Romanesque sentence example

romanesque
  • Though the bishop's see was removed to Christiansand in 1685, the Romanesque cathedral church of St Swithun, founded by the English bishop Reinald in the end of the 11th century, and rebuilt after being burned down in 1272, remains, and, next to the cathedral of Trondhjem, is the most interesting stone church in Norway.
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  • Gyula-Fehervar is the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop, and has a fine Roman Catholic cathedral, built in the 1 nth century in Romanesque style, and rebuilt in 5443 by John Hunyady in Gothic style.
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  • The principal portal is a fine specimen of 12th-century Romanesque, and the lower part of the nave is of the same period; the choir and the transept are striking examples of the style of the 13th century.
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  • They had simply to make Saracen and Greek work in partnership. In England, on the other hand, the Normans did really bring in a new style of their own, their own form of Romanesque, differing widely indeed from the Saracenic style of Sicily.
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  • This Norman form of Romanesque most likely had its origin in the Lombard buildings of northern Italy.
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  • But it took firm root on Norman soil; it made its way to England at an early stage of its growth, and from that time it went on developing and improving on both sides of the Channel till the artistic revolution came by which, throughout northern Europe, the Romanesque styles gave way to the Gothic. Thus the history of architecture in England during the 11th and 12th centuries is a very different story from the history of the art in Sicily during the same time.
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  • England indeed had, possibly in a somewhat ruder form, the earlier style of Romanesque once common to England with Italy, Gaul and Germany.
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  • In the Byzantine and early Romanesque periods it was an essential part of church furniture; but during the middle ages it was gradually superseded in the Western Church by the pulpit and lectern.
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  • The Romanesque cathedral contains some interesting examples of native art (by Giovanni Martini da Udine, a pupil of Raphael, and others).
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  • Other noteworthy churches are the Jakobskirche, an i r th-century Romanesque basilica; the St Martinskirche; the Marienkirche or Obere Pfarrkirche (1320-1387), which has now been restored to its original pure Gothic style.
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  • The Michaelskirche, 12th-century Romanesque (restored), on the Michaelsberg, was formerly the church of a Benedictine monastery secularized in 1803, which now contains the Biirgerspital, or alms-house, and the museum and municipal art collections.
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  • Prospero, close by, has a facade of 1504, in which are incorporated six marble lions belonging to the original Romanesque edifice.
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  • The Palazzo del Comune is Romanesque (12th century), but has been restored.
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  • Giovenale are also Romanesque churches of the 11th century; both contain later frescoes.
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  • Two of the galleries are Romanesque, while two are Gothic. Arles has two other churches of the Romanesque period, and others of later date.
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  • Other specimens still in existence are the municipal buildings, Palazzo Loredan and Palazzo Farsetti - if, indeed, these are not to be considered rather as Romanesque - and the splendid Ca' da Mosto, all on the Grand Canal.
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  • Giovanni e Paolo, which has six semicircular pediments of varying size crowning the six bays, in the upper order of which are four noble Romanesque windows.
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  • The 12th century collegiate church, a fine example of the Romanesque style of Limousin, contains a richly sculptured tomb of St Junien, the hermit of the 6th century from whom the town takes its name.
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  • The chief buildings are the chateau, mainly of the 15th century, of which the massive donjon of the 11th century known as the Tour de Cesar is the oldest portion; and the abbey-church of Notre-Dame, a building in the Romanesque style of architecture, frequently restored.
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  • The hotel de ville, the facade of which is decorated with armorial bearings of Renaissance carving, and the church of St Etienne, an unblemished example of Romanesque architecture, are of interest.
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  • The cathedral has a Romanesque Gothic portal of 1332 by a Roman marble worker named Deodatus, and the interior is decorated in the Baroque style, but still retains the pointed vaulting of 1154, introduced into Italy by French Benedictines; it contains a splendid silver antependium by the 15th-century goldsmith Nicolo di Guardiagrele (1433-48).
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  • Antonio is also in the Romanesque Gothic style.
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  • The town is built partly on an island in the Havel, and partly on hills on the right bank of the river, on one of which stands the fine Romanesque cathedral dating from the 12th century.
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  • The church of the Holy Ghost (Helgeands-Kyrka) in a late Romanesque style (c. 1250) is a remarkable structure with a nave of two storeys.
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  • The Romanesque St Clement's has an ornate south portal, and the churches of St Drotten and St Lars, of the 12th century, are notable for their huge towers.
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  • At St Menoux, Ebreuil and Gannat there are fine Romanesque churches.
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  • The Romanesque churches of Veauce and Ygrande, and the chateaus of Veauce and Lapalisse, are also of interest, the latter belonging to the family of Chabannes.
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  • The cathedral, originally Romanesque, but restored after 1300 is in the Gothic style; the façade is good, and so is the ciborium.
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  • Coucy also has a church of the 15th century, preserving a façade in the Romanesque style.
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  • The oldest of its churches, St Mexme, is in the Romanesque style, but only the facade and nave are left.
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  • The arches of the Romanesque portal are beautifully ornamented, in a manner suggestive of Arab influence; the bronze doors, executed by Barisanus of Trani in 1175, rank among the best of their period in southern Italy.
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  • The capitals of the pillars in the crypt are fine examples of the Romanesque.
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  • The church of the Ognissanti has a Romanesque relief of the Annunciation over the door.
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  • It contains fine buildings of the Renaissance, especially the palaces of the Vitelli, and the cathedral, originally Romanesque.
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  • (El Noble) of Navarre, who is buried within its walls; of the older Romanesque cathedral only a small portion of the cloisters remains.
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  • The beautiful cloisters on the south side of the cathedral, and the chapter-house beyond them, as well as the old churches of San Saturnino (Gothic) and San Nicolas (Romanesque), are also of interest to the student of architecture.
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  • At Alet, which has hot springs of some note, there are ruins of a fine Romanesque cathedral destroyed in the religious wars of the 16th century.
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  • The extensive buildings of the Cistercian abbey of Fontfroide, near Bizanet, include a Romanesque church, a cloister, dormitories and a refectory of the 12th century.
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  • The finest building is the cathedral, in the Lombard Romanesque style, begun in 1107 and consecrated in 1190.
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  • The date of this church has been much disputed, but while traces of Romanesque architecture survive, the building is, in the main, Gothic in style and dates from the first half of the 13th century.
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  • Other churches are the Gothic church of the Holy Ghost; the churches of St Severin, of St Paul and of St Gertrude; the double church of St Salvator; the Romanesque church of the Holy Cross; the pilgrimage church of Our Lady of Succour (Mariahilf); the church of the hospital of St John; and the Romanesque Votiv Kirche.
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  • Francesco, begun in the 12th century in the Lombard Romanesque style, was continued in the 13th in the Gothic style.
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  • The campanile car "leaning tower of Pisa" is a round tower, the noblest, according to Freeman, of the southern Romanesque.
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  • The cathedral, an imposing building in the Romanesque Transition style (1207-1242), has a Gothic choir at each end, and contains some interesting medieval sculptures.
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  • The most striking of these are the palaces of Duke Max and of Prince Luitpold; the Odeon, a large building for concerts, adorned with frescoes and marble busts; the war office; the royal library, in the Florentine palatial style; the Ludwigskirche, a successful reproduction of the Italian Romanesque style, built in 1829-1844, and containing a huge fresco of the Last Judgment by Cornelius; the blind asylum; and, lastly, the university.
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  • The Allerheiligen-Hofkirche, or court-church, is in the Byzantine style, with a Romanesque facade.
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  • Maria di Collemaggio, just outside the town, has a very fine Romanesque facade of simple design (1270-1280) in red and white marble, with three finely decorated portals and a rose-window above each.
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  • The first object of historical and architectural interest in Mainz is the grand old cathedral, an imposing Romanesque edifice with numerous Gothic additions and details (for plan, &c. see Architecture: Romanesque and Gothic in Germany).
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  • Romolo is an early and simple example of the Tuscan Romanesque style; it is a small basilica, begun in 1028 and restored in 1256.
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  • Zeno, but has a fine 12th-century west front of equal interest, richly decorated with naïve Romanesque sculpture (1135).
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  • Stefano is another Romanesque church, probably of the r rth century.
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  • It has two Romanesque towers.
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  • The cathedral of St Benigne, originally an abbey church, was built in the latter half of the 13th century on the site of a Romanesque basilica, of which the crypt remains.
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  • The cathedral, originally a Tuscan Romanesque building of the 11th-12th centuries, is now a fine Renaissance basilica restored in the 18th century, containing some paintings by Luca Signorelli, a native of the place.
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  • The Romanesque church of S.Abondio outside the town was founded in 1013 and consecrated in 1095; it has two fine campanili, placed at the ends of the aisles close to the apse.
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  • Fedele (12th century), both in the town, are also Romanesque, and the apses have external galleries.
