus, and ultimately young roots, must be brought about artificially, either by twisting the branch, by splitting it, by girding FIG.

    0
    0
  • One whole summer, sometimes two, must elapse before the layers will be fully rooted in the case of woody plants; but such plants as carnations and picotees, which are usually propagated in this way, in favourable seasons take only a few weeks to root, as they are layered towards the end of the blooming season in July, and are taken off and planted separately early in the autumn.

    0
    0
  • In this case the scion is grafted directly on to a portion of the root of some appropriate stock, both graft and stock being usually very small; the grafted root is then potted so as to cover the point of junction with the soil, and is plunged in the bed of the propagating house, where it gets the slight stimulus of a gentle bottom heat.

    0
    0
  • grafted by inserting young shoots into the neck of one of the fleshy roots of each kind respectively - the best method of doing so being to cut a triangular section near the upper end of the root, just large enough to admit the young shoot when slightly pared away on two sides to give it a similar form.

    0
    0
  • Trees to be grown in the form of a bush are usually budded low down on the stem of the stock as near the root as possible to obviate the development of wild suckers later on.

    0
    0
  • So of the mode of preparation; some will root if cut off or broken off at any point and thrust into wet earth or sand in a warm place (fig.

    0
    0
  • By Root Cuttings.

    0
    0
  • - Some plants which are not easily increased by other means propagate readily from root cuttings.

    0
    0
  • These are cut up into half-inch lengths (more or less), and inserted in light sandy soil round the margin of a cutting pot, so that the upper end of the root cutting may be level with the soil or only just covered by it.

    0
    0
  • The root cuttings of rose-stocks are prepared and treated in a similar way.

    0
    0
  • The tree will then be ready to lift if carefully prized up from beneath the ball, and if it does not lift readily, it will probably be found that a root has struck downwards, which will have to be sought out and cut through.

    0
    0
  • in which time they will have acquired the shape given by the nurseryman, who generally transplants his stock each autumn to produce large masses of root fibres.

    0
    0
  • The plants should be prepared for this by keeping them rather dry at the root, and after cutting they must stand with little or no water till the stems heal over, and produce young shoots, or " break," as it is technically termed.

    0
    0
  • The advantages of the operation may generally be gained by judicious root pruning, and it is not at all adapted for the various stone fruits.

    0
    0
  • - ThiS term includes not only those fibrous-rooted plants of herbaceous habit which spring up from the root year after year, but also those old-fashioned subjects known as florists' flowers, and the hardy bulbs.

    0
    0
  • Ferns should not be allowed to become quite dry at the root, and the water used should always be at or near the., temperature of the house in which the plants are growing.

    0
    0
  • These should be kept cut off close to the old plant, so that the full force of the root is expended in making the " crowns " or fruit buds for next season's crop. If plants are required for new beds, only the required number should be allowed to grow, and these may be layered in pots as recommended in July.

    0
    0
  • The "Old Catholic" party, under the bishop of Bonn, has failed, despite its early successes, to take deep root in the country.

    0
    0
  • The root from which these words derive is that of "give."

    0
    0
  • As the kingdom had not come, it was assumed that there must be persons living who had been present at the crucifixion; the same reasoning is at the root of the Anglo-Israel belief.

    0
    0
  • Many fungi (Phallus, Agaricus, Fumago, &c.) when strongly growing put out ribbon-like or cylindrical cords, or sheet-like mycelial plates of numerous parallel hyphae, all growing together equally, and fusing by anastomoses, and in this way extend long distances in the soil, or over the surfaces of leaves, branches, &c. These mycelial strands may be white and tender, or the outer hyphae may be hard and black, and very often the resemblance of the subterranean forms to a root is so marked that they are termed rhizomorphs.

    0
    0
  • Infection in these cases occurs in the seedling at the place where root and shoot meet, and the infecting hypha having entered the plant goes on living in it and growing up with it as if it had no parasitic action at all.

