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roosevelt

roosevelt

roosevelt Sentence Examples

  • In 1921, a dozen years before he would be sworn in as president, Franklin Roosevelt was diagnosed with polio.

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  • He graduated from Harvard in 1880 (in the class with Theodore Roosevelt), and the following year entered the banking house of Lee, Higginson & Co., in Boston.

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  • The Roosevelt family' has been prominent in the life of New York for many generations, and is of Dutch origin.

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  • And near the end of 1937, Roosevelt created the National Foundation for Infant Paralysis to join in the fight.

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  • Fred, I know you're an old geezer, but Roosevelt died during World War Two.

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  • I voted for Franklin Delano Roosevelt five or six times.

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  • The spontaneous yet successful effort made by President Roosevelt in 1905 to bring together the Russian and Japanese governments, and to secure their appointing delegates to discuss terms of peace, although not strictly mediation, was closely akin to it.

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  • Franklin Roosevelt was elected.

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  • Roosevelt is saying that freedom itself cannot exist apart from some amount of economic liberty.

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  • I been casting my ballot that way since Roosevelt and I'll keep doing so—even if you do cancel out my vote every dang election.

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  • Franklin Roosevelt wasn't like that, at least when he was running for president.

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  • of March 1655, by the same author (1903); Oliver Cromwell, by Theodore Roosevelt (1900); Oliver Cromwell, by R.

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  • Reports of territorial encroachments aroused much sympathy with Liberia in America and led in February 1909 to the appointment by President Roosevelt of a commission which visited Liberia in the summer of that year to investigate the condition of the country.

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  • "Well," said Mr Roosevelt in reply, "if that is so, they belong to the governing class, and you do not.

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  • "Well," said Mr Roosevelt in reply, "if that is so, they belong to the governing class, and you do not.

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  • President Roosevelt had little difficulty last spring in making Miss Keller understand him, and especially requested Miss Sullivan not to spell into her hand.

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  • In 1886 he was elected mayor of New York City, his nomination having been forced upon the Democratic Party by the strength of the other nominees, Henry George and Theodore Roosevelt; his administration (1887-1888) was thoroughly efficient and creditable, but he broke with Tammany, was not renominated, ran independently for re-election, and was defeated.

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  • Roosevelt went on to outline what he believed would be in this Second Bill of Rights: food, medicine, shelter, and so on.

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  • In using the phrase, "Necessitous men are not free men," Roosevelt was actually quoting from a decision in a well-known 1762 English legal case.

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  • Colonel Roosevelt was there, on Harvard's side; but bless you, he wore a white sweater, and no crimson that we know of!

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  • Mr Taft gained great influence among the more conservative Filipinos, and their entreaties to him to remain influenced him to decline the offer of a place upon the Supreme bench offered by President Roosevelt in 1902.

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  • With the approach of the presidential election of 1908, President Roosevelt reiterated his pledge not to accept another nomination, and threw his immense influence in favour of Mr Taft.

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  • The decisive defeat of Parker by President Roosevelt did much to bring back the Democrats to Mr Bryan's banner.

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  • The free-silver theory was now dead, and while the main question was that of the attitude to be taken towards the Trusts it was much confused by personal issues, Mr Roosevelt himself intervening strongly in favour of the Republican nominee, Mr Taft.

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  • See The Diary and Letters of Gouverneur Morris (2 vols., New York, '888), edited by Anne Cary Morris; Jared Sparks, Life of Gouverneur Morris (3 vols., Boston, 1832), the first volume being a biography and the second and third containing Morris's miscellaneous writings and addresses; and Theodore Roosevelt, Gouverneur Morris (Boston, 1888), in the "American Statesmen" series.

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  • In 1847-1850 he was professor of moral philosophy and metaphysics at Amherst; and in 1850-1854 was Washburn professor of Church history, and in 1854-1874 Roosevelt professor of systematic theology, at Union Theological Seminary.

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  • That his early outdoor life furnished a definite training for his after career is indicated by the fact that when he was about fourteen years of age he went with his father on a tour up the Nile as far as Luxor, and on this journey he made a collection of Egyptian birds found in the Nile valley, which is now in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C. Mr Roosevelt was educated at Harvard University, where he graduated in the class of 1880; 2 his record for scholarship was creditable, and his interest in sports and athletics was especially manifest in his skill as a boxer.

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  • The spring and early summer of 1910 were spent by Mr Roosevelt in travelling through Egypt, the continent of Europe, and England, in acceptance of invitations which he had received to make various public speeches in these countries.

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  • It may be said without exaggeration that no American public man in the history of the country has achieved such extraordinary popularity during his lifetime as Mr Roosevelt had attained at fifty years of age, both at home and abroad.

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  • Mr Roosevelt from the beginning apparently believed with the lexicographers that politics is the science and practice of government.

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  • Mr Roosevelt was severely criticized by many "independent Republicans" for having supported the presidential candidacy of James G.

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  • The reply to this criticism is that Mr Blaine was the choice of the majority of the party, and that while Mr Roosevelt felt free to fight within the party vigorously for reform, he did not feel that the nomination justified a schism like that which occurred in the Democratic party over the free silver issue in 1896 - a schism which remained afterwards a hopeless weakness in that party.

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  • The free-silver theory was now dead, and while the main question was that of the attitude to be taken towards the Trusts it was much confused by personal issues, Mr Roosevelt himself intervening strongly in favour of the Republican nominee, Mr Taft.

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  • See The Diary and Letters of Gouverneur Morris (2 vols., New York, '888), edited by Anne Cary Morris; Jared Sparks, Life of Gouverneur Morris (3 vols., Boston, 1832), the first volume being a biography and the second and third containing Morris's miscellaneous writings and addresses; and Theodore Roosevelt, Gouverneur Morris (Boston, 1888), in the "American Statesmen" series.

