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rodentia

rodentia Sentence Examples

  • (See also RODENTIA.)

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  • Rodentia).

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  • those included in the genus Mus, are dealt with in the article RODENTIA.

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  • Orders: Bimana, Quadrumana, Carnivora, Marsupialia, Rodentia, Edentata, Pachydermata, Ruminantia, Cetacea.

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  • Orders: (a) Monodelphia: Bimana, Quadrumana, Cheiroptera, Insectivora, Rodentia, Edentata, Carnivora, Amphibia, Pachydermata, Ruminantia, Cetacea; (b) Didelphia: Marsupialia, Monotremata.

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  • Orders: Insectivora, Chiroptera, Dermoptera, Edentata (Sub-orders: Xenarthra, Pholidota, Tubulidentata), Rodentia (Sub-orders: Duplicidentata, Simplicidentata), Tillodontia, Carnivora (Sub-orders: Fissipedia, Pinnipedia, Creodonta), Cetacea (Sub orders: Archaeoceti, Odontoceti, Mystacoceti), Sirenia, Ungulata (Sub-orders: Proboscidea, Hyracoidea, Barypoda, Toxodontia, Amblypoda, Litopterna, Ancylopoda, Condylarthra, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla), Primates (Sub-orders: Prosimiae, Anthropoidea).

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  • (See RODENTIA.)

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  • It typifies not only the genus Chinchilla, but the family Chinchillidae, for the distinctive features of which see RODENTIA.

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  • For the characteristics of the family Sciuridae and the different squirrel-like genera by which it is represented, see Rodentia.

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  • BEAVER,' the largest European aquatic representative of the mammalian order Rodentia, easily recognized by its large trowel-like, scaly tail, which is expanded in the horizontal direction.

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  • HAMSTER, a European mammal of the order Rodentia, scientifically known as Cricetus frumentarius (or C. cicetus), and belonging to the mouse tribe, Muridae, in which it typifies the sub-family Cricetinae.

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  • The essential characteristic of the Cricetines is to be found in the upper cheek-teeth, which (as shown in the figure of those of Cricetus in the article RODENTIA) have their cusps arranged in two longitudinal rows separated by a groove.

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  • Capybaras belong to the family Caviidae, the leading characteristics of which are given in Rodentia.

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  • Rodentia.

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  • RODENTIA, or Glires, an order of placental mammals characterized by the peculiar form and structure of their front or incisor teeth, which are reduced to a single functional chisellike pair in each jaw, specially adapted for gnawing, and growing throughout the entire life of their owners.

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  • On these grounds, while admitting that they are allied to the rodents, it has been pointed out that they can scarcely be included in the Rodentia, and the order Proglires has in consequence been proposed for their reception.

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  • Winge, Jord Fundene og Nulevende Gnadere (Rodentia), E.

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  • For the distinctive characteristics of the family Muridae and the genus Mus, to which true rats and true mice alike belong, see Rodentia.

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  • Of the Rodentia the most interesting and conspicuous is the marmot (Arctomys marmota), which lives in colonies close to the snow-line.

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  • We are dependent upon the Carnivora, Rodentia, Ungulata and Marsupialia for our supplies of furs, the first two classes being by far of the greatest importance.

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  • The Carnivora include bears, wolverines, wolves, raccoons, foxes, sables, martens, skunks, kolinskis, fitch, fishers, ermines, cats, sea otters, fur seals, hair seals, lions, tigers, leopards, lynxes, jackals, &c. The Rodentia include beavers, nutrias, musk-rats or musquash, marmots, hamsters, chinchillas, hares, rabbits, squirrels, &c. The Ungulata include Persian, Astrachan, Crimean, Chinese and Tibet lambs, mouflon, guanaco, goats, ponies, &c. The Marsupialia include opossums, wallabies and kangaroos.

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  • The finest and closest wools are possessed by the amphibious Carnivora and Rodentia, viz.

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  • Although the British representatives of this group should undoubtedly retain their vernacular designations of water-rat and short-tailed field-mouse, the term "vole" is one of great convenience in zoology as a general one for all the members of the group. Systematically voles are classed in the mammalian order Rodentia, in which they constitute the typical section of the subfamily Microtinae in the Muridae, or mouse-group. As a group, voles are characterized by being more heavily built than rats and mice, and by their less brisk movements.

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  • (For the characteristics of the family and of its more important generic representatives, see RoDENTIA.) In the Egyptian jerboa the length of the body is 8 in., and that of the tail, which is long, cylindrical and covered with short hair terminated by a tuft, 10 in.

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  • Rodentia (Gnawing Mammals) :- a.

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  • An almost equal degree of doubt obtains with regard to the ancestry of that very compact and well-defined group the Rodentia.

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  • Whether the extinct Tillodontia are most nearly allied to the Rodentia, the Carnivora or the Ungulata, and whether they are really entitled to constitute an ordinal group by themselves, must remain for the present open questions.

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  • The Rodentia have a wider geographical range than any other order of terrestrial mammals, being, as already mentioned, represented by numerous members of the mouse-tribe (Muridae) even in Australasia.

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  • The species without a parachute constitutes the genus Zenkerella, and looks very like an ordinary squirrel (see Rodentia).

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  • Several of them, such as Echinomys and Loncheres, are rat-like creatures with spiny or bristly fur (see Rodentia) .

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  • (See also RODENTIA.)

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  • RABBIT, the modern name of the well-known rodent, formerly called (as it still is in English legal phraseology) Cony,' a member of the family Leporidae (see Rodentia).

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  • those included in the genus Mus, are dealt with in the article RODENTIA.

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  • Orders: Bimana, Quadrumana, Carnivora, Marsupialia, Rodentia, Edentata, Pachydermata, Ruminantia, Cetacea.

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  • Orders: (a) Monodelphia: Bimana, Quadrumana, Cheiroptera, Insectivora, Rodentia, Edentata, Carnivora, Amphibia, Pachydermata, Ruminantia, Cetacea; (b) Didelphia: Marsupialia, Monotremata.

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  • Orders: Insectivora, Chiroptera, Dermoptera, Edentata (Sub-orders: Xenarthra, Pholidota, Tubulidentata), Rodentia (Sub-orders: Duplicidentata, Simplicidentata), Tillodontia, Carnivora (Sub-orders: Fissipedia, Pinnipedia, Creodonta), Cetacea (Sub orders: Archaeoceti, Odontoceti, Mystacoceti), Sirenia, Ungulata (Sub-orders: Proboscidea, Hyracoidea, Barypoda, Toxodontia, Amblypoda, Litopterna, Ancylopoda, Condylarthra, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla), Primates (Sub-orders: Prosimiae, Anthropoidea).

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  • (See RODENTIA.)

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  • It typifies not only the genus Chinchilla, but the family Chinchillidae, for the distinctive features of which see RODENTIA.

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  • CAVY, a name commonly applied to several South American rodent animals included in the family Caviidae (see Rodentia), but perhaps properly applicable only to those belonging to the typical genus Cavia, of which the most familiar representative is the domesticated guinea-pig.

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  • A pair of prairie burrowing owls (Speotyto) are almost invariably inhabitants of a viscachera (see RODENTIA).

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  • For the characteristics of the family Sciuridae and the different squirrel-like genera by which it is represented, see Rodentia.

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  • BEAVER,' the largest European aquatic representative of the mammalian order Rodentia, easily recognized by its large trowel-like, scaly tail, which is expanded in the horizontal direction.

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  • HAMSTER, a European mammal of the order Rodentia, scientifically known as Cricetus frumentarius (or C. cicetus), and belonging to the mouse tribe, Muridae, in which it typifies the sub-family Cricetinae.

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  • The essential characteristic of the Cricetines is to be found in the upper cheek-teeth, which (as shown in the figure of those of Cricetus in the article RODENTIA) have their cusps arranged in two longitudinal rows separated by a groove.

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  • Capybaras belong to the family Caviidae, the leading characteristics of which are given in Rodentia.

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  • timidus of Linnaeus, and the type of the genus Lepus and the family Leporidae (see Rodentia).

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  • RODENTIA, or Glires, an order of placental mammals characterized by the peculiar form and structure of their front or incisor teeth, which are reduced to a single functional chisellike pair in each jaw, specially adapted for gnawing, and growing throughout the entire life of their owners.

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  • On these grounds, while admitting that they are allied to the rodents, it has been pointed out that they can scarcely be included in the Rodentia, and the order Proglires has in consequence been proposed for their reception.

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  • These indicate unusual capacity for crushing or grinding; while the last premolar is a crushing implement, which has reached the highest degree of specialization known in Rodentia.

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  • Winge, Jord Fundene og Nulevende Gnadere (Rodentia), E.

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  • For the distinctive characteristics of the family Muridae and the genus Mus, to which true rats and true mice alike belong, see Rodentia.

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  • Of the Rodentia the most interesting and conspicuous is the marmot (Arctomys marmota), which lives in colonies close to the snow-line.

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  • We are dependent upon the Carnivora, Rodentia, Ungulata and Marsupialia for our supplies of furs, the first two classes being by far of the greatest importance.

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  • The Carnivora include bears, wolverines, wolves, raccoons, foxes, sables, martens, skunks, kolinskis, fitch, fishers, ermines, cats, sea otters, fur seals, hair seals, lions, tigers, leopards, lynxes, jackals, &c. The Rodentia include beavers, nutrias, musk-rats or musquash, marmots, hamsters, chinchillas, hares, rabbits, squirrels, &c. The Ungulata include Persian, Astrachan, Crimean, Chinese and Tibet lambs, mouflon, guanaco, goats, ponies, &c. The Marsupialia include opossums, wallabies and kangaroos.

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  • The finest and closest wools are possessed by the amphibious Carnivora and Rodentia, viz.

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  • Although the British representatives of this group should undoubtedly retain their vernacular designations of water-rat and short-tailed field-mouse, the term "vole" is one of great convenience in zoology as a general one for all the members of the group. Systematically voles are classed in the mammalian order Rodentia, in which they constitute the typical section of the subfamily Microtinae in the Muridae, or mouse-group. As a group, voles are characterized by being more heavily built than rats and mice, and by their less brisk movements.

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  • The so-called prairie-dogs, which are smaller and more slender North American rodents with small cheek-pouches, form a separate genus, Cynosnys; while the term pouched-marmots denotes the various species of souslik, Spermophilus (or Citillus), which are common to both hemispheres, and distinguished by the presence of large cheek-pouches (see RODENTIA).

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  • (For the characteristics of the family and of its more important generic representatives, see RoDENTIA.) In the Egyptian jerboa the length of the body is 8 in., and that of the tail, which is long, cylindrical and covered with short hair terminated by a tuft, 10 in.

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  • Rodentia (Gnawing Mammals) :- a.

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  • An almost equal degree of doubt obtains with regard to the ancestry of that very compact and well-defined group the Rodentia.

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  • Whether the extinct Tillodontia are most nearly allied to the Rodentia, the Carnivora or the Ungulata, and whether they are really entitled to constitute an ordinal group by themselves, must remain for the present open questions.

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  • The Rodentia have a wider geographical range than any other order of terrestrial mammals, being, as already mentioned, represented by numerous members of the mouse-tribe (Muridae) even in Australasia.

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  • SOUSLIK, or SUSLIK, the vernacular name of a European burrowing rodent mammal, nearly allied to the marmots, but of much smaller size and of more slender and squirrel-like build (see RODENTIA).

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