    0
    0
  • Thus, in Sumerian we find such forms as numunnib-bi, " he speaks not to him," where the negative prefix nu and the verbal prefix mun are in harmony, but in dissimilation to the infix nib, " to him," and to the root bi, " speak," which are also in harmony.

    0
    0
  • For example, an indeterminative vowel, a, e, i or u, may be prefixed to any root to form an abstract; thus, from me, " speak," we get e-me, " speech"; from ra, " to go," we get a-ra, " the act of going," &c. In connexion with the very complicated Sumerian verbal system 2 it will be sufficient to note here the practice of infixing the verbal object which is, of course, absolutely alien to Semitic. This phenomenon appears also in Basque and in many North American languages.

    0
    0
  • 1 Latium, from the same root as lotus, side; later, brick; lrXa-r(s, flat; Sans.

    0
    0
  • Used for muffs, trimmings, boas, and carriage 1 The measurements given are from nose to root of tail of average large sizes after the dressing process, which has a shrinking tendency.

    0
    0
  • from nose to root of tail.

    0
    0
  • It had its root in the revolt of Samas-sumyukin (Shamash-shun-ukin) of Babylonia, and coming at a time immediately preceding the disintegration of the Assyrian Empire, may have had most important consequences for Judah and the east of the Jordan.'

    0
    0
  • Socialism of a German type had taken deep root among the working men of the Flemish towns, especially at Ghent and Brussels; socialism of a French revolutionary type among the Walloon miners and factory hands.

    0
    0
  • Full of reforming zeal, he issued ordinances against begging, extravagance and gambling; forbade judges to accept presents from suitors; built new courts of justice; prohibited the sale of offices, maintaining the financial equilibrium by reducing expenses; and, an almost revolutionary step, struck at the root of nepotism, in a bull of 1692 ordaining that thenceforth no pope should grant estates, offices or revenues to any relative.

    0
    0
  • Digitonin, on the other hand, is a cardiac depressant, and has been found to be identical with saponin, the chief constituent of senega root.

    0
    0
  • The grains of both are very small, only one half as long as those of common millet, but are exceedingly prolific. Many stalks arise from a single root, and a single spike often yields 2 oz.

    0
    0
  • The root idea arises from the analogy of the acts of human beings which are observed to have certain purposes: hence it was natural to assume that the whole sum of existence with its amazing complexity and its orderly progress can be explained only on the assumption of a similar plan devised by a conscious agent.

    0
    0
  • lof, &c.; possibly to be referred to the root seen in Gr.

    0
    0
  • The wood-vessels form part of the fibro-vascular bundles or veins of the leaf and are continuous throughout the leaf-stalk and stem with the root by which water is absorbed from the soil.

    0
    0
  • The water taken up by the root from the soil contains nitrogenous and mineral salts which combine with the first product of photo-synthesis - a carbohydrate - to form more complicated nitrogen-containing food substances of a proteid nature; these are then distributed by other elements of the vascular bundles (the phloem) through the leaf to the stem and so throughout the plant to wherever growth or development is going on.

    0
    0
  • on the " mean free path "), and (3) on the average velocity of translation of the molecules, which varies as the square root of the temperature.

    0
    0
  • If the effects depended merely on the velocity of translation of the molecules, both conductivity and viscosity should increase directly as the square root of the absolute temperature; but the mean free path also varies in a manner which cannot be predicted by theory and which appears to be different for different gases (Rayleigh, Proc. R.S., January 1896).

    0
    0
  • He was a great opponent of university reform and of the Hegelianism which was then beginning to take root in Oxford.

    0
    0
  • Although by no means fertile, the Erzgebirge is very thickly peopled, as various branches of industry have taken root there in numerous small places.

    0
    0
  • Then moving farther in the same direction he resolved to strike at the root of the evil by the exercise of his imperial authority.

    0
    0
  • Torn by dissensions the Teutonic Order was unsuccessful in checking the encroachments of the Poles, and in 1466 the land which it had won in the north-east of Germany passed under the suzerainty of Poland, care being taken to root out all traces of German influence therein.