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  • Someone paid you to vote for Roosevelt?

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  • See Roosevelt's War of 1812 (1882); and A.

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  • in diameter; it was dedicated on the 30th of September 1907, when an address was delivered by President Roosevelt.

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  • Mr Roosevelt's mother, Martha Bullock, came from a family of Scotch-Irish and Huguenot origin equally prominent in Georgia.

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  • Roosevelt.

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  • Isaac Roosevelt was a member of the Provincial Congress in 1775-77 and of the state Senate in 1777-86 and in 1788-92; in the state Assembly were James Roosevelt (1796-97), Cornelius C. Roosevelt (2803), James I.

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  • Roosevelt, jun.

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  • (1835-40), and Clinton Roosevelt (183740).

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  • Roosevelt (1767-1854), with John Stevens, Robert R.

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  • His brother, Cornelius van Schaik Roosevelt (1794-1871), was a founder of the Chemical National Bank of New York, and the grandfather of the president.

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  • The president's uncle, Robert Barnwell Roosevelt (1829-1906), was a New York lawyer, New York state fish commissioner in 1866-68, a member of the Committee of Seventy which exposed the corruption of Tammany in New York City, a Democratic member of the national House of Representatives in 1871-73, U.S. minister to the Netherlands in 1888, and author of works on American game birds and fish.

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  • Roosevelt's brother, the president's father, Theodore Roosevelt (1831-1878), was a glass importer, prominent in city charities, an organizer of the Union League Club, and the founder of the Orthopaedic Hospital.

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  • A cousin, James Henry Roosevelt (1800-1863), was founder of the Roosevelt Hospital in New York City.

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  • The president's mother, Martha Bullock, was of an old Georgia family of Scotch-Irish and Huguenot extraction; her grandfather was Archibald Bullock (1730-1777), first president (1776-77) of Georgia; and her brother, James Dunwoody Bullock, often compared by Theodore Roosevelt to Colonel Newcome, was in the Confederate navy, and equipped in England vessels (including the "Alabama") as Confederate cruisers.

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  • Mr Roosevelt, however, received a larger proportion of the total vote cast than any mayoralty candidate of the Republican party had previously received in New York City.

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  • In April 1889, on the accession to the presidency of Benjamin Harrison, Mr Roosevelt, then closely identified with the work of Civil Service reform, was appointed a member of the United States Civil Service Commission.

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  • On the promotion of Colonel Wood to the command of the brigade, Mr Roosevelt became colonel of the regiment, which took an especially prominent part in the storming of San Juan Hill.

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  • In this battle Colonel Roosevelt became the ranking officer and, abandoning his horse, led the charge up the hill on foot under severe fire at the head of his troops.

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  • When his regiment was mustered out of service in September 1898, Mr Roosevelt was nominated by the Republican party for the governorship of New York State and was elected in November by a substantial plurality.

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  • Mr Roosevelt never, however, presided over the deliberations of the Senate, because before the session following his inauguration convened he had ceased to be vice-president.

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  • The nomination and election of President Taft, who had been a member of Mr Roosevelt's cabinet, was very largely due to the latter's great influence in the party.

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  • On March 23rd, two weeks after he ceased to be president, Mr Roosevelt sailed for Africa, to carry out a long-cherished plan of conducting an expedition for the purpose of making a scientific collection of the fauna and flora of the tropical regions of that continent.

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  • The experiences of his African journey were recorded by Mr Roosevelt in a volume entitled African Game Trails: The Wanderings of an American Hunter Naturalist.

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  • Riis,' to whom Mr Roosevelt made it in commenting upon his first political success in the New York legislature.

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  • In his successive offices Mr Roosevelt not merely exerted a strong influence upon the immediate community, whose official representative he was at the time being, but by reason both of his forceful personality and of the often unconventional, although always effective, methods of work which he employed he achieved a national prominence out of ordinary proportion to the importance of his official position.

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  • As police commissioner Mr Roosevelt brought to his side every honest man on the force.

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  • But it was his course in the presidency that gave him his international reputation) and it is as President Roosevelt that future historians: Of American political life must chiefly discuss him.

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  • Mr Roosevelt entered the presidency definitely committed to two principles which profoundly affected his course as chief executive of the United States.

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  • Mr Roosevelt not only attacked dishonesty in public affairs but in private business as welt, asserting that "malefactors of great wealth" endeavour to control legislation so as to increase the profits of monopolies or "trusts," and that to prevent such control it is necessary to extend the powers of the federal government.

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  • Some reference has already been made to the fact that in every office which Mr Roosevelt held he constantly dwelt upon the truism, often forgotten or ignored, that no government can accomplish any permanent good unless its administrative and legislative officers are chosen and maintained for merit only.

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  • If Mr Roosevelt did not invent this term he literally created as well as led the movement which made Conservation in 1910 the foremost political and social question in the United States.

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  • As Mr Roosevelt often pointed out, no nation will live long in which the authority of government - especially in a democracy - is supplanted by the private interest of a real money power.

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  • Early in his political career, Mr Roosevelt foresaw this conflict, and as president he aroused public opinion so that the.

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  • Mr Roosevelt was a pronounced advocate of international peace but also an advocate of law and order.

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  • Mr Roosevelt argued not only that they were consistent but that the one logically followed the other.

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  • On this ground during his presidential administration Mr Roosevelt was deeply concerned in many measures for improving the administrative side of the War Department and educating, training and strengthening the army.

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  • The greatest single material achievement of Mr Roosevelt's presidency was the taking over by the United States of the project to build a Panama Canal.

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  • Mr Roosevelt recognized the new republic of Panama, and obtained from it for the United States, in return for a commercial and military protection advantageous to Panama, the right to build a canal and control it in perpetuity.

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  • But for Mr Roosevelt's vigorous official action and his characteristic ability to inspire associates with enthusiasm the canal would still be a subject of diplomatic discussion instead of a physical actuality.

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  • Although this policy was entered upon at the conclusion of the Spanish War under the presidency of Mr McKinley it has been very largely shaped by Mr Roosevelt.

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  • No account of Mr Roosevelt's career is complete without a reference to his literary work, which has been somewhat overshadowed by his reputation as a man of public affairs.

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  • John Burroughs's Camping and Tramping with Roosevelt (Boston, 1907) is an appreciation of Roosevelt as a naturalist.

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  • Bennett, Roosevelt and the Republic (New York, 1908), is bitterly hostile.

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  • Greene in Roosevelt's American Ideals.

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  • He was secretary of the navy in President Roosevelt's cabinet from July 1905 to December 1906, when he was made attorney-general of the United States.

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  • Dawes as United States Senator from Massachusetts in 1893; and in 1899 and in 1905 was re-elected to the Senate, where he became one of the most prominent of the Republican leaders, and an influential supporter of President Roosevelt.

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  • He wrote: Life and Letters of George Cabot (1877); Alexander Hamilton (1882), Daniel Webster (1883) and George Washington (2 vols., 1889), in the "American Statesmen" series; A Short History of the English Colonies in America (1881); Studies in History (1884); Boston (1891), in the "Historic Towns" series; Historical and Political Essays (1892); with Theodore Roosevelt, Hero Tales from American History (1895); Certain Accepted Heroes (1897); The Story of the American Revolution (2 vols., 1898); The War with Spain (1899); A Fighting Frigate (1902); A Frontier Town (1906); and, with J.

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  • The intervention of President Roosevelt and of President Diaz of Mexico brought about an armistice on the 19th of July, and the so-called "Marblehead Pact" was signed on the following day on board the United States cruiser "Marblehead."

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  • "FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT (1882-), American politician, was born in Hyde Park, N.Y., Jan.

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  • He was a distant cousin of Theodore Roosevelt.

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  • Theodore Roosevelt >>

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  • of the city are the International Fair Grounds, where in 1898 Colonel Theodore Roosevelt organized his "Rough Riders," and Riverside Park.

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  • In the house of Ansley Wilcox here VicePresident Theodore Roosevelt took the oath of office as president.

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  • He was postmaster-general in the cabinet of Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt from April 1898 until January 1902, and did much to develop the rural free delivery system.

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  • There have been mining strikes at Scranton (1871), in the Lehigh and Schuylkill regions (1875), at Hazleton (1897), and one in the anthracite fields (1902) which was settled by a board of arbitrators appointed by President Roosevelt; and there were street railway strikes at Chester in 1908 and in Philadelphia in 1910.

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  • The Naval War of 1812, by Theodore Roosevelt (New York, 1882), is lively but somewhat passionate, and not free from prejudice.

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  • In1883-1889he was a member of the National House of Representatives, and from March 1897 to May 1902 was secretary of the navy, in the cabinet, first of President McKinley and then of President Roosevelt.

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  • John Hay was a man of quiet and unassuming disposition, whose training in diplomacy gave a cool and judicious character to his statesmanship. As secretary of state under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt his guidance was invaluable during a rather critical period in foreign affairs, and no man of his time did more to create confidence in the increased interest taken by the United States in international matters.

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  • In the "free-silver" campaign of 1896 Gage laboured effectively for the election of William McKinley, and from March 1897 until January 1902 he was secretary of the treasury in the cabinets successively of Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt.

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  • Mr Roosevelt brought the whole subject before Congress in his message of the 3rd of December 1901, and thereby started what seemed likely to be a new sphere of Federal initiative and control.

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  • In the Senate he was one of the aggressive Republican leaders, strongly supporting the administration of President M`Kinley (whose name he presented to the Republican National Conventions of 1896 and 1900) in the debatespreceding, during, and immediately following the Spanish-American War, and later, during the administration of President Roosevelt, was conspicuous among Republican leaders for his independence.

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  • In 1904 he resigned on being nominated by the Democrats for president, but he was defeated by Theodore Roosevelt, the electoral vote being 336 for Roosevelt to 140 for Parker, the popular vote 7,623,486 for Roosevelt to 5,077,971 for Parker.

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  • In 1900 he was appointed ambassador to Italy by President McKinley, and five years later was transferred by President Roosevelt to Russia.

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  • In 1907 he was recalled by Roosevelt and made Postmaster-General in his Cabinet.

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  • Roosevelt signed an act establishing the civil government of the Philippines and providing for a new legislative body.

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  • After President Roosevelt's policies became defined, Senator Hanna came to be regarded as the leader of the conservative branch of the Republican party and a possible presidential candidate in 1904.

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  • In 1900 McKinley was unanimously renominated by the National Republican Convention which met in Philadelphia on the 19th of June, and which nominated Theodore Roosevelt, governor of New York, for the vice-presidency.

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  • Immediately after his death Vice-President Roosevelt took the oath of office, announcing that it would be his purpose to continue McKinley's policy, while also retaining the cabinet and the principal officers of the government.

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  • Here he became the close friend of Theodore Roosevelt, then Assistant-Secretary of the Navy.

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  • On the outbreak of the Spanish American War in 1898 Wood was commissioned colonel of volunteers, and together with Roosevelt, as lieutenant-colonel, raised the famous regiment of " Rough Riders," composed of western ranchmen and cowboys as well as members of prominent eastern families eager to serve under these two strenuous leaders.

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  • See James Roosevelt Bayley, The Memoirs of the Rt.

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  • The city lies in a great plain, in the centre of a region of pastures, gardens and orchards, the largest and most beautiful farming district of Arizona, irrigated with water stored by the great Roosevelt dam (about 70 m.

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  • By a law of April 1906 the U.S. consular service was reorganized and graded, the office of consul-general being divided into seven classes, and that of consul into nine classes; and on June 27 an executive order was issued by President Roosevelt governing appointments and promotions.

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  • high, was laid, addresses being delivered by President Roosevelt, James Bryce and H.

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  • The government of Great Britain let it be known that its patience was not inexhaustible, while the senate of the United States declared that it would support President Roosevelt in his efforts for the amelioration of the condition of the inhabitants of the Congo.

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  • The series as a whole has been accepted as finally authoritative, supplanting its predecessors of similar aim, and almost - in the words of Theodore Roosevelt - founding a new school of naval historical writing.

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  • In April 1901 he became attorney-general of the United States in the cabinet of President McKinley, and retained this position after the accession of President Roosevelt until June 1904, when he was appointed by Governor Pennypacker of Pennsylvania to fill the unexpired term of Matthew S.

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  • A statue of Rochambeau by Ferdinand Hamar, the gift of France to the United States, was unveiled in Lafayette Square, Washington, by President Roosevelt on the 24th of May 1902.

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  • He was an ardent supporter of the candidacy of Theodore Roosevelt for the Republican presidential nomination in 1912, and was in charge of the contests for seating the Roosevelt delegates in the national convention.

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  • As a reward for his success in the Philippines President Roosevelt in 1906 finally secured his promotion from captain to brigadier-general, passing him over 862 senior officers.

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  • In 1907 he was appointed by President Roosevelt a member of the Isthmian Canal Commission, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and soon afterwards was made its chairman and chief engineer.

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  • Putnam, History of Middle Tennessee, or Life and Times of General James Robertson (Nashville, 1859); Theodore Roosevelt, Winning of the West (New York, 1889-1896); John Carr, Early Times in Middle Tennessee (Nashville, 1857).

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  • In 1905 he was appointed by President Roosevelt a member of the Interstate Commerce Commission and was retained by President Taft, serving for eight years, part of the time as chairman.

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  • At the Republican National Convention in 1904 he was unanimously nominated for Vice-President with Theodore Roosevelt and was elected.

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  • Franklin Roosevelt was elected.

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  • I been casting my ballot that way since Roosevelt and I'll keep doing so—even if you do cancel out my vote every dang election.

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  • Fred, I know you're an old geezer, but Roosevelt died during World War Two.

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  • I voted for Franklin Delano Roosevelt five or six times.

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  • Someone paid you to vote for Roosevelt?

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  • Franklin Roosevelt wasn't like that, at least when he was running for president.

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  • Whenever I visited Roosevelt on official business, I found a man adroit, voluble, assured and smiling.

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  • The first, the longest, and the loudest clamor against Roosevelt came with his plan for the reorganization of the Supreme Court.

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  • hero depicted by Anthony Hope in The Prisoner of Zenda in relation to the young Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

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  • histrionic talent displayed by the brothers at the annual Theodore Roosevelt reunion.

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  • However, Franklin D. Roosevelt did get into office, and the country was not imperiled.

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  • Churchill had completely miscalculated, but so had Stalin, Hitler and Roosevelt.

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  • One night a poor Italian peddler died in Roosevelt Street.

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  • Rankin was convinced that Franklin D. Roosevelt had deliberately provoked the Japanese attack.

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  • Roosevelt field project same markets more seems to be.

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  • Roosevelt emerald will benefit from river gorge below.

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  • Roosevelt's thinking on Germany was rather simplistic: no aircraft, uniforms or marching.

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  • Abstract/Extract: Eleanor Roosevelt is probably the most famous polio spouse of this century.

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  • Theodore Roosevelt the elements of.

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  • 1865), also graduated at Williams College in 1885 and practised law in Cleveland; he was a Republican member of the Ohio Senate in 1896-1899, was commissioner of corporations, Department of Commerce and Labour, in 1903-1907, attracting wide attention by his reports on certain large industrial organizations, and was secretary of the interior (1907-1909) in the cabinet of President Roosevelt.

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  • See Roosevelt's War of 1812 (1882); and A.

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  • of March 1655, by the same author (1903); Oliver Cromwell, by Theodore Roosevelt (1900); Oliver Cromwell, by R.

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  • In 1886 he was elected mayor of New York City, his nomination having been forced upon the Democratic Party by the strength of the other nominees, Henry George and Theodore Roosevelt; his administration (1887-1888) was thoroughly efficient and creditable, but he broke with Tammany, was not renominated, ran independently for re-election, and was defeated.

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  • Reports of territorial encroachments aroused much sympathy with Liberia in America and led in February 1909 to the appointment by President Roosevelt of a commission which visited Liberia in the summer of that year to investigate the condition of the country.

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  • Mr Taft gained great influence among the more conservative Filipinos, and their entreaties to him to remain influenced him to decline the offer of a place upon the Supreme bench offered by President Roosevelt in 1902.

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  • With the approach of the presidential election of 1908, President Roosevelt reiterated his pledge not to accept another nomination, and threw his immense influence in favour of Mr Taft.

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  • In his inaugural address (4th March 1909) President Taft announced himself as favouring the maintenance and enforcement of the reforms initiated by President Roosevelt (including a strict enforcement of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act, an effective measure for railway rate regulation, and the policy of conservation of natural resources); the revision of the tariff on the basis of affording protection to American manufactures equal to the difference between home and foreign cost of production; a graduated inheritance tax; a strong navy as the best guarantee of peace; postal savings banks; free trade with the Philippine Islands; and mail subsidies for American ships.

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  • He graduated from Harvard in 1880 (in the class with Theodore Roosevelt), and the following year entered the banking house of Lee, Higginson & Co., in Boston.

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  • The decisive defeat of Parker by President Roosevelt did much to bring back the Democrats to Mr Bryan's banner.

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  • Meanwhile it is legitimate to share the hope expressed by President Roosevelt in his message to Congress of December 1905 that some future Hague conference may succeed in making arbitration the customary method of settling international disputes in all save the few classes of cases indicated above, and that - to quote Mr Roosevelt's words - " these classes may themselves be as sharply defined and rigidly limited as the governmental and social development of the world will for the time being permit."/n==Authorities== - Among special treatises are: Kamarowsky, Le Tribunal international (traduit par Serge de Westman) (Paris, 1887); Rouard de Card, Les Destinees de l'arbitrage international, depuis la sentence rendue par le tribunal de Geneve (Paris, 1892); Michel Revon, L' Arbitrage international (Paris, 1892); Ferdinand Dreyfus, L'Arbitrage international (Paris, 1894) (where the earlier authorities are collected); A.

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  • in diameter; it was dedicated on the 30th of September 1907, when an address was delivered by President Roosevelt.

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  • The spontaneous yet successful effort made by President Roosevelt in 1905 to bring together the Russian and Japanese governments, and to secure their appointing delegates to discuss terms of peace, although not strictly mediation, was closely akin to it.

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  • In 1847-1850 he was professor of moral philosophy and metaphysics at Amherst; and in 1850-1854 was Washburn professor of Church history, and in 1854-1874 Roosevelt professor of systematic theology, at Union Theological Seminary.

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  • THEODORE ROOSEVELT (1858-), twenty-sixth president of the United States, was born in New York City on the 27th of October 1858.

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  • The Roosevelt family' has been prominent in the life of New York for many generations, and is of Dutch origin.

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  • Mr Roosevelt's mother, Martha Bullock, came from a family of Scotch-Irish and Huguenot origin equally prominent in Georgia.

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  • Although born in New York, Mr Roosevelt spent much of his boyhood at Oyster Bay, the country home of his father, on Long Island Sound, where he began with a distinct purpose, unusual among boys of his age, to build up a naturally frail physique by rowing and swimming in the waters of Long Island Sound, and by riding over the hills and tramping through the woods of Long Island.

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  • That his early outdoor life furnished a definite training for his after career is indicated by the fact that when he was about fourteen years of age he went with his father on a tour up the Nile as far as Luxor, and on this journey he made a collection of Egyptian birds found in the Nile valley, which is now in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C. Mr Roosevelt was educated at Harvard University, where he graduated in the class of 1880; 2 his record for scholarship was creditable, and his interest in sports and athletics was especially manifest in his skill as a boxer.

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  • In the convention he opposed the nomination of Mr Blaine, and in a speech which attracted considerable Claas Martenszen van Roosevelt (or Rosenvelt) settled in New Amsterdam in 1649; his son Claas (or Nicholas) in 1700 - I was a New York alderman of the Leislerian party; in the next three generations, Johannes, Cornelius and Jacobus (James) were merchants and (in 1748-67,1785-1801and 1797-99 and 1809, respectively) aldermen of New York; in the third generation the family became allied with the Schuylers.

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  • Isaac Roosevelt was a member of the Provincial Congress in 1775-77 and of the state Senate in 1777-86 and in 1788-92; in the state Assembly were James Roosevelt (1796-97), Cornelius C. Roosevelt (2803), James I.

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  • Roosevelt, jun.

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  • (1835-40), and Clinton Roosevelt (183740).

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  • Roosevelt (1767-1854), with John Stevens, Robert R.

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  • His brother, Cornelius van Schaik Roosevelt (1794-1871), was a founder of the Chemical National Bank of New York, and the grandfather of the president.

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  • The president's uncle, Robert Barnwell Roosevelt (1829-1906), was a New York lawyer, New York state fish commissioner in 1866-68, a member of the Committee of Seventy which exposed the corruption of Tammany in New York City, a Democratic member of the national House of Representatives in 1871-73, U.S. minister to the Netherlands in 1888, and author of works on American game birds and fish.

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  • Roosevelt's brother, the president's father, Theodore Roosevelt (1831-1878), was a glass importer, prominent in city charities, an organizer of the Union League Club, and the founder of the Orthopaedic Hospital.

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  • A cousin, James Henry Roosevelt (1800-1863), was founder of the Roosevelt Hospital in New York City.

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  • The president's mother, Martha Bullock, was of an old Georgia family of Scotch-Irish and Huguenot extraction; her grandfather was Archibald Bullock (1730-1777), first president (1776-77) of Georgia; and her brother, James Dunwoody Bullock, often compared by Theodore Roosevelt to Colonel Newcome, was in the Confederate navy, and equipped in England vessels (including the "Alabama") as Confederate cruisers.

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  • Mr Roosevelt, however, received a larger proportion of the total vote cast than any mayoralty candidate of the Republican party had previously received in New York City.

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  • In April 1889, on the accession to the presidency of Benjamin Harrison, Mr Roosevelt, then closely identified with the work of Civil Service reform, was appointed a member of the United States Civil Service Commission.

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  • Mr Roosevelt declined the colonelcy of the regiment, preferring to take the post of lieutenant-colonel under his intimate friend Dr Leonard Wood, who, while a surgeon in the United States army, had served in action with gallantry and skill against the Indians.

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  • On the promotion of Colonel Wood to the command of the brigade, Mr Roosevelt became colonel of the regiment, which took an especially prominent part in the storming of San Juan Hill.

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  • In this battle Colonel Roosevelt became the ranking officer and, abandoning his horse, led the charge up the hill on foot under severe fire at the head of his troops.

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  • At the conclusion of the war, while the troops were still in camp in the South, Mr Roosevelt joined in a "round robin" of protest against the mismanagement in the War Department, which had resulted in widespread suffering among the troops from wretched food and bad sanitary arrangements.

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  • When his regiment was mustered out of service in September 1898, Mr Roosevelt was nominated by the Republican party for the governorship of New York State and was elected in November by a substantial plurality.

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  • Mr Roosevelt never, however, presided over the deliberations of the Senate, because before the session following his inauguration convened he had ceased to be vice-president.

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  • The nomination and election of President Taft, who had been a member of Mr Roosevelt's cabinet, was very largely due to the latter's great influence in the party.

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  • On March 23rd, two weeks after he ceased to be president, Mr Roosevelt sailed for Africa, to carry out a long-cherished plan of conducting an expedition for the purpose of making a scientific collection of the fauna and flora of the tropical regions of that continent.

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  • The experiences of his African journey were recorded by Mr Roosevelt in a volume entitled African Game Trails: The Wanderings of an American Hunter Naturalist.

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  • The spring and early summer of 1910 were spent by Mr Roosevelt in travelling through Egypt, the continent of Europe, and England, in acceptance of invitations which he had received to make various public speeches in these countries.

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  • It may be said without exaggeration that no American public man in the history of the country has achieved such extraordinary popularity during his lifetime as Mr Roosevelt had attained at fifty years of age, both at home and abroad.

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  • Mr Roosevelt from the beginning apparently believed with the lexicographers that politics is the science and practice of government.

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  • Mr Roosevelt was severely criticized by many "independent Republicans" for having supported the presidential candidacy of James G.

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  • The reply to this criticism is that Mr Blaine was the choice of the majority of the party, and that while Mr Roosevelt felt free to fight within the party vigorously for reform, he did not feel that the nomination justified a schism like that which occurred in the Democratic party over the free silver issue in 1896 - a schism which remained afterwards a hopeless weakness in that party.

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  • Riis,' to whom Mr Roosevelt made it in commenting upon his first political success in the New York legislature.

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  • In his successive offices Mr Roosevelt not merely exerted a strong influence upon the immediate community, whose official representative he was at the time being, but by reason both of his forceful personality and of the often unconventional, although always effective, methods of work which he employed he achieved a national prominence out of ordinary proportion to the importance of his official position.

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  • As police commissioner Mr Roosevelt brought to his side every honest man on the force.

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  • When he became assistantsecretary of the navy, his work was not so publicly conspicuous, 1 In a volume entitled Roosevelt the Citizen, which, while it is frankly written as the enthusiastic tribute of a personal admirer, may be relied upon for accuracy in its statement of historical or biographical facts.

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  • But it was his course in the presidency that gave him his international reputation) and it is as President Roosevelt that future historians: Of American political life must chiefly discuss him.

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  • Mr Roosevelt entered the presidency definitely committed to two principles which profoundly affected his course as chief executive of the United States.

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  • Mr Roosevelt not only attacked dishonesty in public affairs but in private business as welt, asserting that "malefactors of great wealth" endeavour to control legislation so as to increase the profits of monopolies or "trusts," and that to prevent such control it is necessary to extend the powers of the federal government.

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  • Some reference has already been made to the fact that in every office which Mr Roosevelt held he constantly dwelt upon the truism, often forgotten or ignored, that no government can accomplish any permanent good unless its administrative and legislative officers are chosen and maintained for merit only.

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  • If Mr Roosevelt did not invent this term he literally created as well as led the movement which made Conservation in 1910 the foremost political and social question in the United States.

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  • Mr Roosevelt not only framed legislation to regulate this concentration of wealth and to preserve forests, water power, mines and arable soil, but organized departments in his administration for carrying his legislation into effect (see Irrigation: United States).

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  • As Mr Roosevelt often pointed out, no nation will live long in which the authority of government - especially in a democracy - is supplanted by the private interest of a real money power.

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  • Early in his political career, Mr Roosevelt foresaw this conflict, and as president he aroused public opinion so that the.

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  • Mr Roosevelt and his supporters were convinced that his policy was necessary to save the country from the social and political dangers of plutocracy, and that in establishing a definite system of government regulation not only were popular rights preserved and justice promoted but industrialism and finance were placed upon a basis of regularity and honesty that paved the way for an era of general prosperity in the United States, unhampered by feverish speculation and shrewd scheming, such as the country had so far in its history been unable to enjoy.

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  • Mr Roosevelt was a pronounced advocate of international peace but also an advocate of law and order.

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  • Mr Roosevelt argued not only that they were consistent but that the one logically followed the other.

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  • On this ground during his presidential administration Mr Roosevelt was deeply concerned in many measures for improving the administrative side of the War Department and educating, training and strengthening the army.

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  • The greatest single material achievement of Mr Roosevelt's presidency was the taking over by the United States of the project to build a Panama Canal.

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  • Mr Roosevelt recognized the new republic of Panama, and obtained from it for the United States, in return for a commercial and military protection advantageous to Panama, the right to build a canal and control it in perpetuity.

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  • But for Mr Roosevelt's vigorous official action and his characteristic ability to inspire associates with enthusiasm the canal would still be a subject of diplomatic discussion instead of a physical actuality.

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  • Although this policy was entered upon at the conclusion of the Spanish War under the presidency of Mr McKinley it has been very largely shaped by Mr Roosevelt.

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  • No account of Mr Roosevelt's career is complete without a reference to his literary work, which has been somewhat overshadowed by his reputation as a man of public affairs.

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  • John Burroughs's Camping and Tramping with Roosevelt (Boston, 1907) is an appreciation of Roosevelt as a naturalist.

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  • Bennett, Roosevelt and the Republic (New York, 1908), is bitterly hostile.

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  • Greene in Roosevelt's American Ideals.

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  • He was secretary of the navy in President Roosevelt's cabinet from July 1905 to December 1906, when he was made attorney-general of the United States.

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  • Dawes as United States Senator from Massachusetts in 1893; and in 1899 and in 1905 was re-elected to the Senate, where he became one of the most prominent of the Republican leaders, and an influential supporter of President Roosevelt.

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  • He wrote: Life and Letters of George Cabot (1877); Alexander Hamilton (1882), Daniel Webster (1883) and George Washington (2 vols., 1889), in the "American Statesmen" series; A Short History of the English Colonies in America (1881); Studies in History (1884); Boston (1891), in the "Historic Towns" series; Historical and Political Essays (1892); with Theodore Roosevelt, Hero Tales from American History (1895); Certain Accepted Heroes (1897); The Story of the American Revolution (2 vols., 1898); The War with Spain (1899); A Fighting Frigate (1902); A Frontier Town (1906); and, with J.

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  • The intervention of President Roosevelt and of President Diaz of Mexico brought about an armistice on the 19th of July, and the so-called "Marblehead Pact" was signed on the following day on board the United States cruiser "Marblehead."

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  • "FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT (1882-), American politician, was born in Hyde Park, N.Y., Jan.

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  • He was a distant cousin of Theodore Roosevelt.

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  • Theodore Roosevelt >>

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  • of the city are the International Fair Grounds, where in 1898 Colonel Theodore Roosevelt organized his "Rough Riders," and Riverside Park.

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  • In the house of Ansley Wilcox here VicePresident Theodore Roosevelt took the oath of office as president.

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  • He was postmaster-general in the cabinet of Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt from April 1898 until January 1902, and did much to develop the rural free delivery system.

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  • There have been mining strikes at Scranton (1871), in the Lehigh and Schuylkill regions (1875), at Hazleton (1897), and one in the anthracite fields (1902) which was settled by a board of arbitrators appointed by President Roosevelt; and there were street railway strikes at Chester in 1908 and in Philadelphia in 1910.

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  • The Naval War of 1812, by Theodore Roosevelt (New York, 1882), is lively but somewhat passionate, and not free from prejudice.

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  • In1883-1889he was a member of the National House of Representatives, and from March 1897 to May 1902 was secretary of the navy, in the cabinet, first of President McKinley and then of President Roosevelt.

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  • John Hay was a man of quiet and unassuming disposition, whose training in diplomacy gave a cool and judicious character to his statesmanship. As secretary of state under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt his guidance was invaluable during a rather critical period in foreign affairs, and no man of his time did more to create confidence in the increased interest taken by the United States in international matters.

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  • In the "free-silver" campaign of 1896 Gage laboured effectively for the election of William McKinley, and from March 1897 until January 1902 he was secretary of the treasury in the cabinets successively of Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt.

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  • - At the opening of the 20th century, during Mr Roosevelt's presidency, the new " Conservation " policy (i.e.

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  • conservation of natural resources by federal initiative and control), to which he gave so much impetus and encouragement, brought the extension of irrigation works in the United States to the front in American statecraft (see Vrooman, Mr Roosevelt, Dynamic Geographer, 1909).

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  • Mr Roosevelt brought the whole subject before Congress in his message of the 3rd of December 1901, and thereby started what seemed likely to be a new sphere of Federal initiative and control.

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  • In the Senate he was one of the aggressive Republican leaders, strongly supporting the administration of President M`Kinley (whose name he presented to the Republican National Conventions of 1896 and 1900) in the debatespreceding, during, and immediately following the Spanish-American War, and later, during the administration of President Roosevelt, was conspicuous among Republican leaders for his independence.

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  • In 1904 he resigned on being nominated by the Democrats for president, but he was defeated by Theodore Roosevelt, the electoral vote being 336 for Roosevelt to 140 for Parker, the popular vote 7,623,486 for Roosevelt to 5,077,971 for Parker.

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  • In 1900 he was appointed ambassador to Italy by President McKinley, and five years later was transferred by President Roosevelt to Russia.

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  • In 1907 he was recalled by Roosevelt and made Postmaster-General in his Cabinet.

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  • Roosevelt signed an act establishing the civil government of the Philippines and providing for a new legislative body.

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  • After President Roosevelt's policies became defined, Senator Hanna came to be regarded as the leader of the conservative branch of the Republican party and a possible presidential candidate in 1904.

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  • In 1900 McKinley was unanimously renominated by the National Republican Convention which met in Philadelphia on the 19th of June, and which nominated Theodore Roosevelt, governor of New York, for the vice-presidency.

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  • Immediately after his death Vice-President Roosevelt took the oath of office, announcing that it would be his purpose to continue McKinley's policy, while also retaining the cabinet and the principal officers of the government.

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  • Here he became the close friend of Theodore Roosevelt, then Assistant-Secretary of the Navy.

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  • On the outbreak of the Spanish American War in 1898 Wood was commissioned colonel of volunteers, and together with Roosevelt, as lieutenant-colonel, raised the famous regiment of " Rough Riders," composed of western ranchmen and cowboys as well as members of prominent eastern families eager to serve under these two strenuous leaders.

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  • See James Roosevelt Bayley, The Memoirs of the Rt.

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  • The city lies in a great plain, in the centre of a region of pastures, gardens and orchards, the largest and most beautiful farming district of Arizona, irrigated with water stored by the great Roosevelt dam (about 70 m.

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  • By a law of April 1906 the U.S. consular service was reorganized and graded, the office of consul-general being divided into seven classes, and that of consul into nine classes; and on June 27 an executive order was issued by President Roosevelt governing appointments and promotions.

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  • high, was laid, addresses being delivered by President Roosevelt, James Bryce and H.

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  • The government of Great Britain let it be known that its patience was not inexhaustible, while the senate of the United States declared that it would support President Roosevelt in his efforts for the amelioration of the condition of the inhabitants of the Congo.

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  • Astute and unscrupulous manipulation of the stock markets, and a capacity for the hardest of bargaining and the most determined warfare against his rivals, had their place in this success, and Harriman's methods excited the bitterest criticism, culminating in a stern denunciation from President Roosevelt himself in 1907.

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  • The series as a whole has been accepted as finally authoritative, supplanting its predecessors of similar aim, and almost - in the words of Theodore Roosevelt - founding a new school of naval historical writing.

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  • In April 1901 he became attorney-general of the United States in the cabinet of President McKinley, and retained this position after the accession of President Roosevelt until June 1904, when he was appointed by Governor Pennypacker of Pennsylvania to fill the unexpired term of Matthew S.

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  • A statue of Rochambeau by Ferdinand Hamar, the gift of France to the United States, was unveiled in Lafayette Square, Washington, by President Roosevelt on the 24th of May 1902.

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  • He was an ardent supporter of the candidacy of Theodore Roosevelt for the Republican presidential nomination in 1912, and was in charge of the contests for seating the Roosevelt delegates in the national convention.

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  • As a reward for his success in the Philippines President Roosevelt in 1906 finally secured his promotion from captain to brigadier-general, passing him over 862 senior officers.

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  • In 1907 he was appointed by President Roosevelt a member of the Isthmian Canal Commission, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and soon afterwards was made its chairman and chief engineer.

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  • Putnam, History of Middle Tennessee, or Life and Times of General James Robertson (Nashville, 1859); Theodore Roosevelt, Winning of the West (New York, 1889-1896); John Carr, Early Times in Middle Tennessee (Nashville, 1857).

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  • In 1905 he was appointed by President Roosevelt a member of the Interstate Commerce Commission and was retained by President Taft, serving for eight years, part of the time as chairman.

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  • At the Republican National Convention in 1904 he was unanimously nominated for Vice-President with Theodore Roosevelt and was elected.

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  • It would be tempting to characterize Roosevelt's remarks as socialistic.

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  • Last year los sprawling roosevelt field project same markets more seems to be.

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  • Delivered to our president roosevelt emerald will benefit from river gorge below.

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  • Roosevelt 's thinking on Germany was rather simplistic: no aircraft, uniforms or marching.

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  • Abstract/Extract: Eleanor Roosevelt is probably the most famous polio spouse of this century.

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  • Even the biggest quot we 've got and theodore roosevelt the elements of.

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  • However, when the Great Depression hit, President Franklin Roosevelt made it against the law to hoard or be in possession of gold.

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  • Examples of pre-1965 silver coins include the Roosevelt type (1946 to 1964), Barber type (1892 to 1916) and Mercury type (1916-1945).

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  • Early in the 20th century, the Panama hat was first seen in the States and became wildly popular thanks to a photograph of President Theodore Roosevelt wearing one.

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  • Theodore Roosevelt National Park is within close vicinity to the campground.

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  • Roosevelt's first ranch cabin, located in Theodore Roosevelt National Park. (701) 623- 4466.

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  • Some preeminent historical figures who were home-schooled include several presidents, such as George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Abraham Lincoln, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

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  • Her fame was so great that both Franklin Roosevelt and Harry S.

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  • Roosevelt included several methods to help the American economy recover from such a drastically low level.

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  • Roosevelt's New Deal, the Federal Housing Admission, or FHA as it is more commonly known, was created to help get the country's citizens back on their feet.

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  • Roosevelt to help families afford to buy homes or stay in the homes they had already purchased.

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  • Natalie Portman, Robin Williams, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Gary Grant, and Frank Sinatra are some of the many famous only children.

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  • Named after Teddy Roosevelt, teddy bears are a staple in a young child's life.

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  • Roosevelt. The 32nd president of the United States was struck by polio as a child and never walked unassisted again.

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  • Roosevelt founded the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (NFIP).

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  • When President Roosevelt passed away in 1944, the mission continued under the guiding force of Basil Connor.

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  • Roosevelt sought to support research and education into a condition he coped with for more of his life and founded an organization that continues to protect future generations.

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  • Other coins that are great for your child to collect include Indian head pennies, buffalo nickels, Jefferson Nickels, Roosevelt Dimes, and Mercury Dimes.

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  • Many legends, including one retold by President Teddy Roosevelt himself, describe Bigfoot as a tall humanoid creature with some features resembling that of a large bear.

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  • The deaths of Franklin Roosevelt and John Kennedy: Edgar Cayce made these predictions in 1939.

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  • Even Teddy Roosevelt and General Patton wore Frye boots.

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  • Theodore Roosevelt had a home there, as did Franklin Roosevelt later.

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  • Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA) created by the work of the first National Nutrition Conference called by President Franklin Roosevelt.

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  • Roosevelt. In addition to administering the Supplemental Security Income program and issuing Social Security cards and numbers, this agency also pays retirement, disability, and survivor's benefits to individuals and their families.

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  • Roosevelt signed the Banking Act establishing the FDIC as what was intended to be a temporary government corporation.

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  • A testament to Bieber's popularity occurred when he attempted to make an appearance at Long Island's Roosevelt Mall in November, 2009.

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  • The mall tour went wrong at Roosevelt Mall in Long Island, NY, when a rumor that Bieber was in an Abercrombie and Fitch Kids store set off a stampede of the 3,000 strong crowd.

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  • Roosevelt did declare that the holiday would be observed on the fourth Thursday of November each year, but Congress did not make it official for two more years.

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  • Roosevelt kept in touch with American through his series of 30 Fireside Chats.

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  • The 140 character Twitter posts represent a significant departure from the wordy Fireside Chats of President Roosevelt.

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  • The group came together with the support of the Roosevelt Administration.

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  • THEODORE ROOSEVELT (1858-), twenty-sixth president of the United States, was born in New York City on the 27th of October 1858.

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  • But this is a misreading of both Roosevelt and history.

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