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  • The Gothic abbey church dates from the 15th century, but its Romanesque crypt from the 12th.
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  • It is a fine Romanesque building in grey stone, built in the form of a Greek cross, with a dodecagonal dome over the centre slightly altered by Margaritone d'Arezzo in 1270.
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  • The most prominent buildings are the new town-hall (1893); the castle of Count Clam Gallas, built in the 17th century, with additions dating from 1774 and 1850; the Erzdekanatskirche, of the 16th century; the Protestant church, a handsome modern Romanesque edifice (1864-68) and the hall of the cloth-workers.
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  • The cathedral is in origin Romanesque,' but has been much altered, and was restored in 1888 by Count Giuseppe Sacconi (1855-1905).
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  • Vincenzo ed Anastasio are also good Romanesque buildings.
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  • There are three ancient Romanesque churches, in one of which, San Miguel, some Roman pillars are incorporated.
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  • The two western portals are adorned with sculpture in the ornate Romanesque style; the tower on the left of the facade was rebuilt in the 17th century.
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  • The church of St James - also called Schottenkirche - a plain Romanesque basilica of the 12th century, derives its name from the monastery of Irish Benedictines ("Scoti") to which it was attached; the principal doorway is covered with very singular grotesque carvings.
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  • Examples of the Romanesque basilica style are the church of Obermiinster, dating from Iwo, and the abbey church of St Emmeran, built in the 13th century, and remarkable as one of the few German churches with a detached belfry.
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  • Mehun-sur-Yevre (pop. 5227), a town with an active manufacture of porcelain, has a Romanesque church and a château of the 14th century.
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  • Among the other interesting churches of the department, that at St Satur has a fine choir of the 14th and 15th centuries; those of Dun-sur-Auron, Plaimpied, Aix d'Angillon and Jeanvrin are Romanesque in style, while Aubigny-Ville has a church of the 12th, 13th and 15th centuries and a château of later date.
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  • There are five churches, four Protestant and one Catholic. The Evangelical Liebfrauenkirche, a Romanesque building (mainly 12th-century), has two octagonal towers and a loth-century porch.
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  • Sainte-Marie contains many artistic treasures, the chief of which are the magnificent stained-glass windows of the Renaissance which light the apsidal chapels, and the 113 choir-stalls of carved oak, also of Renaissance workmanship. The archbishop's palace adjoins the cathedral; it is a building of the 18th century with a Romanesque hall and a tower of the r4th century.
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  • It possesses a fine Romanesque cathedral begun in 1232 and restored in 1 3 30 and 1531, the portal being especially remarkable.
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  • On the wall of the Romanesque crypt, which was restored in 1896, is a rose-bush, alleged to be a thousand years old; this sends its branches to a height of 24 ft.
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  • The Romanesque church of St Godehard was built in the 12th century and restored in the 19th.
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  • The church, which rises high above the buildings clustering round it, consists of transepts and four bays of the nave of Romanesque architecture and of a fine choir (1450 - I 521) in the Flamboyant Gothic style with a triforium surmounted by lofty windows.
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  • The Romanesque choir and apse belong to the 11th century, the rest of the interior is contemporary with the facade.
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  • Begun by the Countess Matilda of Tuscany in 1099, after the designs of Lanfranc, and consecrated in 1184, the Romanesque cathedral (S Geminiano) is a low but handsome building, with a lofty crypt, under the choir (characteristic of the Tuscan Romanesque architecture), three eastern apses, and a façade still preserving some curious sculptures of the 12th century.
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  • The church of Our Lady, a late Romanesque building, has two ancient crypts and a 13thcentury choir of exceptional beauty, but the nave suffered severely from a restoration in 1764.
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  • The archbishop's palace and a Romanesque cloister adjoin the cathedral on its south side.
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  • The county court house (rebuilt in 1887) is in the Romanesque style, and with the gaol attached occupies an entire square.
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  • The finest building in the town is the Romanesque minster church of the first quarter of the 13th century.
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  • It has a fine southern Romanesque cathedral of the end of the 11th century, with a modernized interior, and a castle which from 1456 belonged to the Acquaviva family, dukes of Atri and counts of Conversano.
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  • It has a Romanesque church, with a carved altar of 1523, and stained glass of the 14th and 15th centuries; and there is a 16th century town hall.
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  • The Romanesque churches, still reminiscent of antique models, had preserved all the simplicity of the ancient basilicas with much more than their grandeur; but the taste for religious symbolism which culminated in the 13th century, and the imaginative genius of the northern peoples, transformed them into the marvellous dreams in stone of the " Gothic " period.
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  • It possesses a Gothic church, with a crypt dating from the 15th century, and a still older Romanesque burial chapel.
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  • The town contains three old churches, of which the early Gothic abbey church with its Romanesque cloister is most notable, and some good houses.
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  • There are six Roman Catholic and two Protestant churches, the most important of which is the Munster (minster), an imposing edifice of grey stone, in the Romanesque and Transition styles, surmounted by five towers, of which the central, rising to a height of 315 ft., is a landmark in the Rhine valley.
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  • It possesses six Evangelical churches, notably the Miinsterkirche, a Romanesque building with a Gothic apse of the r 5th century; the Marienkirche, in the Gothic style; and the Johanniskirche, with a steeple 280 ft.
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  • Built into the palace is the ancient church of San Gottardo, a Romanesque building which was built by Azzone Visconti in 1328-1339, and was the scene of the murder of Giovanni Maria Visconti in 1412.
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  • The church was built by St Ambrose early in the 4th-century (on the site of a temple of Bacchus it is said), but as it stands it is a Romanesque basilica of the 12th century, recently well restored (like many other churches in Milan), with a brick exterior, like so many churches of Milan and Lombardy, curious galleries over the facade, and perhaps the most perfectly preserved atrium in existence.
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  • Eustorgio, one of the largest Gothic churches in Milan, with some Romanesque survivals, dates, as it stands, with its campanile, from the end of the 13th century, and has a modern facade in the old style.
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  • Simpliciano, too, though originally Romanesque, is now in the main Gothic, and has been much altered.
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  • Babila, also restored to its original form, &c., are interesting for their Romanesque architecture.
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  • Among the principal buildings are the cathedral (rebuilt in the 16th century), and several other churches, among which the Mariae Kirke with its Romanesque nave is the earliest; a hospital, diocesan college, naval academy, school of design and a theatre.
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  • The church was originally founded in 836 by Louis the Pious, but the present Romanesque building was completed in 1208, the Gothic vaulted roof dating from 1498.
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  • In this quarter of the town, too, is the Liebfrauenkirche, a fine church (nave 1250, choir 1404-1431) with lofty late Romanesque towers; the castle of the electors of Trier, erected in 1280, which now contains the municipal picture gallery; and the family house of the Metternichs, where Prince Metternich, the Austrian statesman, was born in 1773.
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  • The following are also of interest: - Sauveterre, founded in 1281, a striking example of the bastide of that period; Conques, which has a remarkable abbey-church of the II th century like St Sernin of Toulouse in plan and possessing a rich treasury of reliquaries, &c.; Espalion, where amongst other old buildings there are the remains of a feudal stronghold and a church of the Romanesque period; Najac, which has the ruins of a magnificent château of the 13th century; and Sylvanes, with a church of the 12th century, once attached to a Cistercian abbey.
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  • The Franciscan cloister is a fine specimen of late Romanesque; that of the Dominicans is hardly inferior, though of later date.
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  • The Rector's Palace, another noteworthy example of late Romanesque, combined with Venetian Gothic, is one of the masterpieces of Dalmatian architecture.
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  • The nave was begun in 1096 and is Romanesque in style; the transept and choir, which contain magnificent stained glass of the Renaissance period, are of Gothic architecture.
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  • The earlier churches of Genoa show a mixture of French Romanesque and the Pisan style - they are mostly basilicas with transepts, and as a rule a small dome; the pillars are sometimes ancient columns, and sometimes formed of alternate layers of black and white marble.
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  • The two side portals with Romanesque sculptures belong to the 12th14th centuries.
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  • Rostock has five old churches: St Mary's, dating from 1398 to 1472, one of the most imposing Gothic buildings in Mecklenburg, with two Romanesque towers and containing a magnificent bronze font and a curious clock; St Nicholas's, begun about 1250 and restored in 1450, and again in 1890-94; St Peter's, with a lofty tower over 4 00 ft.
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  • By far the most important building in Magdeburg is the cathedral, dedicated to SS Maurice and Catherine, a handsome and massive structure of the 14th century, exhibiting an interesting blending of Romanesque and Gothic architecture.
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  • The Liebfrauenkirche, the oldest church in Magdeburg, is an interesting Romanesque edifice of the 12th and 13th centuries, which was restored in 1890-1891.
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  • The Romanesque cathedral has a simple façade (partly of the 11th, partly of the 14th and i 5th centuries), with a fine portal and rose window.
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  • In the same square is the massive Romanesque Gothic Palazzo Comunale of 1267, the Palazzo dei Priori and the Palazzo della Podesta.
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  • The most magnificent church in Pest is the Leopoldstadt Basilica, a Romanesque building with a dome 315 ft.
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  • The cathedral (see Architecture: Romanesque and Gothic Architecture in France; and Cathedral), which is perhaps the finest church of Gothic architecture in France, far exceeds the other buildings of the town in importance.
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  • Among these may be mentioned the Predigerkirche, dating from the latter half of the 12th century; the Reglerkirche, a Romanesque building (restored in 1859) with a 12th-century tower; and the Barfusserkirche, a Gothic building containing fine 14th-century monuments.
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  • It has a singular Romanesque church of the 12th century.
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  • A triangular keep, a chapel, and other remains of a château (13th and 14th centuries) of the counts of Toulouse stand on the rocky pine-clad hill which rises to the north of the town; the chapel, dedicated to St Louis, belongs to the latest period of Romanesque architecture, and contains fine sculptures.
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  • Peter and Paul, which ranks beside those of Spires and Mainz among the noblest Romanesque churches of the Rhine (see Architecture: Romanesque and Gothic in Germany).
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  • Second in interest to the cathedral is the church of St Paul, also in the Romanesque style, and dating from 1102-1116, with a choir of the early 13th century, cloisters and other monastic buildings.
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  • The late Romanesque church of St Andrew is not used.
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  • The church of St Etienne, or l'Abbaye-aux-Hommes, in the west of the town, is an important specimen of Romanesque architecture, dating from about 1070, when it was founded by William the Conqueror.
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  • It has six Roman Catholic and four Evangelical churches (of which the Gothic Friedenskirche with a lofty spire, and the modern church of St Joseph, in the Romanesque style, are alone worth special mention); there are also a Mennonite and an Old Catholic church.
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  • Bracton fits his definition of villenage into the Romanesque scheme of Azo's Summa of the Institutes, and the judges of the royal courts made sweeping inferences from this general position.
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  • The old cathedral, last used for public worship in 1707, is a very interesting late Romanesque building, with Gothic and Mauresque additions; but the interior was much defaced by its conversion into barracks after 1717.
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  • Other interesting buildings are the Romanesque town hall, founded in the 13th century but several times restored, the bishop's palace and the military hospital, formerly a convent.
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  • The museum contains a good collection of Roman and Romanesque antiquities; and there are a school for teachers, a theological seminary and academies of literature and science.
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  • Two blocks to the north (on Washington Street) is the postoffice, a fine granite Romanesque building.
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  • The Rauberturm is a relic of the old castle of the margraves of Moravia; the round castle-chapel, known as the heathen temple (Heiden-Tempel), in the Romanesque style of the 12th century, was at one time considered the most ancient building in Moravia.
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  • Giorgio, consecrated in 1135, when the Romanesque lower part of the main façade and the side facades were completed.
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  • The Church architecture of the "middle ages," then developed naturally and without a break, through the Byzantine and Romanesque styles, out of the secular and religious architecture of Greece and Rome.
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  • Apart from the fact that reckoning from the birth of Christ was by no means universal, and consequently the mass of men were ignorant that there was such a thing as the year 1000, one wonders how that most enduring type of architecture, the Romanesque, reached its maturity among men who thought that the earth itself was so soon to "shrivel like a parched scroll."
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  • In the Heidenturm are two late Romanesque chapels, one above the other.
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  • There are remains of houses, tombs, &c., of the Roman period, and fine specimens of Romanesque and Gothic architecture in the modern town.
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  • The cathedral was erected between 1122 and 1233, in the Lombard Romanesque style, under the direction of Santo da.
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  • A Romanesque cloister containing a collection of old sculpture flanks the church on the north.
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  • Its style is Romanesque, chosen by Strossmayer as symbolical of the position of his country midway between east and west.
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  • Its cathedral is one of the finest examples of the Romanesque architecture of Apulia, and has escaped damage from later restorations.
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  • The Romanesque cathedral was founded about the middle of the 10th century.
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  • Paragorio, once the cathedral, a Romanesque basilica dating from the 1 rth century, with interesting works of art.
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  • Next t0 the cathedral, the chief is perhaps the abbey church of St Peter, a Romanesque basilica of the 12th century which was tastelessly restored in 1745, and which contains a monument to St Rupert.
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  • Its majestic cathedral was built in the 13th century on the site of a Romanesque church, to which the lateral arcades of the nave and the two western towers with their high stone spires belonged.
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  • Sepolcro was built at the close of the 12th century, and the Romanesque cathedral was begun at the same period, but added to later.
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  • Among many medieval buildings, the church of St Ulrich, one of the finest specimens of Romanesque architecture in Germany, and the church of St James, with a magnificent altar screen and interesting tombs and effigies, are particularly noticeable.
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  • St Frediano or Frigidian dates originally from the 7th century, but was built in the Romanesque style in 1112-1147, though the interior, originally with four aisles and nave, shows traces of the earliest structure; the front occupies the site of the ancient apse; in one of its chapels is the tomb of Santa Zita, patroness of servants and of Lucca itself.
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  • A beautiful Romanesque campanile was added to the baptistery in the 14th and 15th centuries.
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  • Sabino (the bishopric passed in 1818 to Andria), in the southern Romanesque style, was consecrated in 1101: it has five domes (resembling St Mark's at Venice, except that it is, a Latin cross, instead of a Greek cross, in plan) and many ancient columns.
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  • The cathedral has a baroque façade; but traces of Romanesque work (12th century) can be seen at the sides and in the campanile.
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  • It is in the Romanesque style, and accommodates all the civic offices, the board of education, the police and county courts, &c. Many of the churches are worthy examples of good architecture.
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  • The principal church is the imposing Romanesque cathedral, a basilica with transepts, begun in 1042 and consecrated in 1189.
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  • It was built in 1033-1042, in the Romanesque style, and was restored in 1168.
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  • Maria Immacolata is another Romanesque church.
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  • There are a cathedral, the church of St Benedict and other churches, with Romanesque 14th-century facades; the town-hall; and the prefecture, with Romanesque arcades.
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  • The churches of St Christopher (13th and .15th centuries) and St Nicholas, the latter combining the Romanesque and Gothic styles and built above a Romanesque crypt, are of interest.
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  • Buildings of an earlier period are not numerous, but the fine portal of the Romanesque church of SS.
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  • There are several other Romanesque and Gothic churches in the town more or less restored.
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  • Notre-Dame du Fort, the chief church, dates from the nth and 12th' centuries; irregular in plan, it is remarkable for a fine Romanesque tower and spire, and for the crenellated wall which partly surrounds it.
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  • St Basile (12th and 16th centuries), which preserves a Romanesque doorway, and St Martin (12th and 13th centuries), with a leaning tower of the 16th century, are of less importance.
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  • On the highest ground in the city rises the cathedral, the interior of which was built after his death according to the plans of Giulio Romano; it has double aisles, a fine fretted ceiling, a dome-covered transept, a bad baroque façade, and a large unfinished Romanesque tower.
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  • The town is finely situated overlooking the Vienne and a small torrent, and has two interesting Romanesque churches, both restored in modern times.
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  • Bourg-St Andeol, Thines, Maas and Cruas have interesting Romanesque churches.
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  • It contains, however, the Romanesque chapel of S Martin, the Church of SS Peter and Paul, and .the adjoining cemetery where many of the leaders of the Bohemian national movement are buried.
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  • Maria Maggiore di Siponto, built in 1117 in the Romanesque style, with a dome and crypt.
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  • It possesses a church, in Romanesque style, dating from the 11th century, with fine cloisters and the tombs of several members of the Babenberg family.
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  • The small Romanesque church of the 10th century known as the BasseOuvre occupies the site destined for the nave.
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  • The cathedral of St Eulalie, a Romanesque building completed about the beginning of the 12th century, has a beautiful cloister in the same style, with interesting sculptures and three early Christian sarcophagi.
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  • The ancient episcopal palace, now used as prefecture, stands behind the cathedral; it preserves a Romanesque gallery of the 12th century.
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  • Of the abbey church of St Germain, built in the 13th and 14th centuries, most of the nave has disappeared, so that its imposing Romanesque tower stands apart from it; crypts of the 9th century contain the tombs of bishops of Auxerre.
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  • The fine Lombard Romanesque cathedral, originally founded in 7 4 2, was rebuilt in the early 12th century and consecrated in 1106; it suffered from restoration in 1706, but has been brought back to its original form.
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  • Only four of the eighteen piles are left; on one of them stands the chapel of Saint-Benezet, a small Romanesque building.
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  • The cathedral is a Romanesque building, mainly of the 12th century, the most prominent feature of which is the gilded statue of the Virgin which surmounts the western tower.
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  • Martino is a church in the Lombard Romanesque style.
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  • Off this are the market square, containing the grandducal palace, built in 1742, where the duchess Helene of Orleans long resided, the town-hall, and the late Gothic St Georgenkirche; and the square on which stands the Nikolaikirche, a fine Romanesque building, built about 1150 and restored in 1887.
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  • The nave (the West church), divided from the aisles by a double row of massive round pillars, is a transition between Romanesque and Gothic, with pointed windows.
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  • The following places are also of interest: - Lescar, which has a church of the 12th and 16th century, once a cathedral; Montaner, with a stronghold built in 1380 by Gaston Phoebus, count of Foix and viscount of Beam; and Sauveterre, a town finely situated on the Gave d'Oloron, with an old bridge, remains of a feudal castle, and a church in the Romanesque and Gothic styles.
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  • The hotel de ville, which contains a museum and the municipal library, occupies the former bishop's palace, designed by Jules Mansart in the 17th century; the Romanesque tower beside it is the only survival of an old Benedictine abbey.
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  • The former cathedral of this diocese lies some distance to the N.W.; it is a fine Romanesque building of the 12th and 13th centuries.
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  • The latter is a brick building of the 13th and 14th centuries, with a choir in the Romanesque style, and a fine western portal which has been much disfigured.
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  • The church of NotreDame, a Romanesque building, with a nave of the IIth century and a central tower and choir of the 13th century, is a fine example of the Norman architecture of those periods.
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  • Gregorio probably dates from the 9th century: the upper church was consecrated in 1196 and the Romanesque work covered with stucco in the restoration of 1597.
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  • The churches of San Vicente, San Pedro, Santo Tomas and San Segundo are, in their main features, Romanesque of the 15th century, although parts of the beautiful San Vicente, and of San Pedro, may be as old as the 12th century.
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  • The style preferred was that of a Romanesque basilica with campanile, after the style of the cathedral of Torcello near Venice.
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  • The west front of the church was also made Romanesque and a tall 200-foot campanile was also planned but never built.
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  • These are regions steeped in history, whose every village seemingly hides an architectural treasure, from Romanesque chapels to crumbling castles.
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  • Jackson was dazzled and proclaimed the Romanesque cathedral the best of its kind.
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  • Two architectural fragments, probably from a Romanesque shrine, built into the wall.
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  • In the porch there is a Romanesque carved gravestone from about 1200.
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  • It has a romanesque crypt, twelfth century quire and thirteenth century stained glass windows.
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  • The only Romanesque sculpture is on the N doorway and a Purbeck marble font.
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  • The church of Notre-Dame du Port is a typical example of the Romanesque style of Auvergne, dating chiefly from the i rth and 12th centuries.
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  • Between 1310 and 1315 Jacques de Longuyon (or Langhion) introduced into the account of the Indian war Les Viceux du paon, a romanesque and fantastic episode very loosely connected with Alexander.
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  • The cathedral of Notre-Dame (see Architecture: Romanesque and Gothic Architecture in France; and Cathedral), one of the finest Gothic churches in France, was founded in the 11 th century by Bishop Fulbert on the site of an earlier church destroyed by fire.
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  • The cathedral, originally Romanesque, but restored after 1300 is in the Gothic style; the façade is good, and so is the ciborium.
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  • Coucy also has a church of the 15th century, preserving a façade in the Romanesque style.
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  • Zeno, but has a fine 12th-century west front of equal interest, richly decorated with naïve Romanesque sculpture (1135).
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  • Mehun-sur-Yevre (pop. 5227), a town with an active manufacture of porcelain, has a Romanesque church and a château of the 14th century.
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  • Among the other interesting churches of the department, that at St Satur has a fine choir of the 14th and 15th centuries; those of Dun-sur-Auron, Plaimpied, Aix d'Angillon and Jeanvrin are Romanesque in style, while Aubigny-Ville has a church of the 12th, 13th and 15th centuries and a château of later date.
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  • Begun by the Countess Matilda of Tuscany in 1099, after the designs of Lanfranc, and consecrated in 1184, the Romanesque cathedral (S Geminiano) is a low but handsome building, with a lofty crypt, under the choir (characteristic of the Tuscan Romanesque architecture), three eastern apses, and a façade still preserving some curious sculptures of the 12th century.
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  • The old town-hall is a quaint Slavonic adaptation of Romanesque forms. The royal castle, begun in 1905 and completed in 1910 at a cost of £250,000, is a pretentious building in what is officially called Romanesque style.
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  • The cathedral of St Stephen was begun in the 12th century in the Tuscan Romanesque style; to this period belongs the narrow nave with its wide arches; the raised transepts and the chapels were added by Giovanni Pisano in 1317-1320; the campanile dates from 1340 (it is a much smaller and less elaborate version of Giotto's campanile at Florence), while the façade, also of alternate white sandstone and green serpentine, belongs to 1413.
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  • The following are also of interest: - Sauveterre, founded in 1281, a striking example of the bastide of that period; Conques, which has a remarkable abbey-church of the II th century like St Sernin of Toulouse in plan and possessing a rich treasury of reliquaries, &c.; Espalion, where amongst other old buildings there are the remains of a feudal stronghold and a church of the Romanesque period; Najac, which has the ruins of a magnificent château of the 13th century; and Sylvanes, with a church of the 12th century, once attached to a Cistercian abbey.
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  • The Romanesque cathedral has a simple façade (partly of the 11th, partly of the 14th and i 5th centuries), with a fine portal and rose window.
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  • A triangular keep, a chapel, and other remains of a château (13th and 14th centuries) of the counts of Toulouse stand on the rocky pine-clad hill which rises to the north of the town; the chapel, dedicated to St Louis, belongs to the latest period of Romanesque architecture, and contains fine sculptures.
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  • Giorgio, consecrated in 1135, when the Romanesque lower part of the main façade and the side facades were completed.
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  • Michele (for plan see Architecture: § Romanesque and Gothic in Italy) was originally constructed under the Lombard kings, but was burnt in 1004, and the present building dates from the latter part of the 11th (crypt, choir and transepts) and the first half of the 12th centuries (façade and nave with two aisles), and was completed in 1155.
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  • There is a remarkably perfect Romanesque church, with aisles, eastern apse and ambulatory, at Varnhem in Skaraborg Lan, and there are a few village churches of the same period in this district and in Skane.
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  • The cathedral has a baroque façade; but traces of Romanesque work (12th century) can be seen at the sides and in the campanile.
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  • On the highest ground in the city rises the cathedral, the interior of which was built after his death according to the plans of Giulio Romano; it has double aisles, a fine fretted ceiling, a dome-covered transept, a bad baroque façade, and a large unfinished Romanesque tower.
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  • Michele with a Romanesque church, situated on a rocky mountain (998-1002).
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  • Your local party decoration store can probably help you with some general Romanesque decorations.
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  • The ruined church at Longpont (13th century) is the relic of an important Cistercian abbey; Urcel and Mont-Notre-Dame have fine churches, the first entirely in the Romanesque style, the second dating from the 12th and 13th centuries, to which period the church at Braisne also belongs.
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  • The parish church, with its two lofty towers, is substantially a Romanesque building of the 13th century, but the choir and transepts are Gothic additions of a later date.
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  • The walls and ceiling of the fine Romanesque interior are covered with frescoes of 1570, subdued in colour and well suited to the character of the building; those of the octagonal cupola representing the Assumption of the Virgin are by Correggio, but much restored.
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  • The cathedral (1150-1499), a Romanesque building with a beautiful south portal and a Gothic choir, is, next to the cathedral of Upsala, the largest church in Sweden.
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  • Among these is the cathedral of Notre-Dame, one of the finest and best preserved Romanesque and Gothic examples in Belgium (for plan, &c., see Architecture: Romanesque and Gothic in Belgium).
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  • Its foundation dates from the year 1030, while the nave is Romanesque of the middle of the 12th century, with much pointed work.
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  • The Romanesque cathedral is a.
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  • The Public Library building is Romanesque and elaborately ornamented; the building was presented to the city by James P. Baxter; in the library is the statue, by Benjamin Paul Akers (1825-1861), of the dead pearl-diver, well known from Hawthorne's description in The Marble Faun.
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  • The cathedral is a noble late Romanesque building with four imposing towers.
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  • In the centre of the town stand the Place de la Republique, a spacious square overlooked by the hotel de ville, the museum, and the old cathedral of St Trophime, the finest Romanesque church in Provence.
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  • St Andrew's (1811-1813), in the Romanesque style, is a Roman Catholic church, which also serves as the pro-cathedral of the diocese of Galloway.
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  • The Romanesque church of St Gertrude, named after Itta's daughter, dates from the II th century, but has been badly restored and is disfigured by a heavy tower.
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