    0
    0
  • The popular feeling for the first time found expression when Luther, on All Saints day 1517, nailed to a church door in Wittenberg the theses in which he contested the doctrine Luther which lay at the root of the scandalous traffic in indulgences carried on in the popes name by Tetzel and his like.

    0
    0
  • A fragment of a Welsh poem seems to confirm this tradition, which certainly lies at the root of her later abduction by Meleagaunt.

    0
    0
  • Isobutyric acid is found in the free state in carobs (Ceratonia siliqua) and in the root of Arnica dulcis, and as an ethyl ester in croton oil.

    0
    0
  • In modern times the chief exponents of panpsychist views are Thomas Carlyle, Fechner and Paulsen: a similar idea lay at the root of the physical theories of the Stoics.

    0
    0
  • The Greek root corresponds in the Septuagint to the Heb.

    0
    0
  • Saint Paul's visit to Syracuse naturally gave rise to many legends; but the Christian church undoubtedly took early root in Sicily.

    0
    0
  • AMMON, the Graecized name of an Egyptian deity, in the native language Amun, connected by the priests with a root meaning " conceal."

    0
    0
  • The widespread opinion that this sense first asserted itself in reference to the Arab root aj+ (faraqa), " sever," or " decide," is open to considerable doubt.

    0
    0
  • When we reach the Medina period it becomes, as has been indicated, much easier to understand the revelations in their historical relations, since our knowledge of the history of 1 Since in Arabic also the root itr >) signifies " to have pity," the Arabs must have at once perceived the force of the new name.

    0
    0
  • From the root idea of obligation to serve or give something in return, involved in the conception of duty, have sprung various derivative uses of the word; thus it is used of the services performed by a minister of a church, by a soldier, or by any employee or servant.

    0
    0
  • The same root kar leads through something like kar-kar-ta, glakarta (glazard in Breton), to lacerta and to "lizard."

    0
    0
  • In later times the moral ct of his tale was doubtless the main cause of its continued alarity; Osiris was named Onnophris, the good Being excellence, and Seth was contrasted with him as the author the root of all evil.

    0
    0
  • The typical Coptic root thus became biliteral rather than triliteral, and the verb, by means of periphrases, developed tenses of remarkable precision.

    0
    0
  • The employment of the signs are of three kinds: any given sign represents either (I) a whole word or root; or (2) a sound as part of a word; or (3) pictorially defines the meaning of a word the sound of which has already been given by a sign or group of signs preceding.

    0
    0
  • For instance, ~ is the conventional picture of a draughtboard (shown in plan) with the draughtsmen (shown in elevation) on its edge :this sign (I) signifies the root mn, set, firm; or (2) in the group ~ represents the same sound as part of the root mn~, good; or (~) added to the group sni (thus:

    0
    0
  • The secondary value expresses the consonantal root of the name or other primary value, and any, or almost any, derivative from that root: as when ~ a mat with a cake upon it, is not only litp, an offering-mat, but also hip in the sense of conciliation, peace, rest, setting (of the sun), with many derivatives.

    0
    0
  • In the third place, some signs may be transferred to express another root having the same consonants as the first: thus ~, the ear, by a play upon words can express not only .f4m, hear, but also fdm, paint the eyes.

    0
    0
  • The phonetic values of the signs are derived from their word-sign values and consist usually of the bare root, though there are rare examples of the retention of a flexional ending; they often ignore also the weaker consonants of the root, and on the same principle reduce a repeated consonant to a single one, as when the hoe ~, tinn, has the phonetic value bn.

    0
    0
  • This practice had the advantage also of distinguishing determinatives from phonograms. Thus the root or syllable un is regularly written ~ ~to avoid confusion with the detcrminative~.

    0
    0
  • Thus the tonus of the motor neurons of the spinal cord is much lessened by rupture of the great afferent root cells which normally play upon them.

    0
    0
  • The familiar duckweed which covers the surface of a pond consists of a tiny green "thalloid" shoot, one, that is, which shows no distinction of parts - stem and leaf, and a simple root growing vertically downwards into the water.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →